US3500037A - Underwater hand light - Google Patents

Underwater hand light Download PDF

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US3500037A
US3500037A US3500037DA US3500037A US 3500037 A US3500037 A US 3500037A US 3500037D A US3500037D A US 3500037DA US 3500037 A US3500037 A US 3500037A
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bulb
light
lamp
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Walter A Starck
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Walter A Starck
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21LLIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF, BEING PORTABLE OR SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR TRANSPORTATION
    • F21L4/00Electric lighting devices with self-contained electric batteries or cells
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21LLIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF, BEING PORTABLE OR SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR TRANSPORTATION
    • F21L15/00Details of kinds solely applicable to the devices covered by groups F21L2/00 - F21L14/00
    • F21L15/06Details of kinds solely applicable to the devices covered by groups F21L2/00 - F21L14/00 concerned with the fitting

Description

March 10, 1970 w. A. STARCK u 3,500,037

UNDERWATER- HAND LIGHT Filed March 14, 1968 .5 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

FIGJ

INVENTOR WALTER A. STARCK, 1I

ATTORNEYSZ March 10, 1970 w. A. STARCK u 3,500,037

UNDERWATER HAND LIGHT Filed March 14, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 3

INVENTOR WALTER A. STARCK, III

ATTORNEYS.

March 10, 1970 w. A. STARCK u UNDERWATER HAND LIGHT 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 14, 1968 INVENTOR WALTER A. STARCK, 1]:

BY %4, AW, 2%

ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent 3,500,037 UNDERWATER HAND LIGHT Walter A. Starck H, P.0. Box 592,

Big Pine Key, Fla. 33043 Filed Mar. 14, 1968, Ser. No. 713,114 Int. Cl. F21v 31/00; F211 7 00 US. Cl. 240-10.63 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE its reflector association for independent use. The light source is of the quartz-iodide type and by reason of particular mounting features, it is rendered especially adapted for underwater use, particularly as regards its light-giving life.

This invention relates to a multipurpose, hand-type lamp. Lamps of the type of interest herein are commonly referred to as flashlights or lanterns in that they are battery operated and adapted for the purpose of hand use. Primarily the invention is concerned with the provision of a lighting assembly especially adapted for underwater use. However, as will be apparent, the lamp may be used under ordinary conditions. Additionally, by reason of the nature of the new assembly, the lamp of this invention is readily convertible to permit use of the actual light-giving element as an ordinary hanging, or otherwise positionable lighting source. Because of the nature of the light source per se which is employed, the lamp provides a very high degree of illumination, whether it is used in its combined assembled relationship, or whether the light source is employed separately. As will be understood upon further consideration of the nature of the structure, the actual light source, when detached from its main housing and reflector portion may be employed either underwater, or for example, on board ship, or otherwise as may be desired.

In addition to the foregoing features, the lamp assembly of the invention aifords a high degree of general adaptability to underwater use and conditions. It is especially responsive to the needs of the user as such needs and conditions are variously encountered under water. More particularly in this regard, the light source is normally positioned in a housing which carries a reflector. In normal use, the light source and the reflector are associated in co-operating relationship. However, the lamp of this invention involves the special feature that its light-source assembly is positioned in the housing-reflector unit in both removable and sliding relationship thereto, so that the light-source assembly is very readily and immediately positionable relative to the reflector merely by a simple sliding movement relative to its housing. This unique arrangement not only gives the light the above-indicated versatility, but it affords an unusually responsive mode of altering the character of the reflected light from a spot type of projection to a more diifused character. The arrangement eliminates co-operating threaded parts as are usually required for changing the nature of the projected light. Moreover, the usual type of lens system is dispensed with and easy and quick access at all times is aiforded to the light source itself. As will be understood, association of parts by means of threaded type elements usually found in such lighting equipment has a very great disadvantage in underwater use due to corrosion problems which tend to set the threaded elements in fixed, or difiicultly moveable positions. The lamp of this invention, in the main, is free of this disadvantage and it is also extremely easy to clean and service otherwise.

An additional feature of the lamp of this invention is with regard to the actual light source. More particularly, the light source which is especially preferred for use is of the quartz-iodide type. By reason of its unique character, this type afi'ords a highly intense light from a very small, compact source. For example, this type of bulb is available in a size scarcely larger than an ordinary flashlight bulb while providing watts in light power. These lamps are rated for ordinary atmospheric condition use at -a life of about fifteen hours. In the course of this invention, it was found that such bulb when employed underwater suddenly suffered a great loss of its rated life. More particularly, such life would not usually be more than about forty-five minutes. This occurrence normally would render such bulb use as intended herein far too expensive; however, because of a discovery made pursuant to this invention, the bulb life is restored to its normal expected duration. In fact, it appears that by reason of this invention normal bulb life may actually be lengthened somewhat.

The solution to the problem just described was solved by enclosing the light bulb within a shielding glass tube. The outer glass tube not only serves as a means of actual protection of the bulb itself against accidental breakage and leakage of water into the socket; but, it was discovered that in using such tube, life span of the bulb very surprisingly was restored. Evidently, the loss of life of such type bulb when employed under water in an unshielded manner is due to the low temperature maintained in the glass envelope of the bulb when in direct contact with the water. When it is taken under water, it appears that the resultant low temperature of the glass envelope quenches the special recycling action occurring within this type of bulb in normal, atmospheric use whereby dissipation of the filament is inhibited, is impaired to an extent that such filament dissipation occurred at a greatly accelerated rate. In other words, the filament burned out at a much higher rate. If this analysis of the matter be correct, it seems that the benefit of the outer shielding tube, in addition to affording protection against breaking, also provides an insulating volume of air surrounding the bulb envelope such that its temperature characteristics remain substantially unaltered under water.

The lamp of this invention employs a relatively new type of reflector which affords retention of the reflected light in large measure Within a generally rectangular area. Consequently, a greater quantity of light actually afforded by the source may be brought to bear in a localized Way. This type of reflector is not critical in the invention, although it is preferred for use in the asesmb y.

As will be appreciated, the entire lamp assembly is provided with water sealing means so that the wiring, battery, etc., is protected from actual water contact.

The invention is more fully illustrated in drawings which are attached hereto in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view in side elevation;

FIGURE 2 is an end elevational view looking into the reflector-light assembly;

FIGURE 3 is a side view partly in section;

(FIGURE 4 is a view showing the light-source assembly, revealed in the view of FIGURE 5, removed from its normal position;

FIGURE 5 is a partial sectional view through the reflector-light source assembly;

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of a shielded quartz-iodide lamp according to this invention.

Referring first to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, numeral .10 denotes a battery case 'which may be of any suitable material, either metal or plastic, which is conditioned to be resistant to water, especially salt water. The case is of such dimension as to contain an ordinary 12-volt battery and it is provided with strap holders 12 (FIG- URE 2) by which it may be readily attached to a belt for support on the divers body. Numeral 14 denotes a member serving as a closure for the battery case, the member being held tightly in sealing position by wing nuts 16. Numeral 18 denotes a box serving to house electrical connections and parts, numeral 20 denoting a switch for turning the light on and off, and numeral 22 denoting plug-in type electrical outlet. Numeral 24 denotes a top for box 18 held in position by any suitable means, as by bolt 26. Numeral 28 is an electrical conduit extending between the connector unit 22 and leading to the light-source assembly 30 (see FIGURE The lamp itself is moveably and detachably mounted on the electrical circuit box, and it is provided with a yoke 32 for this purpose. Thus, as will be observed, the association of parts is such as to allow the lighting portion to be hand held either separately from the battery case, which may be attached to divers belt, or the entire assembly may be hand carried completely detached from the body of the user.

It is not considered necessary to discuss the details of the circuitry and wiring since the arrangement is perfectly conventional and the wiring is shown in the drawings.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 5, numeral 34 denotes a reflector of the type mentioned hereinabove. As will be seen, the light-source assembly 30 is shown positioned in relation to the reflector. The portion of the lamp assembly by which it is held is generally cylindrical and of such size to be readily accommodated in the hand, while also providing a housing for the light source. The said housing portion is denoted by numeral 36. Numeral 38 denotes a bulb or light socket member which is positioned within the housing 36. The socket member is frictionally held in position by resilient circular rings 40. Numeral 42 denotes a quartz-iodide type bulb which is connected to the battery cable 28 through the interior of the socket member which is hollow. Numeral 44 denotes an outer light-transmitting shielding tube which is frictionally held on the socket member, in water sealing relationship thereto, by the resilient ring 46. It may be remarked that the difference in diameter of the socket member as between the portion which carries rings 40 and the portion which carries ring 46 is for the purpose of adapting the socket to the assembly from the standpoint of convenient size. The light socket, the bulb and the bulb shielding tube when in assembled relation may be regarded as unitary; thus, when the light socket, numeral .38, is moved relative to the housing, these parts move as a unit. The frictional engagement of the light socket with the outer housing is such that the unitary assembly is normally held firmly in position; however, not so firmly as to render it immovable. The pressure between the rings 40 and housing is such as to permit the light socket to be moved longitudinally of the housing so that the bulb may be positioned with respect to the reflector as may be desired, simply by manipulation of the light socket at the point of entry of the electrical conduit at numeral 48. Similarly, the unitary assembly including the light socket, bulb and bulb shield may be easily withdrawn from its housing by pulling rearwardly at the same point of electrical connection so that the light source becomes useable entirely apart from the lamp assembly. It will be perceived that the electrical conduit may be as long as desired, or adapted to be replaced by a longer or shorter conduit.

As will be understood, all electrical components and the battery case itself are protected against water by water-sealed gaskets. For example, such gaskets are shown in :FIGURE 3 at numerals 50 and 52. The fitting 48 as seen in FIGURE 5 is of corrosion resistant metal or plastic and threads onto an extension of the tubular member 38, the extension being denoted by numeral 54.

This is a well known pressure type of electrical fitting containing a gasket which is compressed as the nut itself is tightened so as to eifect a water seal. Similarly, the switch unit, indicated generally at numeral 20, is of a type especially adapted for underwater use, it being of the toggle type and sealed against water by a rubber enclosure. Numeral 56 denotes the casing for the interior portion.

Referring to the combination of a quartz-iodide type bulb with a co-operating outer shielding tube, it will be apparent that such combination may "be provided as a unit entirely apart from the particular lamp structure illustrated herein. It is only necessary to provide a proper socket for receiving both the bulb and outer shielding tube in working relationship. By so doing, a shielded bulb is provided for general use which has the advantages discussed herein. Thus, such a shielded bulb may be employed separately with any desired electrical source and application, and whether or not it is used underwater. If desired, the outer shielding tube may be threaded internally in order to mate with a threaded bulb base or bulb socket so that the two parts become a single unit, yet being separable. Alternatively, the assembly may be completed by providing a retainer cap-like ring surrounding the out side of the tube about the lip portion (see FIGURE 5) which ring may be internally threaded so as to co-operate with a threaded base, thus drawing the tube securely against the base. In such cases, preferably the base should be provided with a cushioned surface, for example a rubber ring or gasket, serving as a bearing surface for the glass lip. The manner of association of the tube and bulb as shown in the drawings is quite satisfactory for both underwater and normal atmosphere use since the ring 46 provides a seal against entry of water and it permits the tube to move longitudinally under inner gas expansion pres sure (due to filament heat) as is more likely to occur at atmospheric conditions.

Referring to FIGURE 6 of the drawings, a shielded bulb of the general type just discussed is shown. In this drawing, numeral 58 denotes an outer glass envelope or shield which preferably is of a heat-tolerable composition, such as Pyrex or quartz, which envelope is mounted in association with the quartz-iodide type of lamp. The envelope is mounted relative to the bulb proper at the base thereof as shown at numeral 60. The base of the bulb, denoted by numeral 62, is somewhat enlarged over that normally necessary or desirable in order to accommodate the mounting of the outer envelope 58. Desirably, the envelope is secured in place by seating in a high-temperature potting material of the type normally employed in sealing the usual bulb wall with respect to the filament base. A bulb according to the present invention is thus rendered adaptable for the usual purposes.

With regard to the space between the outer shielding envelope 58 and the bulb proper, such space acts as an insulating zone and may be filled with air, or preferably, an inert gas. Also, desirably, the space under discussion may be at a subatmospheric pressure, that is to say, a degree of vacuum. By providing a partial vacuum, the degree of insulation can be controlled and thereby adjust the operating temperature of the bulb to the optimum.

What is claimed is:

1. A portable electric lamp comprising a battery housing, means associated with said housing for supporting an electric bulb and reflector assembly, said means constituting an elongated tubular element, open at both ends, and having a reflector attached to one of said ends, means in said tubular element constituting a socket for holding said electric bulb in position relative to said reflector, said latter means being frictionally held in position in said tubular element and also slidably positionable therein such that the said electric bulb may be adjusted positionwise relative to said reflector element, and such that said bulb holding means, together with said bulb, may be entirely withdrawn from the said tubular element for use as a lamp apart therefrom; and means for electrically connecting said electric bulb to a battery source normally contained in said battery housing.

2. A lamp as claimed in claim 1 wherein the bulb employed in said lamp is of the high-intensity quartz-iodide type.

3. A lamp as claimed in claim 2 wherein the said electric bulb is enclosed within a transparent shielding sheath such that said bulb is protected from accidental damage and a layer of gas is provided within said sheath serving to insulate said bulb against temperature changes such as would tend to impair its normal functioning.

4. A lamp as claimed in claim 1 which is provided with water-sealing means for its electrical components and circuitry, whereby said lamp is especially adapted for underwater use.

5. A lamp as claimed in claim 3 which is provided with water-sealing means for its electrical components and circuitry, whereby said lamp is especially adapted for underwater use.

6. A lamp as claimed in claim 5 wherein said bulb shielding means takes the form of a tube, open at one end, and wherein said shield means is frictionally and removably held in sealing position relative to said bulb upon the end of said bulb holding means, such that said bulb is insulated by a surrounding volume of gas and water is prevented from contacting it, and also such that said shielding means may be readily removed from its shielding position and direct access thereby permitted to the bulb for such attention as may be required.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS NORTON ANSI-I'ER, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 24010.69, 26, 44.2

US3500037D 1968-03-14 1968-03-14 Underwater hand light Expired - Lifetime US3500037A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3652846A (en) * 1968-03-14 1972-03-28 Walter A Starck Underwater hand light
US3864562A (en) * 1973-10-19 1975-02-04 Donald K Hawkins Means for illuminating underwater areas of swimming pools
US4947304A (en) * 1989-07-10 1990-08-07 Ute Corp Underwater lamp having watertight electrical connection
US5530631A (en) * 1994-06-29 1996-06-25 Smith; Tristan P. Apparatus for attaching a light housing to a mask body or other structure

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1235809A (en) * 1916-10-24 1917-08-07 Waller Louis Kaufmann Automobile spot-light.
US1674650A (en) * 1926-11-19 1928-06-26 Bright Star Battery Company Portable electric light
US2133159A (en) * 1937-01-23 1938-10-11 Gen Electric Lamp socket
US2228009A (en) * 1937-12-30 1941-01-07 Dwight L Harford Portable lantern
US3137804A (en) * 1960-09-30 1964-06-16 Engelhard Hanovia Inc Explosion-proof lamp
US3379868A (en) * 1965-12-10 1968-04-23 Gen Electric Electric discharge projection lamp

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1235809A (en) * 1916-10-24 1917-08-07 Waller Louis Kaufmann Automobile spot-light.
US1674650A (en) * 1926-11-19 1928-06-26 Bright Star Battery Company Portable electric light
US2133159A (en) * 1937-01-23 1938-10-11 Gen Electric Lamp socket
US2228009A (en) * 1937-12-30 1941-01-07 Dwight L Harford Portable lantern
US3137804A (en) * 1960-09-30 1964-06-16 Engelhard Hanovia Inc Explosion-proof lamp
US3379868A (en) * 1965-12-10 1968-04-23 Gen Electric Electric discharge projection lamp

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3652846A (en) * 1968-03-14 1972-03-28 Walter A Starck Underwater hand light
US3864562A (en) * 1973-10-19 1975-02-04 Donald K Hawkins Means for illuminating underwater areas of swimming pools
US4947304A (en) * 1989-07-10 1990-08-07 Ute Corp Underwater lamp having watertight electrical connection
US5530631A (en) * 1994-06-29 1996-06-25 Smith; Tristan P. Apparatus for attaching a light housing to a mask body or other structure

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