US2806399A - Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means - Google Patents

Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2806399A
US2806399A US204571A US20457151A US2806399A US 2806399 A US2806399 A US 2806399A US 204571 A US204571 A US 204571A US 20457151 A US20457151 A US 20457151A US 2806399 A US2806399 A US 2806399A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
pipe
slot
pipes
members
length
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US204571A
Inventor
John W Mcbride
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BANTAR Inc
Original Assignee
BANTAR Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by BANTAR Inc filed Critical BANTAR Inc
Priority to US204571A priority Critical patent/US2806399A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2806399A publication Critical patent/US2806399A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/04Valves; Valve controls
    • G10D9/053Valves; Valve controls with continuous change of tonal pitch

Description

Sept. 17, 1957 L w. MCBRIDE WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT WITH HELICAL FREQUENCY DETERMINING MEANS 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Jan. 5, 1951 INVENTOR.
BY 5l/,w
Arme/ven Sept 17, 1957 J. w. MCBRIDE 2,806,399
WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT WITH HELTCAL FREQUENCY DETERMINING MEANS Filed Jan. 5, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 TIDA/N W Mae/DE,
IN V EN TOR.
TOE/VEZ J. W. MCBRIDE WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT WITH HELICAL Sept. 17, 1957 FREQUENCY DETERMINING MEANS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 5, 1951 rO//v W MCB/am,
INVENTOR.
\ w, ATTORNEY.
United States Patent O WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT WITH HELICAL FREQUENCY DETERMINING MEANS John W. McBride, Burbank, Calif., assignor to Bantar,
Incorporated, Burbank, Calif., a corporation of Callfornia Application January 5, 1951, Serial No. 204,571
9 Claims. (Cl. 84-386) This invention relates to musical instruments, and particularly to instruments using tubes or pipes, e. g. organs, whistles, or the like.
In such musical instruments, the pitch produced is a direct function of the length of the pipe. In organs, the pipes are of fixed lengths, and there are as many pipes as required by the range of the instrument. Each pipe is permanently tuned to its individual pitch tone.
In other forms of wind instruments, variation in pitch is permitted by varying the effective length of the air passage; for example, in trombones, where telescopic elements are used; or in whistles or saxophones, in which the effective length is determined by aid of openings in the pipe or tube.
It is one of the objects of this invention to provide an instrument in which the pipe length is varied in a simple manner, facilitating the use of the instrument by the performer.
In order to effect this result, the instrument incorporating the invention is arranged to be operated by relative movement of the pipe and a cooperating member that determines effective length; for example, by relative rotation of the parts about the axis of the pipe.
This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several embodiments of the invention. For this purpose there are shown a few forms in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. These forms will now be described in detail, illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that this detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.
Referring to the drawings:
Figure 1 is a plan view of an instrument incorporating the invention;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 2-2 of Fig. 1;
Figs. 3 and 4 are enlarged sectional views, taken along planes corresponding to lines 3 3 and 4-4 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 5-5 of Fig. 3;
Fig. 6 is a plan view of another embodiment of the invention, shown with the effective length of the pipe as a minimum;
Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6, but illustrating a position in which the effective length of the pipe has been increased;
Fig. 8 is a sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 8 8 of Fig. 6;
Figs. 9, 10, 11, and 12 are views, similar to Fig. 6, of modified forms of the invention; and
Fig. 13 is a `sectional view, taken along a plane corresponding to line 13-13 of Fig. 12.
In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 5, inclusive, four pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are arranged in parallel relation (see Fig. 3). These pipes may be either open or ICC closed at the ends. They are rotatably telescroped over the hollow extensions 5 of a mouthpiece 7. These extensions lead to the air passages 6 (Fig. 2) that are in communication with the interior of the mouthpiece 7. The mouthpiece 7 has a narrow end 8 for reception between the lips of a performer. The air for operating the device may be obtained from mechanical sources as well, such as from pumps, or the like, often used for organs. Each of the passages 6 is provided with a transverse opening 9 (Fig. 2). One edge of opening 9 may be formed by a reed 10.
The pitch tone of a pipe, such as pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4, is determined by its effective length. This effective length, in turn, is determined by the position of a through aperture in the pipe communicating with the outside atmosphere. Thus, for example, in a simple whistle structure, several apertures are formed along the length of the whistle. If there is a clear opening near the mouthpiece, the pitch tone is relatively high. As the openings are closed in succession, the effective length of the pipe increases, with a corresponding reduction in pitch tone.
Pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are arranged so that their' effective lengths can be varied by appropriate manipulation of a plurality of keys 11, 12, and 13.
Thus, pipe 1 is provided with a slot 14 which is arranged helically along the length of the pipe. In the present instance, this slot 14 makes approximately a one-half turn around the axis of the pipe. Overlying each of the pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are the external relatively rotatable tubular members 15, 16, 17, and 18. These tubular members are telescoped over the inner pipe 1 and are similarly provided with helical slots 19, 20, 21, and 22. These helical slots also extend for about one-half revolution along the peripheries of the corresponding members 15, 16, 17, and 18. I-lowever, they are of opposite pitch to that of the slots in pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4.
Obviously, by relative rotation between the pipe 1 and the external member 15, the helical slots may be made to cross at any desired point along these slots, to provide through apertures defined by the edges of the slots. Thus, in the free or rest positions, these slots cross near the right-hand ends of the pipes to form clear apertures 23, 24, and 26, corresponding to the free positions of keys 11 and 13, operating the tubular members 15, 16, and 18. Tubular member 17 is shown as rotated by key 12 to an intermediate position, providing a crossing place 25 of the helical slots 14 and 21. This place 25 forms a through aperture. Accordingly, the pipes 1, 2 and 4 are of maximum effective length, and the pitch tones are correspondingly low; and pipe 3 is of intermediate effective length.
The pitch tone of pipe 1 can be adjusted or varied by providing for relative opposite directions of rotation of pipe 1 and member 15. Similar variations in eective pipe lengths can be effected for pipes 3, 4, and 5. This relative rotation may readily be effected since these pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4 are rotatably supported on the extensions 5, and the members 15, 16, 17, and 18 are similarly rotatably supported on the corresponding pipes.
As this rotation occurs, the point of crossing of the two helical slots 14 and 19 approaches the mouthpiece end of the instrument. This correspondingly decreases the effective pipe length and increases the pitch tone. For any relative angular positions of the two telescoping members, there is only one place where the slots cross.
Appropriate axial stops may be provided to maintain the pipes 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the tubular members 15, 16, 17, and 18 in proper axial relationship. For example, a spring ring 39 (Fig. 2) may be arranged between each pipe 1, 2, 3, and 4 and extensions 5; and a spring ring 40 may similarly be arranged between each member 15, 16, 17, and 18 and the corresponding pipe.
Since the mechanism for relatively rotating the pipe 1 and the outer tubular member 15 is identical with the mechanism for performing this relative rotation in connection with the other pipes, a description of this mechanism for pipe 1 and member 15 may apply, as well, to all of the others.
Thus, pipe 1, adjacent its left-hand end, is provided with a spur gear 27. A spur gear 28 of identical pitch diameter, is mounted upon the left-hand end of the outer member 15. A slidable key 11 is provided, of open frame form. It has upper and lower members straddling these gears. A rack 29 engages gear 27 and is disposed on the lower side of the upper frame member of key 11. A similar rack 30 is mounted on the upper side of the lower frame member of key 11 and engages the gear 28. Obviously, as the key 11 is moved downwardly, as viewed in Fig. l, gear 28 will be rotated in one direction, and gear 29 will be rotated in the other direction.
The key 11, as shown most clearly in Fig. 5, is mounted for sliding movement in grooves 31 formed in a guide 32.
This guide 32 is mounted beneath the mouthpiece '7 by the aid of the bracket 33a joined to the mouthpiece body 7, and is attached to the bracket by screws 33. The guide member 32 may be in the form of sheet metal, bent at the sides to provide front and rear guides, as indicated most clearly in Fig. 3. The lower frame members dovetail below the overhanging edges 32a of these guides.
The key 11 is urged to the right by the aid of a tension spring 34 anchored at its left-hand end to an ear 35 at the left-hand lower portion of the key. The right-hand end of the spring 34 may be attached to an ear 36 mounted on a post 37 intermediate the guide elements. The ear 35 limits the movement of the key to the right. In this free position, the slots on each pair of telescoping members intersect adjacent the right-hand end of the instrument. When it is desired to reduce the efective length of any of the pipes, a nger may be used to urge the key in the direction of the arrow 38 on Fig. 3.
The slide 11 is intended to operate another set of gears 41 and 42 (Fig. 1) for rotating the inner pipe 2 and the external tube 16. The same racks 29 and 30, mounted on the frame of the key 11, operate these gears. In other respects, the pipe 2 and the external member 16 are constructed and arranged in the same manner as the rst set described.
The third pipe 3, with its external member 17, is operated by a pair of gears 43 and 44 connected respectively to the inner and outer members 3 and 17. The key 12, of the same structure as key 11, is guided in the manner described hereinabove. Similarly, the gears 45 and 46 on key 13 are likewise arranged to provide rotation for the inner pipe 4 and the outer member 18.
Provisions are made for controlling the volume of air passing through the pipes. For this purpose there is a pair of adjacent slides 47 and 48 (Figs. l, 2, 3 and 4), guided in a transverse slot in the mouthpiece 7. These slides are provided with apertures 49 capable of being placed in registry across the inlet ends of the extensions 5.
Operation of slide 47 is etfected by a link 50 pivotally connected to the ear 51 at the lower end (as viewed in Fig. 1) of the slide 47. This link in turn is pivoted to a lever arm 52 mounted on a stationary pin 53 extending from the base of the guide member 32. The other arm 54 of the lever is in a position to be manipulated by a finger. The other slide 48 is connected, as by the bend 55, to a key 56 that is guided in the guide frame 32.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, a single pipe 57 is provided having a mouthpiece 58 permanently joined to the left-hand end of this pipe. The pipe is illustrated as having a straight slot 59. Disposed over the pipe 57 is a rotary angularly adjustable member 60 held against axial displacement by the aid of a pin 61 mounted at the right-hand end of the pipe 57. This member 60 may be manually operated and is provided with a slot 62 having a slanting or helical edge 63. This slanting edge is intended to overlie'the slot 59 to any desired extent. In the position of Fig. 6, the slot 59 is substantially entirely exposed, causing the effective length of the pipe 57 to be a minimum. However, as the member 60 is rotated, the edge 63 becomes active to cover a portion of the slot 59 and causes a corresponding increase in the elective length of the pipe.
Fig. 9 illustrates a form of the invention in which the slot 59 is intended to align with any one of a series of through apertures 64 provided in the outer telescoped member 65. In this form, the series of apertures 64 are arranged along a helical line. Upon appropriate manipulation of the outer member 67, any one of the apertures 64 serves to determine the eiective length of the pipe in an obvious manner.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 10, the pipe 66 has a slot 67 arranged lengthwise thereof. The effective length of the pipe 66 is eiected by movement of a slanting edge 68 of a slide 69. This slide 69 carries a post 71, by the aid of which it may be manipulated for movement transversely of the slot 67. This post is guided appropriately in the ears 73, 74, mounted on bracket 70, supported on the pipe 66. The ear 73 serves to limit downward movement of the slide 69 in response to the force of a compression spring 72.
Manipulation of the bar 71 upwardly causes a corresponding upward movement of the slide 69 and a corresponding decrease in the effective length of the pipe 66.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 1l, a member 76 is pivotally mounted, as by the aid of a pivot screw 77 on the pipe 78. The pipe 78 has a series of apertures 79 extending longitudinally of the pipe. Member 76 likewise carries a similar set of apertures 80. The member 76 is urged downwardly toward a stop 81 by compression spring 82 having its upper endY anchored against a bracket 83 mounted on the pipe 78. In the free position illustrated, the extreme right-hand apertures 79, are in register, corresponding to a maximum effective length of the pipe 78. As the member 76 is moved manually in a clockwise direction, succeeding apertures 80, one by one, move into registry with the corresponding apertures 79. In this way, the etective length of the pipe 78 is reduced in a step by step manner.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. l2 and 13, mouthpiece 84 is provided with a pair of air passages 85 and 86, cooperating respectively with the pipes 87 and 88. A slide 89 extends across these passages to adjust the volume of air passing to the pipes.
Each of the pipes 87 and 88 is firmly mounted on the mouthpiece 84. Telescoping over these pipes 87 and 88 are respectively the outer members 90 and 91, similar to the outer member 60 in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 6, 7, and 8. Thus, each of the pipes 87 and 88 is provided with a straight longitudinal slot 92, 93. These slots can be covered to any desired extent by the slanting or helical slots 94 and 95 respectively of the aperture in the members and 91.
For ease of manipulation of these members 90 and 91, they are provided with radial arms 96 and 97. Compression springs 98 and 99 urge these radial arms 11pwardly. In the free position illustrated the two pipes 87 and 88 have maximum elective lengths. The lower edges of these springs are anchored on a bar 100 mounted on the mouthpiece member 84.
The player can readily manipulate these arms 96 and 97 for effecting appropriate angular adjustment of the slots 84 and 85 with respect to the slots 92 and 93.
Wherever, in the claims, the term helically arranged passage is used, it will be understood that said term may include a series of relatively short separate spaced passages helically arranged with respect to each other as Well as a single continuous helically arranged passage.
The inventor claims:
1. In a Wind musical instrument: a pipe; said pipe having a helically arranged air passage extending substantially the entire length of and transverse to the pipe; said passage being defined by edges; and means for determining the tone produced by the instrument over substantially the entire playing range of the instrument, comprising a member mounted on the pipe for transverse movement relative to the axis of the pipe and having an edge extending generally longitudinally of the pipe and transverse to the helix defined by said air passage, the edge yof `the member determining, With the edges of the air passage, the effective length of the pipe by cooperation with successive portions of the edges of said passage upon -continued movement of the member.
2. In a Wind musical instrument: a pipe having through longitudinal slot means extending along the operative length `of the pipe; a member mounted lon the pipe and confined for transverse movement with respect to -the pipe and slot means, said member having an edge intersecting the slot means at successive positions along the length of the slot means as the member is transversely moved for determining any one of a number of tones throughout the musical range of the pipe.
3. In a Wind musical instrument: a pipe having a longitudinal through slot extending throughout the operative length `of said pipe; a tubular member mounted on .the pipe and confined for rotation thereabout, said tubular member having an edge that overlies the slot to an extent corresponding rto the relative angular positions of `the pipe and the member for determining :any one of an infinite number of tones throughout the musical range of the pipe.
4. In a Wind musical instrument: a support, a pipe having Ia helical through slot extending `throughout the operation length of said pipe; means mounting 'the pipe on the support for rotation about its axis; a member telescoping over said pipe and having -a helical through slot of opposite pitch; and means for rotating the pipe and the member in :opposite directions for determining `any one fof an infinite number of tones throughout the musical range of the pipe.
5. In a Wind musical instrument: a pipe having a through slot extending throughout the `operative length yof? said pipe having an edge; and a tubular member rotatably mounted on the pipe, and having `a second extending longitudinally of the tubular member; one of said edges being slanted to cause any desired portion of the slot to be covered by the tubular member as the angular position between the pipe and the member lis altered for determining .any one of Aan infinite number of tones throughout the musical range of the pipe.
6. In a wind musical instrument: a pair of pipes, each having a longitudinal slot extending throughout the operative length `of said pipe; ltubular members respectively rotatably mounted over the pipes and each having an edge overlying the respective slot; means urging the members to an angular position in which the edges cross the slots near -one end of the pipe; and means for independently rotating said members in a direction to vary the place of crossing said edges along the length of the corresponding slots for determining for each pipe any one lof an infinite number of tones throughout the musical range `of said pipes.
7. In a wind musical instrument: a support; a pair of telescoping tubular members mounted on said support for rotation about a common axis, each of said members having a helically arranged slot of respectively opposite pitch and extending throughout the operative length of said members; and means for causing simultaneous and opposite adjustment of the angular position of said members with respect to said support for determining the longitudinal position of the intersection `of said slots.
8. In a Wind musical instrument: a support; a pair of telescoping tubular members mounted on the support for rotation about a common axis, each of said members having a helically arranged slot each of substantially one half ot one turn, the slots of the respective members having opposite pitch and extending substantially throughout the entire operative length lof said members; and means for causing simultaneous equal and opposite adjustment of the angular positions `of said members about longitudinal axes for determining the longitudinal position of .the intersection of said slots.
9. In a wind musical instrument: a pipe having a through slot extending along the operative length of the pipe, said slot having an edge; a slide mounted `on the pipe and having an edge; and means for confining the slide for linear movement transverse to the slot and the pipe; one `of said edges being slanting so that the edges intersect as successive positions along the length of the pipe as the slide is transversely moved for determining any one of a number of tones throughout the musical range of `the pipe.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 464,926 Harsin Dec. 8, 1891 510,119 Clinton Dec. 5, 1893 569,777 Williams Oct. 20, 1896 857,969 White June 25, 1907 1,103,462 Alberti July 14, 1914 1,103,555 Alberti July 14, 1914 2,422,360 McBride Iune 17, 1947 2,499,194 McBride Feb. 28, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS 15,088 Great Britain 1889 50,531 Germany Jan. 24, 1890 201,487 Germany Nov. 19, 1907 278,340 Germany Sept. 26, 1914 277,221 Great Britain Sept. 15, 1927 639,866 France Mar. 17, 1928 522,015 Germany Mar. 28, 1931 252,974 Germany Oct. 29, 1912
US204571A 1951-01-05 1951-01-05 Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means Expired - Lifetime US2806399A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US204571A US2806399A (en) 1951-01-05 1951-01-05 Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US204571A US2806399A (en) 1951-01-05 1951-01-05 Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2806399A true US2806399A (en) 1957-09-17

Family

ID=22758472

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US204571A Expired - Lifetime US2806399A (en) 1951-01-05 1951-01-05 Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2806399A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2772504A1 (en) * 1997-12-16 1999-06-18 Laurent Francois Blum Wind musical instrument
US20110197737A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-08-18 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
US20110214553A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-09-08 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
US20110219936A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-09-15 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
WO2012032539A2 (en) * 2010-09-06 2012-03-15 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar A continuous pitch wind musical instrument
US20140366703A1 (en) * 2010-09-06 2014-12-18 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar Continuous pitch wind musical instrument and a composite string instrument and continuous pitch wind musical instrument

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE201487C (en) *
DE278340C (en) *
DE50531C (en) *
DE252974C (en) *
US464926A (en) * 1891-12-08 Transformable clarinet
US510119A (en) * 1893-12-05 James clinton
US569777A (en) * 1896-10-20 Liams
US857969A (en) * 1907-03-30 1907-06-25 Frederick I White Organ-pipe.
US1103555A (en) * 1911-08-05 1914-07-14 Nicholas Alberti Wood wind instrument.
US1103462A (en) * 1911-08-05 1914-07-14 Nicholas Alberti Wood wind instrument.
GB277221A (en) * 1927-02-05 1927-09-15 Samuel Bowley Barnes Improved construction of wind musical instrument
FR639866A (en) * 1927-02-05 1928-07-02 Improvements to wind musical instruments
DE522015C (en) * 1929-09-08 1931-03-28 Koloman Antos Resettable woodwind instrument
US2422360A (en) * 1942-11-24 1947-06-17 John W Mcbride Stringed instrument
US2499194A (en) * 1950-02-28 Stringed musical instrument

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE201487C (en) *
DE278340C (en) *
DE50531C (en) *
DE252974C (en) *
US464926A (en) * 1891-12-08 Transformable clarinet
US510119A (en) * 1893-12-05 James clinton
US569777A (en) * 1896-10-20 Liams
US2499194A (en) * 1950-02-28 Stringed musical instrument
US857969A (en) * 1907-03-30 1907-06-25 Frederick I White Organ-pipe.
US1103462A (en) * 1911-08-05 1914-07-14 Nicholas Alberti Wood wind instrument.
US1103555A (en) * 1911-08-05 1914-07-14 Nicholas Alberti Wood wind instrument.
GB277221A (en) * 1927-02-05 1927-09-15 Samuel Bowley Barnes Improved construction of wind musical instrument
FR639866A (en) * 1927-02-05 1928-07-02 Improvements to wind musical instruments
DE522015C (en) * 1929-09-08 1931-03-28 Koloman Antos Resettable woodwind instrument
US2422360A (en) * 1942-11-24 1947-06-17 John W Mcbride Stringed instrument

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2772504A1 (en) * 1997-12-16 1999-06-18 Laurent Francois Blum Wind musical instrument
US20110197737A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-08-18 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
US20110214553A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-09-08 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
US20110219936A1 (en) * 2010-02-12 2011-09-15 Yamaha Corporation Pipe structure of wind instrument
US8334447B2 (en) * 2010-02-12 2012-12-18 Yamaha Corporation Wind instrument and pipe structure thereof and a method of operating the wind instrument
WO2012032539A2 (en) * 2010-09-06 2012-03-15 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar A continuous pitch wind musical instrument
WO2012032539A3 (en) * 2010-09-06 2012-05-10 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar A continuous pitch wind musical instrument
US8822797B2 (en) 2010-09-06 2014-09-02 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar Continuous pitch wind musical instrument
US20140366703A1 (en) * 2010-09-06 2014-12-18 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar Continuous pitch wind musical instrument and a composite string instrument and continuous pitch wind musical instrument
US9412343B2 (en) * 2010-09-06 2016-08-09 Sankarasubrahmani Uday Shankar Continuous pitch wind musical instrument and a composite string instrument and continuous pitch wind musical instrument

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2806399A (en) Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means
US4112806A (en) Axial flow valve
US20180350329A1 (en) B/f tenor trombone for children
US3937116A (en) Tenor trombone construction
US1912106A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US3326072A (en) Vibrato construction for lute-type musical instruments
US4213371A (en) Axial flow valve
US4299156A (en) Axial flow valve
US3971286A (en) Guitar string supporting device
WO1997044777A1 (en) Keyed free-reed instruments scope
US2738696A (en) Tone adjusting means for brass wind instruments
US3890874A (en) Keying mechanism for wind instruments
US4996902A (en) Musical instrument with barrel
US4831911A (en) Wind instrument having a compact slide configuration
US5834666A (en) Wind instrument having a compact slide configuration
US3175449A (en) Brass wind instrument
US1823683A (en) Tone modifying device for the vibrating elements of musical instruments
US4007658A (en) String mounting and adjustment for steel guitars
US2736226A (en) mcbride
US2288743A (en) Wind instrument
US4336738A (en) Musical instrument
US1606929A (en) Radio apparatus
US1764562A (en) Wind musical instrument
US3686995A (en) Brass wind instrument
US2665606A (en) Valve or piston mechanism for brass band instruments