US3178986A - Recorder - Google Patents

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US3178986A
US3178986A US303081A US30308163A US3178986A US 3178986 A US3178986 A US 3178986A US 303081 A US303081 A US 303081A US 30308163 A US30308163 A US 30308163A US 3178986 A US3178986 A US 3178986A
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Prior art keywords
wind channel
recorder
moisture
mouthpiece
playing
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Expired - Lifetime
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US303081A
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Moeck Hermann
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Moeck Hermann
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Priority to DEM53950A priority Critical patent/DE1235122B/en
Application filed by Moeck Hermann filed Critical Moeck Hermann
Priority claimed from DE19641474074 external-priority patent/DE1474074A1/en
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Publication of US3178986A publication Critical patent/US3178986A/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/02Mouthpieces; Reeds; Ligatures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/02General design of wind musical instruments of the type wherein an air current is directed against a ramp edge
    • G10D7/03General design of wind musical instruments of the type wherein an air current is directed against a ramp edge with a windway for leading the air to the labium, e.g. recorders

Description

April 20, 1965 H. MOECK 3,1

RECORDER Filed Aug. 19, 1963 United States Patent 0 3,178,)86 RECORDER Hermann Moeclr, Hannoversche Strasse 43a,

Celle, Hannover, Germany Filed Aug. 19, 1963, Ser. No. 33035981 Claims priority, applicgiltio n (ge'many, Aug. 20, N62, 7 Claims. of. s r-sea This invention relates to improved recorders and it particularly relates to recorders which substantially avoid the adverse effects of moisture deposits in the wind channels thereof.

' Recorders consist, in general, of two separate tubes; the first is a body tube which may be subdivided in larger instruments and which includes the necessary tone holes and the second is a headpiece placed on the body tube, The headpiece is constricted on the inside of its front end by an inserted core or block in a wind channel, which ends in the region of the mouth. Recorders are commonly constructed of wood, but may also be made of ivory, plastic or metal.

Heretofore, all known recorders have the common drawback of being highly sensitive to deposits of breath moisture in the wind channel. If breath moisture collects in relatively small or relatively large drops on the walls of the wind channel, a disturbance occurs in the air conduction in the wind channel and this results in the recorder or flute becoming hoarse, thereby impairing the playint quality of the instrument. The formation of breath moisture deposits should be reckoned with regularly after relatively long playing; however, troublesome moisture deposits may occur even after relatively brief playing, if the breath is especially humid or if there is cold outside air. Flutes of plastic, ivory or metal are by their nature particularly subject to malfunction, since these materials cannot absorb moisture of any'kind; but even recorders made of wood, which can absorb a certain amount of moisture, are not free of the occurrence of breath moisture deposits.

Since a thorough and effective remedy for this undesirable manifestation has not heretofore been possible, the players of recorders have been to resort to makeshift measures in order to keep their instruments in playing condition, over as long a period as possible. For example, frequently the wind channel is cleared by vigorously blowing moisture accumulations out of the channel. Although this procedure may restore the recorder to its playing capacity for a short while, restoration of playing capacity is not of long duration once the recorder has become hoarse. A less violent, but likewise no more effective method for keeping the wind channel dry is accomplished by keeping the instrument warm on the body during pauses in playing.

Further, in long concerts a player often must use several recorders, since one recorder will ordinarily fail to operate properly for an extended period of time.

Moisture deposits in the wind channel of the recorder not only cause a constantly recurring momentary hampering of the playing, but, in the long run, also impair tonal quality of the instrument. As a result of continually alter nating moistening and drying, the wood portions of the wind channel gradually lose their desired smooth surface; this roughening of the wood is increased by the vigorous blowing of moisture out of the wind channel.

There is thus formed, to varying degrees depending on the kind of wood used, roughenings on the wood surface, similar to that obesrved on wooden portions of washboards. Such roughenings also adversely affect air conduction in the wind channel resulting in the necessity of repair of the instrument, or gradual loss of tonal quality.

aliases Patented Apr. 20, 1965 A further disadvantage of moisture deposits in the wind channel is that the wood which surrounds the wind channel is constantly working, whereby the interior dimensions of the channel change and adversely affect wind conduction. Even minor changes, such as 0.02 mm, are noticeable in the tone. Thus, even good and well maintained recorders do not improve with age as in the case of violins, but deteriorate and, after a period of time, must be repaired or must even be replaced by a new instrument.

The above-mentioned disadvantages have had the result, among others, that the recorder is regarded as a highly unreliable musical instrument for use in public concerts and on the radio, and is thus used only with a certain amount of reservation. Furthermore, since a great deal of experience is required for properly maintaining previously known recorders, amateur musicians have a particularly difiicult time in properly maintaining them; these problems are particularly vexing since recorders are otherwise easily handled and operated musical instrumerits.

it is therefore an important object of this invention to provide an improved recorder wherein the foregoing disadvantages are substantially avoided by providing a stable, absorbent material for lining the wind channel thereof.

It is also an important object of this invention to provide an improved recorder which substantially prevents the formation of moisture in its wind channel, thereby maintaining the playing qualities of the instrument over unusually long periods of playing time.

it is a further object of this invention to provide an improved recorder which may be dryed after playing Lie instrument, and not during pauses in playing or in the midst of playing.

it is another object of this invention to provide a recorder which, after long use, does not form surface changes or alternations on the wood portions of a wind channel as a result of moisture build-up.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a mentor having a replaceable wind channel lining where by any damage to the walls of the wind channel is easily remedied.

An added problem encountered with recorders is that production costs are quite high since the parts of the recorder have to be carefully shaped and sized by chipping and shaving procedures. This problem, together with dimensional changes encountered with wood instruments, may be avoided by providing a plastic mouthpiece for the recorder. However, in recorders heretofore known, moisture formation in the wind channel occurs to a particularly large degree, and as a result, plastic mouthpieces have been used only for inexpensive recorders. Therefore, it is still a further object of this invention to provide a recorder utilizing a plastic mouthpiece having the advantages of providing economical construction and lack of dimensional alternations, while substantially avoiding the undesired formation of moisture within the wind channel of the instrument.

Further purposes and objects of this invention will appear as the specification proceeds.

A particular embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of the head of a recorder, utilizing features of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the head of a recorder, provided with a plastic mouthpiece;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along the line Ill-lll of FIGURE 2; and

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view, similar to FIGURE 3, showing an alternate embodiment of the invention.

Referring to FEGURE 1, there is shown a wooden recorder with a head-piece l and a mouth piece 2 mounted (a thereon. The body tube at the other end of the headpiece 1, provided for carrying the tone holes, is not further shown in the drawings and may be of the usual or desired construction.

The headpiece 1 may also be constructed in a conventional manner and is provided with a central bore 3. The bore 3 terminates with a socket 4-, into which the body tube can be inserted in the usual manner. A mouth or opening 6 is provided in the wall of the headpiece 1, the side Walls 7 of the mouth 6 and the lip or edge 8 being portions of the wall 5 of the headpiece.

At the opposite end of the bore 3, there is provided the mouthpiece 2, which consists of a core shell 19, made from the headpiece ll, and a core or block 9 which is driven into the headpiece. Between the core 9 and the core shell 10 there is formed a wind channel 11, which has a rectangular cross section, tapers inwardly, and terminates at a distance in front of the lip edge 3, at the approximate height thereof.

It is seen from FIGURE 1 that both the upper wall and the lower wall of the wind channel 11, that is, the surface provided at the core 9 and the surface provided at the core shell 19, are each provided with a lining l2. This lining is a stable absorbent material. Although the plate 12 may be secured with cement, as will be describe below, other methods of fastening may be utilized.

The linings 12 substantially avoid the undesirable formation of breath moisture in the wind channel ill. The lining 12 is preferably constructed of a line, porous ceramic material, such as sint-ered aluminum oxide or urglazed porcelain; such material is readily available and easily provided in the desired shape or form. Generally, the lining is to be made of a material which exhibits a high degree of absorbency and a high degree of stability. Other suitable materials include fine, porous mineral compositions, such as meerschaum, and fine porous plastics or sintered metals.

Generally, the linings 12 need to be applied only to the upper wall and the lowe wall of the wind channel Ill. These two walls make up the great majority of the total surface area of the wind channel and moisture accumulations in the region of these wall surfaces are considerably more troublesome than such accumulations in the region of the relatively narrow side walls of the wind channel 11. However, as seen in FZGURE 4 if desired or necessary, linings it and may be provided on the two side walls of the wind channel.

Referring to FIGURE 2, there is shown a recorder having a plastic mouthpiece, wherein only the lower part (b) of the head and the mouthpiece (a) are illustrated.

The mouthpiece consists of a main portion 2i), which includes a wind channel 31 and a connecting projection 21. In the region of the mouth 22, die wall thickness of the connecting projection 21 is thickened in order to form the side walls 23, which laterally support the lip 24 with its sharp edge. The main portion Ztl and the connecting projection 2t may be formed in one piece. However, for reasons of production technology, it is often more desirable to manufacture individual parts and to assemble these, for example, by means of a jig and then cement the parts together; a further advantage of such an assembly procedure is that the relationship between the lip and wind channel can be constantly corrected during assemblage.

The lower part (b) of the head is advantageously made of wood and is provided with a central bore 27, which terminates at one end in an insertion socket 25 and at its other end in a connection bore 26. The inside diameter of the bore 26 is constructed in such a manner that the connecting projection 21 of the mouthpiece (a) can be in serted on lower part (b) with a relatively tight fit. Furthermore, the inside bore 23 of the connecting projection 21 is substantially equal in diameter to the inner diameter of the central bore 27 in the lower part (Z whereby, in an assembled condition, the bores 27 and 23 form a continuous channel or passage. In connecting the parts together, care must be exercised in adjusting the length of the connecting projection 21 inserted into the connection bore 26. The wall 29 of the lower part (b) is provided in the region of the connection bore 26, with a recess 30. The recess 30 has, in plan View, for example, the form of a U, open toward the mouthpiece.

The wind channel 31, in the main part 20 of the mouthpiece, terminates at a distance in front of and at the approximate level of the lip edge 24; also, the channel 31 may be covered along its top with a separate cover 32 or the cover may be made integral with the main part 20. The cross-section of the wind channel 31 may correspond to the cross-section of the wind channel 11, already explained in the description of FIGURE 1.

Also, the wind channel 31 is lined with plates 33 of porous material, which as already described in connection with FlGURE 1, cover the upper Wall and the lower wall of the wind channel, but ordinarily not the side walls, although it may be desirable to provide a lining along the side walls of the wind channel 31. The plates may be constructed of the same material as the plates 32 of FIG- URE l.

The fastening of the plates 33 can be accomplished by means of an adhesive. However, referring to FIGURE 3, there is shown another attachment procedure for the plates 33, which avoids the necessity of using cement. in the side walls 34' of the wind channel 31, grooves 3-5 are milled and are arranged one above the other; the plates are to he slid into the grooves 35 and to provide a secure fit. This type of attachment i possible without difficulty in plastic mouthpieces, since both the grooves 35 and the plates 33 can be constructed within the necessary measurement tolerances.

The groove 35, in the region of the upper plate 33, may, if a separate cover 32 is used, be formed at its upper edge by the lower edge of the cover 32. This type of construction is particularly advantageous if not only the upper wall and the lower wall of the wind channel 31, but also the side walls are to be provided with a lining. in such a case, there is required only a uniformly milled groove having rectangular cross-section, equal to the width of the plates 33. Into this milled groove, the lower plate 33, two.

side plates having a shape corresponding to the side wall portions 34, and the upper plate 35 are placed, whereupon these parts are fixed in position by the cover 32.

Experiments with recorders constructed in accordance with the above have resulted in no impairment of the tone quality, extraordinarily long playing periods and following playing, sufficient drying of the lining plates occurs, so that the recorder is then available again for more playing. Violent blowing of moisture out of the wind channel, or any other methods heretofore used for maintaining the playability of the recorder, may be thus entirely dispensed with. Internal changes within the wind channel have not been observed in recorders constructed in accordance with the invention, even over relatively long periods of time. If the plates are to be secured by means of a cement, a cement which is not adversely affected by moisture is to be use". Repair of the instrument is accomplished in a remarkably simple manner if constructed according to FIGURE 3; but even in the case of fastening the plates by cement no particular ditiiculties are encountered.

Although it is preferred that the plates 12 and 33 be constructed of finely porous ceramic material, it is also possible to use other absorbent materials, having sufficient mechanical strength, a sufiicient stability of form, especially in the moistened state, and a sufficiently smooth surface.

While in the foregoing there has been a detailed description of particular embodiments of the present invention, it is to be understood that all equivalents obvious to those having skill in the art are to be included within the scope of the invention, as claimed.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a recorder having a mouthpiece and a Wind channel provided in said mouthpiece, the improvement comprising a lining for said Wind channel, said lining being an absorbent stable material for absorbing breath moisture whereby moisture is prevented from adversely affecting the playing of said recorder.

2. The recorder of claim 1 wherein said lining is a finely porous ceramic material.

3. In a recorder having a mouthpiece and a wind channel provided in said mouthpiece, the improvement comprising plates for lining said wind channel, said plates being an absorbent, stable material for absorbing breath moisture whereby moisture is prevented from adversely alfecting the playing of said recorder.

4. The recorder of claim 3 wherein one plate covers the upper wall of said Wind channel and a second plate covers the lower wall of said wind channel.

5. In a recorder having a mouthpiece and a Wind channel provided in said mouthpiece the improvement comprising a pair of grooves provided in the side walls of said wind channel, and plates mounted in said groove for lining said wind channel, said plates being an absorb- 6 cut, stable material for absorbing breath moisture whereby moisture is prevented from adversely affecting the playing of said recorder.

6. In a recorder having a mouthpiece and a wind channel provided in said mouthpiece, the improvement comprising four plates for lining the upper and lower walls and the side walls of said wind channel, said plates being a finely absorbent stable material for absorbing breath moisture whereby moisture is prevented from adversely aifecting the playing of said recorder.

7. The recorder of claim 6 wherein said mouthpiece is plastic and is adapted to receive the lower part of the headpiece of said recorder.

Rererences Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,944,459 7/60 Simmonds 84-383 X 3 ,03 0,845 4/ 62 Sherer 84-3 84 FOREIGN PATENTS 5 82,347 11/46 Great Britain.

LEO SMILOW, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A RECORDER HAVING A MOUTHPIECE AND A WIND CHANNEL PROVIDED IN SAID MOUTHPIECE, THE IMPROVEMENT COMPRISING A LINING FOR SAID WIND CHANNEL, SAID LINING BEING AN ABSORBENT STABLE MATERIAL FOR ABSORBING BREATH MOISTURE WHEREBY MOISTURE IS PREVENTED FROM ADVERSELY AFFECTING THE PLAYING OF SAID RECORDER.
US303081A 1962-08-20 1963-08-19 Recorder Expired - Lifetime US3178986A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DEM53950A DE1235122B (en) 1962-08-20 1962-08-20 Recorder

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DE19641474074 DE1474074A1 (en) 1963-08-19 1964-08-11 Stroemungsbetaetigte sorter

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3643538A (en) * 1970-03-19 1972-02-22 Nobuo Toyama Mouthpiece of wind instruments
US3805665A (en) * 1971-06-21 1974-04-23 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Wind type musical instrument
US3869955A (en) * 1972-10-30 1975-03-11 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Recorder
US3988956A (en) * 1974-07-04 1976-11-02 Hermann Moeck Recorder
US5107740A (en) * 1989-11-10 1992-04-28 Strathmann Arnfred R Flute mouthpiece with adjustable core gap

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE19722192A1 (en) * 1997-05-30 1998-12-10 Conrad Mollenhauer Gmbh Flute with reduced sound level

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB582347A (en) * 1944-05-19 1946-11-13 Rose Morris & Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to the manufacture of musical wind instruments
US2944459A (en) * 1956-08-20 1960-07-12 Simmonds Charles George Moulded plastic article
US3030845A (en) * 1960-01-08 1962-04-24 Hohner Ag Matth Sound head for musical wind instrument

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE29380C (en) *
DE48160C (en) *

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB582347A (en) * 1944-05-19 1946-11-13 Rose Morris & Company Ltd Improvements in or relating to the manufacture of musical wind instruments
US2944459A (en) * 1956-08-20 1960-07-12 Simmonds Charles George Moulded plastic article
US3030845A (en) * 1960-01-08 1962-04-24 Hohner Ag Matth Sound head for musical wind instrument

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3643538A (en) * 1970-03-19 1972-02-22 Nobuo Toyama Mouthpiece of wind instruments
US3805665A (en) * 1971-06-21 1974-04-23 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Wind type musical instrument
US3869955A (en) * 1972-10-30 1975-03-11 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Recorder
US3988956A (en) * 1974-07-04 1976-11-02 Hermann Moeck Recorder
US5107740A (en) * 1989-11-10 1992-04-28 Strathmann Arnfred R Flute mouthpiece with adjustable core gap

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DE1235122B (en) 1967-02-23

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