US2481971A - Smoking pipe - Google Patents

Smoking pipe Download PDF

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Publication number
US2481971A
US2481971A US775983A US77598347A US2481971A US 2481971 A US2481971 A US 2481971A US 775983 A US775983 A US 775983A US 77598347 A US77598347 A US 77598347A US 2481971 A US2481971 A US 2481971A
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United States
Prior art keywords
bowl
pipe
groove
air passages
rim
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Expired - Lifetime
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US775983A
Inventor
Joseph S Beeneck
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Joseph S Beeneck
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Priority to US775983A priority Critical patent/US2481971A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES
    • A24F5/00Bowls for pipes
    • A24F5/04Bowls for pipes with holes for admitting air

Description

Sept 13, 1949. y J. s. BgENECK 2,481,971
SMOKING PIPE Filed Sept. 25, 1947 gwvvm/bod I I Joseph S. Beenecky @Wade-f7- Patented Sept. 13, 1949 UNITED sTATEs PATENT Aortica SMOKING PIPE` Y Joseph S. Beeneck, Nanticoke, Pa.` Application september 25, 194i, serial No. 775,983
This invention relates to improvements in smoking pipes, and more particularly to a smoking pipe incorporating improved bowl cooling features.
Although the use of a pipe represents one of the most enjoyable forms of tobacco smoking, an objectionable -feature of pipe smoking arises from the fact that the heat generated by the burning tobacco in the pipe bowl is largely retained in the bowl wall, with the result that after the pipe has been lighted the bowl may become too hot to be handled comfortably, in addition to which the smoke passing to the mouth is so heated as to detract to a large measure from its pleasant taste. Accordingly, it is a general object of the invention to provide a pipe for smoking tobacco incorporating improved bowl cooling features designed to prevent the pipe bowl from becoming overheated during use.
Another objectfof the invention is to provide an improved tobacco pipe bowl which remains cool to the touch While being smoked. Yet another object of the invention is to provide a tobacco pipe in which the bowl thereof is shaped for convenient holding. A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel pipe bowl structure of unique and attractive appearance.
These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be in part apparent and in part pointed out in the following description of` a tobacco pipe according tothe invention, taken with a drawing illustrating a preferred form of bowl cooling means incorporated therein, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a preferred form of tobacco pipe incorporating the improved bowl cooling features according to the invention;
Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the tobacco pipe shown in Fig. 1; and
Fig. 3 is a section taken through the bowl along line 3-3 of Fig. 2;
Referring to the drawings in which like refererence numerals designate similar parts throughout the several views, Fig. 1 illustrates generally a tobacco pipe having a bowl member I formed with the usual stem II to which is connected a bit or mouthpiece I2. The stem and mouthpiece are provided with a smoke passage communicatng with the bowl cavity as is conventional.
According to the invention, the wall of the pipe bowl I0 is provided with a plurality of vertically -disposed cooling air passages I5 which are shown in Fig. 3 to extend downwardly from the bowl rim T6 into the base section I1 of the 4 Claims. (Cl. ISI- 195) bowl. It is to be noted that, while the air passages extend into the bowl base, they preferably do not open through the bottom surface thereof, but instead terminate in blind ends. Thus, the utilitarian purpose of the air passages, which will be'described hereinafter, is realized without destroying the smooth, finished appearance of 'the base of the bowl.
The bowl wall is also provided with an outwardly openingcircumferential groove I8 which extends completely around the outer face of the bowl wall in the vicinity of its mid section. While the width and exact location of the groove may be varied within reasonable limits, its depth is preferably such that in the formation of the groove the material of the bowl wall defining the outer periphery of the previously formed vertical air passages I5 is cut away for a substantial portion of Athe length of said passages, with the result that the air passages partially intersect the horizontal side walls of the groove I8 and open through the same, and that the inner perpheries of such passages form a plurality of vertical utes or ribs I9 which extend across the bottom of the groove I8. Specifically, the cutting of the groove has the effect of opening up the air passages from points above the blind lower ends thereof topoints substantially below the rim IB of the bowl. Accordingly, the air passages I5 in the upper-or rim section of the bowl are open at both ends, and a greatly increased surface area is developed in the baser section of the bowl, as represented by the lower side wall of the groove IB, and the walls defining the lower closed ends of the air passages I5 which extend into the bowl y base section.
It'will be observed that in a pipe bowl constructed as described three cooperating, interrelated cooling areas are provided in the wall of the bowl, as follows: First, the open-ended air passages I5 in the upper or rim section of the bowl act somewhat asi-lues, causing cooling air entering through groove I8 to pass upwardly through the passages as air therein becomes heated and tends to rise. Second, the radiating fins I9 extending across the groove bottom provide a cooling effect in the mid section of the bowl by virtue of the large surface area presented to the cool air moving thereacross into the air passages of the rim' section. Third, the lower ends of the passages which extend into the base of the bowl from the groove substantially reduce the heat retaining mass of the base section as a whole, while greatly increasing its surface area,
' thus permitting the heat which would otherwise the burning of the tobacco takes place in a local` ized area as the charge progressively burns.
If desired, the material of the wall of the rim section which separates adjacent pairs of air passages may be cut away in part, or even entirely, thus to increase the area of the air passages and to decrease the mass of the bowl wall likely*` to retain heat. In the illustrated pipe, the Wall material separating certain pairs of air passages has been cut away adjacent the iiin, as indicated at 2li, for the purpose of increasing the flow of air upwardly and of enhancing the cooling effect vobtained by the cooling air passages.
It will be observed that the circumferential groove I8 provided in the bowl mid section makes the pipe easy to hold since the ngers of the user fit naturally and comfortably along the groove, with the result that there is no requirement to grip the bowl tightly in order to hold it. A further feature of advantage of the groove construction 'resides in the fact that it is practically impossible for the smokers fingers to come in contact with the mid section of the bowl which is often the most intensely heated area. This feature, taken with the inherent cooling features of the improved bowl construction which provide for a cool smoke, also insures that the pipe bOWl will never be too hot to handle comfortably,
In addition to the utilitarian features provided by the groove and the cooling air passages, a pipe constructed as desscribed also possesses a. unique and unusually attractive appearance, thus adding to the usual pleasant and enjoyable features popularly associated with the use of a ne tobacco pipe.
As many changes could be made in carrying lout the above construction without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter vcontained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall "be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.
I claim:
1. A tobacco `pipe bowl having an outwardly opening circumferential groove formed in the mid section of its side Wall, and having Vertical air passages extending through said side wall from the upper rim of the bowl to said groove, the bottom of the groove consisting of vertically extending flutes and intermediate chan- -nels, said channels being in alignment with the air passages.
2. A tobacco pipe bowl having an upper rim section, a .mid section having an outwardly opening circumferential groove. and a.y base section, said base section having a series of vertically disposed holes therein opening into the groove of the mid-section, the rim section having a plurality of vertical air passages formed therein which also open into the groove, the air passages of the rim section and the holes of the base section being .vertically aligned.
3. A tobacco pipe bowl having a plurality of holes formed in its side wall which extend vertically from the rim of the bowl into the base 'thereoi and 'terminate in blind bottom ends, the
bowl being further provided with an outwardly 'opening circumferential groove formed in the mid section of its side wall, the depth of said groove being such as to cut across the vertically disposed holes for a portion of their length and intermediate their ends.
4. A tobacco pipe bowl having a plurality of holes :formed in its side wall which extend vertically from the rim of the bowl into the base thereofand terminate in blind bottom ends,l the bowl being Afurther provided with an outwardly opening circumferential groove formed in the mid-section or its side wall, the depth of said groove being such as'to 'cut across the vertically disposed holes vfor a portion of the length thereof vand said groove being provided with a series oi vertically disposed flutes extending across the bottom thereof.
JOSEPH S. BEENECK.
REFERENCES CITED The lfollowing references are of record in the le of this patent:
UNITED `STATES PATENTS Number I Name Date 858,737 Marshall July 2, 1907 1,585,743 Watters May 25, 1926 1,780,866 Copithorn Nov. 4, 1930 v1,986,730 Kinahan Jan. 1, 1935 2,329,578 lAndis Sept. 14, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number' Country Date 465,009 Great Britain Apr. 29, 1937
US775983A 1947-09-25 1947-09-25 Smoking pipe Expired - Lifetime US2481971A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2614568A (en) * 1950-05-29 1952-10-21 Batty Bernard Smoker's pipe
US2727520A (en) * 1953-06-19 1955-12-20 John P Parkinson Smoker's pipe

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US858737A (en) * 1906-08-16 1907-07-02 William Clarke Marshall Tobacco-smoking pipe.
US1585746A (en) * 1925-07-10 1926-05-25 Joseph A Watters Tobacco-smoking pipe
US1780866A (en) * 1927-05-27 1930-11-04 Walter E Copithorn Smoker's pipe
US1986730A (en) * 1934-01-16 1935-01-01 Kinahan Desmond Beresford Tobacco pipe
GB465009A (en) * 1936-08-04 1937-04-29 Sidney Naylor Improvements in or relating to tobacco pipes
US2329578A (en) * 1941-10-20 1943-09-14 Andis Clipper Co Tobacco pipe

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US858737A (en) * 1906-08-16 1907-07-02 William Clarke Marshall Tobacco-smoking pipe.
US1585746A (en) * 1925-07-10 1926-05-25 Joseph A Watters Tobacco-smoking pipe
US1780866A (en) * 1927-05-27 1930-11-04 Walter E Copithorn Smoker's pipe
US1986730A (en) * 1934-01-16 1935-01-01 Kinahan Desmond Beresford Tobacco pipe
GB465009A (en) * 1936-08-04 1937-04-29 Sidney Naylor Improvements in or relating to tobacco pipes
US2329578A (en) * 1941-10-20 1943-09-14 Andis Clipper Co Tobacco pipe

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2614568A (en) * 1950-05-29 1952-10-21 Batty Bernard Smoker's pipe
US2727520A (en) * 1953-06-19 1955-12-20 John P Parkinson Smoker's pipe

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