US2768396A - Machines for shaping uppers over lasts - Google Patents

Machines for shaping uppers over lasts Download PDF

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US2768396A
US2768396A US394048A US39404853A US2768396A US 2768396 A US2768396 A US 2768396A US 394048 A US394048 A US 394048A US 39404853 A US39404853 A US 39404853A US 2768396 A US2768396 A US 2768396A
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arm
fluid
grippers
treadle
movement
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US394048A
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Jorgensen Bernhardt
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/16Lasting machines with lasting pincers and toe- or heel-embracing wipers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last
    • A43D21/125Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last with a plurality of pincers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/18Lasting machines with lasting pincers and straight-acting wipers, also for forming the shank portions of shoes

Description

1956 l B. JORGENSEN 2,768,396
MACHINES FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Nov. 24, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Inventor Bernhardt fo gensen Oct.30, 1956 B. JORGENSEN 2,768,396
MACHINES FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Nov 24, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Oct; 30, 1956 B. JORGENSEN 2,768,396
MACHINES FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Filed Nov. 24, 1955 5 She ets-Sheet :5
Inventor Br'nhara't Jbryensen By 's A qy Oct. 30, 1956 B. JORGENSEN- MACHINES FOR-"SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed NOV; 24, 1953 Z a N a 4 0 WW a Q, w S 0 WM a fl 0 6 m a l a 9 0 .0 2 W \m. n m Q 0 AA/ I Z clc 0 a Inventor Befinhardt Jorzgensen Oct. 30, 1956 B. JORGENSEN MACHINES/FOR SHAPING UPPERS ovrzs LASTS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 24, 1953 [72110 @P Bernhardt Jo gensen United States Patent MACHINES FOR SHAPING UPPERS OVER LASTS Bernhardt Jorgensen, Marhlehead, Mass., assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application November 24, 1953, Serial No. 394,048
6 Claims. (Cl. 12-1059 This invention relates to machines for shaping uppers over lasts, and is herein shown as embodied in a modification of a toe-lasting machine constructed as disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,408,022, granted on September 24, 1946, on {an application of mine. It is to be understood, however, that in various novel aspects the invention is not limited to the illustrative embodiment.
The machine disclosed in the above-mentioned Letters Patent is provided with grippers for gripping the margin of :an upper on a last and with power-operated means for causing the grippers to pull the upper in the course of a cycle of automatic operations of the machine initiated by depression of a starting treadle. For closing the grippers on the upper the machine is provided with fluidoperated means to which fluid is delivered by a powerdriven pump in response to initial depression of the treadle before the treadle is moved far enough to start the cycle of operations. The pump circulates fluid continuously when the machine is idle and develops sufficient pressure to close the grippers only in response to such depression of the treadle.
The present invention, in one aspect, provides a construction such as to eliminate the need of a power-driven pump and such also that by the use of comparatively simple mechanism the closure of upper-gripping means may be conveniently and easily effected. The construction shown comprises a plunger pump which is operated directly by the initial depression of the above-mentioned starting treadle to deliver fluid to the fluid-pressure means for closing the grippers. If the operator observes that the upper is not properly gripped, he may cause the grippers to relax their grip on the upper sufliciently to permit it to be properly adjusted therein by permitting a slight retractive movement of the treadle and accordingly of the pump plunger or may cause them to open fully by releasing the treadle. After the starting of the cycle of operations the pump is further operated automatically to increase the force with which the upper is gripped, the maximum force thus applied being adjustably determined by a relief valve which controls a bypass for the fluid. At predetermined times in the cycle of operations the pump is so controlled as first to decrease the force with which the upper is gripped and then to cause the grippers to open :and release the upper.
The above and other novel features'of the invention, including various novel details of construction and combinations of parts, will now be more particularly described With reference to the accompanying drawings and thereafter pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings,
Fig. l is a view in right-hand side elevation of the machine in which the invention is herein shown as embodied, with parts broken away;
Fig. 2 is a view partly in front elevation and partly in the ma hi e;
ice
Fig. 3 is a view partly in elevation and partly in sec.- tion of one of the side grippers and the gripper-closing mechanism associated therewith;
Fig. 4 is a view partly in right-hand side elevation and partly in section, showing the means for generating fluid pressure to close the grippers, the parts being shown in their starting positions;
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4, but showing the parts.
the same time in the operation of the machine as in,
Fig. 6;
Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 6, with the parts as they appear when the wipers are about to begin the wiping of the upper inwardly over the insole;
Fig. 9 is mainly a plan view, showing the grippers and the wipers in the same relation to the shoe as in Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 8, showing the parts;
as they appear when the grippers are about to release the upper;
Fig. 11 shows the relation of one of the side grippers to the shoe and the wipers at the same time in the op-' eration of the machine as in Fig. 10; and
Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 10 with the parts as they appear when the wipers have completed their inward wiping movements.
Like the machine shown in the above-mentioned Letters Patent, the machine herein shown is provided with a member 2 (Figs. 1 and 6) arranged to engage the; bottom face of the toe end of the insole to position the shoe heightwise relatively to the lasting instrumentalitiesz and in operating on a shoe of the Goodyear welt typealso to engage the inner face of the lip a of the insole to position the shoe lengthwise and laterally. Substantially at the beginning of the cycle of operations of the machine the shoe is clamped against the member 2 by upward movement of a toe rest 4, and early in the cycle also a heel rest 6 (Fig. l) is moved rearwardly into engagement with the heel end of the shoe to assist in holding it against lengthwise displacement. As part of the lasting means, the machine is provided with a pair of wipers 8, Fig. 9, which are advanced lengthwise of the shoe and are closed inward laterally of the shoe to embrace the upper around the toe end of the last and are moved upwardly to Wipe the upper heightwise of the last, after which they are further advanced and closed to wipe the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the feather and against the lip of the insole, the lip being supported against the inward pressure of the wipers by the member 2. The wipers are supported on a wipershown, to a pair of arms 20 fast on a rockshaft 22 on which is also secured an arm 24 operated by another cam (not shown) on the cam shaft 16. By this mechanism,
the wiper carrier and the wipers are swung upwardly-f about the axis of the rod 12 to wipe theupperheight fl wise of the last and are later swung downwardly to press the-upper on the feather of the insole. The
closed inward laterally of the shoe in proper time relation to their other movements by wiper-closing mechanism supported on the wiper carrier and operated through a bell-crank lever 26' pivotally mounted at 28 on the carrier and connected by a link 38 to an arm 32 fast on a rockshaft 34 on which is also secured an arm 36 operated by a cam on the cam shaft 16. The mechanism for thus operating the wipers is more fullydisclosed in United States Letters Patent No, 2,160,846, granted on June 6, 1939, on an application of F. C. Eastmans and A. F. Pyms.
The cycle of operations of the machine corresponds to one complete revolution of the cam shaft 16. This cam shaft has fast thereon a worm gear 38 driven by a worm 40 on a shaft 42 which is rotated intermittently through a friction clutch 44 one element of which consists of a drum or pulley 46 driven continuously through a belt 48 by an electric motor 50. The clutch is actuated or tripped to start the machine by forward swinging movement of an arm 52 against the resistance of a spring 54. At its lower end this arm carries a pin 56 normally engaged by a shoulder 58 formed on a forwardlyand rearwardly extending bar 60 the rear end of which is normally held by a spring 62 on a supporting screw 64 underneath it and against a stop 66 on the frame which limits its rearward movement. The forward swinging movement of the arm 52 to trip the clutch is effected by the engagement of the shoulder 58 with the pin 56 in response to forward movement of the bar 60. The
bar 60 is thus moved forwardly by a treadle 68 fast on a rockshaft 70 on which is also secured an upwardly extending arm 72 connected to the bar by a pin 74 and swung rearwardly by a spring 76 when the treadle is released. As fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,160,846, the clutch-tripping arm 52 is further controlled by carn-operated mechanism (not herein shown in detail) whereby it is moved downwardly to disengage the pin 56 from the shoulder 58 and thus to permit the arm to be swung rearwardly by the spring 54 if the operator continues to hold the treadle depressed, and whereby also the arm 52 is thereafter moved upwardly to disengage the clutch and bring the machine to a stop at a time determined by the cam which controls the arm. It may be assumed that, in accordance with the disclosure of the last-mentioned Letters Patent, the machine thus comes to a stop twice prior to the end of the cycle, first to permit the operator to attach a binder wire to one side of the shoe and to draw it part way inwardly under the wipers around the toe, and again to permit him to fasten the wire at the other side of the shoe after the wipers have been partially retracted and opened and again advanced and closed to force the wire firmly against the upper. It will be understood that after each of such stops in the cycle of operations the operator again starts the machine in the same manner as initially by depression of the treadle.
In accordance with the disclosure of Letters Patent No. 2,408,022, the machine herein shown is further provided with means for gripping the margin of the toe end of the upper and for applying a pull to the upper to assist the wipers in the lasting of the toe. Guided for upward and downward movements by a post 78 which supports the previously mentioned shoe-positioning member 2 and by a sleeve 80 on the post (Figs. 2 and 6) is a block 82 which serves as a support for an end gripper 84 arranged to grip the marginal portion of the upper outspread around the end of the toe and for a pair of side grippers 86 arranged to grip it respectively at the opposite sides of the toe. The two side grippers are supported directly by the block 82 and are mounted on studs 88 on this block for swinging movements laterally of the shoe in directions oblique to the longitudinal median line of the forepart of the shoe. ported directly by another block 90'which is adjustable The end gripper 84 is sup- 4 vertically along a guideway 92 on the block 82 and is secured in adjusted position by a screw 94. The end gripper is therefore adjustable heightwise of the shoe relatively to the side grippers, and it is further mounted to swing in directions lengthwise of the shoe about a stud 96 on the block 90.
The end gripper 84 includes a pair of upper-gripping jaws 98 and 100, the jaw 98 being secured to a small block 102 which is secured between the lower ends of two spaced upwardly extending plates 104, only. one of which is shown, pivotally mounted at their upper ends on the stud 96 at opposite sides of the block 90. The jaw 98 is provided with a substantially horizontal uppergripping portion 106 the edge of which is curved about the toe end of the shoe and on which the upper is clamped by the lower edge of the jaw 100, this jaw consisting of a comparatively thin, substantially vertical plate curved about the toe end of the shoe similarly to the edge of the upper-gripping portion 106 of the jaw 98. The upper end portion of the jaw is secured to a small block 108 which is secured to a forwardly extending lower end portion of a bar 110 pivotally connected at its upper end to one arm of a bell-crank lever 112 mounted between the two plates 104 to swing about a pin 114. The bar 110 is further controlled by a link 116 also mounted between the plates 104 and pivotally connected at its opposite ends respectively to the plates and to the bar. The other arm of the bell-crank lever 112 is connected by a link 118 to a piston 120 movable in a cylinder 122 having a downwardly extending portion 124 secured between the two plates 104-. A spring 126 connected toa pin 128 on the link 116 and to a pin 130 on the hub of the bell-crank lever 112 tends to move the bar 110 and the gripper jaw 100. upwardly and holds the jaw initially in open position with the piston 120 at the inner end of the cylinder 122. It will be understood that the jaw 100 is moved downwardly to grip the upper against the cooperating jaw 98, as shown in, Fig. 6, by operating fluid admitted to the cylinder 122. This operating fluid, preferably light oil, is forced into the cylinder 122 at the proper time, as, more particularly hereinafter described, through a conduit 132 leading from the source of fluid supply, a portion of this conduit being flexible to permit the requred movements of the gripper in the pulling of the upper.
Each of the side grippers 86 includes a jaw 134- (Figs. 2 and 7*) secured between the lower ends of a pair of upwardly extending plates 136 the upper ends of which are pivotally mounted on the corresponding stud 88 at opposite sides of a lug 138 extending from the block 82. The jaw has an outwardly and upwardly inclined upperengaging face, and arranged to grip the upper against this face is a cooperating jaw 140 pivotally mounted on a pin 142 on, the jaw 134. A tail portion 144 of the jaw 140 is connected, by a link 146 to a piston 148 mounted in a cylinder 150, which has an extension 152 secured between the two plates, 136, Fig. 3. A spring 154 connected to a pin 156 on the link 146 and to a pin 158 on the cylinder holds the jaw 140 initially in open position determined by engagementof its tail portion 144 with a pin 160. Closing or upper-gripping movement is imparted to the jaw 140 by fluid delivered to the cylinder 150 through a flexible conduit 162 communicating with the previously mentioned conduit 132 leading to the cylinder 122 associated with the end gripper.
Upper-pulling movements heightwise of the last are imparted to the end gripper and the side grippers after they have closed on the upper by upward movement of the block 82 against the resistance of a spring 164 confined between a shoulder on the block and the sleeve 80, the sleeve abutting at its upper end against a boss 166 on a head casting 168 mounted on the frame 170 of the machine.- Secured in the block 82 and extending downwardly therefrom are two pins 172 (Fig. 2) which rest at their lower ends on inwardly extending arms 174 of levers 176 pivotally mounted between their opposite ends on pins 178 supported in a web 180 on the head casting 168. The arms 174 are engaged underneath by screws 182 which are threaded in the web 180 and serve to support the block 82 and the grippers initially at an adjustably variable height. The levers 176 are further provided with outwardly extending arms 184 the outer end portions of which are engaged above by arms 186 which are fast on a rockshaft 188 mounted in bearings in the head casting 168., It will be understood that upward movement of the block 82 and the grippers to pull the upper is effected by downward swinging movements of the two arms 186. These arms are thus operated, under control of a cam 190 (Fig. 1) on the camshaft 16, by a spring 192 connected to a bell-crank lever 194 which is mounted to swing about the previously mentioned shaft 34 and one arm of which carries a roll 196 in engagement with the periphery of the cam. The other arm of the bell-crank lever is connected to the lower end of an upwardly extending link 198 secured to the upper end of which (Figs. 1 and 2) is a member 200 having therein a slot 202 through which extends a pin 204 carried by one of the arms 186. Threaded in the upper end of the member 200 is a rod 206 which extends downwardly into the slot 202 and also extends upwardly through an opening in the top of the head casting 168, the rod having on its upper end a knob 208 for turning it to vary the distance between its lower end and the pin 204. When the cam 190 arrives in position to permit the bell-crank lever 194 to be swung downwardly by the spring 192 downward movement is imparted to the link 198 and the member 200 to carry the rod 206 into engagement with the pin 204, after which further downward movement of these parts serves to swing the arms 186 downwardly and thus to operate the grippers to pull the upper heightwise of the last.
As the grippers are thus moved to pull the upper heightwise of the last they alsoreceive short movements which may be termed upper-spreading movements, the end gripper swinging rearwardly about the stud 96 and the side grippers swinging outwardly about the studs 88. For thus operating the end gripper there is fast on the rockshaft 188 an arm 210 (Fig. 6) on which is a roll 212 arranged to engage the front edge of one of the plates 104 of the gripper. It will be understood that in the upper-pulling operation the arm 210 is swung downwardly with a component of rearward movement, thus causing the roll to impart the rearward swinging movement to the gripper. This swinging movement of the end gripper is effected against the resistance of a return spring (not shown). Arranged to cooperate with this spring to determine adjustably the initial position of the end gripper with respect to movement about the stud 96 is a screw 214 which is threaded in a block 216 secured between the two plates 104 of the gripper and bears at its inner end against the block 90.
The outward swinging movements are imparted to the side grippers by the swinging movement of the end gripper. For this purpose there is provided a lever 218 having a pair of downwardly extending lugs pivotally mounted on the stud 96 and having threaded in its rear end a screw 220 engaged by the block 216 to swing the lever about the stud by the swinging of the end gripper. For imparting the swinging movements to the side grippers the front end portion of the lever 218 is arranged to engage the inner ends of two arms 222, one of these arms being secured to one of the plates 136 of one side gripper and the other arm to one of the plates of the other side gripper. The outward swinging movement of each side gripper is effected against the resistance of a return spring 224 (Fig. 2) which surrounds a rod 226 extending outwardly through an opening in the head casting 168. The spring abuts at one end against this casting and at the other end against a washer 228 whichis seated against an enlarged inner end portion of the ,rod. The rod is connected by a universal joint 230 to another rod 232 which is threaded in a block 234 (Fig. 3) secured between the two side plates 136 of the gripper and bears at its inner end against the gripper-supporting block 82. It will be evident that by turning the rod 232 the initial position of the side gripper with respect to swinging movement may be varied, the spring 224 holding the rod normally against the block.
Such turning movement of the rod 232 is effected by tu'rn-' ing the rod 226 by means of a knob 236 on its outer end. The means for thus swinging the several grippers is disclosed in greater detail in Letters Patent No. 2,408,022.
The jaws of the several grippers have smooth upperengaging faces to permit them to slip on the upper when the force of the pull thereon becomes great enough. The force of the pull applied by the grippers to the upper therefore depends upon the force with which they grip the upper and this is determined by the pressure of the fluid in the gripper-closing cylinders 122 and 150. For purposes of this invention fluid is delivered to these cylinders to close the grippers by a pump 238 (Fig. 4) comprising a plunger 240, which may be termed a fluid impelling member, movable in a cylinder 242 secured, on the rear portion of the frame of the machine, Fig. l.
The conduit 132 leads into this cylinder and accordingly the pump is at all times in open communication with the cylinders 122 and 150. The plunger 240 is connected by a link 244 to an arm 246 pivotally mounted at its lower end on the pump casting and connected at its upper end by a link 248 to one arm 250 of a bell-crank lever 252 mounted on a rod 254 on the frame of the machine. Movement of the link 248 to the left is transmitted to .the arm 246 yieldingly through the action of a relatively heavy compression spring 243, the tension of which may be varied by an adjusting nut 245. A pin 247, carried by the link 248, is received in a slot 249 in the arm 246. Pivotally connected to the other arm 256 of the bellcr-ank lever 252 is a rod 258 which extends downwardly through an eye-bolt 260 rotatably mounted on an arm 262 fast on the treadle-operated rockshaft 70 and extending rearwardly therefrom. Pivotally mounted on the rear end portion of this arm is a latch 264 held normally by a spring 266 under a collar 268 fast on the rod 258. It will be understood that initially the arm 262 is in its lowest position determined by engagement of the rear end of the bar 60 with the screw 64 (Fig. 1). The position of the rod 258 at this time is determined by means which limits rearward swinging movement of the arm 246 under the influence of a relatively light spring 270 acting on the arm. This means comprises a rod 272 pivotally mounted on the casting of the pump 238 and extending rearwardly through a lug 274 on the arm 246, the rod having thereon a nut 2'76 for engaging the lug to limit the movement of the arm.
Formed in the front end of the bar 60 is a slot 278 (Fig. 1) through which the previously mentioned pin 74 carried by the arm 72 extends. Provision is thus afforded for lost motion between the arm 72 and the bar 60, so that the treadle will be depressed a certain distance before the clutch is tripped. The upward swinging movement of the arm 262 which takes place in this initial depression of the treadle causes the latch 264 to raise the rod 258 and thereby to operate the pump plunger 240, through spring 243, to force fluid into the gripperclosing cylinders 122 and 150, thus closing the grippers on the margin of the upper positioned between their jaws. The increased resistance to the movement of the treadle when the pin 74 arrives at the front end of the slot 278 is perceptible to the operator and assists him in stopping the treadle at that point if he so desires. Adjustably secured on the rod 258 is a block 280 having a front vertical face 281 engaged initially by a latch 282 pivotally mounted on the frame and held against the block by a spring 284. The front face of the block is of such extent that the above-mentioned initial depression of the treadle does not move this face on the block upwardly beyond the latch 282. If, therefore, the operator observes that the margin of the upper is not properly gripped he may cause the grippers to relax the force of their grip on the upper sufficiently to permit it to be properly adjusted therein by permitting a slight retractive movement of the treadle and accordingly of the pump plunger 246, or may cause the grippers fully to open by releasing the treadle. After the upper has been properly gripped the treadle is further depressed to trip the clutch and start the cycle of operations. By such further depression of the treadle the rod 253 is moved farther upwardly and by further movement of the pump plunger increases the force with which the upper is gripped. In this operation the block 253i) is moved far enough upwardly to cause the latch 282 to be swung by the spring 23 inwardly underneath it, Fig. 5, so that the latch will thereafter prevent retractive movement of the pump plunger regardless of the position of the treadle. When the latch 282 is swung into position beneath the block 280, as above described, a roll 2736 mounted on a tail portion 283 of the latch is brought into contact with a dwell portion 290 of a cam 292 on the cam shaft 16 and, at the same time, a second roll 287 mounted on an arm 289 of a bell crank lever 291 is brought into a position to be contacted by a lift portion 293 formed on a second cam 2% on the shaft 16. A second arm 297 of the bell-crank lever 291 is connected to a collar 299, secured to the rod 258 by means of a pin 301 and a slot 303 in the arm. Thus, as the shaft 16 commences to rotate, in the direction of the arrow see Fig. l, at the beginning of the cycle of operations, the bell crank lever 252 will be swung in a counterclockwise direction, by the action of cam 295, lever 291 and block 299, thereby further increasing the force of the grip on the upper materials. To limit the maximum force of the grip on the upper there is provided in the conduit 132 a relief valve 296 normally held seated by a spring 298 the compression of which may be varied by a screw 300. When the pressure of the fluid, which builds up after the gripper jaws have closed on the upper materials and as the spring 243 is compressed, becomes great enough the valve 296 opens and permits some of the fluid to escape, the fluid thus escaping being conducted by a pipe 302 to a chamber 304 formed in the pump casting, this chamber being open to the atmosphere. Between the chamber 304 and the interior of the pump cylinder 242 is a passageway in which there is a spring controlled check valve 306 which permits such quantity of fluid as may have escaped past the relief valve 2% to return to the pump cylinder upon retractive movement of the pump plunger 240.
Substantially at the time in the cycle of operations when the wipers 8 begin to wipe the marginal portion of the upper inwardly over the insole, a slight rise 308 on the cam 292 arrives opposite the roll 286 and, by swinging the latch 282 in a counter-clockwise direction, allows the rod 258 to drop down to a position determined by the engagement of a setscrew 285 in the block 289 with the latch, such movement of the rod and clockwise rotation of the lever 25?. being permitted by a drop 305-011 the cam 295. This permits the spring 243 to expand and the pump plunger 249 to be slightly retracted by the spring 270 to reduce somewhat the force with which the grippers grip the upper. In order to permit downward movement of the rod 258 if the operator should continue to hold the treadle depressed, a pin 312 on the frame engages a tail portion 314 of the latch 264 and swings the latchout from under the collar 263 when the operator de presses the treadle far enough to trip the clutch, see Fig. 5. Thereafter, before the wipers have fully completed their inward wiping movement, a further rise 310 on the. earn 292 entirely withdraws the latch, thus allowing the rod 258, link 248 and plunger 240 to return to the positions shown in Fig. 4 thereby causing the grippers to open and release the upper.
As is explained in the above-mentioned patent, the machine now comes to a stop, when the wipers have wiped the upper inwardly over the shoe bottom and are holding it. in overwiped position, to permit the operator to apply a binder wire to the toe end of the shoe. Thereafter, the machine is again started by a second depression of the treadle whereupon the wipers are retracted to permit the binder wire to be drawn more tightly inward against the upper and are again advanced whereupon the machine once more comes to a stop to permit the binder wire to be fastened. In response to a third depression of the treadle the operating cycle is completed and the parts are returned to their starting positions. During such second and third depressions of the treadle, the rod 258 is, of course, elevated and the gripper jaws are momentarily closed. However, these are idle movements since the upper isno longer between the jaws. At this time, the latch 282 is held by the rise 310 of the cam 292 away from the block 280 so that the rod 258 is not held up by the latch 282 but is permitted to return to its initial position when released by the latch 264.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for etfecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper, fluid-operated means for closing saiduppergripping means on the upper, a pump including a fluidimpel'ling member movable by the operator to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means prior to the pulling of the uper, and power-operated means for further moving said member to increase the force with which the upper is gripped.
2. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for effecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper, fluid-operated means for closing said uppergripping means on the upper, a pump including a fluidimpelling member movable by the operator to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means prior to the pulling of the upper, power-operated means for further moving said member to increase the force with which the upper is gripped, and a relief valve arranged to control the pressure of the fluid delivered by said member and thereby to limit the force with which the upper is gripped.
3. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for effecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper in the course of a cycle of automatic operations of the machine, fluid-operated means for closing said upper-gripping means on the upper, a pump including a fluid-impelling member movable by the operator to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means prior to the starting of a cycle of operations, and automatic means for further moving said member after the starting of the cycle, of operations to increase the force with which the upper is gripped.
4. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for effecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper in the course of a cycle of automatic operations of the machine, fluidoperated means for closing said upper-gripping means on the upper, a pump including a plunger movable to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means, a treadle movable by the operator thus to operate said plunger prior to the starting of a cycle of operations, and power-operated means including a cam for further moving said plunger after the starting of the cycle of operations to increase the force with Which the upper is gripped.
5. In a machine for shaping uppers over iasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for eflFecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper, fluid-operated means for closing said upper-gripping means on the upper, a pump including a fluid-impelling member movable by the operator to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means on the upper, a device for locking said member against reverse movement, and power-operated means arranged to actthereafter further to move said member to increase the force with which the upper is gripped.
6. In a machine for shaping uppers over lasts, uppergripping means for gripping the margin of an upper on a last, power-operated means for effecting relative movement of said upper-gripping means and the last to pull the upper in the course of a cycle of automatic operations of the machine, fluid-operated means for closing said upper-gripping means on the upper, a pump including a fluid-impelling member movable by the operator to deliver fluid under pressure to said fluid-operated means to close the upper-gripping means prior to the starting of the cycle of operations, a device for automatically locking said member against reverse movement, and automatic means arranged further to move said member after the starting of the cycle of operations to increase the force with which the upper is gripped.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,979,000 Kam-borian Oct. 30, 1934 2,408,022 Jorgensen Sept. 24, 1946 2,547,233 Seppmann Apr. 3, 1951
US394048A 1953-11-24 1953-11-24 Machines for shaping uppers over lasts Expired - Lifetime US2768396A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3066329A (en) * 1960-04-01 1962-12-04 Schon & Cie G M B H Machine for pulling over a last and gluing the uppers of shoes
US3076209A (en) * 1961-05-19 1963-02-05 United Shoe Machinery Corp Toe lasting machines
US3165771A (en) * 1961-04-05 1965-01-19 Kamborian Apparatus for lasting footwear
US3189924A (en) * 1961-05-02 1965-06-22 Kamborian Upper stretching and heel seat lasting machine
US3233261A (en) * 1962-10-19 1966-02-08 Kamborian Method and apparatus for pulling over and lasting shoes
US3237224A (en) * 1962-05-10 1966-03-01 Kamborian Jacob Simon Pulling over and lasting machine

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1979000A (en) * 1934-10-30 Lasting footwear
US2408022A (en) * 1945-09-12 1946-09-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2547233A (en) * 1947-10-14 1951-04-03 Alfred B Seppmann Master cylinder structure

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1979000A (en) * 1934-10-30 Lasting footwear
US2408022A (en) * 1945-09-12 1946-09-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2547233A (en) * 1947-10-14 1951-04-03 Alfred B Seppmann Master cylinder structure

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3066329A (en) * 1960-04-01 1962-12-04 Schon & Cie G M B H Machine for pulling over a last and gluing the uppers of shoes
US3165771A (en) * 1961-04-05 1965-01-19 Kamborian Apparatus for lasting footwear
US3189924A (en) * 1961-05-02 1965-06-22 Kamborian Upper stretching and heel seat lasting machine
US3076209A (en) * 1961-05-19 1963-02-05 United Shoe Machinery Corp Toe lasting machines
US3237224A (en) * 1962-05-10 1966-03-01 Kamborian Jacob Simon Pulling over and lasting machine
US3233261A (en) * 1962-10-19 1966-02-08 Kamborian Method and apparatus for pulling over and lasting shoes

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