US3804089A - Vacuum cannula apparatus - Google Patents

Vacuum cannula apparatus Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3804089A
US3804089A US15109771A US3804089A US 3804089 A US3804089 A US 3804089A US 15109771 A US15109771 A US 15109771A US 3804089 A US3804089 A US 3804089A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
means
barrel
capillary
cannula
reservoir
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
H Bridgman
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Warner-Lambert Co LLC
Original Assignee
H Bridgman
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0058Suction-irrigation systems
    • A61M1/0064Handpieces therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0023Suction drainage systems
    • A61M1/0049Means preventing overflow or contamination of the pumping systems
    • A61M1/005Means preventing overflow or contamination of the pumping systems using valves with freely moving parts, e.g. float valves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/0023Suction drainage systems
    • A61M1/0039Handpieces
    • A61M1/0041Handpieces with means for varying suction manually
    • A61M1/0047Handpieces with means for varying suction manually by changing the size of a vent
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/008Drainage tubes; Aspiration tips
    • A61M1/0084With gas or fluid supply means, e.g. for supplying rinsing fluids, anticoagulants
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S604/00Surgery
    • Y10S604/902Suction wands

Abstract

A vacuum curet for use with uterine aspirator apparatus. The curet has a cannula barrel with a suction port at one end, and a manifold or handle at the other. A capillary runs along the inner length of the cannula barrel terminating at the cannula tip at one end and at the manifold at the other. The entire length of the capillary is pressure-tight. The design permits introduction of appropriate fluid into the uterus at any time during the operative procedure. Introduction of the fluid may be accomplished in different ways. One way is to apply manual pressure on a squeeze tube connected either directly (or indirectly through tubing) to the curet manifold. Alternatively, a standard syringe is used in place of the squeeze tube.

Description

United States Patent 1191 Bridgman VACUUM CANNULA APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Henry Bridgman, P.O. Box 71,

Morristown, NJ. 07961 [22] Filed: June 8, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 151,097

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 63,480, Aug. 13,

1970, Pat. No. 3,713,444.

52] UIs. cl. 128/276, 128/304 1.5 .1. 1.9991111: -11 ----:1,.A1.m.1!90 [58] Field ofSearch ..l28/276278,304

15 6] Rie'rii'ces'ciieki UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,230,218 2/1941 Asche .;i.- 128/276 3,109,426 11/1963 Noonan et a1. 128/276 3,429,313 2/1969 Romanelli 128/276 3.542,031 11/1970 Taylor 128/276 x 1 51, Apr. 16, 1974 Primary Examiner-Charles F. Rosenbaum Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Roland Plottel [5 7] ABSTRACT A vacuum curet for use with uterine aspirator apparatus. The curet has a cannula barrel with a suction port at one end, and a manifold or handle at the other. A capillary runs along the inner length of the cannula barrel terminating at the cannula tip at one end and at the manifold at the other. The entire length of the capillary is pressure-tight. The design permits introduction of appropriate fluid into the uterus at any time during the operative procedure. Introduction of the fluid may be accomplished in different ways. One way is to apply manual pressure on a squeeze tube connected either directly (or indirectly through tubing) to the curet manifold. Alternatively, a standard syringe is used in place of the squeeze tube. I 1 Y 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures f'ATENTEU HR 18 I974 INVENTOR.

HENRY BFUDGMAN m y W ATTORNEYS VACUUM CANNULA APPARATUS This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application entitled Collection Bottle,Ser. No. 63,480, filed on Aug. 13, I970 and now U.S. Pat. No. 3,7l3,444.

The invention relates generally to medical equipment and particularly to vacuum cannula apparatus used in uterine aspiration.

Within the past years, a technique called uterine aspiration, or vacuum curettage, has been developed for performing abortions during the early months of pregnancy. The earliest reference to this technique appeared in an article by Y. T. Wu and H. C. Wu, entitled Suction in Artificial Abortion 300 Cases" in the Chinese Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 6, 1958, beginning at page 447. A recent survey of the subject appeared in an article by D. Kerslake and D. Casey entitled,Abortion Induced by Means of Uterine Aspirator" in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 30, July, 1967, pages 34 -45. Very briefly, the technique is to aspirate the conceptus from the uterus using a tube which has a flexible connection to a source of suction. A typical apparatus includes a suction curet having an oval mouth at its end, or on-one side, and an air hole at the other end to control the suction.' A rubber pressure tubing connects the curet to a transparent, e.g., glass, container which in turn is connected to a suction pump. Aspriation of the uterine contents usually takes less than 2 minutes and the debris can readily be seen as it appears in the glass container.

The method employed may be very briefly reviewed. The perineum, vagina, and cervix are disinfected. The cervix is then drawn forward with a vulsella. The direction of the cervical canal and the depth of the uterine cavity are determined with a uterine sound. It is a common practice to dilate the cervix to allow easy insertion of the suction curet. However, dilation may be unnecessary in certain cases, and when not needed, an anesthesia generally is not used. When dilation is required, a local or general anesthesia is administered. The suction curet of appropriate diameter and design is inserted carefully into the cervix. The suction is then started. In a few seconds the suction reaches the working level which typically is at a mean level of 18 inches of mercury (relative). The suction curet is moved gently up and down over all aspects of the uterine cavity. The debris from the conceptus passes visibly into the glass container, either whole or piecemeal. The degree 'of suction can be controlled with some aspirators by putting a thumb over an airhole in the handle of the curet as well as by using some devices on the pump. During the aspiration process, the uterus reacts by contracting and decreasing volume. Aspiration usually takes less than 2 minutes. It is though to be complete when the uterine wall feels smooth and no further debris emerge.

A typical apparatus used for uterine aspiration consists of a curet connected by a hose to collection bottle which in turn is connected by a second hose to a vacuum pump. An improved apparatus is shown and described in my copending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 63.480 have been described. The curets are usually made from metal or from converted strong urethral catheters. The advantage of metal is that for a given internal diameter, the external diameter can-be less because of the strength of the material. However, transparent curets of either glass or plastic, e.g., plexiglas are popular because cleanliness is obvious and debris can be seen passing through during operation. Each aspirator apparatus is outfilled with several suction curets of different sizes, and sometimes, design. Curets have been used with oval openings both on the side and on the end to facilitate clearing the cornea. A four opening at the working end curet has been described. A double tube curet in which sterilized water (30-50ml/min)irrigates the uterus from the cavity between the tubes while the debris passes down the inner tube, has also been described. The average curet is 25 cm long with external diameters ranging from 3.5 mm to 15 mm with a mode of about 8 mm. The larger diameter'curets are used for later pregenancies. The above cited D. Kerslake and D. Casey article reviews various types of curets.

During the normal progress of a uterine aspiration operation, less and less fetal material remains in the uterus, and the procedure becomes more and more static. Introduction of medicinal fluid during the procedure either constantly or intermittently, keeps the process dynamic, thus assisting remnant removal of the gentle flushing action thus established. As the operation progresses, the uterus contracts very tightly and it often becomes necessary to introduce the lubricating medicinal fluid at the later portion of the operation. The need for the medicinal fluid and lubricant becomes especially important if all the fetal material is not removed on the first attempt. It is desirable that the surgeon have complete control over the introduction of the medicinal fluid. As the operation progresses, and becomes more static, he may wish to introduce and rapidly increase and decrease the amount of surgical fluid. In the present invention the surgeon himself regulates the amount of fluid introduced, and may feel the amount of fluid introduced.

It is desirable that the apparatus for introducing the medicinal fluid be uncomplicated, and not require large amount of plumbing and hoses in the operating room, and if possible, not require a nurse or other operating room attendant for its proper functioning.

A further requirement of the equipment used for introducing medicinal fluid during a vacuum currettage is that it be sterile, because the fluid is introduced into the patient. Reservoir sources, while traditionally sterile, may become contaminated when they are introduced with pumps and piping or plumbing necessary for introducing the fluid.

' It will be appreciated that because of the static nature of the uterus during the latter stages of the procedure, when the fluid is most needed, the fluid must be intro duced under pressure, and this requires a pumping mechanism in'the fluid reservoir source. This pressure source also must be both controlled and must not introduce any source 'of contamination.

These and other problems are solved in the'present invention, which in one embodiment employs a surgical fluid reservoir in a plastic squeeze tube, which is mounted adjacent to the handle of the curet. A capillary tube extends from the sqeeze tube reservoir along the inside ofthe curet to a capillary tip opening near the end of the cannula adjacent to the suction port. The surgeon, in the course of the operation, when additional lubrication is needed,'or at the routine end of the procedure, merely with the same hand holding the curet, squeezes the tube reservoir thereby applying pressure to the surgical fluid and forcing it to flow through the capillary tube on the inside of the cannula, and out of the cannula end at the capillary tube tip. The surgeon may introduce more or less fluid by squeezing the tube and thus adjusts the flow of fluid in the course of the'operation. With this arrangement, the surgeon has complete control over the introduction of the surgical fluid. Thecannula is of course, sterile prior to the operation, having been autoclaved, and the fluid source in the squeeze tube may be prepared under sterile conditions. The attachment of the squeeze tube to the can- 'nula may be done with a sterile coupling, and typically a Luer lock connection may be used. The mating half on the squeeze would be sterile, and covered with a cap or other plastic member to insure its not being contaminated. Thus, the sterile condition of the medicinal fluid is insured, and the chance of contamination is minimized. it will be appreciated that in this present arrangement, the medicinal fluid is introduced by the surgeon himself, and it is not necessary to have an operat-' ing room attendant regulate the introduction of a medicinal fluid through an external pump or other pressure-introducing means. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have pumps or complicated equipment in the operating room for the introduction of the medicinal fluid, and the hoses and interconnections between such pumps and the curet are also avoided.

In an alternative embodiment of the invention, a standard syringe is mounted on the curet adjacent the handle. At the end of the operation, as is sometimes routinely done, between five and twenty cc of distilled water, or other medicinal fluid having an antiseptic and/or analgesic properties, are routinely introduced. At the completion of the operation, the surgeon would pause for a moment, depress the plunger on the syringe to force the fluid into the uterus, and then continue the operation to remove the injected fluid. Here, again, the fluid reservoir source is mounted on the curet and may be discharged by the surgeon himself without the mandatory assistance ofa nurse and withoutrequiring additional pumping of liquid handling apparatus in the operating room.

According to another aspect of the invention the cannula is of a novel design having a very small diameter capillary tube extending down the inside wall of the cannula barrel. The capillary tip is located proximate to the port but further towards the end of the cannula and closer to the opposite side of the cannula.

A further application of the cannula of this invention is in the use of abortions performed during the second trimester. Vacuum is considered to be less and less effective after the 12 week of pregnancy. Abortions by saline injection seems safer and more effective after this period. Saline injection is accomplished by withdrawing an appropriate amount of amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus and replacing it with an equal amount of saline solution, which induces abortion by natural means. The basic cannula, connected to a suitable saline source may be used for this technique. The cannala barrel under vacuum is used to withdraw the amniotic fluid and then after the vacuum has been shut off, the saline solution is introduced into the uterus through the capillary.

The above and other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be apparent in the following detailed description of illustrative embodiments thereof which are to be read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vacuum curettage apparatus having the vacuum cannula of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a side view of vacuum cannula apparatus of this invention.

FIG. 3 is an end view of a portion of the vacuum cannula apparatus of FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a perspective view of a vacuum curettage apparatus, in which there is shown a curet generally indicated at 10 connected by a hose 12 to a collection bottle 14, which in turn is connected by a. second hose 16 to a vacuum pump 18. The collection bottle is of an improved kind, shown and described in detail in my copending US. Pat. application Ser. No. 63,480 filed on Aug. I3, 1970. For a further detaied explanation of such collection bottles, reference is made to said application. A standard 50 cc syringe 20 is shown attached to the curet 10. The syringe is shown attached to'the handle 22 of the curet and makes ,a communicating path with a capillary tube extending down the barrel of the curet to its tip. An additional curet 30 is shown adjacent to the curet 10. It is similar to curet 10 but of slightly different dimensions. It is customary to employ different size'currets depending upon the needs of the operation. It will be noted that the curet 30, just beyond the handle,' has two connectors: one connector 32 is to be made with the hose 12, the second connector 34 is to be made to the standard syringe.

Referring now to the drawings of FIG. 2 and 3, there is shown in FIG. 2 a side view of an alternative embodiment of the curet of the present invention, and in FIG. 3, an end view of the tip of the curet shown-in FIG. 2 and taken along lines 3-3. The curet includes a cannula barrel 40 having a suction port 42 near one end. A capillary 44 extends along the inside length of the cannula barrel. The capillary terminates at its outer end in a capillary tip opening 46, which extends through the wall of the cannula barrel. This is shown in both FIGS. 2 and 3. The capillary tip opening is near the suction port, and as shown in the figure, is preferably further towards the end of the cannula than the suction port, and located on the side away from the port. At the other end of the cannula barrel'is'a manifold 48. The inside of the cannula barrel extends through the manifold to a tapered fitting 50. A handle 52, hollow along its length, fits onto the fitting 50. The other end of the handle 52 is provided with a coupling 54 suitable 'for interconnection with a hose which leads to a collection bottle. An optional vacuum control hole 56 is shown in the handle communicating with the hollow interior. The surgeon may regulate the pressure in the operating area by placing his thumb partially or wholly over this hole 56. In this Figure, the interchangeable handle is shown as part of the path leading from the suction port through the cannula barrel to the vacuum collection system. It should be appreciate that fixed handles may be employed, such as those shown in FIG. 1, or curets with handles that are not in the suction flow path may also be employed.

Referring again to the manifold 44, it will be seen that there is a second port 58 through the manifold connected to the capillary 44 and terminating in a Luer lock connection 60. A squeeze tube fluid reservoir 62 is shown having a mating Luer lock connection attached to the manifold connection 60.

The medicinal fluid is prepared and stored in the squeeze tube fluid reservoir 62. The fluid is sterile and the Luer lock connection 64 is also sterile and initially covered with a protective material. The cannula barrel and manifold are also sterile. When the operation is to be performed, the protective material (not shown) is removed from the Luer lock connection 64 and the squeeze tube fluid reservoir is attached to the manifold by the connectors 60, 64. The surgeon squeezes the tube reservoir 62 slightly, to force the fluid through the port 58 and capillary 88 until a small amount of fluid emerges at the capillary tip opening 46. This is to make sure there is no air in the capillary tube and to insure that no air is introduced into the uterus during the operation. The vacuum curettage than proceeds in the normal manner, and at the appropriate time, the surgeon can move his fingers from the handle 52 and squeeze the fluid from the reservoir 62. The fluid emerges at the capillary tip opening 46, and lubricates the tip of the cannula barrel and the adjacent portions. The quantity of medicinal fluid and its rate of flow is under the complete control of the surgeon.

The reservoir has been shown attached to the curet by a standard Luer lock connection 60, 64. It should be appreciated that any convenient or conventional locking means may be employed.

A curet apparatus has been constructed in accordance with the teaching of this invention and the following dimensions for that curet are set forth below. it should be understood however, that these dimensions are for purposes of dimensions only and variations may be made therefrom without departingfrom the spirit or scope of the invention.

cannula barrel length: 7 Ainches cannula barrel outside diameter: 5/16 inches cannula barrel inside diameter: 0.2626 inches capillary outside diameter: 0.0778 inches capillary inside diameter: 0.0625 inches Although illustrative embodiments of this invention have been described in detail herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to those precise embodiments, and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

l. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a curetting port at one end; capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means for connecting said barrel interiof to a vacuum. source; handle means for manipulating the cannula apparatus; and a fluid source reservoir located adjacent to said handle means, and having connecting means to mate with said first connecting means on said manifold; said reservoir being self contained, and sealed but for said connection with said first connecting means, and of a hand squeeze type wherein the pressure and quantity of fluid expelled from said reservoir is regulated by manual pressure on said reservoir; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle means may also, squeeze said squeeze type fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip.

2. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said fluid source reservoir is a syringe.

3. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said fluid source reservoir is a semi-rigid squeeze-tube.

4. An apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said squeeze-tube reservoir fits directly onto and is totally supported by said first connection means.

5. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said second connecting means includes a mechanically rigidly supportive connection to said handle means said mechanically rigidly supportive connection being such as to position said handle and said fluid source reservoir adjacent to one another, whereby a surgeon using the apparatus may grasp the fluid source and the apparatus with the same hand.

6. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said capillary-tip opening is located further toward the end of said cannula barrel than said port and on the opposite side of said cannula barrel from said port.

7. A vacuum curet apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a curetting port at one end; a capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening located further toward said one end of said cannula barrel than said port and on the opposite side of said cannula barrel from said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means for connecting said barrel interior to a vacuum source.

8. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means-for connecting said barrel interior to a vacuum source; handle means for manipulating the apparatus; and a fluid source reservoir connectible to said first connecting means on said manifold; said reservoir being self contained, and sealed but for said connection with said first connecting means; and of a hand squeeze type wherein the pressure and quantity of fluid expelled from said reservoir is regulated by manual pressure on said reservoir; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle means may also squeeze said squeeze type fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip.

9. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the inner length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, second means for connecting said barrel interior to an aspirator source; handle means at said first and second means for manipulation of said apparatus; a semi-rigid squeeze-tube fluid source reservoir connected to said first connection means and located adjacent to said handle, whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle may also, with the same hand, squeeze said squeeze-tube fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip; said squeeze-tube reservoir fits directly onto and'is totally supported by said first connection means; and said squeeze tube reservoir and said first connecting means, include and are connected together by a Luer lock type fitting.

10. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the inner length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source; second means for connecting said barrel interior to an aspirator source; said apparatus includes a handle for its manipulation; a semi-rigid squeeze-tube fluid source reservoir connected to said first connection means and located adjacent to said handle; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle may also, with the same hand, squeeze said squeeze-tube fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip; said second connecting means includes a rigid tapered fitting; said handle having an air passage-theret'hrough with one end rigidly mating with said tapered fitting, and the other end having means for making connection to the aspirator source.

Claims (10)

1. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a curetting port at one end; capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means for connecting said barrel interiof to a vacuum source; handle means for manipulating the cannula apparatus; and a fluid source reservoir located adjacent to said handle means, and having connecting means to mate with said first connecting means on said manifold; said reservoir being self contained, and sealed but for said connection with said first connecting means, and of a hand squeeze type wherein the pressure and quantity of fluid expelled from said reservoir is regulated by manual pressure on said reservoir; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle means may also, squeeze said squeeze type fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip.
2. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said fluid source reservoir is a syringe.
3. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said fluid source reservoir is a semi-rigid squeeze-tube.
4. An apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said squeeze-tube reservoir fits directly onto and is totally supported by said first connection means.
5. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said second connecting means includes a mechanically rigidly supportive connection to said handle means said mechanically rigidly supportive connection being such as to position said handle and said fluid source reservoir adjacent to one another, whereby a surgeon using the apparatus may grasp the fluid source and the apparatus with the same hand.
6. An apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said capillary-tip opening is located further toward the end of said cannula barrel than said port and on the opposite side of said cannula barrel from said port.
7. A vacuum curet apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a curetting port at one end; a capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening located furtHer toward said one end of said cannula barrel than said port and on the opposite side of said cannula barrel from said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means for connecting said barrel interior to a vacuum source.
8. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, and second means for connecting said barrel interior to a vacuum source; handle means for manipulating the apparatus; and a fluid source reservoir connectible to said first connecting means on said manifold; said reservoir being self contained, and sealed but for said connection with said first connecting means; and of a hand squeeze type wherein the pressure and quantity of fluid expelled from said reservoir is regulated by manual pressure on said reservoir; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle means may also squeeze said squeeze type fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip.
9. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the inner length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source, second means for connecting said barrel interior to an aspirator source; handle means at said first and second means for manipulation of said apparatus; a semi-rigid squeeze-tube fluid source reservoir connected to said first connection means and located adjacent to said handle, whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle may also, with the same hand, squeeze said squeeze-tube fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip; said squeeze-tube reservoir fits directly onto and is totally supported by said first connection means; and said squeeze tube reservoir and said first connecting means, include and are connected together by a Luer lock type fitting.
10. A vacuum cannula apparatus comprising a cannula barrel having a port at one end; a capillary extending along the inner length of the barrel and terminating at a capillary-tip opening proximate to said port; and a manifold at the other end of said barrel and including first means for connecting said capillary to a fluid source; second means for connecting said barrel interior to an aspirator source; said apparatus includes a handle for its manipulation; a semi-rigid squeeze-tube fluid source reservoir connected to said first connection means and located adjacent to said handle; whereby during an operation a surgeon manipulating said cannula with one hand on said handle may also, with the same hand, squeeze said squeeze-tube fluid reservoir to regulate the fluid flow at the capillary tip; said second connecting means includes a rigid tapered fitting; said handle having an air passage therethrough with one end rigidly mating with said tapered fitting, and the other end having means for making connection to the aspirator source.
US3804089A 1970-08-13 1971-06-08 Vacuum cannula apparatus Expired - Lifetime US3804089A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US6348070 true 1970-08-13 1970-08-13
US3804089A US3804089A (en) 1970-08-13 1971-06-08 Vacuum cannula apparatus

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3804089A US3804089A (en) 1970-08-13 1971-06-08 Vacuum cannula apparatus

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3804089A true US3804089A (en) 1974-04-16

Family

ID=26743458

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3804089A Expired - Lifetime US3804089A (en) 1970-08-13 1971-06-08 Vacuum cannula apparatus

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3804089A (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1990003762A1 (en) * 1988-10-07 1990-04-19 Ophthalmic Ventures Limited Partnership Surgical suturing system and probe assembly
US4990153A (en) * 1988-10-07 1991-02-05 Ophthalmic Ventures Limited Partnership Surgical suturing system and probe assembly
US5052999A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-10-01 Klein Jeffrey A Liposuction method and apparatus
US6129547A (en) * 1997-05-06 2000-10-10 Ballard Medical Products Oral care system
US20020029055A1 (en) * 1990-06-28 2002-03-07 Bonutti Peter M. Apparatus and method for tissue removal
US20020040246A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2002-04-04 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue press and system
US20030050708A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2003-03-13 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue grafting material
US20030195524A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-16 Gil Barner Body tissue aspiration cannula
US20040267192A1 (en) * 1994-02-16 2004-12-30 Weldon Thomas D. Electrophysiology positioning catheter
US6990982B1 (en) 1990-06-28 2006-01-31 Bonutti Ip, Llc Method for harvesting and processing cells from tissue fragments
WO2005122943A3 (en) * 2004-06-14 2007-01-04 G John Schoeffel Apparatus for evacuation of root canal
US20080275460A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Jeff Rehman Airway suction spoon
US20090004621A1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2009-01-01 Nancy Quan Endodontic Irrigation System
US20090056719A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-03-05 Newman Jr Lionel Exhalatory pressure device and system thereof
US20090062751A1 (en) * 2007-09-01 2009-03-05 Newman Jr Lionel Medical apparatus for suction and combination irrigation and suction
US20090194108A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-08-06 Newman Jr Lionel Adjustable pressure device and system thereof
US20100282253A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2010-11-11 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc. Pressure release systems, apparatus and methods
US8747439B2 (en) 2000-03-13 2014-06-10 P Tech, Llc Method of using ultrasonic vibration to secure body tissue with fastening element
US8808329B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2014-08-19 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Apparatus and method for securing a portion of a body
US8814902B2 (en) 2000-05-03 2014-08-26 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Method of securing body tissue
US8845687B2 (en) 1996-08-19 2014-09-30 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Anchor for securing a suture
US8845699B2 (en) 1999-08-09 2014-09-30 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Method of securing tissue
US9770238B2 (en) 2001-12-03 2017-09-26 P Tech, Llc Magnetic positioning apparatus

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2230218A (en) * 1938-06-02 1941-02-04 Walter F Asche Gastro-intestinal treatment system
US3109426A (en) * 1961-02-13 1963-11-05 Clayton T Noonan Combined aspirator and irrigation instrument
US3429313A (en) * 1966-02-01 1969-02-25 Ram Domestic Products Co Medical drainage pump
US3542031A (en) * 1968-06-24 1970-11-24 Marshall B Taylor Vacuum curette

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2230218A (en) * 1938-06-02 1941-02-04 Walter F Asche Gastro-intestinal treatment system
US3109426A (en) * 1961-02-13 1963-11-05 Clayton T Noonan Combined aspirator and irrigation instrument
US3429313A (en) * 1966-02-01 1969-02-25 Ram Domestic Products Co Medical drainage pump
US3542031A (en) * 1968-06-24 1970-11-24 Marshall B Taylor Vacuum curette

Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4927428A (en) * 1988-10-07 1990-05-22 Ophthalmic Ventures Limited Partnership Surgical suturing system and probe assembly
US4990153A (en) * 1988-10-07 1991-02-05 Ophthalmic Ventures Limited Partnership Surgical suturing system and probe assembly
WO1990003762A1 (en) * 1988-10-07 1990-04-19 Ophthalmic Ventures Limited Partnership Surgical suturing system and probe assembly
US5052999A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-10-01 Klein Jeffrey A Liposuction method and apparatus
US20020029055A1 (en) * 1990-06-28 2002-03-07 Bonutti Peter M. Apparatus and method for tissue removal
US7896880B2 (en) 1990-06-28 2011-03-01 P Tech, Llc Apparatus and method for tissue removal
US6990982B1 (en) 1990-06-28 2006-01-31 Bonutti Ip, Llc Method for harvesting and processing cells from tissue fragments
US20020055755A1 (en) * 1990-06-28 2002-05-09 Bonutti Peter M. Apparatus and method for tissue removal
US20020099401A1 (en) * 1990-06-28 2002-07-25 Bonutti Petel M. Apparatus and method for tissue removal
US20030009147A1 (en) * 1990-06-28 2003-01-09 Bonutti Peter M. Biodegradable sac and method of using same
US7134437B2 (en) 1990-06-28 2006-11-14 Bonutti Ip, Llc Method for utilizing human tissue
US20030130744A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2003-07-10 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue cage
US7727283B2 (en) 1991-08-12 2010-06-01 P Tech, Llc. Tissue stabilizing implant method
US20040172140A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2004-09-02 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue stabilizing implant
US20040169311A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2004-09-02 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue graft material and method of making
US20030050708A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2003-03-13 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue grafting material
US6905517B2 (en) 1991-08-12 2005-06-14 Bonutti Ip, Llp Tissue grafting material
US6989029B2 (en) 1991-08-12 2006-01-24 Bonutti Ip, Llc Tissue cage
US20020040246A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2002-04-04 Bonutti Peter M. Tissue press and system
US20060106464A1 (en) * 1991-08-12 2006-05-18 Bonutti Peter M Method for tissue grafting
US7070557B2 (en) 1991-08-12 2006-07-04 Marctec, Llc Tissue graft material and method of making
US7462200B2 (en) 1991-08-12 2008-12-09 Marctec, Llc Method for tissue grafting
US20040267192A1 (en) * 1994-02-16 2004-12-30 Weldon Thomas D. Electrophysiology positioning catheter
US7169124B2 (en) * 1994-02-16 2007-01-30 Novt Corp Electrophysiology positioning catheter
US8845687B2 (en) 1996-08-19 2014-09-30 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Anchor for securing a suture
US6129547A (en) * 1997-05-06 2000-10-10 Ballard Medical Products Oral care system
US8808329B2 (en) 1998-02-06 2014-08-19 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Apparatus and method for securing a portion of a body
US8845699B2 (en) 1999-08-09 2014-09-30 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Method of securing tissue
US8747439B2 (en) 2000-03-13 2014-06-10 P Tech, Llc Method of using ultrasonic vibration to secure body tissue with fastening element
US8814902B2 (en) 2000-05-03 2014-08-26 Bonutti Skeletal Innovations Llc Method of securing body tissue
US9770238B2 (en) 2001-12-03 2017-09-26 P Tech, Llc Magnetic positioning apparatus
US20030195524A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-16 Gil Barner Body tissue aspiration cannula
US9872748B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2018-01-23 Ormco Corporation Apparatus for evacuation of root canal
WO2005122943A3 (en) * 2004-06-14 2007-01-04 G John Schoeffel Apparatus for evacuation of root canal
US20080032259A1 (en) * 2004-06-14 2008-02-07 Schoeffel G J Apparatus for Evacuation of Root Canal
US7938794B2 (en) 2007-05-04 2011-05-10 Sscor, Inc. Airway suction spoon
US20080275460A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Jeff Rehman Airway suction spoon
US20090004621A1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2009-01-01 Nancy Quan Endodontic Irrigation System
US20090194108A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-08-06 Newman Jr Lionel Adjustable pressure device and system thereof
US20090056719A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2009-03-05 Newman Jr Lionel Exhalatory pressure device and system thereof
US8235042B2 (en) 2007-08-31 2012-08-07 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc Exhalatory pressure device and system thereof
US8225787B2 (en) 2007-08-31 2012-07-24 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc Adjustable pressure device and system thereof
US9427504B2 (en) * 2007-09-01 2016-08-30 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc Medical apparatus for suction and combination irrigation and suction
US20090062751A1 (en) * 2007-09-01 2009-03-05 Newman Jr Lionel Medical apparatus for suction and combination irrigation and suction
US20100282253A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2010-11-11 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc. Pressure release systems, apparatus and methods
US8783247B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2014-07-22 Wet Nose Technologies, Llc. Pressure release systems, apparatus and methods

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3459189A (en) Trocar catheter
US3459175A (en) Medical device for control of enemata
US3416532A (en) Drainage tube with means for scraping away debris therewithin
US3527203A (en) Apparatus for circulating a fluid within a body cavity
US3459184A (en) Intravenous catheter placement unit
US3352306A (en) Intravenous catheter assembly
US3289669A (en) Biopsy capsule arrangement
US3185151A (en) Catheter placement unit
US6802825B2 (en) Access catheter apparatus for use in minimally invasive surgery and diagnostic procedures in the uterus and fallopian tubes
US5536234A (en) Optical surgical device with scraping tool
US4664128A (en) Single-hand controlled aspiration device
US3920023A (en) Method and apparatus for placement of a suprapubic catheter
US4249541A (en) Biopsy device
US5980534A (en) Cervical clamp
US3683928A (en) Urethral catheter applicator
US2945496A (en) Dental instrument for immobilizing tissue
US4351333A (en) Peritoneal fluid treatment apparatus, package and method
US6290672B1 (en) Exploratory tubular sonogenic catheter
US4990137A (en) Closed wound drainage system with clearing port and method for sterile clearing of closed wound drainage system
US4128173A (en) Peritoneal fluid treatment apparatus, package and method
Leeton et al. The technique for human embryo transfer
US4681123A (en) Chorion biopsy instrument
US5078689A (en) Device for removing body fluids
US4553960A (en) Peritoneal fluid treatment apparatus, package and method
US3774612A (en) Uterine evacuation assembly

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: WARNER-LAMBERT COMPANY 201 TABOR ROAD, MORRIS PLAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BRIDGMAN, HENRY;REEL/FRAME:004024/0287

Effective date: 19820517

AS Assignment

Owner name: WESTON COPCO, INC., P.O. BOX 16-GEDNEY STATION, WH

Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST SUBJECT TO SECURITY INTEREST RETAINED BY SAID ASSIGNOR IN AGREEMENT RECITED NOVEMBER 5,1982;ASSIGNOR:WARNER-LAMBERT COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004199/0528

Effective date: 19821116

Owner name: WESTON COPCO, INC., P.O. BOX 16-GEDNEY STATION, WH

Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST SUBJECT TO SECURITY INTEREST RETAINED BY SAID ASSIGNOR IN AGREEMENT RECITED NOVEMBER 5,1982 SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS;ASSIGNOR:WARNER-LAMBERT COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004199/0528

Effective date: 19821116

AS Assignment

Owner name: PORCELLI, RICHARD, PLAINTIFF

Free format text: SEPT. 16, 1987 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NY, COUNTRY OF WESTCHESTER ISSUED JUDGMENT, INDEX NUMBER 87-14246 IN FAVOR OF RICHARD PORCELLI AND AGAINST WESTON COPCO INC.;ASSIGNOR:WESTON COPCO INC., DEFENDANT;REEL/FRAME:004772/0368

Effective date: 19870916

Owner name: PORCELLI, RICHARD

Free format text: SEPT. 16, 1987 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NY, COUNTRY OF WESTCHESTER ISSUED JUDGMENT, INDEX NUMBER 87-14246 IN FAVOR OF RICHARD PORCELLI AND AGAINST WESTON COPCO INC.;ASSIGNOR:WESTON COPCO INC., DEFENDANT;REEL/FRAME:004772/0368

Effective date: 19870916

AS Assignment

Owner name: WESTON COPCO, INC., NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST RETAINED BY ASSIGNOR IN AN AGREEMENT RECITED 11-05-82; RECORDED AT REEL 4199 - FRAME 0528, DATED 12-01-83.;ASSIGNOR:WARNER-LAMBERT COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:005091/0336

Effective date: 19890316