US1531789A - Process of imitating brick in miniature models - Google Patents

Process of imitating brick in miniature models Download PDF

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US1531789A
US1531789A US1531789DA US1531789A US 1531789 A US1531789 A US 1531789A US 1531789D A US1531789D A US 1531789DA US 1531789 A US1531789 A US 1531789A
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brick
grooves
board
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plastic
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41MPRINTING, DUPLICATING, MARKING, OR COPYING PROCESSES; COLOUR PRINTING
    • B41M1/00Inking and printing with a printer's forme
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41MPRINTING, DUPLICATING, MARKING, OR COPYING PROCESSES; COLOUR PRINTING
    • B41M1/00Inking and printing with a printer's forme
    • B41M1/12Stencil printing; Silk-screen printing

Description

March 31. 1925.

A. JENNINGS ET AL PROCESS OF IMITATING BRICK IN MINIATURE MODELS Filed Feb. 7. 192,4 -2'Sheets-Sheet 1 March 31. 1925. 1,531,789 A. JENNINGS ET AL PROCESS OF IMITATING BRICK IN MINIATURE MODELS I Filed Feb. .7. 1924 z Sheets-511661. g

JJQVENTQRS.

Patented Mar. 31,1925.

ALLEN JENNINGS AND HELEN JEN INGS, or cHAGRIN FALLS/0111c.

PROCESS OF IMITATING BRICK IN MINIATURE MODELS.

Application filed February 7, 1924. SeriaiNo. 691,320.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, ALLEN JENNINcs and HELEN JENNINGS, citizens of the United States, residing a Chagrin Falls, county of Cuyahoga, and State of Ohio, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Processes of Imitating Brick in Miniature Models, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

The practice of those engaged in the building arts, particularly architects and those engaged in the building material business.

such as brick and tile manufacturers, is to .have models of dwellings and buildings reproduced in miniature which embody and set out the features or products in which they are most interested. For instance, if an architect is having a model built, the general design and'outward appearance of the miniature is what he would be the most interested in and in this instance, the manner of reproducing the outward appearance of a'dwelling, particularly of a dwelling having stucco or brick walls, in miniature, becomes of major importance when consideration is given to the cost of the model in relation to its utility.

,, The general object of the present invention, therefore, is the provision of a process for reproducing the outer appearance of brick and tile wall structures. whereby various textures and colors of brick, tile and J stucco may-be accurately reproduced in miniature models of dwellings and buildings.

Our invention contemplates the use of pigs ments ground in a suitable vehicle such as oil, which may become partly oxidized or congealed whereby a thick gummy mass may be obtained which may be applied to a supporting medium such as wood. fiber board and the like. In reproducing brick or tile in miniature, the chosen supporting medium is preferably wooden slabs or boards of a thickness corresponding to the thickness of wall in the miniature model. These slabs may be first grooved to produce slots in the surface thereof, spaced apart to correspond to horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortar I joints of the brick or tile. The pigment of .brick'; Fig. 11 is a cross-sectional View;

coating may then be applied thereover and subsequently scored or grooved coincident with the underlying grooves or slots in the supporting medium.

ing parallel grooves and intermittent transverse parallel grooves in the applied pigments in spaced relation to correspond tothe miniature dimensions of each brick or' tile in the wall and thereby reproduce or imitate the horizontal and vertical mortar beds of the brick wall in miniature.

Other objects of our invention will hereinafter be set forth in the following description of our processa-nd of'the accompanying drawings illustrating a preferred apparatus for carrying out the steps thereof. The essential characteristics of our invention is summarized in the claims.

Fig. 1 of the drawings is a plan view of an apparatus for forming parallel grooves in a pigment supporting medium, preferably wood or board; Fig. 2 is a fragmentary cross-v sectional view taken substantially along the line 22 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 .is a fragmentary cross-sectional elevation taken substantially along the line 33 of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a rotary tool for use in an apparatus such as is disclosed in Figs. 1 and 3 and which is specifically for the purpose of forming alternate scores in the pigment supporting medium; Fig. 5 is a ,crosssectional fragmentary plan view showing the use of the tool illustrated in Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is a corner. fragment of a scored pigment supporting slab; Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the slabpiece shown in Fig. 6 with the pigment coating applied thereto; Fig. 8-is a detailed crosssectional view showing the manner of scoring the pigment when once applied to the score slab; Fig. 9 shows an alternate method of forming the scores in the pigment when on the slab; Fig. 10 isa view similar to 8, showing, however, the use of a tool performing intermittent or broken scores in IOU the pigment, which scores correspond to the vertical mortar joints in each horizontal row similar to Fig; 3 showing the use of a plurality of such tools as are illustrated in Fig. 10; Fig. 12 is a perspective view of an alternate form of tool for manually forming the intermittent scores in the pigment and slabs;

Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic representation of the scores or slots formed in a plastic supporting medium.

In carrying out the objects of our invention, we provide a method whereby a miniature reproduction of'brick and stucco may be obtained which may be of a color to correspond to the textures of brick or stucco, provi ion being made to reproduce either rough brick, scored brick, finished brick or glazed brick, and wherein we may use compositions of pigments ground in oil, and which may be mixed plain or used in combination with sand, gravel, clay or powdered marble. The mixture may be worked up to the consistency of astiff putty whence it may be applied to a supporting medium in the nature of a scored slab, preferably a wooden board ,4 thick, which dimension corresponds to the thickness of a 12 wall on a one inch to the foot scale. Various plastic coatings may be mixed which are applicable to one model. For instance, where the model is a miniature of a proposed dwelling having an exterior finish of stucco with a brick trimor stucco with a stone trim, the combinatlons' would comprise a plastic pigment of a color and texture corresponding to the particular kind of brick chosen'for the trim in the building, which. may be any type of brick and the stucco would comprise a pigment of corresponding color and general texture to that of cement or stucco finish of the building.

Miniature dwellings or models have been made wherein the-walls comprise plaster of Paris having the exterior thereof grooved or scored to form scores corresponding to the horizontal and vertical mortar joints of courses of brick. A particular advantage in our method, however, is that we obtain the advantage of a scored pigment supporting medium which we prefer to form of wood with apparatus such as is disclosed in the drawings. We find that by forming the horizontal mortar bed scores or the scores corresponding to the horizontal mortar beds in the 'wall transversely of the grain of the board, they may be formed very economically by the use of small circular milling saws mounted on an ordinary milling machine. The scores running transversely of the grain are spaced apart a distance. corresponding to the length of brick, or tile and are intermittent and staggered to represent the interbinding joints of the brick in overlying courses in the wall. \Ve may thus effect this scoring in a very satisfactory manner by special forming tools which depress portions of the wood thus forming intermittent grooves which extend in the common direction of the grain of the wood and a clean cut score is effected without causmg a tearing or splintering of the groove edges.

It will be readily understood that the grooves 15 may be formed, as illustrated in Figs. 1 to 8 inclusive, by positioning the board 15 in a holder or frame 20, the frame may be provided with any convenient means for securing the slab 16 thereto, and as shown in Fig. 1, a bar 21 is provided which may be maintained in clamped engagement with an. edge of the boardby screw members 22. This frame is of such shape and size as to be conveniently mounted upon a bed 24 of a milling machine or similar machine suitable for the purpose of rotating small circular saws 25. As shown may connect the arbor 26 to the disc 34: of

the machine spindle 35.whereby the saws may be rotated at a proper speed to mill the slots 15 in the board when the latter is moved therebeneath by the machine bed 24 and frame 20. Any suitable means for properly maintaing' the saws in rigid relation to the supporting arbor 26 may be provided, a preferred means comprising 1 key 36. In forming the transverse or intermittent slots 17, we prefer to use a tool in combination with the supporting frame 20 and arbor26 which may comprise disc members 38 mounted upon the arbor 26 with spacing rings 39 positioned therebewteen which are of a width corresponding to one half the length of the miniature brick spacing as shown in Fig. 13. The discs 38 have the peripheries thereof notched to provide projecting lugs 10 and the key-ways in these disc members are so formed that the discs may be positioned upon the mandrel 26, with alternate discs having the lugs thereof in alignment. When using this tool, it may be -mounted in a milling machine as hereinhave been previously formed by the milling 7 operation now extend parallel with the man drel, so that when the lugs 40 of the discs 38 are brought into a compressive relation with the top surface of the board 16 carried by the frame member, the gear 43 may mesh with the teeth of the rack 42 in such manner that the lugs 40 on alternate discs will form scores or grooves as shown in Fig. 5 by depressing portions of the wood panels. The lugs 40 thus make avery clean cut groove, due to the fact that the discs 38 move in the same direction as the grain of the wood. It is to be understood, however, that if desired, the use of the discs 38 may be omitted and the boa-rd milled or grooved as shown in Fig.6.

After the board is grooved in the manner shown in Figs. 1 and 5, it may then be coated with the selected pigments such as have been hereinbefore' described. In Figs. 7, a section of the board is shown as. being coated with a plastic material 50 to represent a rough bri'ck surface. The-board when thus coated, is permitted to stand for a day or two until the surfacing 50 has sufficiently set to be cut or scored. The board may then be placed again in the.frame 20 and the longitudinal slots milled in the coating as shown in Fig. 8, the board, of course, being adjusted relative to the cutters. on the mandrel 26 whereby the cutters will be in alignment with the previously formed grooves in the underlying supporting medium or board. If desired, plain disc members'fil, as shown in Fig. 9, may be mounted upon the mandrel -26 and may then roll or shear thin ribbons of the coating material 50, causing these ribbons to be positioned at the bottom of the previously formed grooves 15 thus forming pigment grooves, 15, .in the coating. which are coincident with the mill grooves in theboard.

The frame and board may then be shifted in the machine and the disc members 38 may then again be mounted upon the mandrel 26 whereupon proper registration of the lugs 40 with the intermittently formed slots extending with the grain of the board conditions the apparatus for the" formation of slots in the coating 50 which correspond to the vertical mortar joints between the brick.

As shown in Fig. 10 the lugs 40 of the disc 38 will depress short ribbons of the coating into the previously formed short slots in the board. This operation is effected by manually turning the spindle 35 in the manner hereinbefore. described.

In Fig.'12 we show an alternate form of apparatus for effecting the formation of the short slots in the coating, the continuous slots having previously been formed by a milling operation in the manner shown in Figs. 8 or v9. In the use of this device, a

' frame comprises a support for the coated board 16 while a manually manipulated upon the manual advancing of the bar 62 from one set of slots 63 to another, the bar may be shifted longitudinally, upon the for .mat'ion of each succeeding row of slots, a

distance corresponding to the width between the longitudinal slots.

If desired, all milling-and rolling operations may be eliminated in effecting the groovingof the coating 50 after it has been applied to the slotted surface of the board. In the latter case, however, the board may be milled both longitudinally and transversely as shown in Fig. 6 to form rectangles which have a length corresponding to half the lengthof a brick. It will thus be seen that when forming the grooves in the coating by the use, say, of an apparatus such as shown in Fig. 12, the longitudinal or continuous slots may be formed by a bar having an unnotched edge by simply. compressmg the coating into the slots formed in the sponding to the slot portions 64'. e find that such an apparatus is serviceable for all brick reproductions excepting glazed brick sincethe proper effect of a glazed coating would be defective, due to the fact that'the coating when applied flows into the slots formed in the board and would show in dications of the slot portions 64, even though the coating had not been scored immediately over these slot portions. This may be readily understood by referring to Fig. 13 wherein the grooves 15, which correspond to the horizontal mortar beds of the brick wall, are shown as being formed transversely ofthe grain of the board or slab 16, while the grooves 17 extend longitudinally of the In forming the short slots in the grain and are intermittent or alternately staggered to represent the vertical mortar *or slots in the surface thereof which correspond to the horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortar joints of the wall to be imiform to the slotted surface of said supporting medium, drying the plastic material when so applied and removing those portions of the plastic material which lie immediately over the scores or slots formed in the. supporting medium to form configuratated, applying said material while in plastic tions therein corresponding to the miniature shape of the exposed surface of a brick or a mortar joints between the brick in the wall,

applying,pigment coatings to the scored surface of the board which in texture correspond to the texture of the bricks to be represented and removing those portions of the coatings which lie immediately over the scores-in the board and filling the slots formed by such removed with a plastic material which is appearance is representative of the mortar in the horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortar joints of a brick wall,

3. A process of imitating the outer appearance of a brick building wall in miniature Which comprises forming a plastic mass from material having a general texture corxresponding to thetexture of the brick to be imitated, applying said material while in plastic form to a solid supporting medium and scoring the plastic material to form configurations therein corresponding to the miniature shape of the exposed surface of thebrick.

l. A method of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises forming a. plastic mass from material having a general texture corresponding to the texture'of the material Y being imitated, scoring the surface of a plastic supporting medium, by forming grooves or slots in the surface thereof which correspond to the horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortar joints of the wall to be imitated, applying rSELlCl material while in plastic form to the slotted surface of said supporting medium,.drying the plastic .material when so applied and removing those portions of the plastic material which lie immediately over the scores or slots formed in the supporting medium to form configurations therein corresponding to the miniature shape-of the exposed surfaceof a brick or tile when in a wall and filling said slot with a material of a texture and color corresponding to the texture and color of the mortar beds in the brick wall to be imitated.

5. A method of imitating the outer appearance of a brick wall which comprises forming slots in a surface of a plastic supporting board, the slots-being proportioned and spaced relative to each other so as to represent the mortar joints between the brick in the wall, applying coatings to the scored surface of the board, which in texture corresponds to the texture of the bricks to be represented and removing those portions of the coatings which lie immediately over the scores in the board.

6. The process of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises scoring the surface of a plastic supporting medium by forming grooves. therein horizontally and transversely of the medium, the spacing of the grooves being such as to correspond to the horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortarjoints of the wall 'to be imitated, preparing a plastic medium by including the use of a pigment which, when mixed in the plastic material will impart a color thereto,

-7. A process of imitating the outer ap-' pearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises forming a plastic mass of a material having a general texture corresponding to the texture of the brick or tile to be imitated, applying said material while in a plastic condition to a solid supporting medium and treating the surface of the plastic material with fine sand one like material to give it a surface correspondi i Y to the surface of the material in the wall being imitated.

.8. The process of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises milling equidistantly spaced apart grooves in the surface of the plastic supporting medium, forming intermittent transverse grooves therein, applying plastic material to the grooved surface of the supporting medium, drying'the plastic material after being applied, removing those portions of the material which lie over the parallel continuous grooves by a milling operation and removing those portions of the plastic material which lie over the intermittent grooves by depressing those portions-into the intermittent grooves formed in the plastic supporting-medium. 9. The method of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which includes the steps of forming a plastic mass from materialwhich will have a tex-j I continuous parallel'extending grooves which extend transversely of the grain of theboard, forming intermittent grooves transversely of the parallel grooves by makingdepressions therein which extend parallel with the grain of the board, applying the. plastic material to the board when so scored, removing those portions of the plastic material lying over the grooves by the same milling and depressing operations whicheffeet the formation of the grooves in the board.

10. The process of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises scoring the surface of a plastic supporting medium by forming grooves therein horizontally and transversely of the medium, the spacing of the grooves being such as to correspond to the horizontal mortar beds and vertical mortar joints of the wall to be imitated, prepar ing a plastic medium by including the use of a pigment which, when mixed in the plastic material, will impart a color thereto, corresponding to the color of the tile or brick in the wall to be imitated, applying said plastic material to the scored surface of said plastic supporting medium by spreading it over the grooves and intermediate surfaces thereof, treating said plastic material when so applied to give it a texture corresponding to the texture of the tile or brick in the wall being imitated, removing those portions of the plastic material which lie over the grooves formed in the supporting medium and filling the grooves with a material which will impart the appearance of mortar thereto.

11. A process of imitating the outer appearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises forming a plastic mass of an oil and pigment having a general texture corresponding to the-texture of the wall to be imitated, applying said material while in plastic condition to a solid supporting medium and treating .the surface of the plastic material to give it a physi cal appearance corresponding to the physical appearance of the material in the wall being imitated. r

12. The process of imitating the outer z'xppearance of a building wall in miniature which comprises milling equidistantly spaced apart grooves in the surface of the plastic srqpporting medium, forming inter-,

appearance of a building wall in miniat-ure which includes the steps of forming a plastic mass from material which will have a texture corresponding to thetexture of the. material to be imitated in the wall, scoring a board by a milling opera-- tion to form continuous parallel extending grooves which extend transversely of the grain of the board, forming intermittent grooves transversely of the parallel grooves,

by forming depressions which extend parallel with the grain of the board, applying the plastic material of the board when so scored, removing those portions of the plastic material from the outer plain thereof by the same milling and depressing operation which effects the formation of the grooves in the board, and applving a material to the grooves which will be representative of the mortar joints in the wall. In testimony whereof, we hereunto aflix our signatures.

ALLEN JENNINGS. HELEN JENNINGS.

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3174893A (en) * 1961-01-17 1965-03-23 Idella R Church Simulated ceramic tile-like mosaic construction
US4201807A (en) * 1978-07-11 1980-05-06 Rocca Anthony A Accessory item
US4296154A (en) * 1980-02-08 1981-10-20 Ibberson Robert B Strip brick facing material
US20070071949A1 (en) * 2002-11-12 2007-03-29 Kronotec Ag Process for producing a structured decoration in a woodbased-material board

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3174893A (en) * 1961-01-17 1965-03-23 Idella R Church Simulated ceramic tile-like mosaic construction
US4201807A (en) * 1978-07-11 1980-05-06 Rocca Anthony A Accessory item
US4296154A (en) * 1980-02-08 1981-10-20 Ibberson Robert B Strip brick facing material
US20070071949A1 (en) * 2002-11-12 2007-03-29 Kronotec Ag Process for producing a structured decoration in a woodbased-material board

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