US262302A - Spring bed-bottom - Google Patents

Spring bed-bottom Download PDF

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US262302A
US262302A US262302DA US262302A US 262302 A US262302 A US 262302A US 262302D A US262302D A US 262302DA US 262302 A US262302 A US 262302A
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springs
bed
frames
corner
frame
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C23/00Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases
    • A47C23/04Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled
    • A47C23/043Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled using wound springs
    • A47C23/0438Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled using wound springs of special shape

Definitions

  • the object of my invention is to produce a strong, elastic, and comfortable bed bottom, which will be durable, will not lose its shape by use, and will be cleanly and free from insects.
  • myinvention consists primarily in the employment of rigid metallic frames in connection with a spring-bed.
  • Figure 1 is a diagrammatic plan view ofmyimproved bed
  • Fig. 2 is a detail perspective view of one corner of a bed.
  • the metallic bed-frames O are preferably made of bars or tubing. I prefer iron bars, however, as affording more strength and being less liable to break at the corners.
  • Each frame is formed in two parts or sections. Each section consists of a straight portion, 0, runnin g along the side of the bed and bent at each end, so as to embrace the head and foot of the bed and meet the ends of the opposite sections ofthe frame. The ends of the two sections are joined by collars D, which may be ordinary reversely-screw-threaded couplings or plain sockets, in which the ends of the sections fit. In the latter case the springs, when connected, would prevent the sections of the frame from separating; or the ends of the sections might be soldered or welded. I prefer to construct the frames in this manner.
  • the springs A which form the bed-bottom, are shown as of the ordinary hour-glass type, and I prefer to use springs of this character, although it will be obvious that any of the springs usually employed for bed bottoms might be used in my improved bed.
  • These springs are arranged in a bank or series within the metallic frames, and are connected with each other at top and bottom attheir four opposite sides by links a and b, the outersprings being linked to the rigid metallic frames 0 surrounding the top and bottom edges of the bank of springs. Wire stays E at each corner bind the frames together.
  • Each stay is secured to thelower frame a suitable distance from the corner, then passes to the upper frame near the corner, around the upper frame, across the corner, around the upper frame again, and then down to the lower frame, where it is secured.
  • the rigid frames permit the connected springs to adjust themselves to the body and prevent the springs from collapsing and the bed from becoming unshapely, and they impart compactness, elasticity, and durability to the bed in a marked degree.
  • Each spring acts independently, as is usual where the springs are connected with links, as shown, and yet they are all sustained and braced by the rigid frames to which the outer springs are connected, and prevented from swinging or being forced down laterally.
  • connection are such that the upper frame can yield when Weight is put upon it by any one sitting upon the edge of the bed, and when released it will be returned to its normal position by the clasticity of the parts.
  • the who stays prevent lateral motion of the frames. With metal bed frames and springs the bed will be entirely metallic. This is very unfavorable to insect life, and the bed can be kept perfectly clean and free from them.

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  • Springs (AREA)
  • Mattresses And Other Support Structures For Chairs And Beds (AREA)

Description

(N0 Mbdel.) P. H. MELLON.
SPRING BED BOTTOM.
No. 262,302. Patented Aug. 8, 1882.
' UNITED STATES PATENT @rrrciz.
PETER H. MELLON, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.
SPRING BED-BOTTOM.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 262,302, dated August 8, 1882,
Application filed June 16, 1882. (No model.)
To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, PETER H. MELLoN, of the city of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful '1 mprovcments in Spring Bed-Bottoms, of which the following is a specification.
The object of my invention is to produce a strong, elastic, and comfortable bed bottom, which will be durable, will not lose its shape by use, and will be cleanly and free from insects. I
To this end myinvention consists primarily in the employment of rigid metallic frames in connection with a spring-bed.
My invention also consists in certain other improvements, which will hereinafter be described and specifically claimed.
In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a diagrammatic plan view ofmyimproved bed, and Fig. 2 is a detail perspective view of one corner of a bed.
The metallic bed-frames O are preferably made of bars or tubing. I prefer iron bars, however, as affording more strength and being less liable to break at the corners. Each frame is formed in two parts or sections. Each section consists of a straight portion, 0, runnin g along the side of the bed and bent at each end, so as to embrace the head and foot of the bed and meet the ends of the opposite sections ofthe frame. The ends of the two sections are joined by collars D, which may be ordinary reversely-screw-threaded couplings or plain sockets, in which the ends of the sections fit. In the latter case the springs, when connected, would prevent the sections of the frame from separating; or the ends of the sections might be soldered or welded. I prefer to construct the frames in this manner.
The springs A, which form the bed-bottom, are shown as of the ordinary hour-glass type, and I prefer to use springs of this character, although it will be obvious that any of the springs usually employed for bed bottoms might be used in my improved bed. These springs are arranged in a bank or series within the metallic frames, and are connected with each other at top and bottom attheir four opposite sides by links a and b, the outersprings being linked to the rigid metallic frames 0 surrounding the top and bottom edges of the bank of springs. Wire stays E at each corner bind the frames together. Each stay is secured to thelower frame a suitable distance from the corner, then passes to the upper frame near the corner, around the upper frame, across the corner, around the upper frame again, and then down to the lower frame, where it is secured. The rigid frames permit the connected springs to adjust themselves to the body and prevent the springs from collapsing and the bed from becoming unshapely, and they impart compactness, elasticity, and durability to the bed in a marked degree. Each spring acts independently, as is usual where the springs are connected with links, as shown, and yet they are all sustained and braced by the rigid frames to which the outer springs are connected, and prevented from swinging or being forced down laterally. The connections are such that the upper frame can yield when Weight is put upon it by any one sitting upon the edge of the bed, and when released it will be returned to its normal position by the clasticity of the parts. The who stays prevent lateral motion of the frames. With metal bed frames and springs the bed will be entirely metallic. This is very unfavorable to insect life, and the bed can be kept perfectly clean and free from them.
In the hour-glass springs shown the end of the wire forming the last or outer coil at the top of each spring, instead of being cut off and fastened to the adjoining coil or secured in any other way, is bent back and coiled in the reverse direction, as clearly illustrated in the drawings. This leaves a loop, a, through which the end of the wire a is then passed. The end of the wire is hooked, as shown, and serves as a link to connect with the adjoining spring on that side. The springs, as shown in the drawings, may be similarly formed at the base, if desired. Such a construction affords a very secure connection between the springs and increases the facility with which they may be connected and disconnected. It also imparts an elasticity and flexibility to the entire bank of springs which cannot otherwise be obtained.
I am aware that a mattress having a series of springs connected together by four-armed links or braces and having wire binders extending around the top and bottom edges of the series of springs-is old. Such wire binders, however, perform a very materially different function from that of the rigid metallic frames in my improved springbed, and I therefore make no claim to such an organization.
I am also aware that rigid wooden frames surrounding the top and bottom edges ot'a bank of springs are old.
I am also aware that springs having their outer coils reversedand coiled in the opposite direction to form loops are old, and that the ends ot'the spiings have been fastened in the loops, and have also been passed through the loops and driven into the frame. I make no claim, therefore, to any such subject-matter.
In my Letters Patent No. 238,703, granted to me March 8, 1881, I have shown some of the subjectsmatter herein claimed; but no claims are made to such subjects-matter in that patent.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim specifically as new and patentable is 1. The combination, substantially as set forth, of the upper and lower rigid metallic frames and the bedbotto1n springs.
2. The combination of the series or bank of connected springs, the angular frame-sections to which the springs are connected, and the collars joining the ends of the sections, substantially as set forth.
The combination, substantially as set forth, of the series of connected springs, the upper and lower rigid frames to which the springs are connected at top and bottom, and a stay at each corner, which is secured to the lower frame a suitable distance from the corner, then to the upper frame near the corner, passes across the corner, is again secured to the upper frame, and then passes to the lower frame, as described.
4. The combination, substantially as set forth,of the bed-bottom springs, each ofwhich is formed with a loop therein, through which the end of the outer coil is passed and connected with the adjoining spring, and connections or links which also serve to connect the springs.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this 13th day of June, 1882.
PETER H. MELLON.
Witnesses:
LoUIs OHAUVENEr, PAUL 1". (JosTE.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6578216B1 (en) 1999-09-14 2003-06-17 Sunrise Medical Hhg Inc. Toroidal shaped bed construction

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6578216B1 (en) 1999-09-14 2003-06-17 Sunrise Medical Hhg Inc. Toroidal shaped bed construction

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