US1895383A - Stringed musical instrument - Google Patents

Stringed musical instrument Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1895383A
US1895383A US609202A US60920232A US1895383A US 1895383 A US1895383 A US 1895383A US 609202 A US609202 A US 609202A US 60920232 A US60920232 A US 60920232A US 1895383 A US1895383 A US 1895383A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
chord
strings
frets
flat
musical instrument
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US609202A
Inventor
Roy M Sullivan
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HORACE W SULLIVAN
Original Assignee
HORACE W SULLIVAN
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by HORACE W SULLIVAN filed Critical HORACE W SULLIVAN
Priority to US609202A priority Critical patent/US1895383A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1895383A publication Critical patent/US1895383A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D1/00General design of stringed musical instruments
    • G10D1/04Plucked or strummed string instruments, e.g. harps or lyres
    • G10D1/05Plucked or strummed string instruments, e.g. harps or lyres with fret boards or fingerboards
    • G10D1/08Guitars

Description

Jan. 24, 1933. SULLWAN 1,895,383

STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed May 4, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet l ME! 017 Y I 575 /4 6 Inventor Z07 MSu ZZZ LW/n/ Jan. 24, 1933. R su v V 1,895,383

STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.

Filed May 4, 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Invenlor MSu/ZZz'va/n/ Jan. 24, 1933. R. M- SULLIVAN STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed May 4, 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 WWZEC h k zmefztki ut QRQIQ Inventor W M 5201122 1020 warm flllomey Jan. 24, 1933. su w 1,895,383

STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed May 4, 1932 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Inventor A F? M guild/aw flllorney Patented Jan. 24, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROY It. sULLrvANfor ATLANTA, GEORGIA, ASSIGNOR or ONEHALF TO HORACE w. SULLIVAN, or ATLANTA, GEORGIA STBINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Application and ma 4, 1932. Serial 110. 609,202.

This invention relates to an improved stringed musical instrument in the nature of a guitar having the ability to afford the combined results of two guitars, that is,

capable of producing harmonious melody and chord accompaniment in unison.

More explicitly describedJ have evolved and produced a pr'actical'dual guitar including two distinguishable sets of strings, one

set being played like a Hawaiiansteel guitar and the other set of strings serving to produce the supporting accompaniment chords, whereby through the use of proper plec'trum effects the melody andchordsmay be sounded in unison.

'One structural feature of the ensemble is the provision of manually manipulated finger mechanism playable by the right hand for developing the requisite chord effects in proper order and progression.

Another dominant structural feature is predicated upon the use of mechanical means actuated by the left knee of the performer for raising and lowering the pitch of the chord strings in a substantially automatic manner so as to permit the performer to expeditiously make a full range of chords, such as for example. major, minor seventh and diminished chords. e

" Other features and advantages of the arrangement will become more readily apparent from the following description and drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the complete instrument as constructed in accordance with the present inventive conception.

Figure 2 is "a side'or edge el'evational view thereof.

Figure 3 is an end view showing the butt end of the instrument.

Figure 4 is an enlarged transverse section "taken on the plane of the line '4-4 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary plan view showing the distinguishablesets of melody and chord strings respectively. p

H Figure 6 is a perspective View of the knee slide.

Figure 7 is a detail view of the relatively fixed part of the bridge.

Figure 8 is a detail view of one of the relatively movable sections of said bridge.

Figure 9 is a group view of the two movable sections of said bridge showing them in their normal relative relationships.

Figure 10 is a detail view showing the spring suspended arrangement of the finger depressed keys. 50

Figure 11 is a view detailing one of th movable frets or string stop devices in its lowered inactive position.

Figure 12 is a view like Figure 11 showing the device elevated into contact with the strings for shortening the efiective vibratory length thereof.

Figure 13 is a perspective view of one of the stop devices per se. 1

Figure 14 is a view showing the adjustable mounting for the plurality of stop de vices.

Figure 15 is a view in section and elevation showing a permanently attached damper or tone mute.

Referring now to the drawings in detail and utilizing the same reference characters to designate like parts throughout the views, it will be observed that the numeral 16 designates the hollow body of the instrument. This has conventional shape such as is utilized in the construction of an ordinary Hawaiian steel guitar.

The neck, which may be hollow, is designated by the numeral 17 and terminates at the left end in a head 18 constructed to accommodate the conventional tuning devices 19. In playing position, the body is placed'on the lap of the performed and in order that it may be conveniently held in a stationary position it is provided with a depending bracket 20 of the shape seen in Figure 3 which serves as an abutment against which the right leg is pressed.

The finger board is denoted by the numeral 21 and approximately one-third thereof is provided with longitudinally spaced frets 22. The remainder is plain and smooth and not designed for the usual fingering purposes. In fact, instead of using the fingers for making chords I use a mechanical key controlled mechanism.

Before describing this mechanism however I want to call attention to the fact that there are twelve strings. The group of three strings whichoverlie the fretted part of the fingerboard serve as the melody strings and are distinguished in Figure 5 by the numeral 23. The remaining group of nine strings which are distinguished as chord accompaniment strings-are actually divided into four sets denoted by the numerals 24, 25, 25 and 27 respectively. The strings are of course of appropriate gauge dependent on the system of tuning utilized by the performer.

. i All strin s are ermanentl anchored at b the right hand end as indicated at the point 2,8 in Figure 2 and at thispoint-theypass over the .primary fixed bridge 29. The opposite ends. of the string are seated in retaining notches in the secondary bridge generally de-' noted by the numeral 30. This lasit-named bridge which occupies the position of the ordinary nut on the instrument is of composite construction, and the ends of the strings pass-' ing over this-are attached to the usual tuning devices 19 as is customary.

The brldge 30 is made up of three d1st1n- I guishable sections or units. For example,

the stationary unit seen in Figure 7 comprises a cross bar having spaced notches 31 and 32 (lBfiIllIl three differentiated risers 33, 34,' and respectively. The riser 35 is disposed on a plane above the companion members 33 and 34, and is provided with three notches to accommodate the strings 23. The intermediate one 34 serves to accommodate the strings 25 and the remaining one 33 serves to accommodate the strings 27 as seen in Figure 5.

The numeral 36 designates a longitudinal bore through these three parts which serves ,as a bearing for an oscillatory rocker shaft 37 having fixed rocker arms 38 at opposite ends. j My 3 v Under this arrangement it is obvious that the 'strings'23 for melody purposes are elestantially automatic manner.

Each of the units 39 and 40 comprises a sleeve 41 and each one is formed with a pair of grooves 42 and 43 the grooves 42 being deepened asindicated at the points 44 in Figure 9. The sleeve 39 hasa notched lifting finger 45 in alinement with the groove '43 and the sleeve 40 has a similar notched string lifting finger 46 and these, fingers includes a depending abutment. 50. anda return spring 51. The abutment is so located as to permit it to be shifted forwardly or outwardly by pressure from the left knee. The arms 48 are pivotally attached to the rocker arms or crank arms 38 and these crank arms have three definite positions referred to as first, second third I I 7 The first position is the normal position wherein the units 39 and 40 do not affect the pitch of the complemental strings. The second and third positions however bring the lifting fingers 45 and 46 successivelyinto play for impinging against the complemental strings to such an extent as to vary the pitch for the making of difierent types of chords. 7

I provide six distinguishable chord producing devices or adjustable frets for cooperation with -the right hand ends of the chord construction string as seen in Figure 1. Each device is the same in construction and a description of one will sufiice for all.

in Figure 13 and this is adj ustably androckably mounted in bearing fixtures 53..

Each fixturelcomprises. a base member 54 are six of these keys andthey arenumbered from one to 81X incluslvely 'in Figure 2..

' The numerals 58 designate return springs anchored ona suitable hanger bracket 59 as seen in Figure '10. V

The cranks drop down by. gravity but are lifted up bypressure of the finger on any selected one of the keys, and the crank simultaneously bridges all of the overlying strings to act'as a fret for varying the elfective vibratory length of the strings in unison to produce the chord effect.

These six keys are operableby the third and fourth fingers of the right hand.

and second fingers of the same hand and the thumb of the-same, hand is used for strum mechanically changed from major to minor, J

seventh and diminished according to the l composition.

The following operation of the buttons or keys in order given will clarify just how the various types or kinds of chords are made:

The; 1 "three melody strings are pluckedby the first 7 The device is in the nature of a crank 52 as seen Moreover each device has the end port-ion 56 constructed to accommodate a. fingen depressed key 57. ,As before'stated', there When preming button No. 1 down with crank 37 in first position No. 1 chord is B flat major with B fiat bass next. No. 2 chord is F 7th chord with natural and F natural basses.

When crank is in second position No. 1 chord is B flat minor with B flat bass. No. 2 chord is F major chord with C natural and F natural basses.

When crank is in the third position No. 1 chord is B flat 7th chord with B fiat bass, and No. 2 chord is F minor chord with A natural and F natural basses.

Button No. 2

No. 1 is B minor chord with B bass and chord FAQ No. 2 is F sharp major chord with C sharp and F sharp basses.

WVhen crank is in its third position No. 1 chord is B 7th chord with B bass and chord No. 2 is F sharp minor chord with C sharp and F sharp basses.

Button N o. 3

When pressing button No. 3 with cranks on first position No. 1 chord is C major chord with C bass. No. 2 chord is Gr 7th chord with D and G basses.

When the crank is on second position No. 1 chord is G minor chord with C bass and No. 2 is G major chord with D and G basses.

When crank is on third position No. 1 chord is CTth chord with C bass and N0. 2 chord is C minor chord with D and G basses.

Button N o. 4

When pressing down button No. 4 with crank on. first position chord No. 1 is D flat major with D fiat bass and chord No. 2 is A flat 7th with E flat and A flat basses.

When crank is on second position No. 1 chord is D flat minor chord with D fiat bass, and chord No. 2 is A flat major chord with E fiat and A fiat basses.

When crank is on third position No. l chord is D flat 7th chord with D flat bass and chord No. 2 is A flat minor chord with E flat and A flat basses.

Button N0. 5

No. 2 is A minor chord with E and A basses.

Button No. 6'

When pressing down button No. 6 and crank on first position No. 1 chord is E fiat major with E flat bass. Chord No. 2 is B flat 7th and F natural and B fiat basses.

hen crank is on second position No. 1 chord is E fiat minor chord with E fiat bass, and chord N0. 2 is B flat major chord with F natural and B flat basses.

When crank is on third position No. l chord is E flat 7th chord with E fiat bass, and chord N0. 2 is B fiat minor chord with F natural and B flat basses.

All diminished chords can be made by pressing two buttons in succession and these diminished chords can be made in twelve different positions.

In a musical instrument constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention will be found satisfactory in playing all varieties of musical compositions and desirable because of the harmonious lead and accompaniment effect.

In Figure the numeral designates a bar carrying a self-faced damper or muting device 61 used for damping the tone of the string. The bar carries depending arms 62 having heads 63 slidably mounted in springcontained cylinders 64 which serves to return the bar to its normal elevated position. The bar is operated by the wrist of the right hand.

It is thought that the description taken in connection with the drawings will enable a clear understanding of the invention to be had. Therefore, a more lengthy description is thought unnecessary.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described, it is to be understood that minor changes coming within the field of invention claimed may be resorted to if desired.

I claim:

1. A musical instrument of the class described comprising a body having a headed neck, and twelve individual strings attached to the body and neck and strung in a manner to provide a distinct group limited to three strings for playing the lead or melody, and a second group made up of nine co-ordinated strings for playing chord accompaniment to said melody.

2. A musical instrument of the class described comprising a body having a headed neck, twelve separate strings attached to the body and neck and strung in a manner to provide a primary group limited to three companion strings for playing the lead or melody, and a second group comprising nine co-ordinated strings for playing chord accompaniments. and finger depressed mechanism for mechanically fretting said chord accompaniment strings, said mechanism beinglocated on the body for convenient manipulation by the fingers of the right hand.

3. A musical instrument of the class described comprising a guitar includin a body having a neck and a head at one end of said neck, string tuning devices carried by said head, said neck including a fingerboard and said fingerboard having a limited portion fretted and the remaining portion smooth 3 and without frets, a group of three melody structionstrings overlying the smooth fretless portion of the fingerboard,the last-named strings being anchored at one end on the body and attached at theiropposite ends to said tuning devices, and finger depressed mechanism for said chord construction strings supported on the body and including a plurality of keys operable by the fingers of the right hand, and crank-like frets underlying and co-operable with said chord construction strings.

4. In a duplex guitar of the class described,

a body of conventional shape, a neck attached to said body and formed atits left hand end with a head provided with ordinary string attaching and tuning devices,

said neck having a fingerboard with a restricted portion provided with frets and the remaining portion smooth and without frets, a group of three melody strings strung over the fretted part'of the fingerboard and anrchored on the body and tuning devices, a

group of additional strings strung over the i unfretted partof the fingerboard, the second group of strings being disposed on a plane below the first-named strings and being adapted for playing of accompaniment chords, bearing fixtures attached to the body near the right hand ends of the strings, a

plurality of longitudinally spaced cranks ad- 7 justably and rockably mounted in said hearing fixtures and'provided with individual finger depressible keys, the cranks serving i as frets and being movable into contact with the undersides of saidadditional strings to serve as selectively usable frets or stop devices.

5. In a'duplex guitar of the class described,

i a body. of conventional shape, a neck attached to said body and formed at its lefthand end with a head provided with ordinary string attaching and tuning devices, said neck having a fingerboard with a restricted portion provided with frets and the remaining portion smooth andwithout' frets,

a group ofthree melody strings strung over the fretted part of the fingerboard and anchored on the body and tuning devices, a A group of additional strings strung over the unfretted part of the fingerboard, the second group of strings being disposed on a plane below the first-named strings and being adapted for playing of" accompaniment chords, bearing fixtures attached to thebody" near the right hand ends of the strings, a

plurality of longitudinally spaced cranks ad- 'justably and rockably mounted in the hearing fixturesand provided with individual finger depressible keys, the cranks serving as frets and being movable into contact with the undersides of the overlying strings of said additional group to serve as selectively usable frets or stop devices, and the end of the neck adjacent said head being provided with a bridge including stationary members and movable members, the movable members having elements co-operable with predetermined strings of said additional group for raising and lowering the pitch of said strings while the instrument is being played, and mechanical means for actuating said movable mem- V hers.

6. In a duplex guitar of the class described, a body of conventional shape, a neck attached to said body and formed at its left hand end with a head provided with ordinary string attaching and tuning devices, said neck having a fingerboard with a restricted portion provided with frets and the remaining portion smooth and without frets, a group of three melody strings strung over the fretted part of the fingerboard and anchored on the body and tuning devices, a group of additional strings strung over the unfretted partof the fingerboard, the second group of strings being disposed on a plane below the first-named melody strings and being adapted for playing of accompaniment chords, bearing fixtures attached to the body nearthe right hand ends of the strings, a plurality of longitudinally spaced cranks adjustably and rockably mounted in said bearing fixtures and -provided with individual fin er depressiblekeys, the cranks serving as retractible frets and being movable into contact with the undersides of the overlying chord strings to-serve as selectively usua-ble frets or stop devices, and theend of the neck adjacent said head being provided with a bridge including stationary members and movable members, the movable members having elements co-operable with predetermined strings for raising and lowering the pitch of said strings while the instrument is being played, and mechanical means for actuating said -movable members, said means comprising a knee actuated slide having operating connection with said members through the instrumentality of a rockshaft. I

7. A stringed musical instrument of the class described comprising a body of conventional shape, a neck attached'to said body and formed at us left hand end with a head provided with ordinary string attaching and a fingerboard having a restricted portion equipped with longitudinally spaced transversely dis osed frets, the remainder of said fingerboar being smooth and without frets, a group of three melody strings strung over the fretted portion of the fingerboard and anchored on the body and tuning devices, a second group of chord construction strings strung over the unfretted part of the fingerboard and anchored on the body and said tuning devices, and a plurality of normally inactive finger actuated mechanical frets mounted on said body and underlying the right-hand end portion of the strings of said second-named group, said frets being selectively and individually usable.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

ROY M. SULLIVAN.

US609202A 1932-05-04 1932-05-04 Stringed musical instrument Expired - Lifetime US1895383A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US609202A US1895383A (en) 1932-05-04 1932-05-04 Stringed musical instrument

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US609202A US1895383A (en) 1932-05-04 1932-05-04 Stringed musical instrument

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1895383A true US1895383A (en) 1933-01-24

Family

ID=24439767

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US609202A Expired - Lifetime US1895383A (en) 1932-05-04 1932-05-04 Stringed musical instrument

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1895383A (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4377101A (en) * 1979-07-09 1983-03-22 Sergio Santucci Combination guitar and bass
WO1990004248A1 (en) * 1988-10-14 1990-04-19 Stuart Richard Box A guitar
US20040149118A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-08-05 Gerardi Michael M. Strummable electric harpsichord
US20080210077A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2008-09-04 Franklin Dale Boxberger Combination bass with both frets and no frets on the same neck

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4377101A (en) * 1979-07-09 1983-03-22 Sergio Santucci Combination guitar and bass
WO1990004248A1 (en) * 1988-10-14 1990-04-19 Stuart Richard Box A guitar
US20040149118A1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2004-08-05 Gerardi Michael M. Strummable electric harpsichord
US6967270B2 (en) * 2002-09-24 2005-11-22 Gerardi Michael M Strummable electric harpsichord
US20080210077A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2008-09-04 Franklin Dale Boxberger Combination bass with both frets and no frets on the same neck

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Forsyth Orchestration
Ellis On the musical scales of various nations
US3407696A (en) Stringed musical instrument stable, harmonic-free tuning
US2949806A (en) Individual string tone changer for guitars
CN101128859A (en) Morpheus music notation system
US4856404A (en) Guitar with tuning changing, key changing, chord changing and modulating capabilities
Elson Orchestral Instruments and Their Use: Giving a Description of Each Instrument Now Employed by Civilised Nations... and an Explanation of Its Value and Functions in the Modern Orchestra
US2001191A (en) Chord finder for tenor banjos
Szwed et al. The Afro-American Transformation of European Set Dances and Dance Suites1
US7482525B2 (en) Music notation
WO2007146662A2 (en) An engineers piano with bisymmetrical manuals and accompanying musical notation system
US1475345A (en) Nut for guitars and similar instruments
US8269084B2 (en) Finger sleeve with raised flexible bar for playing barre chords
US357168A (en) Musical instrument
US6777608B1 (en) Integrated sound trigger musical instruments
US20060150797A1 (en) Stringed musical instrument with multiple bridge-soundboard units
US3780612A (en) Stringed musical instruments
US4054079A (en) Keyboard and notation system
Ammer The facts on file dictionary of music
Kubik African tone-systems: a reassessment
US4545281A (en) Device for string instruments for adjusting chords
JP3217159U (en) Cord holding aid for stringed instruments
Sadie et al. The Cambridge music guide
US1094038A (en) Mechanical fingering device for stringed musical instruments.
Boyden The Violin and its Technique in the 18th Century