US2911984A - Holders and filters for tobacco smoking - Google Patents

Holders and filters for tobacco smoking Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2911984A
US2911984A US45734954A US2911984A US 2911984 A US2911984 A US 2911984A US 45734954 A US45734954 A US 45734954A US 2911984 A US2911984 A US 2911984A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
smoke
filter
holder
lter
cartridge
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Gerard Merwin
Lester Seeleg
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Aquafilter Corp
Original Assignee
Aquafilter Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F13/00Appliances for smoking cigars or cigarettes
    • A24F13/02Cigar or cigarette holders
    • A24F13/04Cigar or cigarette holders with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke
    • A24F13/06Cigar or cigarette holders with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke filters

Description

M. GERARD ET AL HOLDERS AND FILTERS FOR ToBAcco SMOKING Nov, 10, 1959 Filed spt. 21, 1954 eo, TEQ,

L55 INVENTORS.

T Toe/VE K MEew/N EQA 555A EQ' um NM UnitedStates Pam HOLDERS AND FILTERS FOR TOBACCO SMOKING Mervvin vGerard and Seeleg Lester, Los Angeles, Calif., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Aquafilter Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Application September 21, 1954, Serial No. 457,349

l5 Claims. (Cl. 131--208) The present invention relates to smoking apparatus, and more Vparticularly to holders and filters for articles embodying tobacco, such as cigarettes, cigars and pipes, 'which are effective in removing harmful ingredients from tobacco smoke during the process of smoking.

Accumulated evidence by competent medical authorities indicates that the death rate from diseases of the 4coronary arteries and the death rate from cancer are much higher among persons with a history of regular cigarette smoking than `among persons who did not smoke. YNicotine is believed to be the primary agent in cigarette smoke hastening death due to coronary artery disease. Attempts have been made to reduce the amount of nicotine and other ingredients in tobacco smoke absorbed by the smoker by causing the smoke to pass through filters, 'which are eit er embodied in a filter type cigarette or in a holder for the cigarette, cigar or pipe tobacco. Such filters remove a certain proportion of nicotine and tars from the smoke, but the amount remaining and passing into the smokers system is still far greater than a safe value and is capable of causing objective damage to the heart. v

`Mere reduction by a filter of the nicotine reaching a smoker is not enough, unlessthe tilter vreduces the nicotine i'n the smoke to at least the safe value given above.'

In addition to nicotine, the tars absorbed bya'person may 'have any adverse effect on his health. Moreover,

'the "relatively high temperatures of the smoke passing into the smokers'mouth may produce harm. It is known 'that such'high temperatures pr ducea burning or a biti'n'g sensation, and render smoking less enjoyable.

4In accordance with the present inventionl there is provided a smoking 'filter adapted to effectively remove from smoke, "such as cigarette smoke, the above harmful ingredients, and bring the amount of such ingredients passed b'ythe filter down well withirra tolerable limit. At the saine time 'thisefect is accomplished withoutsigniiicantly removing moisture from the smoke, and without impairing the enjoyment of smoking. Thesev effects and benefits are obtained by providing -a vfilter comprising a mixture'of fibrous material, atportin of which is non-absorbent to liquid, and a portion of which'is absorbent. This 'fibrous filter isfurther substantially saturated with 'ai'liquid in which nicotine is-miscible. In this filter it is primarily the liquid thatacts to treat the smoke, while ,thehun-absorbent fibers provide,in the otherwise saturated filter, the necessarypassagesfor drawing smoke therethrough. Whereas the presence of absorbent `fibers in'a'smoking filter would normally tend to remove natural moisture fromthe smoke, this adverse effect is not obtained by the present Etitte/noue -tothe -fact that such fibers are here substantially saturated with'liquid. 4 Accordingly it is an object 'of lthe present invention 4to'"provide an'improvedfilter to be usedbyip'e'rsons smok- 'ing=tobacco, which is capable'of'redu'cing the amount of' nicotine-'in the smoke passingto the'persons mouth t0' a safe value.

Aice

Another object of the invention vis to provide an improved lter to be used in connection with smoking cigarettes, cigars, `and the llike, which is capable of removing a larger quantity of tars and other potentially harmful substances from the smoke, rendering the smoke entering the persons mouth relatively harmless to the persons system. p

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved fllter to lbe used by persons smoking tobacco, which not only'is capable of effectively removing harnful ingredients from the smoke, but which cools the smoke considera-bly.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a filter to be used by a person smoking tobacco, which does not become clogged nor lose its effectiveness after repeated use.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a filter effective in removing nicotine, tars and other matter detrimental to the health of the smoker, in which the filter offers relatively low resistance to the passage of smoke therethrough. y

Still another object of the invention is to provide a holder or filter for articles of tobacco, in which the smoke is prevented from by-passing the filter, all of it being forced to pass through the filter.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a smoking iilter for cigarettes, or the like, which removes a substantial portion of the tars and nicotine from the smoke, without materially reducing the moisture content thereof.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form in which it may be embodied. This form is shown inthe drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. It will now'be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but'it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense,.since the scope of Athe invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring'to' the drawings:

vFigure lis alongitudinal section through a cigarette holder and filter embodying the invention;

Pig. 2 is an exploded sectional view of 'thelhol'der and filter disclosed in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged'longitudinal section through 'the cigarette holding and eiecting portion of the devicedis- 'closed in Figs, l and v2, the ejector occupying another Voperative position;

Fig. 4'is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line'4-'4 on Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 "is' 'an 'enlarged cross-section taken along the yline"5'-5 on Fig. l;

Fig. 6 is 'an enlarged cross-section'takenvalo'ng the line 6-6 on Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the li'ne 7 7 on Fig. l, the forward end of the filter cartridge beingvomitted.

lThe cigarette '-holder. and filter disclosed in the drawings has vbeen particularly designedfor use in `holding cigarettes and filteringthe products of combustion zemanating therefrom. -It is to Vbeunderstood, :howevenithat such specific illustration represents merely one 'embodiment of the invention, which can be` readily adaptedwfor use in the smoking of cigars and pipe tobacco.v 7Moreover, the filter portion of theapparatusl can be Aused-in connection with articlesof tobacco, such as cigarettes, in the absence of the holder.

As specificallyadisclosed, the cigarette holder. 10 iscof generally tubularform, being made in severaksections. Thus, a rear body portion 11 may be made of a suitable material; such asa synthetic resin, this'rear body portieri having a metallic bushing 12 pressed into a forward chamber portion 13, adapted to receive a filter cartridge. The bushing has an intermediate outwardly directed flange 14 abutting the end of the body section 11, and also a forward externally threaded position 15 adapted to mesh with internal threads provided on the rear part 16 of a forward tubular body section 17 adapted to abut the bushing flange 14.

The rear body member 11 has a central passage 18 therethrough through which smoke from the chamber 13 can be drawn, this body member having a mouthpiece 19 of suitable form that can be held conveniently in the mouth of the smoker. The forward body member 17 has a reduced diameter cylindrical portion 20 that forms an inner shoulder 21 with the remainder of the forward body member. A cigarette C is insertable within the reduced diameter portion 20 of the forward body member, the rearward movement of the cigarette into this body member being limited by its engagement with a transverse pin or ejector rod 22 extending across the reduced diameter portion 20 through opposed axial, inclined cam slots 23 therein and into a circumferential groove 24 in an ejector sleeve 25 that is rotatably and axially movable upon the reduced diameter portion. The ejector sleeve 25 may occupy a rearward position n engagement with a shoulder 26 on the forward member 17, allowing a cigarette to be inserted and retained within the cigarette holding portion 20 of the forward body member (Fig. l), or the ejector sleeve 25 may be turned, which will effect axial forward feeding of the sleeve and the ejector rod 22 along the reduced diameter portion and within the cam slots, in order to effect removal of the cigarette from the holder (Fig. 3).

Despite the fact that the ejector rod 22 extends through the cam slots 23 and into the circumferential groove 24 in the ejector sleeve, it cannot move relative to the ejector sleeve 25 since it is forced into holding engagement with the base 24a of the ejector sleeve groove 24, as, for example, by inserting the rod 22 through the cam slots 23 and into the groove 24 and then striking it in a direction transversely of the longitudinal axis of the holder, which will press its ends firmly against the base 24a of the groove, uniting the rod to the ejector sleeve.

Inadvertent movement of the ejector sleeve 25 along the forward body portion 20 is prevented by a retainer device, which may be in the form of a split snap or contractile ring 30 received within a circumferential groove 31 in the ejector sleeve 25 and frictionally engaging the periphery of the reduced diameter portion 20 of the forward body member 17.

The forward portion of the rear body member 11, the bushing 12 pressed into the rear body member, and the rear portion of the forward body member 17 together form a chamber 13 for the reception of a filter device 32 through which all of the cigarette smoke drawn into the holder must pass before entering the smokers mouth. The filter device includes a cartridge 33 of generally cylindrical form, having a rearward portion 34 adapted to slidably t within the bushing 12 and a forward portion 35 of greater diameter than the rearward portion, for reception within the chamber part provided by the forward body member, which is of greater diameter than the internal diameter of the bushing 12. The rearward and forward portions 34, 35 of the cartridge are interconnected by a transverse shoulder 36 adapted to abut and seal against the forward end 37 of the metallic bushing. The filter device 32 is insertable within the bushing 12 when the forward body member 17 has been unthreaded and removed completely from the bushing, the forward body member then being threaded onto the bushing to the extent at which its rearward end abuts the tiange 14, at which time the internal shoulder 21 will engage the forward end of the cartridge 33 and compress the shoulder 36 into sealing engagement with the end 37 of the bushing, thereby preventing passage of smoke from the cig arette in the holder around the exterior of the cartridge.

The cartridge 33 contains a filtering material 38, which is confined therein against endwise movement by a rear inwardly directed flange 39 of the cartridge, across which extends a diametrically disposed cross-piece 40. The filter material 38 may be inserted through the forward end of the cartridge until the rear portion of the filter material engages the flange 39 and cross-piece 40, whereupon forward tabs 41 at the peripheral portion of the cartridge may be bent inwardly, to partially overlap the forward end of the filter material and prevent its axial shifting in a forward direction.

It is to be noted that the forward face of the filter material 38, as well as its rearward face, is comparatively free from obstruction by the end portions 39, 40, 41 of the cartridge, to provide large spaces for the passage of smoke through the filter and cartridge, and thereby reduce the resistance to the drawing of smoke through the filter and into the smokers mouth.

The filter material 38 consists of fibrous matter, a portion of which is capable of retaining water, glycerine, or some other moisture, which is miscible with the nicotine in the smoke being drawn therethrough. It has been found that a filter material consisting of a mixture of water-absorbent fibers and non-water-absorbent fibers substantially saturated with water is effective in reducing the nicotine passing to the smokers mouth well below the safe value of 0.65 milligram per cigarette. An exceedingly large percentage of thc nicotine in the smoke is removed upon its contact with the water absorbed and present in the filter. The combination of fibers used is such that a very large number of interstices or passages is present through the entire mass of filter material through which smoke can be drawn with comparatively low re sistance. Not only does the filter material remove a very great percentage of the nicotine in the smoke, but it also is effective in removing a very great proportion of the tars and other harmful substances in the smoke, in addition to effectively cooling the smoke to a temperature that is only slightly higher than room temperature.

The specific filter material used can consist of a mixture of non-absorbent cotton fibers and absorbent cotton fibers. If the liquid with which the filter material is to be saturated is water, then the absorbent fibers have the characteristic of being capable of absorbing a relatively large amount of water, whereas the non-absorbent fibers will absorb very little, if any, water. In view of the mixture between the two types of cotton fibers referred to, a relatively large amount of water is available in the absorbent fibers, such water, however, being penetrated by the non-water-absorbent fibers, which provide passages through which the smoke can be drawn. During such passage through the filter, the smoke contacts a large surface of water, the nicotine mixing with the water and remaining in the lter.

A specific example of filter material used has been a mixture of fifty percent by weight of absorbent cotton fibers and fifty percent by weight of non-absorbent cotton fibers, which are intimately mixed with each other, after which they may be placed in a suitable form or shape for insertion in the holding or retaining cartridge 33.

The above specific proportions of absorbent and nonabsorbent cotton fibers can be varied to some extent while still providing a lter material within the filter cartridge capable of effectively removing the harmful materials from the tobacco smoke.

The mixture of the two types of cotton fibers may be rolled into a generally cylindrical form having a diameter that will permit its insertion into the retaining cartridge 33. The cylinder material is cut into the proper length for reception completely within the cartridge. In order to facilitate cutting and the insertion of the cylinder of filter material into the cartridge 33, it is preferred to coat the surface of the cylinder material with a stiffening material that may penetrate the surface to a "small extent, as, for example, to the 7extent of about 1/32 Vto about '3,58 of `an inch. As an example, pectin has been found to be a suitable coating material upon the periphery 'of the cylinder of lter material. Such coating not o'nly enhances the cutting of the iilter material to the proper lengths and facilitates its insertion in the cartridge 33, but the pectin will immediately dissolve upon wetting of the lter materal, as with water, the dissolved pectin then allowing the cylinder of material v38 to swell under the action of 'the water, vor other moisture, until 'it expands ,into intimate contact with theinner wall of the lcartridge 33, both at its smaller and larger "diameter portions '34', 35. Moreover, it has been found that the pectin in the filter also' acts to hold nicotine suspension rarid aids in the removal of the latter, as wel-l as tarry materials, from the smoke passing through the lter. In view of the wetting or :saturation ofthe lter material 38 with water, glycerine, 6r lother equivalent material, and its expansion and swelling into 'intimatecontact with the inrir =wall of fth'e cartridge 33', assurance 'is ha'd against by-passirig or channeling Aof the smoke between vthe periphery "of the cylinder of lter material and the inii'er wa'll off the cartridgeY 'In the use of the apparatus, suction applied ,by Vthe smoker tothe mouthpiece 19 will 'draw smoke lfo-in a cigarette C, such rsmoke passing thrugh the 'lter fnate'rial 38 and thence into 'the chamber 13 in the body member v11 Vrearwardly Vof the lilt'er cartridge 3'3. Some moisture will be contained in the smoke passing into this chamber portion and it is desired that such moisture not be removed from the holder. Accordingly, amoisture trap is formed in the' holder. Thus, a cy-lindrical sleeve of metal 42, having a much smaller diameter than the chamber 13,l may be pres'st in :the central passage 18 through the rear body member, ythis sleeve extending forwardly into the rear portion of the `chamber 13 and being 'axially spaced from the cartridge 33. The smoke and moisture that might be drawn through the lter will first pass into the rear of the chamber 13, the Water tending to drop out of the smoke and into the lower portion of the chamber. The ltered smoke itself will then pass through the sleeve 42 and the central passage 18 in the mouthpiece 19 into the mouth of the smoker.

In the use of the apparatus, the filter mass 38 is wettened with water. In one size of filter suitable for smoking the average type of cigarette, about fteen. drops of water are sucient to saturate the lter material 38. The moisture laden cartridge .'52 is then inserted in the bushing 12 and the forward holder member 17 screwed upon the bushing, so as to securely clamp the shoulder 36 of the cartridge 33 against the end 37 of the bushing. The ejector sleeve 2 5, isI disposed in its rearward position, allowing the insertion of a cigarette C in the forward end 20 of the holder. The cigarette is then ignited and smoked in the usual fashion, the smoke passing through the filter, with some of the harmful ingredients in the smoke being removed during such passage, any excess moisture in the smoke dropping out of the rear trap portion of the chamber 13 prior to entering the passage 18 through the mouthpiece 19.

The smoke is cooled in passing through the lter device 32 tov a considerable extent, the cooling action being substantially enhanced by the high heat conductivity of the aluminum cartridge 33 and bushing 12, as well as by the sleeve 42 forming part of the moisture trap. It appears that moisture in the air drawn through the filter material 38 is also absorbed by the absorbent fibers, tending to retain the lter material in a suitable wet state for most effective filtering of the smoke passing therethrough.

A cartridge and lter 32 can be used for a plurality of cigarettes without losing its effectiveness. A single lter device 32 is etfective for the smoking of a package of cigarettes containing twenty cigarettes.

Briand Nicotine Tars Brand A (non-llltr`type)` Brand B (lter type) yB rand C (lter type) Brand D (filter type) The above values'in Table `I were secured fromaverages obtained 'on cigarettes purchased in the open market ata/ ations tobacconists. c l A* n King -size lbrand A cigarettes ysmoked without filter holders furnished 2.6'milligramsrof lnicotine and 20 milligrams ofutarsV average percigaret-teaccording to rFable I above. The following table gives Ithe result of smoking king size brand A cigarettes through various well-known lter holders, as shown. A,' I'hne nicotine and -tars were recovered -at the loutlet'ot the iilter holder kwhensrlnoking brand A Vcigarettes in luapproximately 35 millimeter pui's, each'pui lasting Zseconds and spaced 1 minute between puis:

. Nicotine vPei-cent1 .'Tars Percent Holder grains) passing grams)l passing f l' through;y 1 through Holder X 2. 16 83 16. 0 80 Holder Y 1. 82 70 12.8 64 Holder Z Y 1.01 61 12.0 60 Applicants 21 8 4. 8 24 From the foregoing Table II, it is evident that applicants holder and lter (consisting of about 50% by weight Iof absorbent cotton fibers and about 50% by weight of non-absorbent cotton bers) are effective in reducing the nicotine in the smoke to an average of about 0.21 milligram per cigarette, the cigarette in each instance in the above table having been smoked through until approximately .a one-inch length of butt remained.

The following table discloses the effectiveness of applicants lter holder after use in repeated smoking of cigarettes:

Table III Percentage of nicotine passing through various filter holders on smoking brand A king size cigarettes after 1, 10 and 20 (1 pack), suggesting the endurance of filter holder effectiveness.

1 Clga- 10 Clga- 20 Ciga- Holdcr rette, rcttes, rettes,

percent percent percent Holder X 83 88 91 Holder Y-.. 70 63 51 Holder Z 61 54 50 Applicants 8 7 7 It is evident from the above table that applicants filter remains essentially constant in performance of nicotine removal from the irst to the last of twenty cigarettes in a pack, applicants lter having a long actual life of effectiveness. The other filter holders continue to permit a percentage of nicotine to pass :through the iilter that is 7 essentially above the safe limit of nicotine that can be absorbed by the human system without damage to the heart.

The following table is a comparison between the rise in temperature in Fahrenheit degrees over prevailing room temperature measured on the stream of smoke leaving the holder after a king size brand A cigarette is half consumed (mid-point), and again when itis burned down so as to leave an approximately 1 inch long butt:

From the above Table IV it is quite evident that applicants lter is exceedingly effective in cooling the main stream of smoke leaving the holder. Applicants lter and holder furnish a three to four times cooler smoke, as measured by lesser temperature rise above room temperature. f

The inventors claim:

l. A lter for use in smoking tobacco, comprising a container having a continuous sidewall construction, a mixture of `moisture absorbent bers and substantially moisture non-absorbent fibers positioned within said oontainer, and a liquid miscible with nicotine substantially saturating said absorbent fibers and thereby swelling said mixture into rm contact with said sidewall, said nonabsorbent fibers affording minute passages through which smoke may be drawn with relatively low resistance when said lter is wet by said liquid, said liquid being adapted to treat the smoke.

2. A filter as set forth in claim 1, wherein said mixture of fibers is approximately by weight of moisture absorbent bers and approximately 50% by weight of substantially moisture non-absorbent bers.

3. A lter as set forth in claim 1, wherein at least said moisture absorbent fibers are cotton fibers.

4. A tilter as set forth in claim 1, wherein said liquid is water.

5. A lter as set forth in claim 1, wherein said mixture of fibers is approximately 50% by weight of moisture -absorbent cotton bers and approximately 50% by weight Vof substantially moisture non-absorbent cotton fibers, and said liquid is water.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 134,713 Turner Jan. 7, 1873 732,252 Assman June 30, 1903 746,808 Ede-Clendinnen Dec. 8, 1903 941,019 Irving Nov. 23, 1909 959,649 Thomson May 31, 1910 1,418,113 Wawricka May 30, 1922 1,451,235 Raie Apr. 10, 1923 1,619,387 Waugh Mar. 1, 1927 1,961,866 Rooker June 5, 1934 2,171,770 Strauch Sept. 5, 1939 2,220,449 Hennings Nov. 5, 1940 2,269,323 Tarrant Jan. 6, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS 13,747 Great Britain 1851 380,041 Great Britain Sept. 6, 1932 OTHER REFERENCES Removal of Undesirable Constituents From Tobacco Smoke, article by Derr, Riesemeyer and Unangst in the July 1937, Industry and Engineering Chemistry magazine, vol. 29, pages 771-776.

US2911984A 1954-09-21 1954-09-21 Holders and filters for tobacco smoking Expired - Lifetime US2911984A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2911984A US2911984A (en) 1954-09-21 1954-09-21 Holders and filters for tobacco smoking

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2911984A US2911984A (en) 1954-09-21 1954-09-21 Holders and filters for tobacco smoking

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2911984A true US2911984A (en) 1959-11-10

Family

ID=23816380

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2911984A Expired - Lifetime US2911984A (en) 1954-09-21 1954-09-21 Holders and filters for tobacco smoking

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2911984A (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3066681A (en) * 1959-10-28 1962-12-04 Samuel L Cohn Cigarette construction
US3250280A (en) * 1964-03-03 1966-05-10 Hu Yow-Jiun Smoking apparatus
US3703179A (en) * 1970-07-16 1972-11-21 Jesse L Nubla Smoke filtering device
US4003387A (en) * 1974-12-27 1977-01-18 Aquafilter Corporation Cigarette filter holder
US4201232A (en) * 1978-06-28 1980-05-06 Aquafilter Corporation Cigarette holder with filter
US4267849A (en) * 1979-07-16 1981-05-19 Smith Ernest A Cigarette holder
US4648410A (en) * 1985-08-22 1987-03-10 Seroussi Henry I Nargile - oriental tobacco water pipe for smoking cured tobaccos
US5549124A (en) * 1988-08-29 1996-08-27 Dorsey; David A. Water filter for cigarettes
US6260554B1 (en) * 1995-06-02 2001-07-17 Music City Marketing, Inc. Pipe

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US134713A (en) * 1873-01-07 Improvement in compounds for use in tobacco-pipes
US732252A (en) * 1902-11-04 1903-06-30 William Assman Cigar-pipe.
US746808A (en) * 1903-08-08 1903-12-15 Harry P Fish Vapor-burner.
US941019A (en) * 1909-03-30 1909-11-23 James A Irving Pipe.
US959649A (en) * 1909-01-25 1910-05-31 Judson L Thomson Smoking-pipe, &c.
US1418113A (en) * 1920-03-08 1922-05-30 Wawricka John Pipe, cigar, and cigarette holder
US1451235A (en) * 1920-09-22 1923-04-10 Raje Thor Cigarette holder
US1619387A (en) * 1925-10-05 1927-03-01 Lester R Waugh Smoking utensil
GB380041A (en) * 1931-03-06 1932-09-06 Abraham Wix Improvements in or relating to cigarettes
US1961866A (en) * 1931-06-26 1934-06-05 William A Rooker Method of treating tobacco
US2171770A (en) * 1937-04-20 1939-09-05 Hartford Empire Co Cigarette tip
US2220449A (en) * 1939-02-09 1940-11-05 Cartier Inc Cigarette and cigar holder
US2269323A (en) * 1939-03-30 1942-01-06 John G Tarrant Cigarette holder

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US134713A (en) * 1873-01-07 Improvement in compounds for use in tobacco-pipes
US732252A (en) * 1902-11-04 1903-06-30 William Assman Cigar-pipe.
US746808A (en) * 1903-08-08 1903-12-15 Harry P Fish Vapor-burner.
US959649A (en) * 1909-01-25 1910-05-31 Judson L Thomson Smoking-pipe, &c.
US941019A (en) * 1909-03-30 1909-11-23 James A Irving Pipe.
US1418113A (en) * 1920-03-08 1922-05-30 Wawricka John Pipe, cigar, and cigarette holder
US1451235A (en) * 1920-09-22 1923-04-10 Raje Thor Cigarette holder
US1619387A (en) * 1925-10-05 1927-03-01 Lester R Waugh Smoking utensil
GB380041A (en) * 1931-03-06 1932-09-06 Abraham Wix Improvements in or relating to cigarettes
US1961866A (en) * 1931-06-26 1934-06-05 William A Rooker Method of treating tobacco
US2171770A (en) * 1937-04-20 1939-09-05 Hartford Empire Co Cigarette tip
US2220449A (en) * 1939-02-09 1940-11-05 Cartier Inc Cigarette and cigar holder
US2269323A (en) * 1939-03-30 1942-01-06 John G Tarrant Cigarette holder

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3066681A (en) * 1959-10-28 1962-12-04 Samuel L Cohn Cigarette construction
US3250280A (en) * 1964-03-03 1966-05-10 Hu Yow-Jiun Smoking apparatus
US3703179A (en) * 1970-07-16 1972-11-21 Jesse L Nubla Smoke filtering device
US4003387A (en) * 1974-12-27 1977-01-18 Aquafilter Corporation Cigarette filter holder
US4201232A (en) * 1978-06-28 1980-05-06 Aquafilter Corporation Cigarette holder with filter
US4267849A (en) * 1979-07-16 1981-05-19 Smith Ernest A Cigarette holder
US4648410A (en) * 1985-08-22 1987-03-10 Seroussi Henry I Nargile - oriental tobacco water pipe for smoking cured tobaccos
US5549124A (en) * 1988-08-29 1996-08-27 Dorsey; David A. Water filter for cigarettes
US6260554B1 (en) * 1995-06-02 2001-07-17 Music City Marketing, Inc. Pipe

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3311519A (en) Additive filter
US3217715A (en) Smoke filter and smoking devices formed therewith
US3496945A (en) Air-admixed cigarette utilizing restrictive-flow orifice
US3339558A (en) Smoking article and filter therefor containing vitamin a
US3614956A (en) Smoking articles
US3251365A (en) Tobacco smoke filter
US3356094A (en) Smoking devices
US3347247A (en) Tobacco smoke filter
US3349780A (en) Acetate filter elements containing carbon
US3389705A (en) Cigarette smoke filter device
US3339557A (en) Cigarette and smoke filter and flavor means
US3625228A (en) Heat activated filter for smoking devices
US3635226A (en) Tobacco-smoke filters
US3547130A (en) Method of cooling cigarette smoke
US3283762A (en) Aeratable cigarette
US3258015A (en) Smoking device
US3584630A (en) Tobacco product having low nicotine content associated with a release agent having nicotine weakly absorbed thereon
US4082098A (en) Flavored cigarette
US3046994A (en) Ventilated cigarette
US4687008A (en) Filter cigarette
US4917121A (en) Smoking article
US3370595A (en) Smoke filters
US3395713A (en) Filtering arrangement for smoking articles
US4201234A (en) Filter for smoking article, mainly cigarette
US4433696A (en) Variable dilution filter