US2664911A - Combination pressure and vacuum tank - Google Patents

Combination pressure and vacuum tank Download PDF

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US2664911A
US2664911A US13376A US1337648A US2664911A US 2664911 A US2664911 A US 2664911A US 13376 A US13376 A US 13376A US 1337648 A US1337648 A US 1337648A US 2664911 A US2664911 A US 2664911A
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tank
valve
oil
pump
pipe
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US13376A
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Clarence S Thompson
George E Clark
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Clarence S Thompson
George E Clark
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60PVEHICLES ADAPTED FOR LOAD TRANSPORTATION OR TO TRANSPORT, TO CARRY, OR TO COMPRISE SPECIAL LOADS OR OBJECTS
    • B60P3/00Vehicles adapted to transport, to carry or to comprise special loads or objects
    • B60P3/22Tank vehicles
    • B60P3/24Tank vehicles compartmented
    • B60P3/243Tank vehicles compartmented divided by rigid walls
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/2931Diverse fluid containing pressure systems
    • Y10T137/3109Liquid filling by evacuating container
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7287Liquid level responsive or maintaining systems
    • Y10T137/7358By float controlled valve
    • Y10T137/7381Quick acting
    • Y10T137/7387Over center mechanism
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7287Liquid level responsive or maintaining systems
    • Y10T137/7358By float controlled valve
    • Y10T137/7423Rectilinearly traveling float
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7287Liquid level responsive or maintaining systems
    • Y10T137/7358By float controlled valve
    • Y10T137/7423Rectilinearly traveling float
    • Y10T137/7426Float co-axial with valve or port
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/8593Systems
    • Y10T137/86187Plural tanks or compartments connected for serial flow
    • Y10T137/86212Plural compartments formed by baffles

Description

Jan. 5, 1954 c. s. THOMPSON ET AL COMBINATION PRESSURE AND VACUUM TANK 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 6, 1948 ill fi'iiiikyaill 50 Lil-l Cz/wz/vcs $1 73 041, 50 65026.6 5. CLARK Awavraxs Arroxwzr Jan. 5, 1954 c. s. THOMPSON ET AL 2,664,911

COMBINATION PRESSURE AND VACUUM TANK Filed March 6, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 C'mxmcz 5'. Manama 65mm; 5 CLARK Avravroxs Patented Jan. 5, 1954 OFFICE COMBINATION PRESSURE AND VACUUM.

TANK

Clarence S. Thompson and George E. Clark, Long Beach, Calif;

Application March 6, 1948, serial N 0. 13,376

'7' Claims. (Cl. 137-205) Our invention relates to the field of tanks, and

more particularly to a combination pressure and vacuum tank adapted to load and unload liquidmaterial therefrom. v

Frequently in the petroleum industry it is desirable to recover crude oil from such locations in the field as sumps or the cellars under =derricks where suitable pumping equipment is normally not available, and to temporarily store the recovered oil until 'it can be transported to permanent storage facilities or used for maintenance purposes. It has been found from experience that oil recoveredf-rom suinps and cellarsis normally mixed with considerable foreign material, and that "such material may have a highly abr'asiveaction on pumps which are used for such recovery purposes. In addition, the'oil present in sumps may be only a relatively thin film floating on water, with the result that it is not practical to attempt to recover same with conventional pumping equipment.

Although the film of oil floating on water in a sump may be relatively thin, the amount of oil which is potentially recoverable from- "each sump will normally run from 50 barrels upwardly. It is therefore to recover this oil situated in a sump rather than 'h'aving'it burned from the surfaceof the water on which it is floating as is -a-common practice in some localities that we have devised our present invention.

'It is a major object of our invention to provide a portable apparatus that can be move'd to alocation where crude oil -'is situated and'loadsam'e into a tank without having the oil flow through a pump, that will be adapted to temporarily store the recovered oil until such time as it can he transported to permanent storage facilities or used in the field for maintenancework, and will be adapted to unload the oil from the temporary storage tank without having it new through a pump during this operation.

Another object of our invention is to furnish an apparatus that will recover crude oil, whenv it is situated as a relatively thin film ona body of water, that will be little affected 'byabrasive foreign material held in suspension in-the *oil, will have a simple mechanical structure, can be easily manufactured, will have a minimum of working parts, and can sold at'aprice which will previously considered waste oil that is now salvaged.

A further object of our invention is to supply an apparatus that requires but one pump to alternately place air'pressure and vacuum on the storagetank, that automatically stops loading oil upon the storage tank being filled, that is provided with a nozzle- -particul'a-rly adapted for skimming and recovering o'ilfloating on water, and can easily be operated by one man.

These and other objects and advantages of our invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred form thereof, and from the drawings illustrating that form in which:

Fig. 1 a side ele'vational View of our combination pressure and vacuum oi-l storage tank mounted on a conventional power-operated truck;

Fig. 2 is an end elevational 'v iewof the device;

Fig. 3 is-a vertical cross-sectional view of the device taken on the fines-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of a combination bumper and spray pipe used in connec't'ion with 'th'eitank Fig. 5 is -a vertical cross-sectional view of the tank taken on-the line 5-5 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 6 is a vertical cross-sectional view of a float-valveassemblyandscrubberused in the de vice, with the valve inthe open'position;

'7 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the floatgvalv'e assembly, with the valve in the closed position} Fig. '8 is a horizontal cross-sectional view of the toggle mechanism used in. connection with our fioatvalve taken'on'the line 8-8 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8A is a plan view of a modified form of toggle mechanism which canbe used in connection with our float-valve;

Fig. 9' isaperspective view of the device being used in recovering an oil filmfioating on water 111a sump Fig. 10 is a vertical cross-sectional view of a nozzle adapted for skimming oil from the surfaceof water in'a sump;

Fig. 11 is a vertical cross-sectional view of anothr'form of nozzle which is also adapted for skimming, oil from the surface of water in a sump; I

Fig: 12 is 8. plan view of a-puin with a hori- 3 zontal cross-sectional view of the valve control used in connection therewith, with the valve being positioned whereby air pressure is placed on the tank; and,

Fig. 13 is a plan view of the pump with a hori zontal cross-sectional view of the control used in connection therewith, with the valve being positioned whereby a vacuum is placed on the tank.

Referring now to Fig. l for the general arrangement of our invention, it will be seen that a cylindrical tank T is supported in a. longitudinal position from the chassis of a motor-powered vehicle V, with the vehicle being provided with :1 pump P whereby either air pressure or a vacuum can be placed on the tank. Thus upon air pressure being applied to the tank T the oil contained therein is forced outwardly through a discharge valve D as can best be seen in Fig. 2, and upon vacuum being applied thereto oil is drawn into the tank through a valve S provided for that purpose. It will of course be apparent that during the time the tank T is filled with oil the valve D is in the closed position.

The tank T is preferably formed from welded steel plates in the form of an elongated cylindrical shell ID having bumped ends ll of a conventional design, with the entire tank assembly being constructed sufficiently heavy as to withstand both the air pressure and vacuum to which it will be subjected. Laterally spaced along the upper portion of the shell are two hand holes l2, each having a cover plate I3 provided thereon which is removably held in place by a conventional screw mechanism adapted for this purpose. Either of the hand holes 12 is sufficiently large as to have a hose lowered therein whereby the tank can be washed out, with the progress of the work being observed from the opposite hand hole.

Situated on the upper portion of the tank T between the forwardly disposed hand hole I2 and the forward pumped end I I is a vertical upwardly extending flanged condition [4. A flanged inverted dome 15 is pivotally mounted on an upright member [6 which is welded or otherwise secured to the upper portion of the shell ID, with the dome being adapted when rotated to a vertical position to engage the nozzle l4 to which it is secured by bolts in a conventional manner.

A 90-degree elbow I1 extends downwardly from the lower rearward portion of the tank T, and has a valve D affixed to its outer end whereby the flow of fluid from the tank T can be controlled. Although any one of the conventional type valves can be used as the valve D, we have found it convenient to apply a quick opening valve which is placed in the open or closed position by a single vertical movement of the handle l8. Another QO-degree elbow l 9 extends downwardly from the lower rearward portion of the tank T adjacent to the elbow l1, and has the valve S mounted on its rearward end. The valve S is also of the quick opening type and is actuated by a vertically movable handle 20. In Figs. 2 and 3 it will be seen that the discharge valve D is of somewhat larger size than the valve S for reasons which will hereinafter be explained. A stand pipe 2| extends vertically upward within the confines of the tank T from the upper end of the elbow 19, with the upper end of the stand pipe being spaced approximately one-quarter of the inside diameter of the tank T from the upper inner surface thereof.

In Fig. 1 it will be seen that a combination bumper and spray pipe 22 is transversely positioned across the rearward portion of the vehicle V, and supported by a pair of laterally spaced substantially horizontal members 22A. A standard pipe reducer 23 is affixed to one end of the spray pipe 22, with its engaging end being blanked oil from the balance of the pipe 22 by a plate 23A welded in a vertical position inside the reducer. Threaded to the outer end of the reducer 23 is a fan shaped nozzle 24 having its slit like orifice vertically positioned to spray oil outwardly as a vertical blanket against embankments such as are normally built around oil storage tanks in tank farms. By the spraying of oil on such embankments the growth of weeds and vegetation which would normally take place thereon i eliminated.

To furnish oil to the nozzle 24 a pipe 25 is connected to an upwardly extending nipple which is welded to the reducer 23 on the outer side of the plate 23A, with the pipe 25 being provided with a valve 26 prior to its being placed in communication with the elbow I! by a suitable fitting situated thereon forwardly from the valve D. A pipe 21 is also placed in communication with the opposite side of the elbow ll forwardly from the valve D by engaging a suitable fitting connected thereto and is provided with a shut-off valve 28 situated in a convenient location.

The spray pipe 22 as can best be seen in Fig. 4 is formed with downwardly extending laterally spaced perforations 29 on the lower portion thereof, and a horizontally positioned and rearwardly sloping baffle strip 30 which serves to direct the oil passing through the perforations rearwardly from the truck in the spraying of roads. Of course, if it is desired an individual rearwardly extending finger can be placed under each of the perforations 29 rather than the above described baffle 30. Thus it will be seen that oil can be sprayed from the nozzle 24 or the perforations 29 by opening the appropriate valve 26 or 28 respectively, or should it be desired to unload oil through the valve D it is placed in the open position after a hose 30 is attached thereto by a coupling 3| in a conventional manner.

It will be apparent that when oil is being discharged through one of the lines controlled by the valve 26, 28, or D that the balance of the valves must be in the closed position. However, it may be desirable at times to spray both a road and an embankment in which case both the valves 28 and 28 are placed in the open position.

In order that the tank T can be loaded with oil through the elbow I9 and stand pipe 21 a vacuum is placed on the tank by use of the pump P which is belt driven in a single direction by a conventional power take off from the engine of the vehicle V. The pump P which is of the blower type, vacuum and pressure variety, is pref erably positioned on the vehicle V near the forward end of the tank T, and is controlled by a 4-way plug cock 40 whereby either air pressure or a vacuum can be placed on the tank T without reversing the direction of the pump.

A pair of laterally spaced movable rods 38 are fixed to the rotatable portion of the cock 40, and extend rearwardly in a horizontal plane alongside the tank T. One of these rods is visible in Fig. 1. Each of the rods 38 is supplied on the rearward end with a handle 39 whereby a man operating the valves D and S can by movement of the appropriate rod 38 control the position of the rotatable portion of the plug cock 40. Such an arrangement is highly convenient in that the operator has more control over all of the preanemia:

being; placed in the position shown in Fig. 1-2 air is pulled inwardly through the combined air intake and discharge muffler 4i to flow through a pipe 42 into the cook 40. The air on entering. the cook 49 flows through a bore l3 formed in the rotatable portion thereof to enter a suction line -4 leading to the pump P, and from whence.

it is discharged through a pipe 45 to again'ent'er the cook. The air flows from the pipe 45'through a bore 46 provided in the rotatable portion of the cock to enter a pipe '4'! which is sealed to and passes through the forwardly positionedrtan-kend H. When it is desired to remove air from the tank T to permit same to be filled with fluid, the rotatable plug portion of the valve '49 is rotated 90 degrees in a counterclockwise 'directicmv to the position'show'n in Fig. 13 and air-'drawn'fr'om the tank T through thepi-pe 4'1 and bore "46 to enter the pump intake line 44, and is discharged from the pump through a pipe 45, bore. 43, pipe 42; and muiller 4| to the atmosphere. Thus, with the above described valving arrangement the pump P can be utilized in providing either air pressure or vacuum on the tank T by simply rotating the movable portion of the cook 49 ninety degrees.

The pipe 4 after passing through the forwardly positioned tank end I l proceeds rearwardly to a vertically positioned separator 48 to which itxis placed in communication by conventional pipe fittings. Separator 48 is formed as an enclosed hollow cylinder having a flanged 'connection 49 extending upwardly from the top portion thereof, and a drain pipe 50 which is of considerably smaller diameter than the separator which proceeds downwardly from the base portion thereof. Drain pipe 59 passes through the lower portion of the tank T to which it is sealed,

and is provided on the lower'end on the exterior of the tank with a valve 50a. By the use of the valve 50a 'either foam or oil which -'has'accumulated in the separator 48 can be removed therefrom by simply opening the valve, and placing a suitable container thereunder for the oil to drain in. It will be noted that the nozzle 49 extends downwardly inside the separator '48 a substantial distance below where the pipe 47 enters, in order that foam or oil entering the separator will not be drawn outwardly through the pipe 41 into the pump. Y

As the impeller on the blower type pressure and vacuum pump which we prefer to use fits veryclosely to the interior surface of the housing it is-highly undesirableto have any foreigninate' rial such as oil or water enter the confines of the pump.

A vertically-positioned. and upwardly extending pipe 5 l having-a flangeon its lower end is'afiixed to the upper face-of the flange connection "45 in a conventional manner by the-use'of bolts. The upper open end of the pipe 5! serves as a valve seat 52, and is formed. with a downwardly and inwardly extending bevel that is preferably faced with brass. An annular ring'53 is secured to the interior face of pipe 54' as can best be seen in Fig. 6, and serves as axsupp'ort for two laterally spaced guide strips '5": that are supported from the upper surface thereof, and two similar guide strips 55 that-are fixed'to'the'bottom race'thereof. Each of the strips Stand 55- is formed with a centrally disposed. arcuate indentation on the interior edge. thereof which serves aszaguide for a vertically-moveablerrod 56. -A;hori'zonta-ll y positioned annular valve disc 51 is rigidlymounted on the, rod 56, and is provided with a'downwardlyand inward-1y beveled periphery having. "a groove formed therein which contains an annular ring 58 formed from a resilient material which is adapted to'seat on the valve seat 52.

Thesrod 5'6 isimoveably-"supported from ai'lorizontally positioned pin 59- that engages the -for-- ward 'end. of a lever 60, which lever as can best be seen from Fig. -6 is pivotally supported .from an arm 6| that extends upwardly from "a horizontal support '62 which is aflixed to the exterior surface of the pipe 51. A vertical bore 63 "is formed in the rearward end portion of the support '62 and has a rod '64 slidably mounted'therein. The rod64' on its upper end is pi'votally connected to the rearward end 01 the lever 60, and onits lower end. is provided with a horizontally posh tioned: annular pressure plate '65. Situated: below. the pressure plate 65 are two vertically spaced horizontal arms 66 which also extend rearwardly from the exterior surface of the pipe 51, with each arm being formed with a vertical bore 61" therein which is in alignment with the bore 53. Av vertically positioned rod 68 is slidably'mounted in the bores 61, and "is' providedon its upper end with a horizontally positioned pressure plate-6'9 Which is adapted to contact thep'late when the rod 68 is moved upwardly by a's ph'ericalfloat 10' that is'affi'xed to the lower endthe'reof.

In order that the valve disc '51 will eitl-ier beoccupying the open position shown in Fig; 6 01' the closed position s hown-in Fig. '7, two oppositely disposed strips 15 of Phosphor bronze or a corirosion resisting'me'tal'ar'e positioned between the strips 54 and 55, with one end of each of'the strips Tibeir'ig pivotallyand-slidably connected to a pin 11 that extendsthrough the'rod56, "and the outer end bi each of the strips beingrotatably suppo'rtedfrom an individual horizontally positioned p'in T'Bthat' is mounted in a convenient manner from the interior base of the ring 5?f. Each of the strips 15 is sufficientlylonggsothat it will pivot and slide on the pin 1 to act sa toggle, and will not remain in ast'able position in the horizontal plane, but'will force the valve disc 51 either into the open "or closed position when actuated by a pair of helical springs-J15. Extending along the longitudinal sidesof the strips 15 are the two laterally spacedhelical springs TBfwhich are supported between two crossbars 80, 'each of which is mounted 'on the outer end of (one of the strips The sprin Hare atall times in tension, and have sufficient strength to hold the valve disc 51 in the open position until the tension of the springs is overcome by pressure applied totheplate 63"which occurs fr o'm the pressure exerted by float H! as the 'levelof, oilfin the tank rises. How'ever, once the valve disc Fl-has been placed in the closed I position as shownin Fig. '7 the sprin s 19. have sufilcient strength to maintain it in this; position until air is forced into the separator 48 by use of the pump P. V

An alternate form of toggle mechanism is shown in Fig. 8A which is of'extremely simple construction. Two strips 15' ofa'thinfresilient material are"pivotally'connected at one endto'the pin 11, and on, the other end to a horizontally p sitioned pin 18 as previously described. The w strips 15' are sufficijentlyg long so that" they will;

not remain 'in "a "horizontal "plane in which position they are slightly bowed, but will assume either an upwardly or downwardly extending position to hold the valve disc in an open or closed position respectively. This form of toggle is differentiated from the previously described form in that no springs 19 are used for the toggle action, which is achieved by the resiliency of the strips 15 themselves.

Upon it being desired to use the tank T in removing oil from a sump the truck V is moved into a convenient location with reference thereto. A length of nose 82 which is normally carried in a longitudinally extending rack 83 that is supported from the tank T as can best be seen in Figs. 1 and 2 is removed, and by the use of a coupling 82A affixed thereto is connected to the valve S.

In Fig. 9 it will be noted that the hose 82 is used in the skimming of oil from a sump, and that a fan shaped nozzle 84 is affixed to the outer end thereof. However, when the hose 82 is being used for removing oil from such a location as a cellar under a derrick the nozzle 84 can be dispensed with and the lower end of the hose dropped directly under the surface of the liquid. In Fig. 10 is shown a vertical cross-sectional view of one form of our nozzle 84 which we have found to be particularly effective in the removing of thin films of oil from the surface of water. The upper end of the nozzle 84 is formed with an internally tapped portion 85 which permits it to be threaded to the nipple provided on the lower end of the hose 82, and from which the balance of the fan shaped nozzle slopes outwardly to terminate in a relatively narrow slit 86 which is provided on the lower edge thereof with an inwardly extending lip 81.

It will be apparent that upon the nozzle 84 being used for the recovery of oil as shown in Fig. 9 that air is drawn inwardly through the passage 86 with a very high velocity by the pump P, with the result that the oil floating on the water is drawn inwardly through the nozzle in a very efficient manner and but slightly contaminated by the water on which it is floating. It has been found from experiments that the inwardly extending lip 81 shown in Fig. 10 aids materially in skimming oil from the water, as does the downwardly extending lip 88 shown in the alternate form of nozzle 84 in Fig. 11. The lip 88 is preferably formed by folding the lower edge portion of the orifice of nozzle 84 rearwardly on itself for reinforcing purposes. Both of the nozzles shown in Figs. 10 and 11 are identical except as to the structures 81 and 88, and although the above described lips 81 and 88 are definitely advantageous in removing oil from a body of water the theoretical reason as to why this occurs is not fully understood.

As the tank T is subjected to both vacuum and air pressure it is of course essential that the tank be reinforced to withstand such varying conditions, and at the same time permit all of the oil which is held within the confines of the tank to drain from the valve D. In Fig. 5 it will be noted that an inverted U-shaped reinforcing member 90 is afiixed to the interior of the shell [0, but that an open space 9| is left between the lower ends of the member which permit liquid to flow along the bottom portion of the tank T. An annular member 92 having the proper structural cross section is situated directly under the member 98 on the lower exterior surface of the tank, and substantially overlaps the lower portion of the inte- ,Jnember 80, extending upwardly to within a relatively short distance of an L-shaped clip 93 which is positioned on each side of the tank T. Stud bolts 94 engage vertically positioned bores formed in both members 93 and 94, and thus the tank T is firmly held in position on the member 92 without recourse to straps extending around the exterior surface of the tank.

Situated between the upper surface of the member 92 and the exterior surface of the tank T is a felt pad 92A which permits a slight movement of the tank with relation to the member 92 as the tank is being transported over rough terrain, but at the same time holds the tank in a fixed position on the truck bed. The members 92, as can be seen in Fig. 5 are supported from vertically positioned plates 94 which are afllxed to the longitudinally extending channel-shaped mem-- bers 95 that form a portion of the truck chassis.

In Figs. 3 and 5 it will be seen that a vertically extending baffle 96 is affixed to the forward face of the reinforcing member inside the tank T, and is strengthened by welding angle iron members 81 to the interior surface of the tank T. In order that access may be easily had to the hand holes [3 and the dome [5 a longitudinally extending runway 98 is provided directly above the hose racks 83 on each side of the vehicle V as can best be seen in Figs. 1 and 2.

The operation of our invention is quite simple. The vehicle V ismoved to a position whereby a length of hose 82 can be aflixed to the suction valve S and the hose is either dropped into a sump from which it is desired to recover oil, or should the oil be floating on the surface of a liquid one of the nozzles 84 is aflixed to the outer end of the hose 82 and the oil skimmed therefrom as previously described.

However prior to starting the recovery of oil either by use of the hose 82 itself, or with a nozzle 84 afiixed thereto, it is necessary to place a vacuum on the tank which is accomplished by starting the pump P and moving one of the rods 38 to rotate the movable portion of the cock 48 to the position shown in Fig. 13.

As the vacuum on the tank T increases air is drawn inwardly through the hose 82 with great velocity and carries with it oil from the sump from which recovery is taking place. Of course with the pump P operating to create a vacuum on the tank T oil will immediately be drawn upwardly into the tank when the lower end of hose 82 is placed beneath the surface of the oil such as is done when oil is being recovered from the cellar under a derrick. Oil will continue to enter the tank T through the elbow l9 and standpipe 2| until the liquid level therein is only a short distance from the interior top portion of the tank T. At this time the liquid level contacts the spherical float 10 as shown in Fig. 6 and the rod 68 moves the pressure plate 89 upwardly until it contacts the lower surface of pressure plate 65. As further pressure is applied to the plate 65 the rod 58 supporting the valve disc 57 is moved downwardly as are the strips 15 until they act as a toggle due to springs 19, and snap downwardly from the position shown in Fig. 6 to t Shown in pon this occurring the resilient ring 58 is pressed into contact with the valve seat 52 and an airtight seal is effected between the scrubber 48 and the interior of tank T. It will be apparent from an examination of Fig. 3 that no further air can be withdrawn from the tank T through the pipe 41 until such time as the valve disc 51 again occupies the position shown In 6. Thus the springs 19 are now holding the valve disc in a closedposition where it will so remain until air pressure is placed on the lower face of valve disc-51 by operation of the pump P to move the disc into the open positio As the tank T is now loaded the vehicle V- is driven to a location where the oil contained in the tank will either be placed in permanent storage facilities or used in maintenance work on the field. In the normal recovery ofoil from sumps and cellars under derrick-s it is quite 'usualffor the vehicle V to be driven over relatively rough roads with the result that the oil contained the tank I is in a constant state of movement and slcshes from one end of the tank to the-other. However the movement of the oil within the tank is some i what restricted by the vertically positionedbaiiie '96 which has a tendencyto hold the movement of the oil to a minimum. It will be, apparent that were, it not for the valve disc 51 being held in a closed position by the previouslydescribed toggle valve there-would bea distinct tendency for oil and foam to pass over into'the separator 48 during the time that the valve disc 51 is in the open position due to the vertical movement of float 10,

However, from an examination of Figs. 6 and '7 I it will be seen that this is impossible for while the level of the oil moves upwardly and down- Wardly due to the movement of truck T over rough terrain, and the float moves therewith,

there is no fixed connection between the pressure plates 63 and E9 and the vertical movement of the spherical float 10 has no influence on theposition of the valve disc 51 once it has assumed the closed position shown in Fig. 7. Upon the ve:

hicle V having reached its destination where it i is desired to unload the oil from the tank T the pump P is started and oneof the ods 38 moved to place the rotatable portion of cock 4 0 in the position shown in Fig. 12 whereupon air pressure is placed on thevalve disc 51 and it is moved upwardly to assume the open position shown in Fig. 6.

It will be apparent that upon the valve disc 51 being moved to the open position by. air pressure that there is air pressure on theupper surface of the liquid H as shown in Fig. 3, and upon the valve D being opened oil will be immediately dis charged therefrom. However it frequently haplpens that in the recovery of oil fromsuch locations as the cellars under derricks that it is material, and that this material when drawn upwardly into the tank T settles along the bot tom thereof in a pattern shown by the phantom line It! in Fig. 3. Upon this contingency 00- curring we have found that the foreign material has a tendency to pack very solidly, and that even by the application of pressure to the surface of the liquid I06 that the settled material will not be forced from the discharge valve D.

To alleviate this condition the upper portion of the liquid in the tank T is drained therefrom by using the standpipe. 21, elbowl9, and the suction valve S for discharge purposes, and thelevel of the liquid lowered to, the top of the standpipe 2!. With the pump P operating vacuum and air pressure are alternately placed on the tank T by movement of the cock tov first the position shown in Fig. 12 and then to the position shown in Fig. 13. This alternate applicationof pressure and vacuum has been found'from experience'to cause thesolidly packed foreign material to be churned up with the oil into a mixture that can be drained from the tank '1 through the valve. D in the normal manner. However, 'for the applimixed with a considerable amount of foreign cation of alternate air pressure and vacuum to be most eifecti-ve in churning up the deposited material the spacein the interior upper portion of the tank down to the top of the st-andpipe 2| must be made available for the application of'such air pressure and vacuum by th above described operation. Thus it will be seen that whether the recovered oilis totally'free of foreign material or whether it is heavily contaminatedtherewith the above described device is not only fully capable ofloading the oil without it flowingthrough the pump lEfbut is equally capable of discharging the oilfunder the same conditions. It will be apparcut that "while we have illustrated our invention with'particular reference to the petroleum indust-ry that it will also have numerous other industrial uses "where it is desired to recover liquid products.

Although it has been found that a conventional floatvalv assembly can be used to actuate the valve disc 51 such a valve has the disadvantage that it is actuated by the movement of oil in the tank as the vehicle V travels over rough ground. Thisof course results'in the floatalter nately opening and closing the'valve disc 51, with the result that oil and foam spill overinto the scrubber when the valve disc 51 is in the open position. Such oil and foam must be drained from'the separator by the use of valve 50;: to prevent it being drawn into pump P through the pipe 41, and possibly doing considerable damage thereto. v

While the above device herein described is fully capable of attainingithe objects and providing the advantages herein-before stated, it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the presently preferred form of our invention, and that wedo not mean to limit ourselves to the detailsof construction herein shown and described other than as defined in the appended claims.

We claim 1. A portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus which includes: a tank; a pump onerable to alternately furnish either air pressure or a vacuum; pipe means connecting said pumpv to the interior of said tank, said pipe means including an end portion disposed atthe upper portion of said tank; a first valve selectively actuable so as to admit liquid material into said tank up n said pump being operated to place, a vacuum upon said pipe means; float-operated valve means positioned in said end portion for closing said end portion when the level of said liquid ma-, terial reaches a predetermined height Within said tank; means for holding said float-operated valve means tl$ i until said pump is operated to place a positive air pressure on said pipe means; and a second valve selectively operable to, permit said liquid material to be discharged from said tan-k upon said. pump being'operated to place positive air pressure on said pipe means.

'2; In a portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus having a tank, a vehicle supporting said tank, a pump supported on said vehicle and. being operable to alternately furnish either air pressure or a vacuum, pipe means connecting said pumpto the interior of said tank and in; cluding an end portion disposed at the upper portion of said tank, and a valve selectively actu-q able to admit liquid material into said tank upon said pump being operated to place avacuum upon sa d pe means he com ina n t l idv ape paratus whichincludesi float valve means 'posi tioned in said end portion to close said end por- 1 1 tion when the level of said liquid material reaches a predetermined height within said tank; and spring means connected to said float valve means so as to hold said means closed until said pump is operated to place positive air pressure on said pipe means.

3. In a portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus of the class described having a tank, and power driven pump means adapted to supply either air pressure or vacuum to the interior of said tank: a separator positioned inside said tank and connected to said pump; a float valve connected to said separator to control the communication between said separator and the interior of said tank; valve means selectively actuable to permit liquid to be discharged from said tank when said pump means is operated so as to place air pressure on the interior of said tank; valve means selectively actuable to permit liquid to be admitted within said tank when said pump means is operated so as to place a vacuum upon the interior of said tank; and spring means to hold said float valve closed until said pump means is operated so as to place air pressure on the interior of said tank.

4. A portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus which includes: a tank; power driven pump means adapted to supply either air pressure or a vacuum to said tank; a pipe connecting said pump means to said tank; a cylindrical separator vertically positioned in said tank, with said separator having a beveled valve seat formed at the upper end thereof, and a lower discharge pipe, the upper portion of said separator being formed with an annular baflled passageway in communication with said pipe; a valve disc adapted to engage said valve seat; spring means for holding said valve disc against said seat; a pivotally mounted arm movably connected to said valve disc; a float, which upon rising to a predetermined elevation, pivots said arm to seat said disc; means for permitting the discharge of liquid from said tank upon said pump placing air pressure on the interior of said tank through said separator valve seat; and means for permitting liquid to be admitted into said tank upon said pump placing a vacuum on the interior of said tank through said valve seat, the loading of said liquid being stopped upon said float being raised by the level of liquid in said tank to a predetermined height whereby said valve disc is forced into said valve seat to place the interior of said tank and said valve disc out of communication, said spring means holding said disc closed until air pressure is placed on said valve disc by said pump.

5. A portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus which includes: a tank; a power driven pump adapted to supply either air pressure or a vacuum to said tank; a pipe connecting said pump to the upper portion of said tank; a separator in said tank, with said separator having a beveled valve seat, and said separator being connected at the end of said pipe; a valve disc adapted to engage said valve seat; spring means for holding said valve disc in position in said seat; a pivotally mounted lever movably connected to said valve disc; at downwardly extending rod pivotally connected to the opposite end of said lever; a slidably mounted member in substantially vertical alignment with said rod; a float aflixed to said member; valve means connected to the lower portion of said tank for permitting the discharging of liquid from said tank upon said pump placing air pressure on the interior of said tank through said separator valve seat; and valve means connected to said tank for permitting the admission of liquid into said tank upon said pump placing a vacuum on the interior of said tank through said valve seat, the loading of said liquid being stopped upon said float being raised to a predetermined position whereupon said member is moved upwardly to contact said rod and rotate said lever sufficiently to place said disc in said valve seat so as to block further communication between said separator and the interior of said tank, and said disc remaining so positioned due to said spring means until air pressure is placed on said disc by said pump.

6. A portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus which includes: a tank; a power driven pump adapted to supply either air pressure or a vacuum; a pipe connecting said pump to the upper portion of said tank; a separator vertically positioned in said tank, with said separator having a beveled valve seat at the upper end thereof, and said separator being connected to the end of said pipe by an annular bafiled passageway; a valve disc adapted to engage said valve seat; a toggle mechanism for holding said valve disc in position in said seat; a pivotally mounted lever movably connected to said valve disc; a downwardly extending rod pivotally connected to the opposite end of said lever; a slidably mounted member in substantially vertical alignment with said rod; a float afiixed to said member; valve means connected to said tank for permitting liquid to be discharged from said tank upon said pump placing air pressure on the interior of said tank through said separator valve seat; and valve means connected to said tank for permitting liquid to be admitted into said tank upon said pump placing a vacuum on the interior of said tank through said valve seat, with the loading of said liquid being stopped upon said float being raised to a predetermined position whereupon said member is moved upwardly to contact said rod and rotate said lever sufliciently to place said disc in said valve seat to block further communication between said separator and the interior of said tank, and said disc remaining so positioned due to said spring means until air pressure is placed on said disc by said pump.

'7. A portable vacuum and pressure tank apparatus which includes: a tank; a power driven air pump adapted to furnish either air pressure or a vacuum to said tank; a pipe connecting said pump to the upper portion of said tank; a discharge valve connected to the lower portion of said tank for draining said tank; an inlet valve connected to said tank for filling said tank; a standpipe extending upwardly inside said tank and in communication with said inlet valve to prevent a liquid from draining from said inlet valve after it has been placed in said tank; a separator in said tank mounted at the outlet end of said pipe, with said separator having a valve seat formed at the top thereof; a valve disc adapted to seat in said valve seat; a spring loaded toggle mechanism adapted to hold said valve disc firmly positioned in said valve seat after it has been moved therein; a float which upon rising to a predetermined elevation, moves said disc into said seat to block communication between said separator and the interior of said tank, and said disc remaining so positioned irrespective of the movement of liquid in said tank until sufficient air pressure is applied to said disc by 13 said pump to overcome the force of said toggle Number mechanism. 1,485,222 CLARENCE S. THOMPSON. 1,587,864 GEORGE E. CLARK. 1,725,581 5 1,725,620 References Cited in the file of this patent 1,9 4,147 UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,003,808 Number Name Date 39,169 Peck et a1. July 7, 1863 10 6 61,880 Serrell Feb. 5, 1867 2309043 1,104,633 Cressy July 21, 1914 2325274 1,162,565 Bufiat Nov. 30, 1915 2375442 1,421,038 Shocker June 27, 1922 1,437,916 Shelor Dec. 5, 1922 14 Name Date Ginty Feb. 26, 1924 Sargent June 8, 1926 Hendricks Aug. 20, 1929 Mumma, Aug. 2?, McCla'bchie 1 June 13, 1933 Mascuch June 1, 1935 Thwaits Jan. 11, 1938 Buchs Sept. 6, 1938 Bosh et a1. Sept. 13, 1938 Breckheimer Jan. 19, 19 13 Pye July 27, 19 13 Sandberg May 8, 1945

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Cited By (31)

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US2757686A (en) * 1954-07-30 1956-08-07 John M Maxwell Suction flow device
US2861708A (en) * 1958-03-12 1958-11-25 Pennsylvania Furnace And Iron Cargo tank
US3211171A (en) * 1963-02-28 1965-10-12 Sta Rite Products Inc Milking system
US3267509A (en) * 1965-02-12 1966-08-23 Holmes E Boyd Apparatus for cleaning septic tanks
US3315611A (en) * 1965-06-28 1967-04-25 Thompson Tank And Mfg Co Inc Portable vacuum and pressure liquid tank truck
US3319578A (en) * 1965-06-18 1967-05-16 Burlington Industries Inc Liquid transfer unit
US3398513A (en) * 1967-01-09 1968-08-27 David L. Thompson Scrubber apparatus
US3621893A (en) * 1969-09-10 1971-11-23 Shin Meiwa Ind Co Ltd Suction hose cleaning device for filth car
US3971400A (en) * 1975-01-24 1976-07-27 Thompson David L Portable vacuum and pressure liquid tank apparatus
US4057364A (en) * 1974-08-23 1977-11-08 John Bratschitsch Fluid transfer systems and valves therefor
US4114636A (en) * 1976-09-30 1978-09-19 Acf Industries, Incorporated Bottom operable air inlet and outlet valve
US4136973A (en) * 1976-07-01 1979-01-30 Lely Cornelis V D Mobile device for transporting liquid substances
US4186782A (en) * 1978-05-22 1980-02-05 Lou Scharf Portable arrangement for and method of transferring materials between open-mouthed containers
US4213479A (en) * 1978-11-07 1980-07-22 Industrial & Municipal Engineering, Inc. Eduction unit
FR2503645A1 (en) * 1981-04-14 1982-10-15 Sepur Sarl Tanker lorry for collecting and decanting waste water etc. - has multi:level drain valves for precise sepn. of clarified water from sludge
US4517099A (en) * 1983-10-07 1985-05-14 Breckner Raymond A Apparatus and method for handling solids in liquid
US4951704A (en) * 1989-08-22 1990-08-28 Reber Larry F Concealed relief systems for closed system fire tank trucks
DE4206214A1 (en) * 1992-02-28 1993-09-02 Ind Werke Saar Gmbh Maschinen Motor vehicle fuel tank with internal reinforcing baffles - which are further reinforced by sheet metal strips of increased thickness.
US5492144A (en) * 1994-06-29 1996-02-20 Kriewaldt; George Multi-compartmented vacuum tank
US5503753A (en) * 1995-03-01 1996-04-02 Wallace Woodall Vacuum Pumping Service, Inc. Apparatus and method for collecting and dewatering the contents of sanitary sewer traps
US6224345B1 (en) 1999-03-22 2001-05-01 Bijur Lubrication Corporation pressure/vacuum generator
US20040007272A1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-15 Vladimir Yliy Gershtein Vessel with optimized purge gas flow and method using same
US6837174B1 (en) 2003-10-16 2005-01-04 Alfred Rudolph Baurley Pneumatic bilge liquid removal system and method therefor
US20050168058A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-08-04 Eberling Charles E. Air system module including reservoir and mounting structure
US20070181583A1 (en) * 2006-02-08 2007-08-09 George Zacharias Portable double-walled fuel tank
US20110006068A1 (en) * 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Kaupp Patrick A Portable fluid storage tank and method of use
US20120055569A1 (en) * 2009-06-01 2012-03-08 Bycyrus International Inc. Sealed hydraulic tank system for mining shovel
US20130213502A1 (en) * 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Loren Van Wyk Fluid Delivery Device
US8763855B1 (en) 2009-12-07 2014-07-01 Hydrochem Llc Mounted bladder for storage tank
US20160262563A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2016-09-15 Accutemp Products, Inc. Method and apparatus for filling a steam chamber
US10101751B2 (en) 2015-06-26 2018-10-16 Ray Sonnenburg System and method of air pollution control for liquid vacuum trucks

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Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2757686A (en) * 1954-07-30 1956-08-07 John M Maxwell Suction flow device
US2861708A (en) * 1958-03-12 1958-11-25 Pennsylvania Furnace And Iron Cargo tank
US3211171A (en) * 1963-02-28 1965-10-12 Sta Rite Products Inc Milking system
US3267509A (en) * 1965-02-12 1966-08-23 Holmes E Boyd Apparatus for cleaning septic tanks
US3319578A (en) * 1965-06-18 1967-05-16 Burlington Industries Inc Liquid transfer unit
US3315611A (en) * 1965-06-28 1967-04-25 Thompson Tank And Mfg Co Inc Portable vacuum and pressure liquid tank truck
US3398513A (en) * 1967-01-09 1968-08-27 David L. Thompson Scrubber apparatus
US3621893A (en) * 1969-09-10 1971-11-23 Shin Meiwa Ind Co Ltd Suction hose cleaning device for filth car
US4057364A (en) * 1974-08-23 1977-11-08 John Bratschitsch Fluid transfer systems and valves therefor
US3971400A (en) * 1975-01-24 1976-07-27 Thompson David L Portable vacuum and pressure liquid tank apparatus
US4136973A (en) * 1976-07-01 1979-01-30 Lely Cornelis V D Mobile device for transporting liquid substances
US4114636A (en) * 1976-09-30 1978-09-19 Acf Industries, Incorporated Bottom operable air inlet and outlet valve
US4186782A (en) * 1978-05-22 1980-02-05 Lou Scharf Portable arrangement for and method of transferring materials between open-mouthed containers
US4213479A (en) * 1978-11-07 1980-07-22 Industrial & Municipal Engineering, Inc. Eduction unit
FR2503645A1 (en) * 1981-04-14 1982-10-15 Sepur Sarl Tanker lorry for collecting and decanting waste water etc. - has multi:level drain valves for precise sepn. of clarified water from sludge
US4517099A (en) * 1983-10-07 1985-05-14 Breckner Raymond A Apparatus and method for handling solids in liquid
US4951704A (en) * 1989-08-22 1990-08-28 Reber Larry F Concealed relief systems for closed system fire tank trucks
DE4206214A1 (en) * 1992-02-28 1993-09-02 Ind Werke Saar Gmbh Maschinen Motor vehicle fuel tank with internal reinforcing baffles - which are further reinforced by sheet metal strips of increased thickness.
US5492144A (en) * 1994-06-29 1996-02-20 Kriewaldt; George Multi-compartmented vacuum tank
US5503753A (en) * 1995-03-01 1996-04-02 Wallace Woodall Vacuum Pumping Service, Inc. Apparatus and method for collecting and dewatering the contents of sanitary sewer traps
US6224345B1 (en) 1999-03-22 2001-05-01 Bijur Lubrication Corporation pressure/vacuum generator
US20040007272A1 (en) * 2002-07-10 2004-01-15 Vladimir Yliy Gershtein Vessel with optimized purge gas flow and method using same
US6901941B2 (en) * 2002-07-10 2005-06-07 Air Products And Chemicals, Inc. Vessel with optimized purge gas flow and method using same
US20050168058A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-08-04 Eberling Charles E. Air system module including reservoir and mounting structure
US7117896B2 (en) * 2003-08-08 2006-10-10 Bendix Commercial Vehicle System Llc Air system module including reservoir and mounting structure
US6837174B1 (en) 2003-10-16 2005-01-04 Alfred Rudolph Baurley Pneumatic bilge liquid removal system and method therefor
US20070181583A1 (en) * 2006-02-08 2007-08-09 George Zacharias Portable double-walled fuel tank
US20160262563A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2016-09-15 Accutemp Products, Inc. Method and apparatus for filling a steam chamber
US9109612B2 (en) * 2009-06-01 2015-08-18 Caterpillar Global Mining Llc Sealed hydraulic tank system for mining shovel
US20120055569A1 (en) * 2009-06-01 2012-03-08 Bycyrus International Inc. Sealed hydraulic tank system for mining shovel
US20110006068A1 (en) * 2009-07-07 2011-01-13 Kaupp Patrick A Portable fluid storage tank and method of use
US8215516B2 (en) * 2009-07-07 2012-07-10 Kaupp Patrick A Portable fluid storage tank and method of use
US8919391B1 (en) 2009-12-07 2014-12-30 Hydrochem Llc Multilayered bladder and carbon scrubber for storage tank
US8763855B1 (en) 2009-12-07 2014-07-01 Hydrochem Llc Mounted bladder for storage tank
US9216885B1 (en) 2009-12-07 2015-12-22 Hydrochem Llc Bladder and engagement device for storage tank
US20130213502A1 (en) * 2012-02-22 2013-08-22 Loren Van Wyk Fluid Delivery Device
US10101751B2 (en) 2015-06-26 2018-10-16 Ray Sonnenburg System and method of air pollution control for liquid vacuum trucks
US10627837B2 (en) 2015-06-26 2020-04-21 Ray Sonnenburg System and method of air pollution control for liquid vacuum trucks

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