US2499194A - Stringed musical instrument - Google Patents

Stringed musical instrument Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2499194A
US2499194A US2499194DA US2499194A US 2499194 A US2499194 A US 2499194A US 2499194D A US2499194D A US 2499194DA US 2499194 A US2499194 A US 2499194A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
string
frets
members
musical instrument
tuning
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2499194A publication Critical patent/US2499194A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/20Winding tools separate from the musical instruments, e.g. tuning keys

Description

Feb. 28, 1950 .1. W. M BRIDE STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 19, 1946 I A m u 0 d .2 b A. 1

INVENTOR Jo/m W Mrfir/b/e flw ATTORNEY Feb. 28, 1950 J. w. MCBRIDE 2,499,194

STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed Aug. 19, 1946 i s Sheets-Sheet 2 V E V 25' a7 a2 34 51 33 35 ,2 as

7 YINVENTOR John W McEr/be JJAA ATTORNEY J. W. M BRIDE STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT L flllovl Feb. 28, 1950 filed Aug. 19, 1946 INVENTOR John W Mc Br/de %/%MJ ATTORNEY Feb. 28, 1950 J. w. M BRIDE STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 19, 1946 INVE NTOR \/o /m Wf/V/c Br/a 4 4 1- TO R N E Y Patented Feb. 28, 1950 STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT John W. McBride, Burbank, Calif., assignor to Bantar, Incorporated, Burbank, Calif., a corporation of California Application August 19, 1946, Serial No. 691,550

21 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a string musical instrument.

As is well understood, the musical sounds of such instruments are produced by vibration of the strings, the pitch of the sounds being varied by altering the free vibrating length of the strings. Such tuning or stopping of the strings can be accomplished in various ways; for example, as by the aid of mechanism illustrated in a patent issued to John W. McBride on April 20, 1943, bearing Number 2,316,799 and entitled Stringed musical instrument. This mechanism includes a rod rotatable about an axis substantially parallel with the string and having a helical-like crest. The angular position of the rod about its axis determines which point along the crest contacts the string, and thus determines the free vibrating length.

Such strings are usually tensioned between two fixed points, so that stopping the string at an intermediate point defines two vibrating lengths, respectively between the point of contact and the two fixed points. Generally, the musical sound irom but one of these vibrating lengths is utilized, a resonant cavity or an electrical sound system being provided for amplifying the sound.

In a copending application filed in the name of John W. McBride on May 29, 1943, under Serial No. 489,040 now Patent No. 2,479,757 and entitled Stringed musical instrument, an instrument is shown having tensioned strings stopped at an intermediate point by a crested rod, rotatable about an axis substantially parallel with the string, to provide two vibrating lengths, and arranged to utilize the sound from both of these vibrating lengths. For this purpose, an electric pick-up device is provided for each vibrating length, which transmits electrical impulses corresponding to the string vibrations. ihe electrical impulses from both piclnups are fed to a circuit including suitable volume and tone controls, and thence to an amplifier and speaker system.

It is an ob ect of this invention to provide an im roved instrument of this type t is another object of thi invention to provide a musical instrument arranged to utilize simultaneously vibrations from a plurality of adiusted lengths of a tensioned string, wherein the sum of these lengths is not necessarily equal to the total tensioned length of the string.

It is another object of this invention to provide a musical instrument utilizing simultaneously vibrations from a plurality of adjusted lengths of a tensioned string, wherein one of such lengths may be adiusted independently of the other.

It is another object of this invention to provide a musical instrument utilizing a tensioned string structure having means to form apair of free vibrating string portions, separated by an intermediate portion of adjustable length and position along the string structure, whereby the length of the free vibrating portions may be altered.

The capability .of the instrument to provide these adjustable lengths along one or more string structures, (each of which may comprise a single string or a member of close parallel strings) may be utilized by musicians to produce a large variety of chords simultaneously, or in succession, with attendant novel artistic effects. It is accordingly another object of this invention to make it possible to produce a large variety of chords by relatively simple manipulation, and with a compact apparatus.

In an application filed in the name of John W. McBride on June 17, 1944, under Serial No. 540,794 now Patent No. 2,489,657 and entitled Musical instrument with tensioned strings an instrument is shown having a series of movable frets operated by a rotatable rod with a helicallike crestfor contacting the string and altering the free vibrating length thereof. These frets are shown as having arched surfaces adapted to engage the string and are so arranged that, when operated by the rod, different parts of each such surface are brought successively into contact with the string by an action similar to a rolling action. Itv is another object of this invention to provide such an instrument arranged optionally to stop the string simultaneously at more than one point.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a modified form of fret capable of production in a simple and inexpensive manner and which has a diiierent mode of operation to vary the point of contact with the string in a substantially continuous manner.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several embodiments of the invention. For this purpose there are shown a few forms in the drawings accompanying and forming part of thepresent specification. The forms will now be described in detail illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that this detailed description is not to be taken in incorporating the features of the invention;

a limiting sense, since the scope of this invention is best defined by the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Figure l is a plan view of. a musical instrument Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section, partly in elevation, on an enlarged scale, taken as indicated by line 22 of Fig. 1, part of the figure being broken away;

Fig. 3 is a pictorial view of a pair of the tuning members; is a fragmentary V cross-section on. an enlarged scale taken as indicated by line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a top plan view of the operating mechanism for the tuning members, certain parts being broken away better to illustrate the structure;

Fig. 6 is a cross-section on an enlarged scale, taken as indicated byline E6 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary elevation, partly in section, as seen from the right of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a detail plan of one of the bridge structures utilized for tensioning the strings;

Fig. 8--a, is a cross-section on an enlarged scale, taken along one of the strings of Fig. 8;

Fig. 9 is a View similar to Fig. 1, but showing a modified form of the invention;

Fig. 10 is a cross-section on an enlarged scale, taken as indicated by line I --I 0 of Fig. 9, one

pair of the tuning members being shown in a different operating position;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary longitudinal section on a further enlarged scale showing the manner of cooperation between the frets and one of the tuning members of Fig. 10;

Fig. 11a is a similar view, showing diagrammatically the operation of the frets by a pair of tuning members;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary cross-section similar I to Fig. 10, but showing a further modified form of the invention;

Fig. 13 is an elevation of one of the tuning members used in that form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 12; and

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Fig. 11, showing still another form of the invention.

Referring to Figs. 1-8 of the drawings, the instrument is shown as one of the plucking type such as a guitar or banjo. I, which may be formed of wood, or other suit- It comprises a body able material, and which serves to mount the operating parts of the instrument, suitable cavi- 3-b. 3-c respectively. but it is to be understood that either or both of these string structures might comprise any other desired number of strings, or a single string. The strings in each set are placed nuite close together.

Each of these strings passes over a supporting ost 4 (Fig. 8) adjacent the left-hand end of the body I and thence downwardly through an aperture (see Fig. 2) in the body, where the string is anchored. At the op osite end of the body the string passes over a similar post 6 and thence to a conventional tuning peg I, By a ropriate adjustment of the tunin pe I,

the string may be tensioned as required between,

posts 4 and 6.

The posts 4 and 6 are adiustable for hei ht, for this purpose com rising round-headed machine screws threaded into plates 8 and 9 respectively fastened to the body I and held in.

adjusted position by lock. nuts ID. The kerf .in the screw head accommodates'the associated string, positioning it laterally, and as shown in Fig. 8a, is formed with a convex bottom surface 4-a for supporting the string. The string elements 2a, 2--b, 2-c, and 3a, 3-2), 3-0

are not necessarily at the same height; and,

- in some cases, it is desirableto have the center j s trings 2-b and-3--b abovethe other strings.

Provisions are made for stopping each of the.

strings Z-a, 2-4:, 2-0, 3-a, 3--b, and 3-0 at one or more points intermediate the supports 4 and 6. For this purpose, pairs of rotatable tuning members, generally indicated by I3 and I l, are provided for the string structures 2 and 3 respectively, and are accommodated in a longitudinal cavity I 5 in the body I. Since each pair of members I3 and i l, and the manner in which it cooperates with its associated string structure 2 and 3, are substantially identical, only one of such pairs, for example, that indicated by the numeral 53, will be described.

This pair I 3, as best shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 comprises a pair of rods or tubes I1 and I8, bent to a helical-like form and supported at the proper distance from a common axis of rotation i9 by crank arms I'ia and ilb, and I8-a and I8b, respectively adjacent the opposite ends of the rods 87 and i8. These rods l7 and I8, as clearly shown in Fig. 4, have their outer surfaces ground, or otherwise formed, to provide definite crests I'i-c and I8c, respectively, and conforming to the required helical-like form, and serving to contact one or more of the strings of the associated string structure 2.

As shown in Fig. 2, the crank arms on rod I? are appropriately offset from those on rod I8 to permit assembly of the rods. The arms ll-a and I8-a at the left-hand end of the pair of rods is are provided with apertures adapted to receive a common bearing pin 25, secured to an angle bracket 2| attached to the body I and extending into the cavity I5. The arm E8-b at the opposite end of the rods has a shaft 22 fixed therein which extends through a bearing bracket 23 mounted on the frame 26 of the key mechanism 25, which is provided for operating both pairs of rods, I3 and I4. This key mechanism 25 will be described hereinafter. The arm I'lb of rod IT! has a tubular extension 25 adapted to telescope over the shaft 22, and is freely rotatable thereon. In this way the tuning members I i and Ill are supported for relative angular movement about the axis I9.

For imparting angular movement to the members I? and I3. pinions 29 and 3!] are secured respectively to the shaft 22 and sleeve 28, meshing with racks SI and 32 (Figs. 5. 6 and 7) carried by keys 33 and 36. The key 33 is guided for movement transversely of the body I by aligned slots 35 and 36, formed respectively in the depending front lip 31 of a protective cover 38 for the key mechanism 25, and in an intermediate wall 39 of the cover. The key 35 is guided in a s milar manner. Of course, the amount of relative motion between the rods ll, I 23 is limited by the contact of one rod with the other.

A light torsion spring ill is suitably anchored at one end to the frame 24 (see Fig. 5), and at its other to the shaft 22, and serves to urge the tuning member I8 to rotate in a clockwise direction (Fig. 4), causing the key to move downwardly in Fig. 5. Another light torson spring 4|, secured at one end to the pinion 3i! and anchored at its other end to a bracket 32 on the frame 24, similarly urges the tuning mem" ber l1 clockwise and key 34 downwardly. To limit such rotation of the members I; and I8 so as to locate them in their home or initial position, shown in Figs. 4 and 5, keys 33 and 34 have stop lugs 43 and it formed respectively on their inner ends, and which are engageable with a stop bar 45 detachably mounted in a pair of "Upward movement of keys 3mm in-Fi'g 5 will impart counter-clockwise angular movement to the members I! and 18 in opposition to springs and 4|, as desired, stop lugs, such as shown at 48 on key 33 in Fig. 6, being provided to limit the movement of the keys by engaging the lefthand side of bar 45.

The tuning members of the other pair [4 are similarly arranged for operation, being provided respectively with pinions 5D and 5| engaged by racks 52 and 53 carried by keys 54 and 55, torsion springs 56 and 51 being provided for urging the members toward their initial positions.

To facilitate operation of the keys 33, 34, 54 and 55, each key has a downward extension as 58 on key 33 (Fig. 6) adapted for engagement by the players fingers. Appropriate pressure on the keys will serve to turn the tuning members against the force exerted by their associated springs 40, 4|, 56 and 51, so that the strings are stopped at the desired points. Release of such pressure will allow the tuning members to be returned by the springs.

The tuning member [1 will, by its contact with the strings of the structure 2, serve to divide the strings between their supporting posts 4 and 6 into two portions having relative lengths in accordance with the angular position of the member I! about its axis 19. Further, the other tuning member l8 will divide one of these portions into two shorter portions having relative lengths determined by the angular position of member i8 about its axis. As shown most clearly in Fig. 4, the center string 2b is higher than the other two strings; this occurs because these strings are equi-distant from axis l9.

Any or all of these portions of the string may be set into vibration by the player, either separately or in unison. Conventional electric pickups 60 and iii are provided adjacent respectively the string supports 4 and 6. These pick-ups are affected when any of the string portions are put in vibration.

As is well understood, such pick-ups usually comprise means forming a magnetic circuit and a winding, the magnetic circuit being arranged to be influenced by the vibrating strings in a manner to create a minute current in the winding. The windings of the pick-ups 60 and BI may be appropriately connected by wirin (not shown) accommodated in a channel 62 (Fig. 6) formed in the body I. This wiring may include a phone jack (not shown) to facilitate connection to a conventional circuit including an amplifier and speaker. A rheostat 63 (Fig. 5) serves to control the output, being arranged for adjustment by means of a lever 64. This lever 64 is pivoted at 65 to the key mechanism frame 24, and has an upward extension li4a adjacent the key 34 providing a, thumb rest 66 for the ployed to stop the strings, rests on the housing 38 and extends thereacross, so that the fingers may operate the keys 33, 34,54, and 55 conveniently, the thumb resting on the thumb rest 56 for operating the volume control. Thus, the instrument as viewed in Fig. would be turned 6 end-for-end from the position illustrated when played.

It may be desirable to avoid the sliding contact between the crests of the rotatable tunin members and the tensioned strings, such as occurs in the type of instrument just discussed when the free vibrating length of the strings is altered. For this purpose, a modified form of instrument shown in Figs. 9, 10, and 11 is provided.

Referring to Fig. 9, the instrument is shown as comprising a body 18 with a pair of string structures H and 12, each comprising three strings, by way of example, tensioned lengthwise of the body Hi between conventional bridge forming members 'H-a and 'H-b, and 12-a and 12-h, respectively, in a manner similar to that in the first described form, except that the strings are on a common level. Pairs 13 and 14 of independent, angularly movable tuning members (Fig. 10) are provided respectively for each string structure H and I2, and are arranged for operation by a key mechanism 15, as before. However, in the present instance, a series of movable frets l1 and i8 is interposed respectively between the tuning members of the pairs 13 and i4 and the associated string structure H and 12. Since the pairs of tuning members 13 and I4 and series of frets Ti and 18 are substantially identical in structure and in their manner of cooperation with their respective string structures H and 12, only the tuning members and frets 'associated with the strin structure H will be described.

In Fig. 11, a few of the frets extending from the right-hand end of the series I? associated with the string structure H are shown. In this figure only one of the tuning members, as 19, of the pair 13 is shown, the other member being omitted. The member 79 is shown as turned from its initial position, so that an intermediate fret, indicated by the numeral 8| is urged against the string structure 'H. Member 19 is shown in this instance as formed of a flat bar and its contacting edge is quite narrow.

In this instance, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10, the body 10 has a central longitudinally extending cavity 82 for accommodating the tuning mem bers l3 and 14. A plate structure 83, providing a pair of slots 85 and 86 forming guides respectively for the frets of the series 11 and 18, is secured to the body above the cavity 82.

Each of the frets has a convex string engaging surface 81 and a thin depending projection 88, providing a narrow concave surface 89 adapted. to be engaged by the helical crest 9| or 92 of the tuning members 19 and 80. Furthermore, the frets each have converging side surfaces 93 and 94 (Fig. 11), and are strung on a pair of light wires 95 and 96 accommodated in suitable openings or recesses 9'! and 98 adjacent the ends of each of frets. The end frets of the series, as 99, are arranged to prevent translatory movement of the wires, as by having the ends of the opening 9i and 98, closed. As best shown in Fig. 10, the frets have lugs I00 and I0! on their opposite ends, which, by engagement with longitudinally extending lower lips I02 and 503 provided in slot 85, serve to support the frets when not engaged by the tuning members i9 or 80. Similarly. upper lips I04 and I05 serve to retain the frets in the slot 85, and to limit their upward ,move

merit.

As clearly shown in Fig. '10, the helical-like crests 9i and 92 of the tuning members are quite high. Thus, in connection with the thinness of the projection 88 providing the cooperating surface 89 on the fret, ensures that but one fret at a time will be engaged by the tuning member 19 or 80; and, further, that there will be but a point contact between the crest of the tuning member and the surface 89, so that the fret will be free to rock, as this point moves, due to rotation of the tuning member.

Thus, in Fig. 11, the fret 8| is shown as supported by the engagement of the mid-point 89a of its surface 89 by the crest 92, so that the midpoint of the surface 81 contacts the string structure II. A few frets on each side of fret 3| are raised and supported at intermediate heights by the Wires 95 and 96. These wires are light and flexible so that the weight of the frets urges them toward their lower positions, except when raised by the tuning member 19.

As the tuning member I9 is rotated, the point of support 89-a will move toward'one end or the other of the fret 8| in accordance with the direction of rotation of the member, causing the fret 8| to rock and the point of the contact 8'Ia with the string structure 'II to move correspondingly. Assuming the rotation of the tuning member I9 is such as to cause the supporting point 89-11 to move to the left (Fig. 11), the fret 8| will rock in a counter-clockwise direction and cause the contact point 81-11 to move to the left also. At the same time, the left-hand side of fret 8! is being raised and, due to the wires .95 and 96, the next fret I08 to the left is being raised also. Thus, as the point of support 89a reaches the end of surface 89 on fret BI and engages the surface 89 on fret I08, the point of contact Iii-a moves from surface 81 on fret 8i to the corresponding surface 81' on fret I08. In this way, a continuous rolling contact between the frets and the string structure 'II is maintained. The inclination of the sides 93 and 94 of the frets is such that, when the point of support 89-a is about to leave the surface 89 of one fret,

.the corresponding surface of the next fret to be a fret I III is shown which is identical with those just discussed, but is arranged for operation by a single tuning member I II to stop the string i- I I2 at one or more points intermediate its length. This tuning member III (see also Fig. 13) is shown as having a pair of helical-like crests H3 and I I4 for cooperating with depending members II on the frets H0, in the manner previously described, to impart a rolling motion to the frets.

I These crests I I3 and I I4 extend in a non-parallel jjmanner about the member III.

Thus, as the member is rotated, the free vibrating lengths of the string II2 will be altered, and will differ by an amount which varies in accordance with the angular position of the member III. There may be aplurality of tuning members III arranged for operation by appropriate key mechanism,

I s'uch, for example, as disclosed in a patentissued vto John W. McBride on December 12, 19 1fl, en

titled fStringed musical instrument, and bearing Number 2,364,351-

A modified form of fret is shown in Fig. 14.

. These frets I20 have a configuration which is by sharp corners.

.the same as that of the frets illustrated in Figs.

Due to the-fact that theirside surfaces are parallel, the frets I are constrained to move straight up and down into and out of engagement with the spring structure in response to movement: of the crested tuning member I22 about its axis. However, the thickness of the frets is such that the points contacted on the string by successive frets are sufficiently close to provide a. substantially continuous variation in the length of the string, such as is provided by the rolling action of the previously discussed frets.

The inventor claims:

1. In-a musical instrument having a tensioned string: means for stopping the string at a plurality of adjustable points along the string, comprising a plurality of members rotatable with respect to each other and mounted on a common axis substantially parallel to the string, each of said members having a helical-like crest.

2. In 'a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; and means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced points adjustable along the string and intermediate said fixed points to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, said means comprising a plurality of members movable independently of each other lengthwise of said string.

3. 'In a musical'instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced points,

' said means comprising a plurality of members .sound from each of said string portions.

4.'In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed .points; and means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced 'points, said means comprising instrumentalities independently adjustable lengthwise along the string, to provide free vibrating string portions ofdesired length. v

,5. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points, adjustable means for stopping said string at adesired intermediate point between said fixed points; and a second means capable of limited adjustment along said string with respect to said adjustable means for stopping said string at a second desired point between said intermediate point and one of said fixed points.

6.. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced points along the string to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, said means comprising a ."plurality-of' helical-like. crests frosubstantially parallel with said string; and means for transmitting the sound from said string portions.

7. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced points along the string to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, said means comprising a plurality of members providing substantially identical helical-like crests, said members being rotatable independently of each other about an axis substantially parallel with said string structure; and means for transmitting the sound from said string portions.

8. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at a plurality of spaced points along the string to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, said means comprising a plurality of members providing helicallike crests having substantially identical pitches and beginning at a point in a common plane normal to the string.

9. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at points spaced along the string intermediate said fixed points to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, comprising a plurality of members relatively angularly adjustable about an axis parallel with the string, each of said members having a helicallike crest.

10. In a musical instrument: a string tensioned between a pair of fixed points; means for stopping said string at points spaced along the string intermediate said fixed points to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length, comprising a plurality of helical-like crested members, means rotatably supporting one end of each of said members, one of said members having an axially extending shaft at its opposite end, bearing means supporting said shaft, a tubular extension on the other member rotatably mounted on the shaft, and means for rotating each of said members.

11. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for movement toward and away from the string, and extending lengthwise of the string; and means cooperating with said s ries to cause frets there n to stop said strin simultaneously at a plurality of points spac d there along to provide a pluralitv of free vibrating string portions of desired length.

12. In a musical instrrment having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for movement toward and away from the string. and extending lengthwise of the string; means comprising a plurality of helical-like crests rotatable about an axis substantially parallel with the string, cooperating with said series to cause frets therein to stop said string at a plurality of spaced points to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length.

13. In a m sical instrument having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for movement toward and away from the string, and extending lengthwise of the string; means comprising a plurality of helical-like crests relatively angularly adjustable about an axis substantially parallel with the string, cooperating with said series to cause frets therein to stop said string at a plurality of spaced points there along to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired length.

14. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for movement toward and away from said string, and extending lengthwise of the string; means for urging the frets successively to engage the string, and a flexible member connecting the frets for causing the frets adjacent the string engaging fret to approach the string.

15. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for movement toward and away from said string and extending lengthwise of the string, a flexible member connecting the frets, and means for rocking the frets successively.

16. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a series of frets guided for sliding movement with respect to each other toward and away from said string and extending lengthwise of the string; means between adjacent frets limiting the relative movement between said adjacent frets; and means for urging the frets successively to engage the string.

17. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a plurality of frets having convex string engaging surfaces; and a plurality of rotatable members, each of said members having a helicallike crest, and independently adjustable for urging the frets into contact with the string at a plurality of points.

18. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string: a plurality of frets having convex string engaging surfaces; and a rotatable member having a plurality of helical-like crests for urging the frets into contact with the string at a plurality of points.

19. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string; means for stopping the string at selected points along the string, comprising a plurality of members rotatable with respect to each other about a common axis substantially parallel to the string.

20. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string; means for stopping the string at selected points along the string, comprising a plurality of helical members angularly displaced with respect to each other and rotatable with respect to each other about a common axis substantially parallel to the string.

21. In a musical instrument having a tensioned string; a series of frets guided for transverse movement toward and away from the string and. extending lengthwise of the string; and means separate from said frets and cooperable with said series to cause frets therein to stop said string at a plurality of points spaced therealong to provide a plurality of free vibrating string portions of desired lengths.

JOHN W. MCBRIDE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,374,388 Reed Apr. 12, 1921 2,001,392 Miessner May 14, 1935 2,316,800 McBride Apr. 20, 1943 2364,860 McBride Dec. 12, 1944 2,368,256 McBride Jan. 30, 1945

US2499194D Stringed musical instrument Expired - Lifetime US2499194A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2499194A true US2499194A (en) 1950-02-28

Family

ID=3436919

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2499194D Expired - Lifetime US2499194A (en) Stringed musical instrument

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2499194A (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2604806A (en) * 1948-10-19 1952-07-29 Billeci Salvatore Sonometer for testing musical ear
US2658419A (en) * 1951-09-24 1953-11-10 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument having angularly adjustable string contacting mechanisms
US2727422A (en) * 1951-12-21 1955-12-20 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument
US2736226A (en) * 1956-02-28 mcbride
US2806399A (en) * 1951-01-05 1957-09-17 Bantar Inc Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means
US4304163A (en) * 1979-10-29 1981-12-08 Siminoff Roger H Adjustable nut for stringed musical instrument

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1374388A (en) * 1918-06-14 1921-04-12 Charles H Reed Fingering attachment for stringed instruments
US2001392A (en) * 1932-12-14 1935-05-14 Miessner Inventions Inc Method and apparatus for the production of music
US2316800A (en) * 1941-09-15 1943-04-20 John W Mcbride Stringed musical instrument
US2364860A (en) * 1942-10-02 1944-12-12 Burt E Lloyd Clothes support
US2368256A (en) * 1942-03-16 1945-01-30 John W Mcbride Stringed musical instrument

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1374388A (en) * 1918-06-14 1921-04-12 Charles H Reed Fingering attachment for stringed instruments
US2001392A (en) * 1932-12-14 1935-05-14 Miessner Inventions Inc Method and apparatus for the production of music
US2316800A (en) * 1941-09-15 1943-04-20 John W Mcbride Stringed musical instrument
US2368256A (en) * 1942-03-16 1945-01-30 John W Mcbride Stringed musical instrument
US2364860A (en) * 1942-10-02 1944-12-12 Burt E Lloyd Clothes support

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2736226A (en) * 1956-02-28 mcbride
US2604806A (en) * 1948-10-19 1952-07-29 Billeci Salvatore Sonometer for testing musical ear
US2806399A (en) * 1951-01-05 1957-09-17 Bantar Inc Wind musical instrument with helical frequency determining means
US2658419A (en) * 1951-09-24 1953-11-10 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument having angularly adjustable string contacting mechanisms
US2727422A (en) * 1951-12-21 1955-12-20 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument
US4304163A (en) * 1979-10-29 1981-12-08 Siminoff Roger H Adjustable nut for stringed musical instrument

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4063727A (en) Arm wrestling exercise device
US4704936A (en) Tremolo with lever angle control
US4491050A (en) Foot-controlled musical instrument
EP0042005B1 (en) Electronic music instrument
US4570521A (en) Electronic musical instrument with string-simulating switches
US3237502A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US6191350B1 (en) Electronic stringed musical instrument
US5191159A (en) Electrical stringed musical instrument
US3742114A (en) Guitar-like electronic musical instrument using resistor strips and potentiometer means to activate tone generators
US5095797A (en) Automatic tone control for stringed musical instruments
US5398585A (en) Fingerboard for musical instrument
US3443018A (en) Guitars or like stringed musical instruments
GB2132402A (en) Drum pad means, drum pad assembly, and electronic musical instrument
US7838753B2 (en) Electric high-hat circuitry system
US3407696A (en) Stringed musical instrument stable, harmonic-free tuning
US3248991A (en) Tremolo device for stringed instruments
US20030188622A1 (en) Musical instrument with multiple interchangeable stringed instruments
US4686880A (en) Digital interface for acoustic and electrically amplified pianos
US8319082B1 (en) Stringed instrument keyboard
US2973682A (en) String tension controlling means for lute-type instrument
US4483233A (en) Combined guitar and bass guitar having eight strings
US4285262A (en) Tremolo device
US2792738A (en) Fretted electronic musical instrument
AU2004314451B2 (en) Adjustable tremolo bridge
US6384311B1 (en) Guitar having tremolo device on each string thereof