US2744433A - Guitar keyboard - Google Patents

Guitar keyboard Download PDF

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Publication number
US2744433A
US2744433A US367592A US36759253A US2744433A US 2744433 A US2744433 A US 2744433A US 367592 A US367592 A US 367592A US 36759253 A US36759253 A US 36759253A US 2744433 A US2744433 A US 2744433A
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Prior art keywords
depressor
shaft
guitar
key
button
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US367592A
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David N Rooms
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David N Rooms
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/06Necks; Fingerboards, e.g. fret boards
    • G10D3/08Fingerboards in the form of keyboards

Description

May 8, 1956 D. N. ROOMS GUITAR KEYBOARD Filed July 13, 1953 Dov/'d IV. Rooms INVENTOR.

@ween ana/ow 5mm United States Patent vO GUITAR KEYBOARD yDavid N. Rooms, Bartlesville, Ulrla. Application July '13, 1953, Serial No. 367,592

Claims. (Cl. 84-31-5) The present invention relates to a novel and improved self-contained unit which is applicable to a stringed musical instrument, a guitar for example, or any similar instrument with a fretted fingerboard, and has more particular reference to what may be conveniently referred to, in a unitary sense, as a guitar keyboard.

Broadly speaking, keyboards for guitars, banjos, and the like are not broadly new. Therefore, it is an object of the instant invention to structurally, functionally and otherwise improve upon similarly constructed and performing keyboards and, in doing so, to provide a unique structural attachment which is the utmost in simplicity, is compact and convenient, and wherein the adaptable and cooperating features are systematically consolidated to provide a highly ypractical and reliable keyboard through the medium of which average and so-called amateur instrumentalists may aptly and satisfactorily play a guitar.

Another object is to provide a well-ordered and simplified arrangement of keys or buttons which cooperate with means making it ypossible to shorten the distance required to linger various combinations of individual tones and chords, and which is such that it eliminates finger strain, `linger interference with adjacent strings, eliminates the forming of callouses on the finger tips and brings the most difficult combinations of chords within the reach of the average performer.

A Vfurther object ofthe invention is l*to provide vprecision ymeans through the medium of which, finger pressure applied to a single key or button is transmitted in the lmost eiiicient and reliable manner to a mechanical string depressor, the latter being located at an exactfpoint in |reference to a string and cooperatingfret so that the note or tone desired is reliably in tune.

One phase of the invention has to do with novel and practical adapter means which ylatter is characterized by a :housing providing an rauxiliary fingerboard `and enclosing easily insertable complements or `inserts so as to thus provide a substantial construction, one which accommodates the mechanism for accurate and proper 'functioning of the strings.

Briefly summarized, the invention -comprises va vguitar having a Afretted string-equipped fingerboard, and a remote-type keyboard removably mounted on said fingerboard and comprising adapter means characterized by transverse and longitudinal rows of keys, string depressors, one for each key, and an operating connection between each depressor and its complemental key.

Further novelty is predicated on the operating connections wherein each one is characterized by a push-pull iiexible shaft and an accompanying rigid conduit which leads from the desired key or button to the desired position for the depressor whereby to provide a construction wherein the various conduits may be individually shaped and mounted and wherein the flexible shafts conform to the varying curvatures and shapes of the complemental conduits.

2,744,433 Patented May 8, 1956 Then, too, novelty is predicated on a string-operating device incorporated in the over-all attachment wherein the parts are capable of being accurately manufactured and assembled and wherein the buttons or keys are suspended in their ready-to-play positions by sensitive spring return means, the buttons and the complemental depressor each having a screw threaded socket member and the end portions of the flexible shaft having screw threaded fittings or terminals which may be readily attached and detached in respect to their button and depressor complements.

Other objects, features and advantages will become more readily apparent from the following description and the accompanying sheet of illustrative drawings.

In the drawings, wherein like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the views:

Figure l is a view showing a fragmentary portion of a guitar iingerboard and showing, in section and elevation, the mechanical attachment therefor which is herein referred to as a keyboard;

Figure 2 is a perspective View showing the complete ready-to-use guitar;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3 3 looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view emphasizing certain particulars not clear from Figure l.

Referring now to the drawing, and with reference to Figure 2, a conventional guitar is shown, and the body is denoted by the numeral 6, the ngerboard by the numeral 8, the frets by the numerals 10, and the strings by the numerals 12.

The attachment is characterized, broadly construed, by a readily applicable and removable adapter unit or means. This is preferably made up of several sections or parts. The outermost section is denoted by the numeral 14 and is an enclosing casing, and it is closed at the outer end as at 16 and at the inner end as at 13. if desired, the longitudinal sides are likewise closed in, so that said section 14 provides an auxiliary fingerboard 20 which is in spaced parallelism with the fingerboard 8 and also provides Va chamber or .recess for the complemental sections. The two-part section is preferably made up of two panels or inserts denoted by the numerals 22 and 24, and these are provided withappropriate grooves and passages which serve in a manner to be later described. The complemental section or panel is denoted at 26 and this is in spaced parallelism above the strings and frets. These several sections which go to make up the sectional housing or adapter means are assembled and secured together by screws or similar headed fastenings, as denoted generally at 28. The assemblage of keys is such that they are arranged in transverse rows which rows are longitudinally spaced from each other, and, to some extent, the keys may also be said to be in longitudinal row alignment. In any event, they are systematically arranged so that they may be fingered with the utmost of speed and selective eiiciency. Actually, each key may be described as a press button, and it is denoted, therefore, by the numeral 30. For each key, there is a string depressor which is in the form of a hammer-like head and each head is denoted by the numeral 32. The head is arranged with respect to the string and fret to press the string down and to obtain the note or tone designed. lt is unnecessary, it is believed, to name the strings or the tones which are susceptible of production, or the various chords, etc. The invention is, as is obvious, in the structural attachment or device whereby the guitar may be mechanically played in remote-controlled fashion. The means for transmitting the finger forces to the depressors is the same in each instance, and for this reason, the description of one will suliice for all. With this in of Figure l,

mind, it will be seen that a principal part of this operating connection is a coiled exible steel shaft 34 which may be conveniently called a push-pull shaft. This shaft operates through a passage which is lined and the lining is referred to as a rigid tube or conduit 36. In order that the forces may be transmitted accurately depending on which key or button is depressed, the conduits are of varying lengths and shapes, as shown in Figure l. It is unnecessary, it is believed, to trace out the position and shape of each, due to the fact that there are so many of them and they all vary, but are systematically positioned. To accomplish this, the panels 22 and 24- have passages and grooves which correspond in shape to the different conduits, as shown in the drawings. By making the panels individually and matching them in the manner shown, the passages may be molded or otherwise satisfactorily and accurately formed. Also, the tubes may be readily inserted and removed for repair, etc. Each key or button is operable in a pocket 38 provided therefor in' the auxiliary fingerboard 20. There is a spiral spring 40 provided and this is arranged in the pocket and engages the bottom of the pocket and the button and serves to suspend the button and maintain it in its normal or neutral position. Each button is provided at its center with a screw threaded bushing providing a socket member 42. Each depressor, which is in the form of a cylindrical block, is likewise provided with a screw threaded socket member. There is a terminal connector 44 at the upper end which screws into the socket member 42 and a similar terminal connector 46 at the lower end which screws into the socket member 48 in the depressor. It will be evident, therefore, that by threading the flexible shaft through its particular conduit, the means is assembled and ready to provide the mechanical operation desired. That is to say, by depressing a given button or key 30, the spring 40 is compressed, and the flexible shaft is actuated to, in turn, operate the spring depressor, this in an obvious manner. The spring means 40 serves to return the button as soon as the linger pressure thereon is released. With this systematic arrangement of keys or buttons in proper row alignment, it will be seen that the performer may accessibly operate the buttons singly or collectively in order to utilize the tones individually or in groups or chord relationship. The direct delivery of iinger pressure to the spring depressor and the quick return resulting from the use of a eXible shaft is, of course, of utmost importance. It is felt, therefore, that I have evolved and produced a simple, practical and etiicient keyboard attachment in which instrument makers, sellers and users will find their respective requirements and needs aptly and electually taken into consideration and met.

From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explanation is believed to be unnecessary. However, since numerous modications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination, a guitar having a fretted stringequipped fingerboard, and a remote-type keyboard removably mounted on said fingerboard and comprising adapter means characterized by transverse and longitudinal rows of keys, string depressors, one for each key, and an operating connection between each depressor and its complemental key, each operating connection embodying a rigid conduit, a flexible push-pull shaft slidable in said conduit and having its ends projecting beyond the respective ends of the conduit and provided with screw threaded terminal connectors, each key being in the form of a button having a screw threaded socket member, each depressor being in the form of a head having a screw threaded socket member, said terminal connectors being screwed into and thus joined with their respective socket members.

2. For use in association with a keyboard attachment of the class described, an open ended rigid conduit of predetermined length, cross-section and lengthwise shape, a eXible shaft threaded through and slidably operable in said conduit and having its ends projecting beyond the respective open ends of the conduit, a string depressor detachably screwed on one end of said shaft, a nger depressed button detachably joined with the opposite end of said shaft, and return spring means cooperable with said shaft and button.

3. For use on and in association with a guitar keyboard attachment of the class described, a rigid open ended conduit, a flexible shaft operable through said conduit, said shaft being provided on one end with a screw threaded terminal, a button having a screw threaded socket member, said terminal being joined with said socket member, a spring depressor having a screw threaded socket member, the adjacent end of said exible shaft having a screw threaded terminal screwed into said last named socket member.

4. In combination, a guitar having a fretted stringequipped ngerboard, and a close-type keyboard remo"- ably mounted on said fingerboard and comprising adapter means characterized by transverse and longitudinal rows of keys, string depressors, one for each key, and an operating connection between each depressor and its complemental key, said operating connection embodying a pushpull flexible shaft, and a rigid conduit in which a major portion of the shaft is encased and is slidable.

5. In combination, a guitar having a fretted stringequipped tingerboard, and a close-type keyboard removably mounted on said fingerboard and comprising adapter means characterized by transverse and longitudinal rows of keys, string depressors, one for each key, and an operating connection between each depressor and its complemental key, said operating connection embodying a pushpull flexible shaft, and a rigid conduit in which a major portion of the shaft is encased and is slidable, said shaft being detachably connected at its respective ends to its respective key and depressor.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

US367592A 1953-07-13 1953-07-13 Guitar keyboard Expired - Lifetime US2744433A (en)

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2906158A (en) * 1953-07-27 1959-09-29 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument of the percussion type
US2928309A (en) * 1950-08-26 1960-03-15 Baldwin Piano Co Playing key switch
US3422717A (en) * 1966-04-11 1969-01-21 Norman T Roussel Chord playing attachment for fretted musical instruments
US3682036A (en) * 1971-06-18 1972-08-08 Cecil A Null Digital/electron logic and electromechanical control for stringed musical instruments
US3915051A (en) * 1974-08-28 1975-10-28 George R Kincaid Stringed instrument chord player
US4222303A (en) * 1978-11-21 1980-09-16 Kryzanowsky Dmytro M Musical justification for guitars and the like
FR2557721A1 (en) * 1984-01-02 1985-07-05 Visse Gerard Electronic synthesiser organ guitar
US5492045A (en) * 1994-02-07 1996-02-20 Roblee; Todd A. Quick release capo for stringed instrument
US20100077901A1 (en) * 2008-10-01 2010-04-01 Samuel T. Artioli Method, system and apparatus for a multiple fret variable string capotasto
US7812233B1 (en) * 2008-03-20 2010-10-12 Steven Pyoung-Uk Lee Chord aiding device for a fretted stringed instrument
US8319082B1 (en) 2009-10-22 2012-11-27 George Donald Bacon Stringed instrument keyboard
US8618389B2 (en) * 2012-01-24 2013-12-31 Benjamin B. Ryan Capo for stringed musical instruments
US9257102B2 (en) 2012-01-24 2016-02-09 Benjamin B. Ryan Fully-adjustable capo for stringed musical instruments
US9653047B2 (en) 2015-09-28 2017-05-16 Tsung-Jung Chen Finger-pressed auxiliary device for a stringed instrument

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US295984A (en) * 1884-04-01 James c
US957681A (en) * 1909-10-11 1910-05-10 Andrew Theodore John Keyed finger-board for violins and similar stringed musical instruments.

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US295984A (en) * 1884-04-01 James c
US957681A (en) * 1909-10-11 1910-05-10 Andrew Theodore John Keyed finger-board for violins and similar stringed musical instruments.

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2928309A (en) * 1950-08-26 1960-03-15 Baldwin Piano Co Playing key switch
US2906158A (en) * 1953-07-27 1959-09-29 Bantar Inc Stringed musical instrument of the percussion type
US3422717A (en) * 1966-04-11 1969-01-21 Norman T Roussel Chord playing attachment for fretted musical instruments
US3682036A (en) * 1971-06-18 1972-08-08 Cecil A Null Digital/electron logic and electromechanical control for stringed musical instruments
US3915051A (en) * 1974-08-28 1975-10-28 George R Kincaid Stringed instrument chord player
US4222303A (en) * 1978-11-21 1980-09-16 Kryzanowsky Dmytro M Musical justification for guitars and the like
FR2557721A1 (en) * 1984-01-02 1985-07-05 Visse Gerard Electronic synthesiser organ guitar
US5492045A (en) * 1994-02-07 1996-02-20 Roblee; Todd A. Quick release capo for stringed instrument
US7812233B1 (en) * 2008-03-20 2010-10-12 Steven Pyoung-Uk Lee Chord aiding device for a fretted stringed instrument
US20100077901A1 (en) * 2008-10-01 2010-04-01 Samuel T. Artioli Method, system and apparatus for a multiple fret variable string capotasto
WO2010044991A1 (en) * 2008-10-01 2010-04-22 Artioli Samuel T Method, system and apparatus for a multiple fret variable string capotasto
US8319082B1 (en) 2009-10-22 2012-11-27 George Donald Bacon Stringed instrument keyboard
US8618389B2 (en) * 2012-01-24 2013-12-31 Benjamin B. Ryan Capo for stringed musical instruments
US20140060283A1 (en) * 2012-01-24 2014-03-06 Benjamin B. Ryan Capo for stringed musical instruments
US8962958B2 (en) * 2012-01-24 2015-02-24 Benjamin B. Ryan Capo for stringed musical instruments
US9257102B2 (en) 2012-01-24 2016-02-09 Benjamin B. Ryan Fully-adjustable capo for stringed musical instruments
US9424817B2 (en) 2012-01-24 2016-08-23 Benjamin B. Ryan Fully-adjustable capo for stringed musical instruments
US9653047B2 (en) 2015-09-28 2017-05-16 Tsung-Jung Chen Finger-pressed auxiliary device for a stringed instrument

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