US1197438A - Machine for shaping shoe-uppers. - Google Patents

Machine for shaping shoe-uppers. Download PDF

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US1197438A
US1197438A US63765511A US1911637655A US1197438A US 1197438 A US1197438 A US 1197438A US 63765511 A US63765511 A US 63765511A US 1911637655 A US1911637655 A US 1911637655A US 1197438 A US1197438 A US 1197438A
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last
heel
machine
grippers
shoe
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US63765511A
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Matthias Brock
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USM Ltd
United Shoe Machinery Co AB
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United Shoe Machinery Co AB
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/16Lasting machines with lasting pincers and toe- or heel-embracing wipers

Description

M. BROCK.
MACHINE FUR SHAPING SHOE UPPEHS.
APPLICATION FILED IULY I0, I9II.
Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
7 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
M. BROCK.
MACHINE FOR SHAPING SHOE UPPERS.
Y 9 1,197,438 APPLICATION FILED JUL I0 I II Patontcdsept. 5,
ISHEETs-SHEET 3.
Il* .III
IIIII II M//T/VESSES M. BROCKv MACHINE FOR SHAPING SHOE UIPERS. APPLICATION FILED IuLY III. Isn.
1 1 97,438 Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
Fig. G.
IMM/5555'. iwf/WUR.
M. BROCK.
MACHINE Fon sHAPmG SHOE uPPERs.
APPLICATION FILED )ULY l0, 19H.
Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
SHEETS-SHEET 5.
Mnl/55551 JMW/Q 9A/dew M. BROCK.
MACHINE FOR SHAPING SHOE UPPERS.
APPLICATION FILED JULY l0, 19H. 1 ,1 97,438. Patented sept. 5, 1916.
SHEETS-SHEET 6.
M. BRCVK.
MACHNE FOR SHAPING SHOE UPPERS.
APPLICATION mw JULY xo. |911.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MATTHIAS BROCK, 0F BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR T0 UNITED SHCE MACHINERY COMPANY, 0F PATEBSON, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
Application led July 10, 1911. Serial No. 637,655.
To all whom it may concern Be '1t known that I, MArrHrAs Brook, citizen of the United States, residing at Boston, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain Imrovements in Machines for Shaping Shoeppers, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like reference characters on the drawings indicating like parts in the several figures.
This invention relates to machines for shaping boot and shoe uppers and is herein shown as embodied in a machine for shaping the rear portions of uppers to impart thereto characteristics of `form desired in the finished shoe or boot.
While features of this invention are applicable to machines employed in making shoes in accordance with the customary practice, the invention also contemplates somewhat of a departure from that practice and the illustrated machine is designed with such a departure in view. In the customary practice, the portions of the shoe upper are assembled with the upper mater1als projecting above the plane of the last bottom to .form an upstanding marginal portion that is lasted inwardly over the insole. Usually the u per materials are secured in this position y one or more tacks which fasten the upper materials to the rear portion of the insole and to the rear end face of the last so as to maintain them in their selected relation while the shoe is being pulled over and lasted. In that use of the illustrated embodiment of the invention which is shown in the drawings, however, the upper materials will be assembled upon the last and pulled over with the rear portion of the upper and its associated parts below the plane of the last bottom and preferably below the ball or head of the heel so that they embrace only the relatively narrow or nec portion of the last. After being assembled and pulled over and fastened at the forepart it is contemplated that the shoe will be presented to the illustrated machine and the rear portion of the upper pulled up from its assembled position around the narrow neck of the last into a final position around the relatively large ball portion of the heel of the last. In so pulling up the upper ma-l terials they are stretched or distended by the wedging action of the last upon them so the invention is to be distn that the rear part of the upper is rendered taut about the ball of the heel and is caused to fit the ball and neck of the heel snugly so that the shoe will not slip up and down while being worn. In the manufacture of two classes of foot-wear the results achi'eved by this procedure are of especial importance. It will be readily understood upon inspection of the human foot that the lower portion or ball of the foot at the heel extends outwardly on both sides and at the rear substantially beyond the upper portion or neck which connects the ball to the ankle. The fitting of the shoe snugly around this ball and neck portion of the heel is depended upon in high or long legged boots, which have no throat opening over the instep, to prevent the wearers heel from slipping up and down while he is walking in such boots. Also, in the class of light slippers or footwear known as pumps which are entirely open over the instep, similar dependence is placed upon the snug fitting of the upper materials to the ball and neck of the heel to preventa slipping of the wearers foot and to retain the pump on the foot. While conformation of the upper materials to the described contour of the heel portion of the foot is of prime importance in the two classes of foot-wear mentioned, it ,is advantageous in all shoes so that the invention is of general utility.
An organized machine for operatin upon shoes to stretch the upper around the eel of the last ,is one broad feature of this inventlon.
Another broad feature of this invention is the provision of means for positively molding the upper materials to the contour of the side and bottom faces of the last and allowing them to remain under molding pressure until they have become set and their shape permanently established in accordance with the contour of the last. In this respect ished from those machines and methods 1n accordance with which the upper is clasped about the side faces of the last and is wiped over the heel seat and then tacked to the insole to retain it in approximately the osition in which the clasp and the wlpers have formed it.
Broad features of this invention are to be reco ized both in the novel method of making shoes herein disclosed and in the organization and construction of apparatus for practising the method, the claims to the method, however, being presented in a copending application Ser. No. 62,041, filed Nov. 17, 1915.
One of the important features of this'invention consists in upper pulling mechanism arranged to apply differential pulling movements to the upper at the heel end and at the shank of a shoe whereby the upper is pulled from a position inclined rearwardly and downwardly from the plane of the shoe bottom into a position with its edge parallel to the shoe bottom. h
Another feature of this inventiop consists in the provision of a gripper mechanism of the above described type, or of any other suitable type, which is movable from position to-coperatewith a shoe on one support into a position to coperate with a shoe on another support. One advantage of this construction is that a single gripper mechanism serves to pull the upper of shoes on a plurality of supports. As herein shown a gripper mechanism is capable of manual movement from 'an out-of-the-way position A, down into operative relation to a shoe and v when its purpose has been served it will return automatically to the out-of-the-way position and-be moved toward operative relation with another shoe support. Conveniently two actuators for the gripper mechanism are .employed and it is moved out of connection with one and .toward the other. The gripper mechanism is manually positioned to do its work and provision also exists for a manual control of the pulling movement but the gripper mechanism is preferably operated by ower driven mechanism which is arrange to effect automatic release when the upper has been pulled up around the ball of the heel as Well as to cause an automatic return to out-of-the-way position and a transfer toward operative relation to the other shoe support.
Another feature of this invention consists iii the combination with a shoe sup ort and molds that are adapted to clamp t e upper about the heel portion of the last, of connected mechanism for actuating the support into operative relation to the lmolds and for actuating the molds to do their work.
Another feature of this mechanism is found in the combination with a shoe support and heel lasting wiper plates, of connected mechanism for actuating the support to present the shoe and for actuating the f wiper plates to do their work, with or Without the further combination of the molds operated as above described.
The novel heel seat lasting wipers herein shown and described are not claimed in this application but are claimed in my co-pending application Ser. No. 706,655, filed June 29, 1912.
cams dealingwith the The parts are all heavily built in the illustrated machine and it is contemplated that each shoe, after having been pulled up at the heel, if that portion of the invention is employed, clamped to the last by the molds and overlaid into lasted position upon the heel seat by the wipers shall remain under pressure while one or more other shoes are being similarly treated so that the upper materials will become thoroughly established in the form to which they have been molded and will retain this form in the finished shoe. It is contemplated that the fastening of the upper materials to the heel seat and the insole shall be done by a simple tacking machine, as distinguished from a heel seat laster, after the shoe and last have been removed from this shaping machine.
For convenience in description the narrow portion of the heel part of the last which corresponds with the narrow portion of the foot connecting the ankle to the heel is herein referred to as the neck of the last and the larger portion of the last corresponding to the ball or enlarged portion of the heel of the foot is herein designated as the ball or the head of the heel part of the last.
The several features of the invention, including those above mentioned and also certain more' important details of construction and combinations of parts, will now be described in connection with the accompanying drawings and the invention will then be pointed out more definitely in the claims.
Figure 1 is a side elevation of a machine embodying this invention; Fig. 2 is a front view; Fig. 3 is a plan view; Fig. 4 is a side view of the cams operating the pincers and the molds; Fig. 5 is a side view of the cam operatin the jack; Fig. 6 shows the cam operating t e wipers; Figs. 7, 8 and 9 are details which will be referred to; Figs. 10 and 11 are side elevations of different constructions of pincer mechanisms; Figs. 12 and 13 are sections on lines 12--12, 13-13, Fig. 10 and contrast the perimeter of the last about which the upper is initially positioned with that about which it is stretched by this machine; Fig. 14 is a front elevation, partl in section, of Fig. 11; Figs. 15, 16 and 1 show the. heel seat wiper mechanism on a larger scale than Fig. 3. Fig. 18 is a diagrammatic view showing the approximate relation of the several operating cams dealing with one shoe to one another during the cycle of the machine, it being understood that during the second half of the cycle the other shoe in to operate 180 behind those represented in the dlagrams..
The machine comprises a base or column 2 having bearings or the driving shaft 4 and a cam shaft 5 which is connected thereto by intel-meshing speed reducin gears 6 and 7. At the front side of the ase is a l pivot rod 8 bearing, for each half of the duplex machine, a shoe supporting spindle 10.upon the upper end of which rests a pinion nut 12 secured upon the stem of the thimble pin 14 which stem extends down- ,wardly into the spindle 10 and is restrained ing connection with an oblique rod 20. which' extends up near the toe of the boot and has a hand wheel by which rotary movement can be applied to be transmitted through the described connections to the pinion nut 12. This arrangement provides for adjusting or manually lifting the boot through an operating device which is entirely outside of the boot leg and in convenient position to be manipulated. The boot spindle 10 has a forwardly extending arm to which is pivoted the post 22 upon the upper end of which rests a screw nut 23 having threaded connection with the stem of the toe rest 25, said stem extending into the post 22 and being restrained from turning movement in said post by the pin 24. There are two boot supports, each like the other, and one of which it is contemplated shall hold a right boot in the machine and under" pressure while a left boot is being applied to the other support and prepared for the lasting operation. i
Upon the top of the machine head which is ailixed to the column there is provided a T-shaped guide rib 30 for the carriage 32 of the upper pulling grippers, said guide rib extending transversely across the machine to allow movement of the gripper carriage from operative relation to one boot support, Fig. 2, into operative relation to the other boot support. In the' carria e 32 is formed a guideway extending from ront to back in which the bar 34 is reely movable endwise and on the front end of this bar is pivoted a gripper carrier 35, Figs. 1, 10 and 11, said carrier being connected to the bar by a pivot shaft 33, and a spring 36, the rear end of which is adjustably attached by an eye-bolt to a projection 37 from the carriage 34 and serves as a counterbalance for the gripper carrier and the parts attached thereto and normally holds said carrier tipped upwardly about the pivot so that the grippers are above the boot and out of the operators way. The front end of the gripper carrier 35 is formed as a. handle and from this handle,
which is located over the ball of the shoe, extends rearwardly a. gripper lever 40 to the rear end of whic the heel gripper is attached, while from a transverse pivot rod 42, located in said lever at about the middle of its length, the shank or side grippers are sustained. The grippers each comprise links 43 connected at their lower ends by a jaw closer 44 which is movable up and down 1n a slot in the tail of the inner gripper jaw 45. This inner jaw is thin in order to adapt it to extend between the upper and the last. The outer gripper jaw 46 is pivoted to the inner jaw at 47 and its tail is formed as a cam with relation to the direction of the slot in the inner jaw.l This arrangement provides that as the jaw closer 44 is pulled upwardly with relation to the jaws it will rock the outer jaw toward the inner jaw to effect gripping of the upper and, after the upper has been seized, continued movement of the links will cause the closer 44 to lift the jaws and effect pulling of the upper. The jaws are held down during the closing movement by a bell crank lever, Fig. 11, having a thumb piece 48 in convenient relation to the handle of the gripper carrier 35. Upon the horizontal arm of this bell crank lever is pivoted a block 50 which has on the rear side of the pivot a finger 51 extending between the links 43 of the heel gripper and engaging the upper end of the tail of jaw 46. From the front arm of the block 50 project laterally similar fingers 53 between the links of the shank grippers and into position to engage the upper ends of the outer jaws of said shank grippers. Springs 52 connecting the jaws with the upper ends of the link 43 tend to move the jaws upwardly with relation to the cross pins 44 and thereby effect opening of the jaws whenever the springs are permitted to act.
The gripper carrier 35 also supports the last bottom engaging abutments 55 which are depending arms having their lower ends roughened and their upper ends connected by a toggle above their pivotal attachment to the carrier. The middle pivot of the toggle is connected to a collar on a hand screw 56 which isthreaded into the carrier 35 and which, b its adjustment, determines the spread o the lower ends of the abutments 55, Fig. 14, according to the Width of the shank of the last over which the boot is being made. The abutment feet are connected with the abutment bars by toggle links 57 which are normally held straight as in Fig. 1 b friction or a spring but can be flexed by andles 58 to allow the grippers to reach down farther than usual for seizing a scant vamp. Straightening the toggle 57 again after the grippers have been closed will re store the abutment feet to their normal position after which the grippers will pull the upper as usual.
The gripper lever 4() is connected by a link 59 with an operating lever 60 pivoted on the` carrier 35 and connected by other its links 61, Figs. 1 and 3, to a rigid arm of the shaft 33 in the bar 34. Said shaft receives its movement through other arms 67 that are rigid on the shaft 33 and have rolls 63 on their forward ends, one or the other of which rolls extend laterally Figs. 2 and 3,
into a groove in one or the other of two operating slides 62. The operating slide is guided in the side of the machine head and of the column 2, having a pin 64 and slot connection with the column, and at its lower end is connected to a lever 65, Figs. 1 and 4, which is fulcrumed at the rear of the column on the shaft l and carries a roll 66 that is engaged with a cam groove of the cam 67 for drawing the slide downwardly to lift the gripper carrying lever 40 and thereby cause the grippers/to seize and then to pull the upper. The cam 67 is one of three cam blocks on the shaft 5 that are shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2. A slight reverse movement of the slide 62, see the cam track in Fig. 4, forces the gripper closing pins 44 downwardly to open the grippers after the upper has been pulled up.
1t is to be noted, from Fig. 1, that the heel gripper, which is required to move a;
greater distance than the shank grippers for pulling the upper up to proper position, is connected to the rear ofthe lever i0 while the shank grippers are connected to the lever about midway between its ends so that a movement is given to the several gfippers in the proportion that the work requires. It will also be noted thatmovement of the gripper carrying lever is about an axis located over the ball of the last.
The carriage 32 and the 'parts associated with it are moved transversely of the machine, Fig. 2, on the guide rib 30 to an outof-the-way position with reference to the shoe just operated upon after the grippers have been released. This transverse movement is effected by a lever 70 fulcruined on the side of the column and having at its lower end a roll standing in a` groove of a cam block 72. The extent of this automatic movement is sufficient to transfer the grip-Y per carriage to a median position between the two boot supports where it is out of the way of subsequent operations on the boot which has just been ulled and is not in position to interfere with any operation that may remain to be performed on the boot carried by the other support.
For transferring the gripper carriage 32 into operative relation with said other boot support the carriage has a rack bar 74 with which engages, see Figs. 8 and 9, a pinion 75 on a crank arm shaft which bears a crank 76 in position to be conveniently reached by the operator. A second operating slide 62 is mounted at the opposite side of the machine from the one shown in Fig..1, as plainly appears from Fig. 2, and it has a head like the one first described for engagement with a roll 63 on the adjacent side of the gripper carrier. Instead of using a crank for operating the rack bar 74 and gear 75, the gear may be actuated from a foot treadle 73 having a link connection to a toothed rack 77, as shown in Fig. 7.
Referring to Figs. 10 and 11, it may be seen that the shank grippers are adapted for adjustment about the pivot 42 which extends transversely of the last. In Fig. 10 a handle bar 80 is shown rising from the shank gripper into a position where it can be convenientl engaged by the operator. A similar handle bar is attached to the other shank gripper and these bars provide means by which the shank grippers may be set farther forward or backward as the size of shoes varies or as other conditions may require. These handle bars may also be employed for moving the shank grippers forwardly after they have seized the upper and by such movement may be made to forwardly tension the marginal portion of the boot upper. Also these independent handle bars provide means by which one shank gripper can be moved relatively to the other one for adjusting the upper around the last. This may be idesirable for ositioning a back seam, and also for positioning the side seams of the boot, Fig. 10, opposite to one another. In Fig. 11 the bars 81 corresponding in function to the bars 80 are connected at their upper ends by links 82 with a hand lever S4 -pivoted to the gripper carrier 35, one of said links-82 being connected to the lever above its pivot and the other one below its pivot so that movement of the hand lever 84 will shift one shank gripper and the adjacent side seam of the boot forwardly while the other shank gripper and side seam are shifted backwardly. The lever 84 carries a pawl to engage a ratchet 85` for locking the grippers in adjusted position.
The spindle l0 is connected, at a point which will be below the top of a full length boot, to a rod 90 which in turn has a yielding connection 91 to the lower end of an angle lever 92, Figs. 1 and 2, having on its horizontal arm 93, Fig. 5, a cam roll in a groove in the side of a cam block 94. This cam 94 is timed with relation to the gripper operating cam 67 to swing the spindle toward the machine and draw the shoe into operative relation to the lasting devices after the grippers have pulled the upper and have re- .leased the shoe, or when they are about to release their hold upon it.
- The machine is provided with heel embracing jaws or molds 100,Y Fig. 1, into which the heel portion of the boot is forced by the above described operation of the jack and against which the rear end of the heel is firmly pressed and held, the yielding connectionV 91 taking up the variation in sizes of different lasts. These molds are arranged to swing about a center located substantially at the rear end face of the shoe, Fig. 3, and thereby to close around the heel portion of the boot and by pressure to conform the upper and heel stiil'ener of the boot to the side and end face of the last. The molds will preferably comprise metallic face blocks 102, Fig. 2, yieldingly connected to their body portions of the jaws so that an effective molding of the upper materials will be produced between the side faces of the last and a rigid outer molding surface. The molds are guided, Fig. 3, in their closing movement by a pin and cam slot directing devices and are connected to the links 106 of an operating slide 108 which has a yielding connection through a spring 110 with a lever 112 fulcrumed at 113 and extending downwardly into a cam track in the left hand side of the cam disk 6i?, Fig. 4, on the cam shaft 5 by which the molds are closed. The yielding connection 110 and the yielding mounting of the mold plates 102 permit adaptation to variations in size and, to a slight extent, to variations in contour of different boot lasts, as well as to variations in thickness of the upper materials of the boot.
The Wipers have a link connection with the cross-head 122 of a plunger 124 which extends rearwardly and -has an adjustable connection, through a block 125 that is threaded upon the plunger, with the upper end of a lever pivoted on the ulcrum rod 113 and extendin downwardly to a cam groove in the face o cam 115 on the shaft 5. This groove in the cam is formed, Fig. 6, and arranged with relation to the other cam grooves to advance the wipers and then partially or completely to back them off and then to advance them again after the boot has been forced back into the mold and the mold has been closed. Simultaneousl with the second advance, or it may be directly after the completion of such advance, the spindle 10 is elevated to compress the shoe against the wiper and the machine comes to rest with the rear portion of the shoe under molding pressure.
For the purpose of liftin the last spindle a lever has a pin an horizontal slot connection with the spindle and. is fulcrumed at 141 with its rear end pivoted to the lower end of a link 142 which is in turn connected to a depending arm of an angle lever 144, Fig. 5, which arm and link form a toggle. The angle lever 144 is fulcrumed on the shaft 4 and its horizontal arm carries a roll in position to be engaged by a cam groove 146 of the cam 94 on the shaft 5. This cam is advantageously formed and timed, as suggested in the preceding paragraph, to elevate the spindle during the second advance of the wipers, whereby the wipers grip the upper with increasing pressure as they close, and preferably the cam continues to elevate the spindle after the Wipers have completed their advance and thereby effects a direct compression of the lasted upper materials upon the last bottom.
The above mentioned wipers shown in Fig. 3, and in greater detail in Figs. 15, 16 and 17, comprise multipart lasting plates, the members of each plate being mounted for relative movement during the closing operation. In the illustrated construction each plate comprises three members; namely, a heel end member 150, a side member 152 and a shank member 154. The rear end member is integral with or is attached to the cam plate 155 and has with Said plate a forward movement derived from a link connection 156 with the crosshead 122 of the plunger 124. These end plates also have with the cam plates a swinging or closing movement about the inner a jacent ends of their acting edges, this movement being derived from the guiding walls 158 against which the outer curved edges 160 of the cam plates abut and from roller studs 162 which rise from the supporting surface into cam slots 164 1n the cam plates. The side members 152 of the lasting .plates are arranged to be carried inwardly by the swinging or closing movement of the cam plates 155 and for this purpose each cam plate has an edge wall 165 against which the inner edge of the member 152 abuts and slides, and each of said members 152 has an upstanding elongated lug 168 which is located in an elongated slot 170 in the cam plate 155 and from this lug 168 rises a stud 169 which projects above the cam plate and into a transverse slot 174 formed in a cap late 173 which is a stationary portion o the frame. By this arrangement the movement of the cam plates 155 acts through the lug 168 to move the wiper member 152. The stud 169 and the slot 174 in the cap plate restrain the side member 152 from any forward sliding movement but permit lug 168 and Wall 165 to cause said member to accompany the cam plate in its turning movement The shank member 154 of the wiper is pivoted to the side member 152 at 175 so that it is carried inwardly with said side member. The shank member also has a cam slot 176 in which stands a stationary stud 178 which compels the shank member, as it slides inwardly with the side member, to turn about the pivot 17 5 and thereby in effect to travel faster than the side member. This construction and arrangement of the wiper mechanism causes the wiper members 150, 152, 154 in response to force transmitted from the plunger 124, Figs. 3 and 15, to move from the full line position in Fig. 15 to the dotted line position. It will be noted that in this closing of the wipers the end members 150 have advanced and slightly turned, the side members 152 have closed inwardly and have slightly turned without.. advancing and the shank members 154 have closed inwardly and turned backwardly. Thse movements eil'ect wiping of the stock over the curved rear end of the heel with a combined inward and turning movement .as shown, while at the sides of the heel the upper is wiped over by an inward sweeping almost eX- clusively without any forward displacement of the stock, and at the shank or breast region of the heel the upper is wiped in with a slight backward movement. This construction eliminates entirely the undesirable bunching of surplus stock ahead of the wipers at the shank or breast region of the shoe and produces in its stead a shoe in which the upper is wiped over and drawn tightly to the contour of the last at the breast region of the heel. A curved tongue 151 projecting fromone cam plate 155 into a seat in the other cam plate maintains the adjacent edges of the wiper members 150 in alinement during all their turning movements. lt will be noted that the wiper members are herein shown -as heavily constructed and are located on the lower sides of the cam plates which are in turn covered by the cap plate and securely bolted to the frame of the machine so that great rigidity of the Wipers is provided to enable themi to act effectively in the compressing and molding'of'the heel seat of the shoe.
With each shoe support are connected similar operating devices and similar molds and wipers to those above described and it is contemplated that in operating the machine a boot which has been operated upon as above described will be allowed to remain clamped in the molds and under the heel Seat compression while the previously lasted boot will be released from the other set of molds and wipers and removed from the support and while the third shoe is being app ied and lasted.
A Horton clutch is employed for connecting the loosedriving pulley 180, Figs. 1 and 2, with the shaft 4 and for controlling this clutch a foot treadle 182, normally upheld by a spring 184, is connected to a rod 185 which extends upwardly and backwardly to a lever 186 that is mounted on the rocking stud or rock shaft 188 and has projecting upwardly from it a pawlcarrying arm 190 in which is a spring-pressed pawl arranged to engage ratchet teeth on the controlling sleeve 192 of the Horton clutch. Depression of the treadle effects withdrawal of the pawl whereupon the clutch is automatically closed by its usual closing spring and the machine is driven, motion being transmitted through the reducing gears 7 to operate the working parts at a comparatively low speed. The machine will continue in rotation as long as the treadle is depressed but means is provided which will stop the' machine at predetermined points in its cycle if the operator allows said stopping means to act. These points, as herein contemplated, are rst,-immediately after the grippers have operated to pull up the upper and before they release it; second, after the jack has been drawn back to force the rear end of the shoe against the mold and the mold jaws have been closed to clamp the upper materials under molding pressure against the side faces ofthe last and after the wipers have been operated over the heel seat to wipe the upper into lasted position and have been partially backed oil' from the heel seat to expose the tacking line; and third, after the wipers have been again advanced and the spindle has been raised to subject the heel seat to compression. Provision for stopping the machine at these points is formed by the controlling disk 194, having suitably spaced recesses for the reception of a .stud on the swinging arm 186. Whenever the treadle is released the spring 184 operates to swing the arm 186 into position for its stud to enter the next recess which comes opposite the stud in the rotation of the disk 194 and this movement of the arm turns the rock shaft 188 and swings the pawl carrying arm 190 into position to engage the ratchet face on the clutch controlling sleeve 192 and open the clutch. A brake shoe 196 is also carried by the arm 190 and engages a disk 198 to stop the machine promptly when the clutch is opened.
In the use of the machine a boot, or it might be any kind of a shoe, including a pump, is prepared for presentation to the machine preferably by assembling it and pulling it over at the toe, and it may be at the sides of the forepart also. In this preparatory work the upper materials are preferably arranged as shown in the drawings with the rear part of the upper lower down on the last than is its normal position and it is in this condition that the upper is longitudinally stretched forwardly and tacked at the toe. Theshoe will be ap lied while the s indle 10 is in its forwardll;r tipped position, as in Fig. 1, the gripper mechanism being at that time upraised and tipped backwardly by the action of the spring 36. The operator will now grasp the gripper carrier 35 by its handle ortion and draw the gripper mechanism ownwardlv and forwardly to the position shown in Fig. 1, locate the abutments 55 upon the shoe bottom at the shank, and insert the inner jaws of the several grippers between the u per materials and the body of the last. I diilicnlt is experienced in positioning the shan grippers properly to seize the upper, the
`toggle 57 can be flexed to allow the grippers to descend lower with relation to the abutment 55. When the grippers have been properly positioned the machine is started and during the first portion of its cycle the cam 67 acts through the roll 66, lever 65 and slide 62, Figs. 1 and 4, to draw downwardly upon the rear end of the lever 60 and thereby uplift the rear end of lever 40. This movement is transmitted by the links 43 to draw upwardly the bars 44 against the tails of the outer gripper jaws 46 to close the jaws, the operator holding the jaws from rising during this time by pressure with his thumb upon the lever 48, Figs. 1 and 11. When the jaws have been fully closed the continued movementof lever 40 will uplift all of the grippers and by reason of the relative locations of the shank grippers and the heel gripper with relation to the fulcrum of lever 40 the heel gripper will be moved farther than the shank grippers and the rear portion of the shoe upper will be drawn up to osition for the marginal portion of it to be asted over upon the shoe insole. In so drawing the upper upwardly over the curved rear end of the heel and about the bulging side faces of the heel, see Figs. 12 and 13, the upper is compelled to stretch longitudinally in order to enable it to embrace or surround the relatively large ball portion of the heel. The extent of this stretching will be appreciated by comparing in Fig.' 13 the length of the two marginal lines which represent respectively the edge line in a section on line 134-13 of Fig. 10 and the edge line of the sole face ofthe last. It will also be appreciated from these views, and particularly from Fig. 10, that the direction in which the upperkis thus stretched is back wardly from the shank and forepart toward the heel and obliquely upwardly and backwardly from the instep toward the heel seat.
As the high point of the cam 67 passes the roll GG the pull of the upper is completed. It will be noted that the length of this pulling movement is predetermined by the machine and draws a definite amount of margin of the upper above the plane of the last bottom for the overwiping, operation. Immediately after passing the limit of up ward movement a slight depression in the cam is reached, see Fig. 4, which lowers the gripper carrying lever 40 sufficiently to open the gripper jaws and allow them to slip ofi' from the upper after which the spring 36 swings the ripper mechanism upwardly and backwar ly out of the way. lf the operator has removed his foot from the starting treadle the machine will come to rest first after the grippers have pulled up the upper and while they still hold it. This allows the operator to use the shank gripper adjusting means for correcting any error in the position of the side seams or for tensioning the marginal portion of the upper forwardly by the use of the hand bars in Fig. 10. If the operator has not released the starting treadle, or when the machine is restarted, the jack will be swung backwardly by the action of cam 94 on angle lever 93 and rod 90 to draw the shoe firmly back into and against the molds 100. The spring in the rod 90 insures that the shoe will be hard pressed back against the molds Without damaging the shoe or injuring the machine because of variation in the size of the shoe or thickness of the upper materials. After the shoe has been positioned in the molds the mold jaws are ciosed by the action of cam 67, Fig. 4, transmitted through the lever 112, the spring 110 and the plunger 108. 'This mechanism clasps the molds rmly but yieldingly around the sides of the heel.
The heel seat wipers are advanced to wipe the marginal portion of the upper materials into lasted position upon the heel seat end of the insole and are then partially backed oli' to uncover the tacking line whereupon the machine comes to rest again with thel stock so held. At this time, it will be remembered, the grippers have been moved out of the way so as to uncover the heel portion of the shoe and give ready access thereto for the purpose of tacking the heel seat in lasted condition. When the machine is again started the wi ers are completely advanced once more an the last spindle is raised by the action of the cani track 146 upon the level' 140. The machine now stands with the heel portion of the shoe under compression not only upon the heel seat face, but about the side faces of the last, and the entire heel portion of the shoe stands under molding pressure while the operation above described is repeated on another shoe. The described series of operations consumes onehalf a rotation of the cam shaft and during the last Step above described the shoe on the other jack has been released by the return of all of the parts coperating with that shoe to the starting position and the tipping of the jack forwardly into position for the shoe that has been standing under molding pressure to be removed and another one applied.
The jack lifting cam path 146, Fig. 5, is so arranged `relatively to the wiper cam path, Fig. 6, that the shoe is lowered before the wipers are retracted whereby dragging of the upper fiange outwardly by the wipers is avoided. The chart shown as Fig. 18 indicates the preferred relative timing of the several means operating on one of the two shoes that the machine is arranged to hold. The means associated with the second jack and operating on the shoe carried thereby are set 180 ehind those operating on the first shoe.
llfi
0f course it will be understood that if desired the tacking of the heel seat may be deferred until after the shoe has been removed from the machine, it being anticipated that the molding pressure to which the shoe is subjected will so set the shoe materials in their lasted condition that the shoe may be taken from the lasting machine to a tacking machine for fastening the heel seat.
The shoe upper is shown as carried on a. last, but many of the novel combinations comprised in this invention require only a heel form as the inner member of the molding apparatus, and the claims are to be understood as answered by such a heel form except when a last is needed to fulfil the requirements of the combination.
Having explained the nature of this invention and described a preferred construction embodying the mechanical features thereof in the best form now known to me, l claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, said machine being constructed and arranged to present around the rear part of the last as far down as said neck of the last a clear space in which upper engaging means may be manipulated for the purposes described; and grippers for engaging said depressed heel portion of the upper and stretching it up around the relatively large head of the heel part of the last.
2. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, grippers for engaging the upper at the end of the heel and at the sides, and means for relatively moving the grippers and the last to draw the upper up around the relatively large head of the heel part of the last, said last-mentioned means having provision for automatically drawing the upper at the heel end of the last appropriately farther than the upper at the sides of the heel.
3. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, grippers for engaging the upper at the end of the heel and at the sides, and means for actuating the grippers to stretch the upper up around the relatively large head of the last, said operating means being arranged to impart to the heel end gripper a proportionately longer movement than to the side grippers to cause all said grippers to draw the edge of the upper into position for overwiping.
4. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last and extending in a line lnclined downwardly and backwardly from in front of the breast line toward the rear end of the heel, and gripping means for forcing the said heel portion of the upper upwardly around the relatively large head of the heel part of the last into position for overwiping.
5. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means yfor holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel end and side grippers to seize the said heel portion of the upper, a support in which the grippers are mounted, and means for moving the support to impart to the heel end gripper a substantially longer movement than to the side grippers, for the purpose described.
6. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel end and side grippers, a, supporting lever for said grippers fulcrumed in front of them, and means for lifting the rear end ofthe carrier, said parts bein impart suitably proportione lengths of movement to the several grippers.
7. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holdin in` position for the operation of the mac iinl a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel and side grippers, a carrier, a last engaging foot depending from the carrier, a gripper supporting lever pivoted to the carrier in front of the grippers, and means for moving said lever in the carrier and relatively to said foot to cause the grippers to stretch the upper upwardly about the relatively large head of the heel part of the last.
8. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assemblul and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around arranged to the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel and side grippers, a carrier therefor that is movably mounted and counterbalanced to occupy normally an inoperative position away from the shoe support, and a last engaging foot depending from the carrier to determine the normal position of the grippers and formed for manipulation by the operator to permit a lower gripping position.
9. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for holding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel and side grippers, a carrier therefor that is movably mounted and counterbalanced to occupy normally an inoperative position away from the shoe support, last engaging feet depending from the carrier, and means for adjusting said feet in and out for lasts of different widths.
10. A machine of the class described having. in combination, means for holdin in position for the operation of the mac iney a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel and side grippers arranged to extend down the side faces of the last and having thin inner jaws to be inserted between the upper and the last, said heel grippers extending down lowest, and means for relatively moving the last and said grippers together and through appropriate relative distances at the sides and rear end of the heel to stretch the upper up around the head of the heel into position for overwiping at the end and sides of the heel seat.
11. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for h0lding in position for the operation of the machine a last with an upper assembled and pulled over with the heel portion depressed around the narrow neck of the rear part of the last, heel and side grippers arranged to extend down the side faces of the last and having thin inner jaws to be inserted between the upper and the last, a lever fulcrumed over the forepart of the last and connected to said heel end and side grippers, and means for operating the lever about said fiilcriim to effect pulling movement of the side and end grippers in predetermined proportion.
12. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a last support, a. gripper lever, a last engaging foot determining the position of the lever fulcrum, grippers connected with the lever, and -means for actuating the lever to lift the grippers.
13. A machine of the class descri ed having, in combination, a last support, a gripper lever fulcrumed over the forepart of the last on said support, heel end and side grippers connected with the lever, and means for rocking said lever about said fulcruni to pull the upper.
14. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a last support, a gripper lever, a pair of gripper jaws pivotally connected together, a jaw closer, a connection therefrom to the lever to effect closing and then lifting of the jaws, and means controlled by the operator during the lever movement to determine when closing of the jaws shall occur.
15. A machine of the class described having, in combination. a last support, a gripper lever, a pair of gripper jaws pivotally connected together, a jaw closer, a connection therefrom to the lever to effect closing and then lifting of the jaws, a spring to draw the jaws toward the lever and relatively to the closer in the direction to maintain the jaws open, and manually controlled means for holding the jaws against upward movement while the closer is lifted to close the jaws and then give way to continued movement in the direction for lifting the jaws.
16. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a last support, a gripper carrier having a foot to engage the bottom of. the last on said support, a lever connected with the carrier, a gripper connected to the lever to be operated by it for pulling the upper, power mechanism for operating the lever, and the controller 48, 50 arranged to be manually operated during the progress of the lever movement to cause the gripper to seize the upper at times determined by the will of the operator.
17. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a last support, a gripper carrier having a foot to engage the bottom of the last on said support, a lever connected with the carrier, gripper jaws 45, 46 connected together, the inner jaw being slotted, a non-circular closer 44 movable in said slot in engagement with the other jaw to effect closing and serving by its form to prevent rotation of the jaws thereon, links connecting the closer and thereb the jaws with the lever, and a controller or holding the jaws down while the closer is upraised to cause the jaws to seize the upper.
18. A machine of the class described having, in combination, an abutment for engaging a last bottom, a plurality of pairs of gripper jaws for engaging the upper at separate points about the last, operating means that moves the jaws from upper seizing position, a closing device for each pair of jaws to be drawn up by the operating means to effect closing of the jaws and then uplifting thereof, and means arranged for manual control during the action of said operating means to determine the time at which the closing devices shall become 0perative.
19. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, a plurality of pairs of jaws, jaw closers for each pair, litters connected with the elosers, and a block having arms cooperating with the several pairs of jaws to hold the jaws down while the clbsers are relatively lifted.
20. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, a plurality of pairs of jaws, jaw closers for each pair, lifters connected with the closers, and a hell crank having a thumb piece on one arm and a block pivoted to the. other end and having fingers for holding down the several jaws while the closers are lifted.
Q1. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, a last support, a gripper carrier movable from an out-ot-the-way position into operative relation to the work on the last support, 0rippers on the carrier to seize the upper, means for operating the grippers to pull the upper, means for causing the grippers to release the upper, and means for operating the carrier to return the grippers to their inoperative position after they have released the upper.
22. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, a last support, a gripper carrier movable from an out-of-the-way position into operative relation to the work on the last support, grippers on the carrier to seize the upper, and automatic means tor moving the grippers to pull the upper and returning the carrier and grippers to inoperative position after the upper has been released.
23. A heel seat lasting machine lhaving, in combination, a last support, a gripper carrier movable from an out-of-the-way position into operative relation to the work on the last support, grippers on the carrier to seize the upper, power mechanism for operating the grippers to pull the upper, and a spring to return the carrier and the grippers to inoperative position after the upper is released,
24. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination` a last support, a griiper carrier movable lengthwise of the shoe rom a position in the rear thereof into operative relation .with the heel portion of the last, gripper@I on the carrier arranged to reach down to the neck of the last and pull the heel portion ot' the upper up about the head of the last, and means for ol'ierating the grippers to pull the upper and permit return movement of the carrier at the end of the pulling operation to expose the work for heel seat overwiping.
A heel lasting machine having. in combination, means for positioning a last,
heel end and side grippers arranged with relation to the last so positioned to enable them to reach below the plane of the heel seat to engage the upper and draw it from around the neck of the last up about the head of the heel into position to be overwiped, means for transferring the last into the field of the overwiping means, and wipers for overwiping the fringe of the upper so drawn up.
. 26. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for positioning a last having thereon an upper that has been tensioned forwardly with its heel portion embracing the neck only of the heel part of the last, grippers for engaging ldie heel portion of the upper, and means for relatively moving the grippers and the last to draw the upper upwardly about the head of the heel part of the last for tensioning the heel portion of the upper, said last-mentioned means operating automatically to pull the upper farther at the rear end ot the heel than at the sides of the shoe.
27. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, a last support, heel seat wipers, heel end and side grippers arranged to reach down to the neck of the heel part of the last to engage an upper and stretch it up about the head of the heel part of the last and draw the edge portion of the upper into position to be acted upon by the wipers, automatic mechanism for operating the wipers, and operating means for the grippers arranged to cause the grippers to pull the upper from around the neck of the last into a position in which the edge of the upper is substantially parallel with and extends evenly above the last edge.
28. A heel seat lasting machine having, in combination, heel seat wipers, grippers arranged to pull the rear portion of an upper from down around the neck of the last heel up around the head of the heel, and a support movable to carry the last from the upper pulling position into operative relation to the Wipers.
Q9. A machine of the class described having, in combination, wipers, grippers, a last support and power operating mechanism for moving the grippers to pull the upper with the support in one position and then moving the support to present the shoe to the wipers.
30. A machine of the class described having, in combination, heel seat wipers, heel grippers to engage the upper while it is down around the neck of the last and pull it up around the head of the last heel, a last support, and connected mechanism for operating the grippers to pull up the upper while the last is away from the wipers and for moving the support to transfer the shoe into position to be acted upon by the Wipers.
31. A machine of the class described having, in combination, heel lasting wipers, grippers that pull the upper that is to be overwiped while the work is away from the wipers, a last support that transfers the shoe into position to receive the action of the wipers, and power operating mechanism having provision for stopping at the will of the operator after the upper has been pulled and also before the final advance of the wipers.
32. A machine of the class described having, in combination, an abutment for engaging a last bottom, grippers for engaging the upper, power operating mechanism for lifting the grippers, and means arranged to be manually actuated during said power operation for causing said mechanism to effect closing of the grippers at times selected by the operator.
33. A machine of the class described having, in combination, grippers to engage the shoe upper materials at opposite lateral sides of the heel, power operated mechanism for moving said grippers and the last relatively to pull the stock up into position for overwiping and to put under lengthwise tension the portion of upper extending around the heel of the last, heel embracing wipers and mechanism connected with said power mechanism for closing the wipers to last the heel seat of the shoe.
34. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means for engaging the rear portion of a last, and means for engaging the rear portion of an upper extending about said last, operating mechanism for. relatively moving said two meansto put the upper under tension longitudinally of the edge portion of the upper extending around the head portion of the last heel and to position the upper for heel seat lasting, and means for lasting the entire heel seat simultaneously.
35. A machine of the class described having, in combination, upper pulling mechanism arran ed to apply differential pulling strains to t e upper at the heel end and at the shank of a shoe, and operating means for' causing said pulling mechanism `to pull the upper from a position inclined rearwardly and downwardly from the plane of the shoe .bottom into a position with its edge parallel to the shoe bottom.
362 A machine of the cla described having, in combination, a gripper mechanism, and two actuators into operative relation to which said mechanism can be transferred alternatively, and guiding means for directing the transferring movement of said gripper mechanism.
37. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper mechanism, two actuators with which said mechanism is to be operatively connected alternatively, and operating mechanism including said actuators for causing the gripper mechanism to do its work and then automatically move out of operative relation to one actuator and toward operative relation to the other actuator.
38. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper mechanism comprising cooperating jaws, power operatin mechanism for closing said jaws and upli ting them to pull the stock, and means under control of the operator which maintains the jaws closed during pulling movement and can be manually manipulated during that movement to cause the jaws to relax their hold and thereby discontinue pulling the upper at the will of the operator.
39. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper mechanism comprising coperatmg jaws, power mechanism for closing the jaws, uplifting them to pull the upper and then automatically opening the jaws, and a controller which must be manually actuated to insure the closing of the jaws and which can be manually actuated at any point during the pulling operation to cause the jaws to release their grip on the upper which is being stretched.
40. A machine of the 'class described having, in combination, a last support, grippers, a mold comprising coperating jaws; and power operated mechanism to cause the grippers to pull up the rear portion of the upper, to move the su port for forcing the shoe into the mold an to move the jaws for clamping the upper materials to the side faces of the last.
41. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a last support, grippers, a mold comprising cooperating jaws; and power operated mechanism to cause the grippers to pull up the rear portion of the u per, to move the support for forcing the sioe into the mold and to move the jaws for clamping the shoe materials to the side facesof the last, said machine having provision for permitting the power operated mechanism to be stopped between the upper pulling operation and` the closing of the mold jaws.
42. A machine of the class described having, in combination, upper pulling jaws, counter clamping jaws, heel seat end lasting plates, and connected mechanism for operating said parts.
43. A machine of the class described having, in combination, heelseat wipers, a jack constructed and arranged to support a last carrying a boot, connected mechanism for operatin the wipers to last the heel seat and the )ack to raise the-last for compressing the heel seat against the wipers, and means having an operating device extending outside the leg of the boot for adjusting the last toward and from the plane of the wipers.
44. A machine of the class described having, in combination, heel lasting devices, a last supporting spindle, a frame having a pivot stud for said spindle permitting the latter to tip toward and from -the frame and also arranged to permit vertical movement of the spindle, and means for swinging the spindle toward and from the frame and for lifting the spindle toward the lasting devices.
45. A machine of the class described having, in combination, two shoe supports, upper pulling grippers, a carriage for the grippers, .and a guide for the carriage eX- tending transversely across the machine to allow movement of the gripper carriage from operative relation with one support into operative relation with the other supiort. l 46. A machine of the class described having, in combination, upper pulling grippers, a gripper carriage having a guideway extending from front to back, a bar freely movable in said guideway, and a gripper carrier on said bar.
47. A machine of the class described having, in combination, upper pulling grippers, a gripper carriage having a guideway extending from front to back, a bar freely movable in said guideway, a gripper carrier pivoted on said bar, and a spring arranged to tip the carrier upwardly about said pivot and to draw the bar rearwardly in its guidewa 4%. A machine of the class described having, in combination, upper pulling grippers, a gripper carriage having a gui eway extending from front to back, a bar freely movable in said guideway. a gripper carrier pivoted to said bar, and a handle on the front end of said carrier for moving the carrier about its pivotal connection with the bar and moving the bar in its guideway.
49. A machine of the class descrlbed having, in combination, a gripper carrier movable forwardly over the rear part of the shoe, a gripper lever pivoted to the forepart of said carrier, a heel gripper connected to the rear end of said lever, shank grippers connected to said lever between its ends, and means for rocking said lever about its pivotal connection with said carrier.
50. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper lever, links suspended from said lever, an inner jaw formed to extend between the upper and the last and having an elongated slot in its upper portion, an outer jaw pivoted on said inner jaw and having a tail piece bent across said slot, and a non-circular jaw closer extending through said slot and connected to the lower ends of the links for movement upwardly in the slot in engagement with said tail piece for closing the jaws.
51. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper lever, an inner jaw having an elongated slot, an outer jaw pivoted to the inner jaw and having a tail piece extending across said slot, a jaw closer movable in said slot and connected tc said lever, and a controller engaging said tail piece to hold the jaws from rising while the closer is lifted to cause the jaws to seize the work.
52. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a ripper carrier, a sole rest supported by sai carrier, a gripper lever connected at one end to the carrler, grippers suspended from the lever, and means operating independently of the sole rest for raising the lever to cause the grippers to pull the upper.
53. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper carrier,
a shank grippers connected thereto for engaging opposite sides of a shoe, and a handle bar extending from each shank gripper upwardly into position to be engaged for adjusting said shank grippers independently or together lengthwise of the shoe.
54. A machine of the class described, having, in combination, a support for a shoe, a gripper carrier adapted to have a position over the shoe, grippers extending. below said carrier, a shoe rest depending from the carrier and between which and the grippers upper pulling movement may be made to take place, and means permitting a reliminary retraction of the shoe rest to a low the grippers to reach down and engage a short upper and to effect a return of the rest to its normal relation to the ippers prior to the normal operation of t machine.
55. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a shoe bottom rest, a gripper, and means for effecting a normal upper pulling movement between said rest and gripper relatively, said rest4 being mounted for manipulation by the workman without interruptlng the operation of the machine, to allow the gripper to reach down below its usual gripping position to seize a short upper and for reverse manipulation to restore its normal relation to the gripper prior to the normal upper pulling movement.
56. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper to grip the upper and a bottom rest said gripper and rest maintaining normally ositions relatively fixed preparatory to t e gripping of the upper and means permitting variation of such relative positions Without interrupting the operation of the machine to accommodate undersized or abnormally prepared uppers and adapted for manual operation to restore such normal relative positions of the rest and gripper preparatory to the normal operation of the machine.
57. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means to position a shoc lengthwise, grippers arranged relatively thereto to engage the upper in the shank portion of the shoe, rests to engage the shank portion of the shoe bottom, means for relatively actuating said grippers and rests to pull the upper, and means for adjusting said rests from and toward each other transversely of the shoe to permit them to engage wide or narrow Shanks at similar' distances from the sole edges.
58. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means to pull an upper and an opposed last bottom rest comprising two bars, a carrier in which the bars are pivotally mounted for movement about axes substantially parallel to the plane of the shoe bottom, and means for moving said bars about said axes.
59. A machine of the class described having, in combination, means to pull an upper and an opposed last bottom rest comprising a bar formed in two longitudinal sections, a toggle connecting the sections 'and means for flexing and straightening the toggle.
60. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a gripper, power mechanism arranged to close and then to lift the gripper and manual means for holdingr the gripper down until it is closed on the stock.
61. A machine of the class described having, in combination, a shoe support, grippers engaging the upper back of the ball of theforepart to pull the upper, mechanism to operate said grippers to do their work, and means by which said grippers can be relatively moved lengthwise of the shoe to adjust the upper longitudinally around the heel of the last.
62. A machine bf the class described having, in combination, a shoe support, grippers engaging the upper back of the ball of the ,forepart to pull the upper, mechanism to operate said grippers to do their work, and lever connections by which said grippers on opposite sides of the machine canV be moved in opposite directions respectively to adjust the upper lengthwise around the heel of the last.
63. A machine of the class describedV having, in combination, a shoe support, grippers engaging the upper back of the ball of the forepart to pull the shank portion of the upper, mechanism to operate said grippers to do their work. lever connections by which said gri ppers on opposite sides of the ma chine can be moved in opposite directions respectively to adjust the upper lengthwise around the heel of the last, and end embracing lasting means for working the adjusted upper into lasted position.
64. In an apparatus of the class described, means constructed and arranged to engage the rear portion of an upper at opposite sides of the shoe and operating to stretch the upper of a shoe circumferentially around the heel portion oi a last to form a pocket for the ball portion of the heel of the foot, and mechanism to operate said stretching means.
65. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination with a last of means acting exclusively upon the rear part of a shoe upper for stretching the upper circumferentially around the ball portion of the heel relatively to the portion of the upper that extends around the neck portion of the heel.
66. In an apparatus for the purpose described, the combination with a last and means holding the forepart of an upper against rearward movement relatively to the last bottom, of means for effecting stretching of the rear part of the upper circumferentially around the heel of the last.
67. In an apparatus for the purpose described, the combination with a last and means engaging the edge ofthe rear portion of a shoe upper; of mechanism for relatively moving the said engaging means and the last to stretch or distend the rear part of the upper circumferentially around4 the heel of the last.
68. In an apparatus for the purpose described, the combination with means for holding an upper taut around the neck of the heel portion of a last and means for relatively wedging the heel portion of the last and the heel portion of the upper together to distend the upper around the ball of the heel portion of the last for forming a pocket for the ball of the heel portion of the wearers foot.
69. In an apparatus of the class described,
means'operating to stretch the upper of a shoe circumferentially around the heel portion of a last to form a heel pocket for the ball of the heel of a wearers foot, combined with means for forming the margin of the upper into a sole attaching flange.
70. In an apparatus of the class described. means operating to stretch the upper of a shoe circumferentially around the heel por-- tion of a last to form a heel pocket for the ball of the heel of a wearers foot, combined with means for turning the margin of the upper inwardly to form a flange for attachment to the sole or innersole of the shoe, and means for positively molding the upper materials to the contour of the side and bottom faces of the heel portion of the last and causing them to become set in their
US63765511A 1911-07-10 1911-07-10 Machine for shaping shoe-uppers. Expired - Lifetime US1197438A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730733A (en) * 1953-08-03 1956-01-17 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel lasting machines
US3130429A (en) * 1961-07-21 1964-04-28 Jacob S Kamborian Heel seat lasting with breast line pincers
US3273183A (en) * 1964-08-17 1966-09-20 Schindler Herbert Grippers for a heel lasting machine
US3316572A (en) * 1963-09-24 1967-05-02 Lowell Molding Corp Apparatus for making shoes

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730733A (en) * 1953-08-03 1956-01-17 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel lasting machines
US3130429A (en) * 1961-07-21 1964-04-28 Jacob S Kamborian Heel seat lasting with breast line pincers
US3316572A (en) * 1963-09-24 1967-05-02 Lowell Molding Corp Apparatus for making shoes
US3273183A (en) * 1964-08-17 1966-09-20 Schindler Herbert Grippers for a heel lasting machine

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