US3174893A - Simulated ceramic tile-like mosaic construction - Google Patents

Simulated ceramic tile-like mosaic construction Download PDF

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US3174893A
US3174893A US83205A US8320561A US3174893A US 3174893 A US3174893 A US 3174893A US 83205 A US83205 A US 83205A US 8320561 A US8320561 A US 8320561A US 3174893 A US3174893 A US 3174893A
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resin
pieces
ceramic tile
members
supporting members
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Idella R Church
Douglas D Dean
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Idella R Church
Douglas D Dean
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44CPRODUCING DECORATIVE EFFECTS; MOSAICS; TARSIA WORK; PAPERHANGING
    • B44C3/00Processes, not specifically provided for elsewhere, for producing ornamental structures
    • B44C3/12Uniting ornamental elements to structures, e.g. mosaic plates
    • B44C3/123Mosaic constructs
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44FSPECIAL DESIGNS OR PICTURES
    • B44F11/00Designs imitating artistic work
    • B44F11/06Imitation of ceramic patterns
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1089Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor of discrete laminae to single face of additional lamina
    • Y10T156/109Embedding of laminae within face of additional laminae
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/16Two dimensionally sectional layer
    • Y10T428/162Transparent or translucent layer or section
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/16Two dimensionally sectional layer
    • Y10T428/163Next to unitary web or sheet of equal or greater extent
    • Y10T428/164Continuous two dimensionally sectional layer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/16Two dimensionally sectional layer
    • Y10T428/163Next to unitary web or sheet of equal or greater extent
    • Y10T428/168Nonrectangular
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/17Three or more coplanar interfitted sections with securing means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24273Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including aperture
    • Y10T428/24322Composite web or sheet
    • Y10T428/24331Composite web or sheet including nonapertured component
    • Y10T428/24339Keyed
    • Y10T428/24347From both sides
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24479Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness
    • Y10T428/24612Composite web or sheet

Description

March 23, 1965 1. R. CHURCH ETAL 3,174,893

SIMULATED CERAMIC TILE-LIKE MOSAIC CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 17, 1961 ikili FIG.

INVENTORS.

C C c IDELLA R. CHURCH DOUGLAS 0. DEAN F/G.3 BY

ATTORNEYS 3,174,893 SIMULATED CERAMIC THEE-LIKE MOSAIC CQNSTRUCTHGN lldella R. Church, 200 Green Valley Road, Suisun City,

Calif., and Douglas D. Dean, Suisun City, Calif.

(Box 625, Fairlield, Caiif} Filed .ian. 17, 1961, Ser. No. 83,205 6 Claims. (Cl. 161-5) This invention relates to mosaics. More particularly, it relates to a novel simulated ceramic tile-like mosaic construction and to the method of preparation thereof.

In recent times, mosaics, both in their form as Works of art as well as items of utility appear to have enjoyed increasing popularity. However, ceramic mosaics are generally expensive, primarily because they require considerable skill and human labor in their construction.

It is a principal object of the present invention to provide a simulated ceramic mosaic tile-like construction from readily available and inexpensive materials, such as, for example, paper board tile pieces embedded within a layer or coating of substantially transparent synthetic resin. In the particular embodiment of the invention to be described in more detail hereinafter, we teach how it is possible to fabricate a remarkably realistic simulated mosaic tile construction using as the base materials a conventional jig saw puzzle made of chip-board, cardboard, or a similar heavy paper stock, and a clear polyester type resin. As will more fully be described, the jig-saw puzzle is assembled in the usual manner on a fiat table surface, whereupon the liquid resin is poured and spread directly over the upper face of the puzzle to form a relatively thick coating over the entire surface. We have found that some of the resin will separate or run down between the puzzle pieces and that this action produces a multiplicity of results in reference to determining the ultimate physical and visual characteristics of the end product. More specifically, the resin will of course form a grouting in the hairline cracks and sufficient quantities of the liquid will also seep under at least the marginal edges of the jig-saw pieces to permanently bond the latter to the table surface on which the puzzle has been prepositioned. The flow or seepage of the resin into the hairline cracks also results in each puzzle or tile piece being coated with a thinner layer of resin adjacent its marginal edges than at its center portions. Therefore, when the clear resin dries and hardens, each of the individual puzzle or tile pieces is formed with a rounded crown of resin coating which creates highlights and shadows that very realistically simulate the rounded or crowned surface contour of actual ceramic tile pieces.

There is also another phenomenon that has been observed to occur due to seepage of resin into the hairline cracks separating the puzzle pieces in instances where the puzzle or tile pieces are made of relatively absorbent paper stock or similar material. In this connection, the cardboard or chip-board pieces will tend to absorb a certain amount of the resin adjacent their peripheral margins Where the original sheet of paper stock has been die-cut to form the multiplicity of individual puzzle pieces. It has, therefore, been found that the relatively heavy impregnation of each piece around its peripheral margins will tend to deepen the tone of color painted or lithographed on the upper surface of the puzzle. As a consequence, each puzzle piece looked upon individually will appear to have deeper tones of color around its periphery than toward its center portions. This difference in color tone effect gives great depth and a three-dimensional effect to the end product.

A principal object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide a mosaic and method of making same which can be made to appear as a remarkably realistic duplication of a polished mosaic tile work.

More specific objects of the invention are to provide a 3,l7 i,893 Patented Mar. 23, 1965 simulated ceramic mosaic tile-like construction that is inexpensive to manufacture, that requires substantially little skill, and that may be fabricated to form items of utility, particularly table surfaces which because of their heavy overlayer or coating of durable plastic may be employed for indoor or outdoor use.

Further objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following detailed specification, in which:

FIGURE 1 shows in perspective one embodiment of the product provided by the present invention.

FIGURE 2 shows in top elevation an enlarged section of the product illustrated in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 shows a sectional side view of an enlarged segment of the product illustrated in FIGURE 1 and is taken along line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

The present invention may be more easily understood by considering the preferred embodiment as being composed of three major elements designated by letters particularly as shown in FIGURE 3. These major elements comprise a plurality of resin supporting members A, a base or supporting surface B for said resin supporting members A, and a resin layer C coated on the resin supporting members A. The resin supporting members A are disposed on base B in closely positioned relationship and the resin layer C which covers a major portion of the surface of members A imparts a ceramic tile-like appearance to resin supporting members A. Resin layer C also serves to bond resin supporting members A to each other and to base B.

The resin supporting members A in the embodiment shown in the drawings are conventional jig-saw puzzle pieces and are made out of cardboard. Piece 10 has a top 11, a bottom 12, and sides 13. There are, however, a multitude of suitable sizes and shapes for the resin supporting members A. Thus, top 11 may be curved instead of fiat and in some instances the curvature may accent and bring out the desired simulated ceramic effect. Piece 10 may similarly have straight sides instead of being irregular and interlocking as is true of jig-saw puzzle pieces 10. The interlocking nature of pieces 10 is particularly Well shown in FIGURE 2. The only requirement for pieces it is that they have enough surface area to support a sufficient quantity of resin capable of forming the resin configuration to be hereinafter described.

It has been found that a flat, relatively thin design is suitable for pieces 10. This design is found in the conventional jig-saw puzzle pieces 10. Thus, the size of conventional jig-saw puzzle pieces 10, which are generally about one inch across at the widest point on top 11 and have a side 13 of about /8 inch in height, are suitable for use in the present invention. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the foregoing dimensions are subject to a great deal of permissible latitude.

Pieces 10 are assembled in conventional closely spaced substantially abutting interlocking relationship. This normally leaves an irregular channel 14 or hair line crack defined by the adjacent sides 13 and located between all adjacent puzzle pieces 10. The function of irregular channel 14 will be described later.

Base B is made from any desired material and is shown as a Wooden surface. It is contemplated that base or supporting surface B will be designed to just fit the overall outside perimeter of the closely spaced pieces 10 although variations in design to suit the individual are unlimited. Supporting surface B will generally be designed with the end purpose of the simulated ceramic mosaic in mind. Thus, if it is to be hung on a wall, base B would be some type of a frame. The embodiment illustrated in FIG- URE 1 shows the mosaic employed as the decoration for a table top 15 having table legs 16 and 17 and two other legs not shown. Optionally, the completed mosaic is bordered by a molding 18 which serves to protect the edges of the mosaic from being broken and also to improve the overall appearance of the construction.

it should be pointed out that while the preferred embodiment employs a base or supporting surface B, constructions which do not have such a base are still to be considered within the scope of the present invention. For example, a construction having resin supporting members and a resin coating of suflicient strength because of the type and thickness of resin employed, and therefore does not require an external support or base, is contemplated.

Each of puzzle pieces has a section of a visual display such as a section of a design or an image visible on the top 11 thereof. When the puzzle pieces 10 are disposed in interlocking and ordered relationship, the solved puzzle may be viewed and the total composed visual display seen as illustrated in FIGURE 1. Puzzle pieces 10 are preferably disposed on base B in a coplanar relationship. However, other special relationships are contemplated by the present invention such as may be found when employing a base B with a curving surface. It will also be obvious that pieces 10 be free of any design or image or other visual display.

Resin layer C covers a major portion of the surfaces of pieces 10 including substantially all of tops 11 and sides 13. The part of layer C disposed on top 11 of pieces 14 is present in the shape of a rounded crown. This is due to the fact that resin layer C is thicker in the central portion 19 of top 11 than it is in the vicinity of the peripheral portions 20 of top 11. This differential thickness of layer C in contact with top 11 results partially from the surface tension of the layer C during the time it is being applied in the form of a liquid as will be more fully described hereinafter. In addition, when resin layer C is in its initial liquid state, it tends to flow from peripheral areas 29 of top 11 down into channel 14. This leaves less resin in the peripheral areas 20 than in the central portion 1h of top 11 and thereby produces the foregoing differential thickness.

The configuration of a rounded crown present in that part of layer C which is in contact with top 11 is responsible for creating the illusion that pieces 10 are ceramic tiles. As a result, the completed puzzle shown in FIG- URE 1 appears to be composed of a plurality of ceramic tiles and resembles a ceramic mosaic to an amazing degree.

Resin coating C has yet another important function. As previously mentioned, the resin flows down channel 14. It also usually seeps to an appreciable extent beneath bottom 12 of piece 10 and thus is simultaneously in contact with bottom 12 and base B. The resin in the foregoing two locations serves to bond pieces 10 to each other and to base B.

Besides assuming a rounded crown configuration on top 11 and thus imparting a simulated ceramic tile-like appearance to pieces 16, resin C creates the ceramic illusion in yet another manner. Sides 13 of cardboard puzzle pieces 10 are porous and resin permeable as compared with the glazed top 11 which is relatively resin non-permeable. When resin C flows down channel It), a portion of resin C permeates through side 13 and into the interior portions 21 of piece 10 proximate to channel 14. The resin C present in interior portions 21 causes the appearance of puzzle pieces 10 to be deeper in color in the areas where resin C is present. Thus, there is a color gradient between interior portions 21 and the remainder of puzzle pieces 10. This color gradient is visible to the human eye and tends to increase the apparent depth of individual pieces 10, further heightening the illusion that pieces 10 are ceramic tile-like.

In addition, resin coating C tends to cause top 11 of piece 10 itself to become crown shaped. This occurs as resin coating C dries and hardens, at which time it contracts the interior portions 21 where it has permeated. The result is a shortening of sides 13 and the creation of a crown effect on top 11.

The foregoing simulated ceramic tile-like construction may be prepared by the method provided by the present invention. The construction may be made by optionally providing a supporting surface or base as is discussed above. A plurality of resin supporting members are dis posed in closely positioned relationship and a coating of resin applied over a substantial portion of the surface of the resin supporting members.

In the case of the preferred embodiment, the resin supporting members selected are conventional jig-saw puzzle pieces and are disposed on a supporting surface which comprises a table top with legs.

The method of this invention is practiced, in the case of the illustrated construction, by applying at least one layer of a translucent laminating resin over substantially all of the surface of the puzzle pieces. The result is the creation of a ceramic tile-like appearance in the puzzle pieces.

As mentioned above, differential permeation of the resin in various parts of the resin supporting members heightens the ceramic illusion. The desired degree and areas of resin permeation and its attendant effect may be accomplished by the present method by preselecting the resin supporting members with this end in mind. Thus, by preselecting the members for the portions of their surface which are porous and for the degree of porosity of those porous portions, any desired effect may be ob tained when practicing the present invention.

Any resin having the properties of being iiowable, preferably at room temperature, and which may then be cured to sufficient hardness to be durable under the conditions of the intended use of the mosaic is suitably used. A group of suitable resins is herein referred to as laminating resins to differentiate them from resins used for diverse other purposes including adhesives or in the eX- trusion of plastics to make products of various shapes.

In particular it is preferred to use laminating resins of the polyester type which may be cured at room temperature. One very suitable example is Laminac polyester resin 4116 which is manufactured by American Cyanamid Company. Laminac resins are thermosetting and are a group of reactive polyester copolymers. They are supplied in the form of liquids. This resin and others of the same variety are designed to be catalyzed prior to being applied to the resin supporting members. Any of the catalysts known in the art for such purposes may be used. Suitable examples include the organic pproxides such as methylethyl ketone peroxide and the ire.

The resin is applied in any manner which results in a layer being formed over a major portion of the surface of the resin supporting members. It is preferred that the resin be so applied that it covers substantially all of the tops 11 and sides 13 of puzzle pieces 10 at least in the case of when the construction of the preferred embodiment is made. When this procedure is followed, sufficient resin will necessarily flow beneath the resin sup porting members to create a sufficiently strong bond between the resin supporting members and the base or supporting members when one is used.

One suitable way of applying the resin in accordance with the present method is to add the catalyst selected to a container containing the particular resin selected. The catalyst and resin are then mixed and the contents of the container poured in a continuing stream over the resin supporting members. A small amount of the contents of the container is reserved. The resin is smoothed into a layer over the resin supporting members with a cardboard squeegee. The small portion of the reserved contents of the container is then used to do any necessary touching up in the coating. The resin is then allowed to set or harden. Any bubbles that may form are pricked with a pin and any parts of the supporting members that may float up are pushed down.

The length of time necessary for producing a hard surface will depend on the particular resin chosen and Will usually be about one to three days. In most cases the time can be accelerated by subjecting the applied resin to heat. After a period of about one month the surface will have hardened to the point where it is as hard as glass.

In the case of the preferred embodiment, the table top, legs, and molding may be stained or varnished or otherwise decorated to suit the individuals taste.

lthough the foregoing inventions has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be practiced within the spirit of the invention as limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed:

1. A simulated ceramic tile mosaic construction comprising a single layer of a plurality of closely positioned resin supporting members and a continuous coating of resin over a substantial portion of the surface of said members, the coating over each member being thicker in the central portion than at the peripheral portions thereof to define a rounded crown of resin thereover, and thereby to impart a ceramic tile appearance to said members.

2. A construction in accordance with claim 1 wherein said resin supporting members are disposed on a supporting surface.

3. A simulated ceramic tile mosaic construction comprising a supporting surface, a plurality of fiat resin supporting members disposed on said supporting surface in closely positioned substantially coplanar relationship, and a continuous coating of laminating resin over a major portion of the surface of said members including substantially all of the tops and sides of said members forming a ceramic tile curved top on each of said resin supporting members.

4. A simulated ceramic tile mosaic construction comprising a plurality of relatively thin, flat, resin supporting members each having a section of an overall visual display imprinted on its top surface, said resin supporting members being disposed in closely positioned substantially coplanar relationship and in such a manner as to form an ordered total visual display composed of said display sections, and a coating of laminating resin over a major portion of the surface of said members including substantially all of the tops and sides of said members, the coating over each member being thicker in the central portion than at the peripheral portions thereof to define a rounded crown of resin thereover, thereby to impart a ceramic tile appearance to said members,

5. A construction in accordance with clainr 4 wherein said resin supporting members are differentially resin permeable and said resin is permeated through a part of said members thereby increasing the illusion of said members appearing tobe ceramic.

6. A simulated ceramic tile mosaic construction comprising a plurality of jig-saw puzzle pieces having a portion of a visual display on one side of each piece, a supporting surface for said pieces, said pieces being disposed on said surface in interlocking substantially coplanar relaitonship in such a manner as to form an ordered total visual display from said display portions, and a coating of translucent laminating resin over substantially all of said pieces, the coating over each piece being thicker in the central portion than at the peripheral portions thereof to define a rounded crown of resin thereover, thereby to impart a ceramic tile appearance to said pieces and to bond said pieces to each other and to said surface.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 20,607 Tomec Dec. 28, 1937 1,531,789 Jennings et al Mar. 31, 1925 1,997,500 Swarovski Apr. 9, 1935 2,156,566 Kirschraun May 2, 1939 2,214,387 Snyder Sept. 10, 1940 2,245,047 Odell June 10, 1941 2,572,269 Maier Oct. 23, 1951 2,637,995 Mann May 12, 1953 2,668,328 Porter Feb. 9, 1954 3,025,626 Schurnacher Mar. 20, 1962 3,056,224 Almy et a1 Oct. 2, 1962

Claims (1)

1. A SIMULATED CERAMIC TILE MOSAIC CONSTRUCTION COMPRISING A SINGLE LAYER OF A PLURALITY OF CLOSELY POSITIONED RESIN SUPPORTING MEMBERS AND A CONTINUOUS COATING OF RESIN OVER A SUBSTANTIAL PORTION OF THE SURFACE OF SAID MEMBERS, THE COATING OVER EACH MEMBER BEING THICKER IN THE CENTRAL PORTION THAN AT THE PERIPHERAL PORTIONS THEREOF TO DEFINE A ROUNDED CROWN OF RESIN THEREOVER, AND THEREBY TO IMPART A CERAMIC TILE APPEARANCE TO SAID MEMBERS.
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US3319392A (en) * 1964-06-18 1967-05-16 Tile Council Of America Flexible ceramic file unit
US3610175A (en) * 1969-06-05 1971-10-05 Wilton Brass Co Plaquelike covering members for serving pieces
US3946529A (en) * 1973-12-07 1976-03-30 Jean Chevaux Floor for sports and in particular for roller skating
US4038126A (en) * 1973-11-28 1977-07-26 Liane E. Lester Method for forming table and bench construction
FR2546451A1 (en) * 1983-05-25 1984-11-30 Borderie Olivier Method of applying photographs to pottery tiles
BE1000334A3 (en) * 1987-02-23 1988-10-25 Bvba Interwood Decorative inlaid panel - has plastic plates forming mosaic pieces glued and covered by polyester
US5202166A (en) * 1990-09-06 1993-04-13 Crompton Todd F Composite structure
US6659023B2 (en) 2001-01-26 2003-12-09 Glenn Lisa Saltzman Tile-topped furniture with removable tiles
US20040163749A1 (en) * 2003-02-14 2004-08-26 Verschoor Gerrit Leendert Method and manufacturer for producing mosaic, using a pattern consisting of multiple piece-segregated patterns underneath a transparent mosaic base
US20040200392A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Sun Isle Inc. Table top and process of making the same
US20040200391A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-10-14 Sun Isle Inc. Table top and process of making the same
US20050194738A1 (en) * 2002-03-12 2005-09-08 Simmons Terry L. Three-dimensional puzzle
US20070257431A1 (en) * 2006-05-03 2007-11-08 Shih-Hung Chuang Structure of pieces of a 3D jigsaw puzzle
US20080305295A1 (en) * 2006-12-20 2008-12-11 Welker Brian H Mosaic
US20090218029A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Ezer Cohen Process for transforming printed works to a composition of tiles
US20110100270A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2011-05-05 Tom Atkins Aluminum table with flat upper surface
US20120280450A1 (en) * 2009-11-30 2012-11-08 Ravensburger Spieleverlag Gmbh Self-stabilizing jigsaw puzzle
US8307769B1 (en) 2009-07-31 2012-11-13 Mity-Lite, Inc. Plastic and plywood laminate table with drop corner
US8550012B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2013-10-08 Mity-Lite, Inc. Leg locking and folding mechanism for folding table
US8671850B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2014-03-18 Mity-Lite, Inc. Convertible tabletop with pivotal modesty panel
US20140246832A1 (en) * 2011-06-03 2014-09-04 Gateway Arch Inc. Jigsaw puzzle and manufacturing method thereof

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USRE20607E (en) * 1937-12-28 Building material
US2156566A (en) * 1935-04-16 1939-05-02 Patent & Licensing Corp Building unit and method of manufacture thereof
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US2572269A (en) * 1946-09-05 1951-10-23 Wellington W Maier Method of making matrices for simulated log structures
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US2668328A (en) * 1953-04-08 1954-02-09 U S Chemical Corp Method of casting patterned plastic sheets
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US3056224A (en) * 1958-12-09 1962-10-02 Armstrong Cork Co Tessellated surface covering

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US1531789A (en) * 1925-03-31 Process of imitating brick in miniature models
USRE20607E (en) * 1937-12-28 Building material
US1997500A (en) * 1931-06-09 1935-04-09 Swarovski Daniel Method of manufacturing new articles of jewelry and ornaments
US2156566A (en) * 1935-04-16 1939-05-02 Patent & Licensing Corp Building unit and method of manufacture thereof
US2214387A (en) * 1938-11-28 1940-09-10 Mastic Asphalt Corp Siding material
US2245047A (en) * 1939-06-15 1941-06-10 Leslie S Odell Brick simulating siding panel
US2572269A (en) * 1946-09-05 1951-10-23 Wellington W Maier Method of making matrices for simulated log structures
US2637995A (en) * 1948-12-22 1953-05-12 Meyercord Co Surface-covering tile
US2668328A (en) * 1953-04-08 1954-02-09 U S Chemical Corp Method of casting patterned plastic sheets
US3025626A (en) * 1958-10-07 1962-03-20 Gilbert Co A C Scenic tiles for miniature railroad
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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3319392A (en) * 1964-06-18 1967-05-16 Tile Council Of America Flexible ceramic file unit
US3610175A (en) * 1969-06-05 1971-10-05 Wilton Brass Co Plaquelike covering members for serving pieces
US4038126A (en) * 1973-11-28 1977-07-26 Liane E. Lester Method for forming table and bench construction
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