US2423454A - Lasting machine - Google Patents

Lasting machine Download PDF

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US2423454A
US2423454A US601564A US60156445A US2423454A US 2423454 A US2423454 A US 2423454A US 601564 A US601564 A US 601564A US 60156445 A US60156445 A US 60156445A US 2423454 A US2423454 A US 2423454A
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grippers
last
shoe
insole
machine
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US601564A
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Jorgensen Bernhardt
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last
    • A43D21/125Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last with a plurality of pincers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/16Lasting machines with lasting pincers and toe- or heel-embracing wipers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/18Lasting machines with lasting pincers and straight-acting wipers, also for forming the shank portions of shoes

Description

Search Room July 8, 1947. JORGENSEN 2,423,454.
LASTING MACHINE Filed June 26, 1945 8 Shets-Sheet 2 355 3&2,
[nven for Bernhardt Jrgensen 4 Search mom July 8, 1947. B. JORGENSEN LASTING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 26, 1945 In men for Bernhardt \Ergensen y his A tome aearcn R00"! y 1947- B. JORGENSEN 2,423,454
LASTING MACHINE Filed June 26, 1945 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 1 n ven for Bernhardt \byensen 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 1n ven for Bernhardt .Ergensen y 1947- B. JORGENSEN LASTING MACHINE Filed June 26, 1945 Search Rmm y 1947- B. JORGENSEN 2,423,454
LASTING' MACHINE Filed June 26, 1945 a Sheets-Sheet 8 I 4 f [nven for" 1 c Bernhardt Jargenscn 4% lfffi By his ttor Patented July 8, 1947 Search Room LASTING MACHINE Bernhardt Jorgensen, Marblehead, Mass, as-
signor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J a corporation of New Jersey Application June 26, 1945, Serial No. 601,564
109 Claims.
This invention relates to lasting machines, the term lasting being herein used in a broad sense as applicable generally to the shaping Or conforming of an upper to the contour of a last. The invention is herein illustrated as embodied in a machine for lasting the opposite sides of the foreto wipe the marginal-portion of the upper inwardly over an insole at the opposite sides of the forepart of the shoe from its toe portion to its waist or shank portion, the wipers including at each side of the shoe what may be termed for purposes of designation a main wiper and an additional wiper movable relatively to the main wiper with a component of movement lengthwise of the shoe toward its toe end to act on portions of the upper where the edge of the shoe bottom curves inward heelwardly of the ball line. Arranged to cooperate respectively with the different wipers are retarders which clamp the margin of the upper against the edges of the wipers to assist in conforming it to the contour of the last and in lasting its marginal portion tightly and smoothly over the insole.
Instead of the above-mentioned retarders, the present invention, in one aspect, provides grippers which are operated by novel means to apply a pull to the upper before the wipers act thereon. In the construction shown each gripper is carried by a support which is movable with it heightwise of the last to cause it to pull the upper and is pr vided with a chamber to receive operating flu d, and mechanism including a lever mounted on the gripper support and operated by the fluid in this chamber imparts the upper-pulling movement to the support and gripper by a purchase on the bottom of the shoe through a holddown. The gripper and its operating means thus form a compact unit which, as illustrated, is adjustable in various ways to position it relatively to a shoe. It is a further characteristic of the construction shown that such a holddown is associated with each of the grippers and is adjustable with it, each gripper and its holddown, moreover, being movable as a unit outwardly over the bottom of the shoe with one of the jaws of the gripper close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper to insure that under any conditions the marginal portion of the upper materials will be spread outwardly from over the insole and will be properly positioned between the gripper jaws before they are closed. Thereafter, by the action of the above-mentioned fluid-operated mechanism, the holddown is moved heightwise of the shoe into engagement with the margin of the insole and the gripper is operated as described to pull the upper by a purchase on the shoe through the holddown, a portion of the latter being yieldable in response to resistance of the upper to the force of the pull applied thereto. Since the purchase on the shoe is thus in a location close to the gripper, there is substantially no tendency to displace the last and shoe by the action of the gripper on the upper. After the pull on the upper the holddown remains in engagement with the margin of the insole until the main wiper associated therewith begins to act on the upper, the holddown being so controlled as to permit it to be pushed inwardly from the extreme edge of the insole by the wiper. When the main wiper thus begins to act on the upper, the additional Wiper having already been forced yieldingly inward against the tensioned upper, the holddown is retracted heightwise of the shoe from the insole simultaneously with release of the margin of the upper by the gripper, the gripper being then further retracted heightwise of the shoe by mechanism which receives its movement from the wiper-operating means. It is contemplated that the margin of the upper thus wiped inwardly over the insole will be secured to the insole by cement previously applied to the shoe, although the invention is not limited to a machine in the use of which the upper is lasted with cement.
In addition to various novel features involved in the construction above outlined, the invention further provides a novel organization of fluidoperated means for not only pulling the upper but for also closing each gripper on the upper in proper time relation to the upper-pulling operation. In the construction shown each movable gripper support is provided not only with a chamber to receive fluid for operating the gr pper to pull the upper, as above described, but also with a chamber to receive fluid for operating a gripper-closing member in that chamber, operating fluid being admitted first to that chamber and thereafter from that chamber to the first-mentioned chamber. More particularly, the con.
struction shown includes a partition separating the two chambers and a valve movable by the gripper-closing member for admitting fluid at the proper time through the partition to the firstmentioned chamber to effect the pulling of the upper after it has been gripped. A check valve permits exhaust of the fluid from the first-mentioned chamber through the partition when the gripper releases the upper after the pull,
In the machine herein shown, moreover, each of the above-mentioned additional wipers, which is movable inwardly over a portion of the bottom of the last having an inclination toward the shank portion of the last heelwardly of the ball line, is of novel construction for the purpose of better conformity to the contour of the last and to the varying contours of lasts of different shapes. As illustrated, each additional wiper comprises a wiping plate substantially parallel to the main wiper associated therewith and a flexible, upper-engaging plate diverging in an outward direction from the inner marginal portion of the wiping face of that wiping plate and adjustable as to contour by wedging means movable in inward and outward directions between the two plates.
Further features of the invention are to be recognized in novel means providing for the clamping of the shoe prior to the starting of a cycle of automatic operations of the machine, and in novel means providing for the above-described outward movements of the grippers over the bottom of the shoe into their upper-gripping positions also prior to the starting of the cycle. In the construction shown opportunity is then afforded to return the grippers and release the shoe in case the operator observes that conditions are not right for the performance of the lasting operation, the clamping of the shoe and the outward movements of the grippers being effected by fluid-operated means to which fluid i admitted and from which it may be released at the will of the operator. A member movable by the operator thus to admit the fluid serves thereafter to start the cycle of operations of the machine by initiating the movement of a rotatable fluid-operated controlling member having means for properly timing the operations of the fluid-operated grippers and also the movements of the wipers which are likewise operated by fluid-pressure means.
The above and other features of the invention. including variou novel details of construction and combinations of parts, will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings and thereafter pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings,
Fig. 1 is a view mainly in front elevation of the machine in which the invention is herein shown as embodied;
Fig. 2 is a view in right-hand side elevation of the upper portion of the machine, with parts broken away;
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the upper portion of the machine with the position of a shoe in the machine indicated diagrammatically;
Fig. 4 is a section on the line IV--IV of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a front view, with parts in section, showing the grippers and parts associated therewith as they appear in relation to a shoe when the shoe is first presented to the machine;
Fig. 6 is a view in elevation in the direction of the arrow A in Fig. 5;
Fig. 'l is a section on the line VII-VII of Fig. 5;
Fig. 8 is a section on the line VIII-VIII of Fig. 5;
laterally thereof.
Fig. 9 is a section on the line IX-IX of Fig. 3 on an enlarged scale;
Figs. 10 to 15 inclusive are vertical sectional views showing the right-hand gripper and parts associated therewith as they appear at different times in the course of the operation of the machine;
Fig. 16 is a plan view of the wipers as they appear at the time in the operation of the machine represented by Fig. 14, with the gripper jaws and holddowns in section;
Fig. 17 is a view similar to Fig. 16, but showing the parts as they appear at the time in the operation of the machine represented by Fig. 15;
Fig. 18 is a section on the line XVIII-XVIII of Fig. 17;
Fig. 19 is a view partly in left-hand side elevation and partly in section, showing mechanism at the lower portion of the machine for controlling the operation of the machine by fluid pressure;
Fig. 20 is a view illustrating diagrammatically the relation of the different fluid-operated mechanisms to the source of operating fluid and to the means for admitting fluid thereto and releasing it therefrom;
Fig. 21 is mainly a vertical sectional view showing one of the valves with which the machine is provided and portions of the valve-controlling mechanism associated therewith; and
Fig. 22 is a perspective view of certain parts portions of which are shown in Fig. 19.
The machine is provided with a frame 2 (Figs. 1 and 2) on the top of which are secured upwardly extending plates 4 supporting a horizontal top plate 6. Pivotally mounted substantially midway between its opposite ends on a pin 8 supported on a forked member l0 fast on the top plate 6 is a forwardly and rearwardly extending lever l2 provided at its front end with a member l4 arranged to engage the bottom of the forepart of a shoe to determine the position of the shoe heightwise and with respect to tipping movements about axes extending lengthwise and This member may be assumed to be of substantially the same construction as disclosed in the previously mentioned Letters Patent and to be adjustable in the same manner in upward and downward directions relatively to the lever 12 by a screw 16 threaded in the lever. This portion of the structure is disclosed in greater detail in Letters Patent No. 2,346,688, granted on April 18, 1944, on an application of mine. As also therein disclosed, there are provided two opposite side gages l8 arranged to determine by contact with the opposite sides of the ball portion of the shoe the position of that portion of the shoe widthwise in the machine, these gages being secured to upwardly. extending arms of bell-crank levers 20 (Figs. 1 and 2) which are mounted on pins 22 to swing about axes extending lengthwise of the shoe. The pins 22 are mounted in an arm 24 extending forwardly from a plate 26 which is supported on a vertical cylinder 28 mounted in the space between the plates 4 and secured at its lower end to the top of the frame 2 for a purpose hereinafter described. The two bell-crank levers 20 are provided with arms 30 extending inwardly toward each other and engaged on their upper faces by a flange 32 formed on a screw 34 which is threaded in the arm 24. A spring 36 connected to the two bellcrank levers tends to swing them in directions to separate the side gages l8 and thus holds the arms 30 at all times against the flange 32. By
5 adjustment of the screw 34 the gages I8 are caused to swing equal distances toward or from each other as required for shoes of different widths.
Mounted on the front end of an arm 38 which is fast on a rockshaft 40 supported in hearings in the plates 4 is a toe rest 42 arranged to engage the forepart of the shoe underneath and to clamp it against the shoe-positioning member I4. In the construction herein shown this toe rest is moved upwardly into position thus to clamp the shoe by fluid-pressure means. For this purpose there is fast on one end of the shaft 40 a rearwardly extending arm 44 arranged to be operated by a piston 46 movable in a cylinder 48 secured on the top of the frame 2. Extending upwardly from the piston through the closed upper end of the cylinder is a piston rod 50 connected by a link 52 to the lower end of a rod 54 extending upward loosely through a block 56 which is pivotally mounted on the rear end of the arm 44. Confined by a nut 58 on the upper end of this rod is a collar 60 which bears on the upper end of a spring 62 the lower end of which is seated on another collar 64 in engagement with the upper end of the block 56. It will thus be seen that in response to downward movement of the piston 46 the toe rest 42 is swung upwardly to clamp the shoe, after which the spring 62 is compressed by further downward movement of the piston to hold the toe rest firmly against the shoe, the rod 54 sliding downwardly through the block 56. For thus operating the piston operating fluid, preferably light oil, is supplied to the upper end of the cylinder 48 through a bore 66 in the cylinder from a pipe line 68 leading from a source of fluid supply hereinafter described. When the fluid is released from the cylinder 48 the piston 46 is moved upwardly to its initial position by a spring I the lower end of which is seated on a flange 12 of the cylinder 48 and the upper end of which presses against an arm 14 fast on the piston rod 50. A pin I6 extending upwardly from the flange l2 and another pin 18 extending downwardly from the arm 14 serve to hold the spring I0 in place. When the piston is thus moved upwardly the link 52 serves by engagement with the lower end of the block 56 on the arm 44 also to return the toe rest 42 to its initial position, the return movement of the toe rest and also the return movement of the piston 46 being limited by engagement of a screw 80 (Fig. 3) threaded in an arm 82 fast on one end of the shaft 40 with a lug 84 on one of the vertical plates 4.
For purposes of this invention the machine herein shown is provided with a pair of grippers 86 for gripping the margin of the upper at the opposite sides of the ball portion of the shoe and for applying a pull to the upper in those locations before its margin is lasted inwardly over the insole. As illustrated in Figs. 16 and 17, these gripper: are arranged to engage portions of the upper extending both forwardly and rearwardly of the oall line of the shoe, including portions where the edge of the shoe bottom curves inward rearwardly of the ball line, and they are curved lengthwise of the shoe approximately in accordance with the curvature of the corresponding portions of the edge of the shoe bottom. Each gripper includes what may be termed an inner or fixed jaw 88 (Fig. the upper portion of which is forked and is positioned between two spaced lugs 90 extending downwardly from a cylinder 92. Two pins 94 and 96 extending through these lugs and through the forked portion of the jaw 88 hold it in fixed relation to the cylinder 92. Piv- Search otally mounted on the pin 96 for swinging movements toward and from the jaw 88 is a cooperating jaw 98. The jaw 88 is provided with a recess I00 into which a portion of the margin of the upper is forced by the jaw 98 to insure that the upper will be firmly gripped. The jaw 98 is connected by a link I02 to a piston I04 which is movable downwardly by operating fluid admitted to a chamber I06 in the cylinder 92 to cause the jaws to grip the upper, as illustrated in Fig. 11. The fluid is thus admitted to the chambers I06 of both cylinders through flexible tubes I08 (Fig. 1) communicating with a pipe line IIO which leads from the source of fluid supply.
Each cylinder 92 is secured at its upper end to a block II2 by means of a pin II4 which extends through the block and through a pair of ears I I6 extending upwardly fro-m the cylinder at opposite sides of the block, the upper end face of the cylinder being thus held against the block. The block I I2 is mounted to turn with the cylinder 92 and the gripper supported thereon about a stud I I8 which is threaded in a slide I20 movable in directions widthwise of the shoe along a guideway on a bar I22 (Figs. 5 and 8) secured by two screws I24 to an arm I26 (Figs. 2 and 3) extending lengthwise of the shoe. Threaded in the slide I20 is a rod I28 which is mounted to turn in a bearing formed in an upwardly extending end portion I30 of the bar I22 and has on its outer end a knob I32 for turning it. Cooperating with this knob to prevent lengthwise movement of the rod is a nut I34 which is threaded on the rod and engages the upwardly extending portion I30 of the bar. It will thus 'be seen that by turning the rod I 28 the gripper may be adjusted bodily in directions widthwise of the shoe. Secured to the block II2 is an arm I36 whereby the block and the gripper may be adjusted about the stud IIB, i. e,. about an axis extending heightwise of the shoe, to position the gripper in this respect in proper relation to shoes of different shapes. This arm is provided with a knob I38 for swinging it, and extending downwardly from the knob is a pin I40 (Fig. 3) arranged to enter any one of a plurality of holes I42 formed in a plate I44 which is fast on the slide I20. The arm I36 is flexible to permit the pin to be withdrawn from any of the holes when it is desired to adjust the gripper.
The above-mentioned arm I26 is adjustably secured to a rearwardly extending bar I46 beneath it, and this bar is secured at its rear end (Fig. 4) to another bar I48 which is mounted on the upper arm of a substantially U-shaped support .I50 (Fig. 2), the lower arm of this support being mounted on the previously mentioned shaft 40 to turn on the shaft. The gripper, supported as described, may, therefore, be SW'llIlg upwardly aboutv the shaft 40, its normal height relatively to the shoe being determined by a screw I52 which is threaded in the U-shaped support and is arranged to engage the rear edge face of the plate 6. It will be evident that by turning this screw the height at which the gripper is initially positioned may be adjustably varied. The arm I26 is secured to the bar I46 by a screw I54 which extends through a slot I56 in the arm and is threaded in the bar, this construction permitting the gripper to be adjusted bodily in directions lengthwise of the shoe. Cooperating with the screw I54 to position the arm I26 angularly is a pin I5I extending from the bar I46 into the slot I56. The bar I48 is pivotally mounted at its rear end on a stud I58 threaded in the upper arm of the U-shaped support I50 to permit the bar and the gripper to be swung in directions widthwise of the shoe for a purpose hereinafter described. Such swinging movements of the bar and the gripper are limited by a stud I60 extending upwardly from the U-shaped support into a slot I62 in the bar, the bar being provided with a screw I64 arranged to engage the stud to limit adjustably the swinging movement in an outward direction.
In accordance with the usual practice the upper of a shoe presented to the machine will have been previously pulled over and fastened by pulling-over tacks at the toe portion and will have been lasted along the shank portion. Under these conditions the margin of the upper along the sides of the ball portion of the shoe tends to extend more or less inwardly over the insole. To facilitate the presentation of the shoe to the machine and to insure that the margin of the upper will be properly gripped, the grippers are so positioned initially that their inner or fixed jaws 88 are located substantial distances inwardly from the edge of the insole, the screws I52 also being so adjusted that these jaws are substantially or nearly in contact with the bottom face of the insole, as illustrated in Fig. 5. Before they grip the upper the grippers are, moreover, moved in outward directions to positions such that their inner jaws are preferably just beyond the edge of the insole, as illustrated in Fig. 10, thus insuring that the margin of the upper will be spread from over the insole and that if it has adhered prematurely to the edge of the insole by reason of the presence of cement previously applied it will be detached from the insole. To control the grippers with respect to movements widthwise of the shoe, there is provided a Cylinder I66 (Figs. 3 and 4) and a piston I68 in the cylinder, the cylinder being secured by two screws I to a bar I72 one end of which is confined on a stud I14 extending u wardly from the two bars I46 and I48 associated with the right-hand gripper. Mounted in the left-hand end of the cylinder I66 is a block I'IS through which a piston rod I18 extends outwardly from the piston I68, the outer end of this piston rod being secured to a bar I80 connected to a stud I82 extending upwardly from the bars I46 and I48 associated with the left-hand gripper. The block H6 is confined in the cylinder I66 by a projection I84 extending from the bar II2 through the cylinder and into an opening in the block, and the block serves as an abutment for one end of a spring I86 located between it and the piston I68. The spring, accordingly, acts on both the cylinder and the piston with a tendency to swing the grippers in inward directions about the studs .I 58, their inward movements being limited by engagement of the studs 160 with the bars I48 in the slots I62 formed in the bars. To impart to the grippers their outward movements to the positions illustrated in Fig. 10 operating fluid is admitted to the cylinder I65 through a flexible tube I88 which leads from the same pipe line 68 (Fig. 2) from which fluid is supplied to the cylinder 48 to move the toe rest 42 into operative position. The grippers are, therefore, moved outwardly as described simultaneously with the operation of the toe rest, their outward movements being adjustably limited by engagement of the screws I64 with the studs I60.
The swinging movement of the jaw 98 of each pp r o rip t e upper as hereinbefore described is efiected against the resistance of two springs I90 (Figs. 5 and 9) which are mounted in bores formed in the block H2 and abut at their upper ends against plugs I92 in the bores. At their lower ends these springs engage flanges formed on the upper ends of two forks I94 of a downwardly extending rod I96 the lower end of which is pivotally connected to an arm I98 integral with the gripper jaw 98. It will be understood that when the fluid is released from the chamber I06 after the pulling of the upper the springs I90 return the jaw 98 to open position and also impart return movement to the piston I04.
The pulling of the upper by each gripper is effected by moving the gripper heightwise of the last together with its supporting cylinder 92, the block I I2 and the other parts previously described as mounted for swinging movement about the shaft 40. For this purpose the cylinder 92 is provided with a second fluid-receiving chamber 200 (Fig. 12) separated from the previously mentioned chamber I06 by a partition 202 secured in the cylinder by two screws 204 (Fig. 7). Movable in the chamber 200 is a piston 206 connected by a link 208 to one end of a lever 2I0 which is pivotally mounted substantially midway between its opposite ends on a pin 2I2 supported on the block I I2. When the piston is moved upwardly by fluid admitted to the chamber 200 it acts through the lever 2I0 to impart the upward movement to the gripper and its supporting means by a purchase on the bottom of the shoe through a holddown 2I4. This holddown includes a substantially vertical bar 2I6 provided at its lower end with a presser foot 2I8 arranged to engage the margin of the insole and pivotally mounted on a pin 220 to permit it to adjust itself to the insole and last. One end of the lever 2I0 extends into a recess in the upper end of the bar 2 I6 and is provided with a bearing for a pin 222 in the opposite ends of which are threaded two studs 224 (Fig. 6) guided for downward and upward movements in slots 226 in the bar. Threaded in the pin 222 is also a screw 228 which extends through slots in the end of the lever and bears at its lower end against a crossbar 230 in engagement with the upper ends of two springs 232 in the bar 2I6. It will thus be seen that the lever 2I0 acts on the bar 2I6 through these springs and that the springs are yieldable in response to resistance of the upper to the force of the pull applied thereto by the gripper, and it will be evident that the force of the pull may be varied by adjustment of the screw 228. Connected to a pin 234 extending through the bar 2 I 6 are two springs 236 the upper ends of which are anchored to the previously mentioned pin 2 I2, these springs tending to lift the holddown and also to swing it laterally toward the gripper about its connection with the lever 2I0. Initially they hold it spaced above the insole and against the inner side of the grip; )r jaw 88, as shown in Fig. 5, with the piston 206 in its lowest position against the partition 202. When fluid is admitted to the chamber 200, after the gripper has been moved outwardly over the insole and after it has closed on the upper, the piston 206 in its upward movement first moves the holddown downwardly into engagement with the margin of the insole, as illustrated in Fig. 12, and thereafter causes the lever 2I0 to fulcrum on the holddown and thereby to lift the gripper and its supporting means (Fig. 13), the springs 232 yielding more or less in response to resistance of the upper to the force of the pull. The upward movement of the piston 3584' CH Km is limited by its engagement with the block H2, portions of the block extending over the end of the cylinder 92 as shown in Fig. 3. When the fluid is released from the chamber 200 the springs 236 return the piston 206 to its initial position and retract the holddown heightwise of the shoe relatively to the gripper.
In order properly to time the movement of the piston 206 relatively to the movement of the piston I04, the operating fluid is admitted to the chamber 200 from the chamber I06 when the piston I04 has substantially completed its movement to cause the gripper to grip the upper. For this purpose the partition 202 has a bore 238 extending through it, and movable in this bore is a valve member 240 secured to the piston I04. This valve member, as shown particularly in Fig. 7, is in the form of a rod which flts in the bore 238 and has in one side thereof near its upper end a slot 242. At its lower end the valve member has thereon a head 244 of larger diameter seated in a recess in the piston I04 and held in the recess by the overlapping heads of two screws 246 which are threaded in the piston. It will be understood that when the piston I04 has nearly completed its downward movement the slot 242 in the valve member 240 permits the fluid to flow from the chamber I06 to the chamber 200 to operate the piston 206. When the fluid is released from the chamber I08 after the pulling of the upper the fluid in the chamber 200 returns to the chamber I06 through a passage 248 (Fig. 12) in the partition 202 and past a check valve 250 which is held normally against the lower face of the partition by a spring 252 connected to a pin 254 (Fig. 7) the ends of which lie in recesses in the partition 202. It will be understood that the fluid thus entering the chamber I06 is also permitted to exhaust from that chamber. The upward movement of the piston I04 which takes place at that time is limited by engagement of the heads of the screws 246 with the partition 202, so that the piston stops short of the check valve 250 as illustrated in Fig. 5.
After the upper has been pulled by the grippers its marginal portion is wiped inwardly along the opposite sides of the ball portion of the shoe by means constructed in most respects generally as disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,346,687. Included in the wiping means are what may be termed main wipers 256 which are resiliently flexible and are each secured by a pair of bolts 258 (Fig. 17) to a forwardly extending arm 280 (Fig. 3) of a bell-crank lever 262 pivotally mounted on a stud 264 on the top plate 6 to swing about an axis extending heightwise of the shoe. The two bell-crank levers have other arms 266 extending widthwise of the shoe in crossed relation to each other and connected by links 268 to upwardly extending arms I80 of other bell-crank levers 212 (Fig. 2) mounted on a rod 214 to swing about an axis extending idthwise of the shoe, this rod being supported on an arm 216 extending rearwardly from thy previously mentioned plate 26. Forwardly extending arms 218 of the bell-crank levers 212 are connected by links 280 to a rod 282 which extends through the vertical slots 284 in the sides of the previously mentioned cylinder 28 and through a piston 286 in the cylinder. In response to upward movement of this piston, therefore, wiper-operating movements are imparted through the bell-crank levers 212 to the bellcrank levers 262, the wiper-carrying arms 260 of the latter being swung inwardly toward each other. Such upward movement of the piston 286 is efiected by operating fluid which, in the construction herein shown, is admitted automatically at the proper time to the lower end of the cylinder 28 through a pipe line 288. The operative movements of the wiper-carrying arms 260 are limited by their engagement with shoulders 290 (Fig. 17) on blocks 292 secured to the top plate 6, these blocks having portions which overlie the arms to hold them against upward deflection by the pressure of the shoe on the wipers. When the fluid is released from the cylinder 28 the wipers 256 and the piston 286 are returned to their initial positions by springs 294 connected to the previously mentioned arms 218.
When a shoe is pressed upwardly against the shoe-positioning member I4 by the toe rest 42, movement of the lever I2 by the pressure of the shoe on the shoe-positioning member is prevented by an arm 296 mounted to swing about the rod 214 and provided with a roll 298 which underlies the rear end of the lever. A spring 300 connected to the arm holds it normally in an upright position determined by engagement of the roll with a lug 302 on the lever. When the wipers 256 have substantially or nearly completed their inward wiping movements the arm 296 is swung rearwardly to release the lever I2 and thus to permit the shoe to be pressed more forcibly up against the wipers by the toe rest under control of the spring 62, thus insuring that all portions of the margin of the upper wiped inwardly by the wipers will be pressed firmly down on the insole. To effect such swinging movement of the arm 286 the upwardly extending arms 210 of the bellcrank levers 212 carry a yoke member 304 (Fig. 3) provided with a screw 306 arranged to engage the arm 296, the screw being adjustable to determine the time with respect to the operative movements of the wipers when their pressure on the upper is increased. The initial position of the lever I2 is determined by a stop 308 on the top plate 6, against which the front arm of the lever is held by a light spring 3 I 0.
The bolts 258 which secure the flexible wipers 256 to the aims 260 are located substantial distances widthwise of the shoe from the shoe-engaging portions of the wipers and accordingly these portions of the wipers are left free throughout their length to be flexed or bent by the increased upward pressure of the shoe against them when the lever I2 is released as above described. This permits the wipers to conform satisfactorily to the more or less convex lengthwise and lateral curvatures of the bottom of the ball portion of the shoe and thus to apply adequate pressure to all portions of the margin of the upper on which they act. The arms 260, however, carry screws 3I2 and 3I4 arranged to engage the top faces of the wipers at their front and rear ends, respectively, to limit the bending of the shoe-engaging portions of the wipers as a whole and to cause the portions between the screws to bend more efiectively in conformity to the lengthwise curvature of the shoe bottom. The wipers are maintained in a heated condition, as is preferable in lasting with cement, by electrical heating units 3I6 (Fig. 17) mounted in blocks 3I8 secured to the lower faces of the wipers in locations substantial distances from their shoe-engaging portions. The studs 264 about which the wipers are swung are in such relation to the wiping edges of the wipers that the latter have small components of movement lengthwise of the shoe toward its toe end as they are moved inwardly widthwise of the 1 1 shoe. To prevent the wipers from disturbing any upstanding pulling-over tacks t which may be in the shoe at the sides of the toe they are provided with recesses 3 9.
Associated with the wipers 256, in general accordance also with the disclosure of Letters Patent No. 2,346,687, are additional wipers 320 for wiping the margin of the upper inwardly over the insole in locations where the edge of the shoe bottom curves inward heelwardly of the ball line. These wipers comprise plates 32! resiliently flexible like the wipers 256 and arranged to be moved inwardly over the shoe bottom between the shoe and the wipers 256 in substantially parallel relation to the latter and in contact with their wiping faces. The wipers 320 are secured at substantial distances from the shoe on forwardly extending arms 322 of levers 324 mounted to swing about the axes of vertical pins 326 to which they are secured and which are rotatable in bearings formed in brackets 328 on the frame. Swinging movements are imparted to the levers 324 to operate the wipers 320 by the movements of the arms 26!! which carry the wipers 256. For this purpose the arms 26!] are connected to the forwardly extending arms 322 of the levers 324 by means including links 330 pivotally connected at their inner ends to th arms 26!] and slidingly movable in blocks 332 pivoted on the arms 322. Between these blocks and nuts 334 on the outer ends of the links are springs 336 which are yieldable to permit further inward swinging movements of the arms 26!! after movements of the levers 324 have been stopped as hereinafter described. Nuts 338 on the links serve by engagement with the blocks 332 to impart return movements to the levers 324. As the wipers 320 are thus operated they have substantial components of movement lengthwise of the shoe toward its toe end along the wiping faces of the wipers 256 by reason of the locations of the pins 326, which are farther apart widthwise of the shoe than the studs 264 about which the arms 26!] are swung, and by reason of the shape of the arms 322 which are curved inwardly toward each other widthwise of the shoe. The wipers 320 are heated by their contact with the heated wipers 256, and they may bend with the latter to conform better to the contour of the bottom of the shoe when the pressure of the shoe on all the wipers is increased in the manner hereinbefore described. The arrangement of the links 330 relatively to the arms 26!] and 322 is such that the wipers 320 ar moved inward more rapidly than the wipers 256 and begin earlier than the latter to act on the upper. The inward movement of each wiper 320 is limited by a nut 34!) which is threaded on a rod 342 extending outwardly from the bracket 328 and is engaged by the forked rear end of a rearwardly extending arm 344 of the lever 324. It will be understood that by adjustment of the nuts 34!] th limits of the inward movements of the wipers 320 may be varied each independently of the other. The wipers 320 are forced inwardly against the upper while the grippers are still holding it under tension, after which the springs 336 yield until the wipers 256 begin to act on the upper as illustrated in Figs. 14 and 16. At this point the grippers release the upper, whereupon the wipers 320 are forced farther inwardly by the springs 336 to the limits determined by the nuts 34!) as the wipers 256 continue their inward movements. In this manner insurance is afforded that no portion of the margin of the upper acted upon by the wipers will be unduly deflected in a heelward direction.
Since the wipers 320 are movable inwardly over portions of the shoe bottom which slope toward the shank heelwardly of the ball line, there is welded to the inner marginal portion of that face of each wiper plate 32! which is toward the shoe another more flexible wiper plate 346 (Fig. 18) which diverges outwardly from the plate 32! in a direction opposite to the direction of the operative movement of the latter. The wiping face of the plate 346 merges with the wiping face of the plate 32! and by its engagement with the upper over the portion of the bottom of the last which slopes as above described cooperates with the plate 32! to conform the upper smoothly and tightly to the contour of the insole and last in that location. The outer portion of the plate 346 is in engagement with the lower face of the arm 322 and is provided with a slot 348 through which extends a stud 35!! threaded in the arm. Between the two plates 32! and 346 is a block 352 which is movable inwardly or outwardly along the lower face of the plate 32! in wedging engagement with the plate 346 to vary adjustably the contour of the latter in accordance with the shape of the shoe, the slot 348 permitting such play between the plate 346 and the stud 350 as to facilitate this adjustment of the plate. The block 352 is adjusted by means of a rod 354 which is threaded in the arm 322 and has at its inner end a head 356 confined in a recess in the block 352 and rotatable in the recess. Fast on the outer end of the rod 354 is a knob 358 for turning it.
To prevent the grippers from returning immediately to their initial positions heightwise of the shoe when they release the upper and when the fluid is released from the chambers 260, and thereby to avoid interference between the grippers and the wipers 256, there is associated with each gripper a bell-crank lever 36!! (Figs. 2, 3 and 4) which is pivotally mounted on the bracket 328 at that side of the machine. One arm of the bell-crank lever underlies and engages the bar !46 of the gripper-supporting means. and its other arm is connected by a spring 362 to the screw 3!4 mounted in the corresponding wipercarrying arm 26!). The wiper-operating movement of this arm accordingly tensions the spring 362, and as soon as the gripper releases the upper it is not only prevented from moving downwardly, but together with its supporting means is swung farther upwardly by the spring about the shaft 40. That end of the spring 362 which is connected to the bell-crank lever is anchored to an eye-bolt 364 which extends through the eye of another such ye-bolt 366 on the bell-crank lever and has threaded thereon a nut 36'! for varying the tension of the spring. Movement of the bell-crank lever by the spring is limited by engagement of a pin 368 (Fig. 2) thereon with the bracket 328.
To relieve the opentor of the necessity of holding the shoe when it'is released by the downward movement of the toe rest in the return of the parts to starting positions, there is provided a shoe receiver 369 (Fig. 2) upon which the shoe may fall when it is thus released. This shoe receiver comprises a U-shaped rod 31!) supported in an inclined position by the ends of its arms on a bracket 312 fast on the frame. Secured t0 the two arms of the rod are outwardly flaring wings 314. The arms of the rod and the wings thus provide a support on which the shoe falls still bottom upward when it is released by the Search Room toe rest. Supported on the bracket 312 at the lower ends of the arms is a pad 316 for engaging the heel end face of the shoe.
Fluid under pressure is supplied for operating the different mechanisms described and its flow to and from the mechanisms is controlled by means herein shown as conveniently of the same general character as disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509, granted on July 20. 1943, on an application of mine. Secured to a horizontal plate 318 (Fig. 19) is a casting 380 which has therein a chamber 382. the plate serving as a closure for the top of the chamber. Secured also to the plate 318 is a castin 384 which serves as a reservoir or sump for the fluid under atmospheric pressure. A pump 386 (Fig. 20) driven continuously by an electric motor 388 draws fluid from the reservoir 384 through a pipe 390 and delivers the fluid through a pipe 392 to the chamber 382. The normal pressure of the fluid in this chamber is determined by a spring-controlled relief valve 394 past which the excess fluid returns to the reservoir 384 through a pipe 396. From the chamber 382 the fluidis delivered through valves to the different mechanisms to be operated. A valve 398 for admitting fluid to the pipe line 68 to operate the toe rest and to move the grippers outwardly over the insole, and for also controllin the exhaust of the fluid from this pipe line, is shown in Fig. 21. It is a sleeve valve slidingly movable on a tube 400 one end of which is in communication with the pipe line 68 and the other end with the chamber 382. Within the tube is a partition 402 which separates one end portion thereof from the other, and extending through the tube at opposite sides of this partition. respectively, are two sets of ports 404 and 406. When the valve i in its normal position against the casting 380, as shown in Fig. 21, flow of fluid from the chamber 382 through the ports 406 is prevented and fluid is permitted to exhaust from the pipe line 68 through the ports 404 back to the reservoir 384 under the valve. Formed in the valve is an annular chamber 408 which affords communication between the ports 404 and 406 to permit the fluid to pass from the chamber 382 to the pipe line 68 when the valve is moved toward the left with reference to Fig. 21. For thus operating the valve there is provided an arm 410 pivotally mounted at its upper end on a pin 4l2 supported on a bracket M4 on the plate 318. the arm being provided at its lower end with a pin 4|6 extending into a groove 418 in the valve. A spring 420 connected to the arm 4|0 holds the valve normally against the casting 380 a shown. 4
For moving the valve into position to admit fluid to the pipe line 68 there is provided. a lever 422 also pivotally mounted on the pin M2 and operated by means hereinafter described. This Isver consists of two parts pivotally connected together by a pin 424 but held by a spring 426 normally in a relation to each other determined by the interengagement of shoulde; 5 formed thereon. When the rear end of the lever 422 is lifted the lever acts through a spring 428 on a lug 430 formed on the arm M0 to swing the arm toward the left against a stop 43! and thus to move the valve into position to admit fluid to the pipe line 68. When the lever 422 is thus operated, a latch 432 mounted to turn on the pin 424 is swung to a position over a shoulder 434 on the bracket 414 by means of a spring 436 connected to an arm '438 of the latch. In this manner the lever is held against return movement to maintain the valve in open position.
When the machine is not in operation no substantial pressure is developed in the chamber 382, though the pump 386 is running, since the fluid is returned freely from the chamber to the reservoir 384 through a valve 440 (Figs. 19 and 20), this valv corresponding to the valve I088 of Letters Patent No. 2.324.509. The valve 440 is a sleeve valve like the above-described valve 398, but when it is in its initial position. as shown in Fig. 19, its relation to the ports which it controls is such as to provide free passage for the fluid from the chamber 382 to the reservoir 384 through an outlet 442. The valve 440 is controlled by mechanism of th same construction as that shown in Fig. 21 for controlling the valve 338, including a two-part lever 444 by upward movement of the rear end of which the valve is moved to close the outlet from the chamber 382 and thus to cause the development of pressure in the chamber The valve is then held against return movement by a latch 446 controlled by a spring 448 connected to an arm 450 of the latch.
The movement of the lever 444 to operate the valve 440 as above described is effected by upward movement of a rod 452 connecting the rear end of the lever to an arm 454 fast on a rockshaft 456. Also fast on this rockshaft is an upwardly extending arm 458 which is forked at its upper end and is provided between its forks with a block 460 engaged by a latch 462. The latch is connected by a rod 464 to an upwardly extending arm 466 of a three-armed lever 468 fast on a rockshaft 410 and having a forwardly extending arm supporting a treadle 412. It will, therefore, be evident that upon depression of this treadle the forward movement of the rod 464 causes the latch 462 to swing the arm 458 in the direction to lift the rod 452 and thereby to move the valve 440 into position to close the outlet from the chamber 382. The valve is then held against return movement by the latch 446, while the treadle, upon its release by the operator, is returned by a spring 414, the latch 462 moving rearwardly along the block 460. The same depression of the treadle serves also, by upward movement of the rear end of the lever 422. to move the valve 398 into position to admit fluid under pressure to the pipe line 68 for moving the toe rest 42 to its operative position and for moving the grippers outwardly over the insole. For this purpose there is connected to the rear end of the lever 422 a downwardly extending rod 416 having on its lower end a bar 411 provided with a shoulder 418 engaged underneath by a second arm 480 fast on the rockshaft 453. A spring 482 connected to the rod 416 holds it normally in position thus to be operated by the arm 480. Near the end of the depression of the treadle. however, when the latch 432 (Fig. 21) is in position to hold the valve 398 against return movement. a screw 484 mounted in a downwardly extending portion of the arm 480 swings the rod 416 rearwardly to disconnect it from the arm, so that the valve 398 may be returned automatically to its initial position at the proper time when it is released by the latch 432 by means hereinafter described.
If it should be desired to release the shoe and present it again after the treadle has been depressed as above described, the operator may cause the toe rest and the grippers to return to their initial positions. For this purpose there is provided a rod 486 slidingly mounted in a bearing near the front of the machine and provided on its front end with a pad 488 (Fig. 1) which the operator may engage with his foot, the rear end of the rod being connected to the upper end of the arm 458. Rearward movement of the rod therefore serves to swing the arm 458 in a rearward direction, so that the arm 454 acts through the rod 452 to swing the rear part of the twopart lever 444 downwardly about its connection with the front part of the lever. This causes an inclined face 490 on the rear part of the lever to act on a tail portion-492 of the latch 446 to swing the latch into position to release the lever, whereupon the valve 440 is returned to its initial position to terminate the pressure in the chamber 382. At the same time the rear part of the lever 422 is pulled downwardly to release in a similar manner the valve 398. For this purpose the rod 452 is provided with an arm 494 (Fig. 22) arranged to engage a screw 486 mounted in an arm 498 on the rod 416. Both the valves 398 and 440 having thus been returned to their initial positions, the operator may once more present the shoe to the machine and again depress the treadle to cause the shoe to be clamped by the toe rest and the grippers to be moved outwardly over the insole.
After the shoe has been presented and clamped as above described, it is operated upon by the grippers and the wipers in a cycle of automatic operations of the machine. Fluid is admitted from the chamber 382 to the pipe line H for closing and operating the grippers and is later released from this pipe line by a valve 500 (Fig. 20), and the same functions are performed with respect to the pipe line 288 leading to the means for operating the wipers by a valve 502. Each of these valves is like the valve 398 (Fig. 21) and is operated and controlled by mechanism not herein shown but of the same general character as that associated with the valve 398, except that instead of a two-part lever like the lever 422 there is provided a one-piece lever operated automatically instead of by a treadle. More particularly, the mechanism for operating and controlling each of the valves 500 and 502 is like that disclosed in Fig. of Letters Patent No. 2.337,.558, granted on December 28, 1943, on an application of mine. As will further be understood from that disclosure, the operation and the release of these valves at the proper times in the cycle, as also the automatic release of the previously mentioned valves 398 and 440 by engagement with the respective latch arms 438 and. 450, are effected by appropriately arranged fingers 504 mounted on a drum 506 one complete revolution of which corresponds to the cycle of operations of the machine. As shown in Fig. 19, and as more fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509, the drum 506 is turned in one direction by a fluid-operated piston 508 movable in a cylinder 5l0, the piston acting on the drum through a rack bar 5 l2, a pinion 514, and a one-Way clutch (not shown) associated with which is spring means (also not shown) for returning the piston 508 without returning the drum when the operating fluid is released from the cylinder 5l0. Leading from this cylinder to the chamber 382 is a pipe line 5 I 6, and fluid is admitted to this pipe line and is thereafter released therefrom by a valve 518 corresponding to the valve 1286 shown in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509. This valve is controlled by mechanism generally similar to that provided for controlling the valve 398. It is connected to an arm 520 which is pivotally mounted at its upper end on a pin 522 supported by a bracket 524 and is controlled by a spring 526 which holds the valve normally against the casting 380 with the pipe line 5 I 6 open to exhaust. Pivotally mounted also on the pin 522 is a twopart lever 528 the two parts of which are pivotally connected together by a pin 530 and are normally held in a fixed relation to each other by a spring 532. In response to upward movement of the front end of the lever 528 the lever acts on the arm 520 through a spring 534 to move the valve into position to admit fluid to the pipe line 5l6. Pivotally mounted also on the pin 530 is a latch 536 controlled by a spring 538 which swings it over a shoulder 540 on the bracket 524 to hold the valve against return movement. To cause the valve to return to its initial position and thus to stop the rotation of the drum 506 there is provided a latch-operating lever 542 pivotally mounted on the pin 522 and arranged to engage a portion of the latch underneath, the lever 542 being operated at the proper time by one of the fingers 504 on the drum 506.
The upward movement of the front end of the lever 528 to start the cycle of operations is effected by a second depression of the treadle 412 through the action of means more fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509. Briefly, there is pivotally connected to the front end of the lever a yoke member 544 in which is slidingly mounted the reduced upper end portion of a downwardly extending rod 546, the rod serving by its upward movement to compress a spring 548 in the yoke. At its lower end the rod 546 is pivotally connected to a rearwardly extending arm 550 of a bell-crank lever 552 which is mounted to swing about a pin 554 and has a downwardly extending arm 556 connected by a link 558 to the lower arm of a lever 560 mounted between its ends to swing on the previously mentioned shaft 456. The upper arm of this lever supports a latch 562 connected by a. rod 564 to the previously mentioned upwardly extending arm 466 of the treadle lever 468. Accordingly, depression of the treadle 412 causes the latch 562 to swing the lever 560 in the direction to lift the rod 546 and thereby to compress the spring 548. The front end of the lever 528 is, however, held initially against upward movement in response to the action of the spring on the yoke member 544 by a latch 566 engaging a pin 568 on the end of the lever. The latch is pivotally mounted on a pin 510 and has extending therefrom an arm 512 connectedto a downwardly extending rod 514 the lower end portion of which is slidingly mounted in a laterally offset portion of a bar 516 pivotally connected to the front end of the treadle lever 468. Between the laterally ofiset portion of the bar and a collar 518 fast on the rod 514 is a spring 580 through compression of which the latch 566 is held initially in its operative position. Also fast on the rod below the offset portion of the bar 516 is a collar 582 which, near the end of the downward movement of the treadle, is engaged by the offset tion to release the lever 528. Accordingly, the
front end of the lever is lifted suddenly by thgi' compressed spring 548 to insure that the valve 518 will be moved at once into position to permit the full flow of fluid into the pipe line 5l6.
As further more fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509, the first depression of the treadle 412, which in the machine herein shown causes the shoe to be clamped and the grippers to be moved outwardly as hereinbefore described, is ineffective to start the cycle of operations because of the fact that a screw 584 carried by the arm 458 supports the latch 562 at such a height as to prevent it at that time from acting on the Search lever 560. The forward swinging movement of the arm 458 effected by the first depression of the treadle causes the screw to lower the latch 562 and thereby to render it operative on the lever 560 in response to the second depression of the treadle. A screw 586 carried bythe lever 560 engages and lifts the latch 562 near the end of the second depression of the treadle to permit the machine to be stopped automatically at the proper time by the automatic release of the valve I8 if the operator should continue to hold the treadle depressed.
Further in accordance with the disclosure of the last-mentioned Letters Patent, there is provided means for varying the speed of rotation of the drum 506 and for thereby varying the time which it takes the machine to perform its cycle of operations. For this purpose there is a cylinder 588 in line with the cylinder 5I0 and having therein a piston 590 integral with the front end of the rack bar 5I2. The front end of this cylinder communicate through a pipe 592 with the' fluid reservoir 384 below the level of the fluid therein, and in this pipe is an adjustable needle valve 594 which variably restricts the flow of fluid from the cylinder 588 to the reservoir when the piston 508 is operated to turn the drum. When the piston 508 is returned to its initial position fluid is drawn into the cylinder 588 from the reservoir 384 by the suction of the piston 590, the fluid being by-passed around the needle valve 594 through a check valve 596.
If it should be desired to stop the operation of the machine at any point in the cycle, this may be done by the use of mechanism like that shown in Letters Patent No. 2,367,782, granted on J anuary 23, 1945, on an application of mine. This mechanism comprises a bar 598 extending rearwardly and downwardly over the latch-operating lever 542 and having a portion 600 at the front of the machine extending laterally and then downwardly to a position where it is secured to one end of the previously mentioned pin 510 which is rotatable in a bracket on the frame. The bar may, therefore, swing rearwardly about the axis of the pin and thus act on the lever 542 to release the valve 5 I 8 and bring the machine instantly to a stop. The bar is thus swung rearwardly against the resistance of a return spring 602 by a plunger 604 slidingly mounted in a bushing on the front of the frame with its rear end in position to engage the bar, the plunger having on its front end a pad 606 arranged to be engaged by the knee of the operator. After having thus topped the machine, if conditions are such as to permit a continuance of the cycle of operations, the operator may start it again by depressing the treadle 412. If it should be desired, however, to remove the shoe and to operate on it again from the beginning of the cycle, the operator may stop the operation of the pump 386 by a switch (not shown) which controls the electric motor 388, so that no more fluid will be forced into the chamber 382. He then completes the rotation of the valve-controlling drum 506 by hand, using a hand wheel (not shown) provided for that purpose, to cause all parts of the machine not already in their starting positions to be returned to those positions. The operator thereafter starts the pump again and after having properly presented the shoe once more proceeds as before. When the operator thus turns the drum by hand it is important to stop its movement at exactly the right point for the beginning of the cycle. There is, accordingly, further provided, a disclosed in the last-mentioned Letters Patent, an arm 608 pivotally mounted on a pin 6I0 and arranged to engage a finger 6I2 on the drum to stop the drum at the proper point. The arm 608 is connected to a link 6I4 pivotally mounted at its lower end on the previously men.- tioned pin 530 carried by the valve-controlling lever 528. When, therefore, the front end of this lever is swung upwardly by the treadle to start the machine the link H4 is moved upwardly by the lever and imparts upward swinging movement to the stop arm 608 to withdraw it from the path of the finger 6I2. When the lever 528 is released by the latch 536, as it is, for example, in response to the movement of the bar 598 by the operator to stop the machine, the arm 608 is swung downwardly again into the path of the finger 6I2. Likewise, when the lever 528 is released at the end of the cycle the arm 608 is swung downwardly into position to be engaged by the finger 6 I 2 and thus to insure against any overrunning of the drum.
The manner of operation of the machine will now be briefly summarized. The operator presents the shoe to be operated upon between the side gages I8 with the bottom of its forepart in contact with the shoe-positioning member I4, the position of the shoe lengthwise being determined with suflicient accuracy by sight with reference to the grippers 86. Having thus presented the shoe, he depresses the treadle 412 and thereby moves the valves 398 and 440 into positions to cause them respectively to admit fluid from the chamber 382 to the pipe line 68 and to close the outlet from this chamber so that pressure will be developed therein, the valves being retained in those positions by the latches 432 and 446 associated therewith. The fluid thus admitted to the pipe line 68 acts on the piston 46 to move the toe rest 42 into position to clamp the shoe against the member I4 and also acts on the cylinder I66 and the piston I68 (Fig. 4) to move the grippers, together with the holddowns 2 I4, outwardly over the insole to positions such as illustrated in Fig. 10. In such outward movements of the grippers, from the positions in which they are shown in Fig. 5, their inner jaws 88 which are substantially in contact with the insole, serve to insure that any portion of the margin of the upper which may lie inwardly over the insole will be spread outwardly and that the upper will be detached from the edge of the insole if it has adhered prematurely thereto.
If for any reason it should be desired, after the shoe has been clamped and the grippers have been moved outwardly as above described, to release the shoe and to present it again to the machine, the operator moves the foot-operated rod 486 rearwardly to effect the release. of the valves 398 and 440 by their latches, thus causing them to return to their initial positions. Otherwise the oi' erator starts the cycle of operations of the mach ne by again depressing the treadle, thereby moving the valve 5I8 into position to admit fluid to the cylinder 5I0 to cause the piston 508 to turn the drum 506. Shortly after the drum begins its movement one of the fingers 504 thereon moves the valve 500 into position to admit fluid to the pipe line IIO leading to the cylinders 92 which support the grippers. The fluid admitted to each of these cylinders first acts in the chamber I06 on the piston I04 to close the gripper on the upper (Fig. 11) When this piston has nearly completed its movement the slot 242 in the valve member 240 carried thereby arrives in position to admit fluid from the chamber I06 to the chamber 200 for operating the piston 206. As illustrated in Fig. 12, this piston acts through the lever 2l0 first to move the holddown 2l4 downwardly into engagement with the margin of the insole and thereafter (Fig. 13) to impart upward movement to the cylinder 92 and the gripper by a purchase on the bottom of the shoe through the holddown, the springs 232 in the holddown yielding more or less in response to resistance of the upper to the pull applied thereto by the gripper. In this upward movement the cylinder and its supporting means swing about the shaft 40 (Fig. 2). When the pull of the grippers on the upper is substantially completed another finger on the drum 506 operates the valve 502 to admit fluid to the cylinder 28 for operating the wipers 256 and 320. As the wiper-carrying arms 260 and 322 are swung inwardly the wipers 320 first engage the tensioned upper and are forced yieldingly against it through the springs 336 until the wipers 256 arrive in positions where they begin to act on the upper as shown in Figs. 14 and 16. As the wipers 256 are forced against the upper the holddowns 214 are moved short distances inwardly over the insole away from the grippers by the pressure of the upper against them, thus permitting the upper to be pressed inwardly against the extreme edge of the insole by the wipers before it is released by the grippers. At this point (Fig. 14) another finger on the drum 506 causes the valve 500 to return to its initial position, thus releasing the fluid from the pipe line H and the cylinders 92. Thepistons I04 and 206 then return to their initial positions in the cylinders 92, causing the grippers to open and the holddowns to be retracted heightwise of the shoe. The grippers, however, are moved still farther upwardly by the action of the bell-crank levers 360 (Fig. 4) on the gripper supports, these bell-crank levers being operated through the springs 362 by the wiper-carrying arms 260. When the grippers release the upper the Wipers 320 are forced farther inwardly to the limits determined by the stop nuts 340 by means of the springs 336. The wipers 256 at the same time continue their inward movements, and when they have substantially or nearly completed their movements the lever I2 is released by the arm 296 to permit the shoe to be forced farther upward by the spring 62 which controls the toe rest. In this operation the flexible Wipers 256, controlled by the stop screws 3 l 2 and 3| 4 above them, bend to conform better to the contour of the shoe bottom, the additional wipers 320 also bending more or less in response to the pressure of the shoe thereon. The parts are then in the positions illustrated in Figs. and 17. As the cycle of operations continues, the appropriate fingers 504 on the drum cause the valves 502 and 398 to return to their initial positions, thus causing the return of the wipers and grippers and the release of the shoe. Substantially at the end of the cycle also the valves 440 and 518 are returned, thus bringing the drum 506 to a stop and terminating the pressure in the chamber 382. When the shoe is released by the toe rest it falls still bottom upward on the shoe receiver 369 where it remains until the operator, who may have in his hands another shoe ready to present to the machine, thereafter removes it.
It is to be understood that with respect to various novel features of the means herein disclosed for operating and controlling the grippers the invention is not limited to grippers which act on the upper at the opposite sides of the ball portion of the shoe or to a machine having a plurality of such grippers.
Having described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, and means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving them in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to relative movements of the jaws to grip the upper.
2. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, supports for the grippers mounted for swinging movements about axes extending heightwise of the last, and means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving them in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole about said axes with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper.
3. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, and means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving them in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole to positions in which their inner jaws extend outwardly beyond the edge of the insole prior to relative movements of the jaws to grip the upper.
4. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, the grippers bein positioned initially with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole, fluid-operated means for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, and means for adjustably limiting the outward movements of the grippers.
5. In a. lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for ulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, the grippers being positioned initially with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole, a device having a cylinder and a piston connected respectively to the diiferent grippers for moving them by fluid pressure in the operation of the machine from those positions Search Room 21 outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, and stop means for determining the limits of the outward movements of the grippers.
6. In a lasting machine, grippers for grippin the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, the grippers being positioned initially with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole, means for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to relative movements of the jaws to grip the upper, and means for variably determining independently with respect to each gripper the limit of its outward movement.
7. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and power-operated means for automatically moving said grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper.
8. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, power-operated means for automatically moving said grippers outwardly widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, and means for variably determining independently with respect to each gripper the limit of its outward movement.
9. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, a fluid-operated device connected to both grippers for automatically moving them by fluid pressure outwardly widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, and stop means for limiting r the outward movement of each gripper independently of the movement of the other gripper.
10. In a lasting machine, a gripper for gripping the margin of an upper on a last and for pulling the upper, said gripper having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, and means for moving the gripper in the operation of the machine outwardly over an insole on the last in a path substantially parallel to the bottom of the last with its inner jaw substantially in contact with the insole prior to relative movement of the jaws to grip the upper.
11. In a lasting machine, a gripper for gripping the margin of an upper on a last and for pulling the upper, said gripper having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, the gripper being positioned initially with its inner jaw substantially in contact with an insole onthe last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole, and means for moving the gripper in the operation of the machine from that position outwardly over the insole to a. position in which its inner jaw extends outwardly beyond the edge of the insole prior to relative movement of the jaws to grip the upper,
matically moving said gripper outwardly over the bottom of the last to a predetermined position prior to the gripping of the upper, and a stop for adjustably limiting such outward movement of the gripper.
13. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and supports for said grippers movable in the operation of the machine to carry the grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, said supports being movable heightwise of the last with the grippers each about an axis extending widthwise of the last in the upper-pulling operation.
14. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and supports for said grippers mounted for swinging movements in the operation of the machine each about an axis extending heightwise of the last to carry the grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, said supports being movable heightwise of the last with the grippers each about an axis extending widthwise of the last in the upper-pulling operation.
15. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and supports for said grippers movable in the operation of the machine to carry the grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, the grippers being preliminarily adjustable relatively to said supports each independently of the other about axes extending heightwise of the last.
16. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper On a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and supports for said grippers movable in the operation of the machine each about an axis extending heightwise of the last to carry the grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, the grippers being bodily adjustable relatively to said supports in directions widthwise of the last.
1'7. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, and supports for said grippers movable in the operation of the machine to carry the grippers bodily outward widthwise of the last from positions opposite the bottom of the last before they grip the upper, said supports havin thereon means for adjusting the grippers relatively to them in directions widthwise of the last and also means for adjusting the grippers about axes extending heightwise of the last.
18. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, members supporting said grippers and movabe to adjust the grippers bodily in directions widthwise of the last prior to the operation of the machine, the grippers being further adjustable relatively to said members each independently of the other about axes extending heightwise of the last, and means for securing the grippers in adjusted positions about said axes.
19. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, members supporting said grippers and movable to adjust the grippers bodily lengthwise of the last each independently of the other prior to the operation of the machine, and other members supporting the grippers on said first-named members and movable to adjust the grippers bodily in directions widthwise of the last also prior to the operation of the machine, the grippers being further, adjustable relatively to said other members about axes extending heightwise of the last.
20. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, members supporting said grippers and movable to adjust the grippers bodily in directions lengthwise of the last each independently of the other, other members supported on said first-named members for adjustin the grippers bodily in directions widthwise of the last prior to the operation of the machine, and means on said other members for further adjusting the grippers about axes extending heightwise of the last and for holding them in adjusted positions.
21, In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, and holddowns associated respectively with the different grippers and movable outwardly with them, said holddowns being arranged to engage the margin of the insole in the upper-pulling operation.
22. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the marging of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer face of the upper respectively, means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, holddowns associated respectively with the different grippers and movable outwardly with them to positions opposite the margin of the insole, and means for thereafter effecting relative-movements of the holddowns and grippers heightwise of the last to cause the holddowns to press on the margin of the insole and to cause the grippers to pull the upper.
23. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, holddowns associated respectively with the different grippers and movable outwardly with them out of contact with the insole to positions opposite the margin of the insole, and means for thereafter moving the holddowns heightwise of the last into engagement with the margin of the insole and for moving the grippers relatively to the holddowns to pull the upper.
24. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, said grippers having inner and outer jaws arranged to engage the inner and outer faces of the upper respectively, means for positioning the grippers with their inner jaws close to an insole on the last and spaced inwardly from the edge of the insole and for moving the grippers in the operation of the machine from those positions outwardly over the insole with their inner jaws thus close to the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, holddowns associated respectively with the different grippers and movable outwardly with them to positions opposite the margin of the insole, said holddowns being arranged to engage the margin of the insole in the upper-pulling operation, and sprin means for maintaining the holddowns yieldingly in contact with the inner jaws of the grippers while permitting relative movements of the holddowns and grippers heightwise of the last.
25. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping th margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, holddowns associated respectively with the difierent grippers for engaging an insole on the last, and means for moving said grippers and their holddowns as units in outward directions widthwise of the last in the course of the operation of the machine prior to the gripping of the upper.
26. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively and for pulling the upper, holddowns associated respectively with the diiferent grippers for engaging an insole on the last, means for moving said grippers and their holddowns as units in outward directions widthwise of the last in the course of the operation of the machine with the holddowns out of contact with the insole prior to the gripping of the upper, and means for thereafter moving the holddowns heightwise of the last into engagement with the margin of the insole and for efiecting relative movements of the grippers and the last to pull the upper.
27. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of th last respectively, and mechanisms associated respectively with said different grippers for moving them heightwise of the last each independently of the other to pull the upper by a purchase on the bottom of the last.
28. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the opposite sides of the last respectively, holddowns associated respectively with said different grippers and arranged to engage the bottom of the shoe, and mechanisms for moving said grippers heightwise of the last to pull the upper each independently of the other by a purchase on the bottom of the shoe through the holddown associated therewith.
29. In a lasting machine, grippers for gripping the margin of an upper on a last at the oppo-
US601564A 1945-06-26 1945-06-26 Lasting machine Expired - Lifetime US2423454A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2469467A (en) * 1947-01-02 1949-05-10 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2609552A (en) * 1948-04-09 1952-09-09 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2614275A (en) * 1949-03-09 1952-10-21 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2623224A (en) * 1944-09-30 1952-12-30 Bata Narodni Podnik Driving arrangement for shoemaking machines
US2697844A (en) * 1948-11-08 1954-12-28 Auman Irwin Lasting machine
US2706823A (en) * 1950-10-10 1955-04-26 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machines
US2763016A (en) * 1952-12-13 1956-09-18 United Shoe Machinery Corp Stitchdown lasting machines
US3022527A (en) * 1959-01-22 1962-02-27 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machines for shaping uppers over lasts
US3060469A (en) * 1961-04-27 1962-10-30 Moenus Maschf Pulling over and toe end lasting machine
US3102282A (en) * 1961-10-09 1963-09-03 Jacob S Kamborian Control for pulling-over and heel seat lasting machine
US3237224A (en) * 1962-05-10 1966-03-01 Kamborian Jacob Simon Pulling over and lasting machine

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE923652C (en) * 1952-09-17 1955-02-17 United Shoe Machinery Corp Shoe lasting machine
DE1106644B (en) * 1958-08-16 1961-05-10 Eugen G Henkel Fa Pinching machine with sliders and pincer also for shaping the joint parts

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1082704A (en) * 1909-11-24 1913-12-30 Anton Stein Shoe-machine.
US1678873A (en) * 1925-01-26 1928-07-31 United Shoe Machinery Corp Upper-shaping machine

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1082704A (en) * 1909-11-24 1913-12-30 Anton Stein Shoe-machine.
US1678873A (en) * 1925-01-26 1928-07-31 United Shoe Machinery Corp Upper-shaping machine

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2623224A (en) * 1944-09-30 1952-12-30 Bata Narodni Podnik Driving arrangement for shoemaking machines
US2469467A (en) * 1947-01-02 1949-05-10 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2609552A (en) * 1948-04-09 1952-09-09 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2697844A (en) * 1948-11-08 1954-12-28 Auman Irwin Lasting machine
US2614275A (en) * 1949-03-09 1952-10-21 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2706823A (en) * 1950-10-10 1955-04-26 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machines
US2763016A (en) * 1952-12-13 1956-09-18 United Shoe Machinery Corp Stitchdown lasting machines
US3022527A (en) * 1959-01-22 1962-02-27 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machines for shaping uppers over lasts
US3060469A (en) * 1961-04-27 1962-10-30 Moenus Maschf Pulling over and toe end lasting machine
US3102282A (en) * 1961-10-09 1963-09-03 Jacob S Kamborian Control for pulling-over and heel seat lasting machine
US3237224A (en) * 1962-05-10 1966-03-01 Kamborian Jacob Simon Pulling over and lasting machine

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