US2320203A - Musical instrument - Google Patents

Musical instrument Download PDF

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US2320203A
US2320203A US44406442A US2320203A US 2320203 A US2320203 A US 2320203A US 44406442 A US44406442 A US 44406442A US 2320203 A US2320203 A US 2320203A
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portion
instrument
air
valve
passage
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Thompson Josephus
Morton S Brockman
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Thompson Chemical Co
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Thompson Chemical Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D7/00General design of wind musical instruments
    • G10D7/10General design of wind musical instruments of the type with a cupped mouthpiece, e.g. cornets, orchestral trumpet, trombone

Description

May 25, 1943.

J. THOMPSONr Er Al.v MUSICAL INS'TRUMENT Filed May 22, 1942 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 May 25, 1943. J. THoMPsoN E-rAl.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed may 22, 1942 Ffa/4 f/a/E. H11/5 F/Q/Z May 25, 1943. J. HoMPsoN Em MUSICAL INsTnUMmi'r Filed May 22, 194? 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS. JSEPHL/S THMPS'A Z NUHTU/v 5 @HUGH/MM May 25, 1943. J. THOMPSON Em. 2,320,203

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT May 25, 1943. J. THOMPSON ErAL MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Filed May 22, 1942 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 @Mdm Patented May 25, 1943 MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Josephus Thompson, Covington, and Morton S. Broekman, Cleveland, Ohio, assgnors of onesixth to said Thompson and five-sxths to Grossman Music Company Application May 22, 1942, Serial No. 444,064

17 Claims.

The inventions disclosed herein relate to trumpet type musical instruments and more particularly are improvements oi the musical instrument disclosed in the co-pending United States patent application, Serial No. 398,775 which was filed June 19, 1941, by Josephus Thompson.

The prior patent application discloses a musical wind instrument in which the operating valves are in the lower portion of the body and wherein the operating or finger buttons connected thereto were on the top of the instrument. The valve stems connecting the buttons and valves therefor necessarily had to pass through long vertical channels in the body of the instrument and the friction thus encountered sometimes interfered with the proper playing of the instrument. Furthermore, the particular type of valve disclosed in the earlier instrument did not always provide a perfectly air-tight closure and leakage sometimes took place between the air passage and the compensator ducts Also, because of the fact that the compensator ducts entered ihe primary channel at the bottom of the instrument, saliva under certain conditions had a tendency to interfere with the smooth operation of the valves. Cleaning of the instrument was also complicated for the same reason.

It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide molded plastic wind instruments with body members having interconnected compensator ducts and primary air passages and wherein the said connections are made at places other than at the normal bottom portion of the body members.

Another object of this invention is to provide devices of the type mentioned which have improved types of valve devices and which devices are more precise and smoother in operation than those of the earlier instruments. which are more responsive to the touch of the player and which are to install, repair or replace.

These and other objects, features and advan tages of these improved instruments will become apparent through a reading of the attached specicatiens and claims, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which like parts are designated by like reference characters and in which:

Figure l is a top or plan view of the simplest or preferred form of the instrument;

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view of the same instrument taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 2-2 of the Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an enlarged elevation of a portion of the instrument, with portions thereof broken away to show interior construction and assembly;

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view along the line and in the direction of the arrows 4--4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line and in vthe direction of the arrows E--S of Figure 3;

Figure 6 is a vertical cross sectional view of instrument taken along the line and in the direction of arrows 6-6 of the Figure 3 and showing a valve open as when the button is depressed;

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view of the instrument taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 1 1 of the Figure 3;

Figure 8 is a plan view of one of the two forms of valves which may be used in the preferred form of the instrument;

Figure 9 is a side view of the same Valve shown in the Figure 8 and also showing in broken lines an alternate view or open position thereof;

Figure 10 is an end view of the same valve 4taken along the line and in the direction of the 'view of a slightly modified form of valve mechanism capable of use with this preferred type of instrument and also showing the said valve in the closed position;

Figure l5 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of the modified form of valve mechanism shown in the Figure 14 and taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows Ill--lfl thereof Figure 16 is alateral vertical sectional view of the same style of valve mechanism in the depressed or open `position taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows Iii-l5 of the Figure 17;

AFigure 17 is a longitudinal Vertical sectional view of the same valve taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows I'l-l'l of the Figure 16;

Figure 18 is a top view of the right side only and in the direction of the arrows 22-22 of theA Figure 21;

Figure 23 is a similar view of the-small chan nelled member used in the instrument; the view f taken along the line and in the direction of the l arrows 23-23 of the Figure 24;A

Figure 24 is an end view of the'channelled' member shown in Figure 23;

Figure25 is a similar view of a third. channelled `member -used in the'instrument;

Figure 26 is a top view of the left half ,of the instrument;

Figure 2'7is a longitudinal. vertical elevation of theV portion shown in the Figure 26 'and taken along the line and in the direction of the Yarrows -v Figure 28 is a front end view of the leftliand portion of the instrument, the viewtaken along-- the line and. in the directionl of thearrowsS-Z of the- Figure, 27;.

Figure-29 is a` verticalandlateral sectional View v of the assembled instrument taken along the line and in the direction of thev arrows 25J-+29 of the- Figure .35;

Figure 30 is an exploded view=of thebpartsshown in Figu-re29 and Imore particularly:show#Y ing sectionsof the Figures-18,213 ,and `27 Figure 31 is a lateral sectional viewer-the in,

strument taken along the line and '-in 'thedirec-f` Figure 32 is an exploded view of the mainporv tions'ofthe body shown'in the Figure 31 ;A

Figure-33 is a portion of the view shown! inthe Figure 29 but showing thevalve'fmechanism opened Aor in the depressed#position;4

Figure-34 is a plan viewrof tions of the instrument;

Figure'35 is a-rightk sidey view" of the assembled' instrument;

Figure 36 is an exploded sidel 'View of the vvalve body and stem; and

Figure 37 is alateral sectionalview of the 'valve body and stern'fsho'wn" in the"Figure 36;?v

Preferred form The first two pages of the drawingsshow va simplified or 'preferred form"of fthe trumpetf. This. particular 'model 44 `is made, of -two 'similari the assembled por: Y

or symmetrically fmoldedhalve's :which t i' and areV cemented-together"in the" middle" as shown. v: The three air valves 6i! used to change the tone' of the instrument aremounted in about theceney ter or approximately 'mdway-betweenth'e front and rear end portions 43 and 44 respectively and on the top' 4I of the' instrument. The valve members 6! are each alike and are interchangeable' and easily installed. replacedor repaired.

The instrument mayfbe 4rmade v7ofY molded plastic or composition material and is `'so designed that the two symmetrical sides of the circuitcus air passage 49, the ducts 5354 fand 55, themouth` piece and bell portions fifi-and 45 areformed within the unitary body of the instrument without the necessity of having to attach extraneous parts thereto.

The Figure 2 shows a vertical longitudinal section of the simpler and therefore, the preferred form of instrument and particularly shows the body member 49 as having a top portion 4|, a bottom portion 42, a front end portion 43, a rear end portion 44 and a middle or central portion 45 therebetween. The aforesaid portions are named from the positions they occupy or the locations they are in while being played in the regular manner. The circuitous air passage 49 opens into or terminates at the mouthpiece portions-4l yand passes downward across or through the rear end portion -44 to the bottom port-ion 42. At about the middleof the instrument and more particularlyV to the portion thereof designated as the middle section 45, the air passage 49 turns and goes lbackward to the rear end portion 44, then upward to the top portion 4i. From there, it passes. in a relatively straight line to the front end portion 43, then downwardthrough the front end, portion .43 to the front part of the bottom i portion 42. It thenpasses rearward to the mid.-A

dlesection 45 and then forward again through the lower part of the bottom section 42 Lto the front end section43 where it passes upward toward. the top thereof` and terminates in a bell 46,.. .The portion of the air passage which Ais des,-`l ignated by `th'e character 52, tapersand -enlargesv gradually before terminatingv in the vbellv 46.-

The portion of the air passage which is desigflat and smooth top, bottom and side walls. Y The rest of the passage 49 may be made round in cross Vsection kas-in a conventional metalinstrument. The horizontal portion of the air passage i whichj enters into the mouthpiece portion 41 may be enlarged as shownvto receive the special mouth- 'i piece 41a if desired; The `portion of the air passage 48 which Apasses forward across the bottomportion-42, has va smallopening 59 therein, at about the point where the passage turns upward and rearward. vThis small opening 59 is covered by the valve E5 which may be of a conventional design and is used to remove any moisture accumulating in the instrument. The two lateral holes 48 'and 48a `which, extend from the middle portion 45 to thefront and rear portions 43 and 44 respectively are below the top portion 4| are made to accommodate the fingers ofthe player so that the instrument maybe played exactly like a standard cornet or trumpet.

The auxiliary air passages also known and referred to as compensator air ducts are of three diierent lengths, so that the instrument may be varied in tone according to the duct or combination of ducts engaged during play.v The intermediate duct 53 which is located toward the rear of the instrument has an air passage which is 1 passes downward in a trated; Each of the three ducts 53, 54 and 55 rlhe middle duct 54 which is the shortest of aaaaao extend or lie longitudinally in the body of the instrument and open into the floor of the rectangular section I of the main air passage. The three ducts may be entirely round in cross section or they may be formed with tapered rectangular terminal portions contiguous to the section 5| as indicated by the character 56 of the Figures 1, 2 and 3.

The top portion 4| of the instrument is provided with three internally threaded holes 5i) which are above the termini of the three compensator ducts. These openings are made to receive the valve members 60 which are illustrated in detail on sheet two of the drawings.

The Figures l and 2 show a complete valve inserted in the rear opening of the instrument and directly over the terminal of the medium sized duct 53. The same figures show a valve body only, inserted over the short duct 54. The front opening 50 which is over the compensator duct 55 is shown entirely open and without any valve parts.

The Figure 3 is an enlarged view of the top part of middle portion 45 of the instrument and shows the construction and assembly of one form of air valve suitable for use with this particular instrument. Specifically the form of Valve shown in the Figures 1 to 13 consists of a somewhat hollow body 6|) which has an outside knurled surface for convenience in handling. It has a hexagon portion 6| which is convenient to use with a tool in case the valve body gets stuck in the instrument and is diihcult to remove for replacement or repair. The bottom portion of the valve is that portion which is indicated by the character 62 and is threaded externally to t the threaded portion 50 of the body member. The Valve body 6U has sufficient space therein for the valve spring 64 and the small valve stem pin E5, and has an externally threaded ring 63 inserted therein which retains the valve spring 64 in place and which helps guide the slidable stern 66.

The valve stem 66 passes vertically through hexagon top portion 6 l, the valve body, the coiled spring 64 and ring 63 as shown. This valve stem 66 has a suitable finger button 61 mounted on the top thereof and also has the small horizontal pin therethrough which engages the spring 64 as shown.

The lower portion of the valve stem 66 is shown in greater detail in the Figures 1l, 12 and 13. The lower end of the stem 66 has a substantially forked bottom portion 68 as shown. Each of the two pointed portions E9 are referred to herein as blade portions. They depend from the portion 68 and are tapered in opposite directions and form cam-like members which engage and operate the levers 13 hereinafter described in detail. lower portion t8 of the valve stem, the two tapered blade portions 68 and a small portion of the stem 6B passes through the air passage 5I and they therefore, should be made as small as possible so that as little disturbance as possible is created in the air column passing therethrough. If so desired, the three valves 66 may be mounted in the instrument body 46 slightly to the side thereof so that the portions of the valve stem 66 and 68 which project across the air passage 5| will be closer to one side wall thereof.

The top portion i of the body, at a point midway between the termini of each of the three ducts 5S, 54 and 55 and at a point immediately below the valve stem has a small reotangular recess 51 which receives the pointed They blades 69 and the two levers '13 operated thereby. The effective portion of the valve member, namely, the valve leaves or plates 1| are simply ktwo small metal sheets hingedly attached together around a pin 'l2 much in the manner of an ordinary door hinge. Each of the plates 1| has an open portion or slot 16 therein perpendicular to the pin 12 which receives the lever 13 of the opposite and co-acting portion 1|. The levers 'I3 and the slots '|6 should be made to fit as neatly as possible so that air leakage will be at a minimum. This particular assembly and construction is clearly shown in the Figures 8, 9 and 10. The pin 12 laterally passes through the body of the instrument at a point even with the top of the rectangular recess 51 and with the bottom of the straight air passage 5|. This permits the valve plates to lay flat in the two shallow recesses which are formed along the bottom of the passage 5|. The plates are also of sufficient size to completely and securely close the two ends or termini of each of the ducts 53, 54 and 55.

When a duct is not engaged or opened for play the valve plates are flat and smooth and remain in the position shown in the Figures 4 and 5. In this position the main air channel 5| is substantially clear. -The slight obstruction caused by the valve stem members 68 are not suilcient to interfere with tone quality as all undesirable air currents or eddies are smoothed out in the passages 49 and 52 before reaching the bell 46. When the valve stem 66 is depressed and assumes the position shown in the Figure 6, the lower portion 68 of the stem and the levers 'i3 are also depressed into the rectangular recess 51 and at the same time the plates 1| rise in the rectangular passage 5|, close the passage at that point and deflect the current of air through its particular duct and then back into the part of the main air passage which is on the other side of the valve stem.

Inasmuch as there is no direct connection be Vtween the plates and the valve spring 64, a

small auxiliary spring 14 is mounted on the lateral pin 12 in a manner causing the two plates` 1| to operate simultaneously and more effectively. It will be observed that each of the forked cam-like members 69 engage oppositely extending levers 13. So that the plates 1| are opened in unison.

There are obviously many types of valves which may be applied to this particular design of the instrument. For the sake of clarity however, a second form of valve is illustrated in the Figures 14, 15, l5 and 1'7, This second form of valve has a body portion 66 like that of the valve previously described. It too, has a Valve spring 64 and a threaded portion 62 which fits the threaded openings in the instrument body 4t. The threaded ring 63, however is different from the previously described threaded disc 63 in that it has a lateral slot 84 which receives the top part of the lower portion ci the valve stem member.

The valve stem member 86 differs from the previously described valve stem in that it has a rectangular frame 88 on the bottom end thereof. This rectangular frame 63 is made to slide laterally through two grooves 89 in the side walls of the air passage 5|, and also fits in the groove tel thereabove. The central portion of the frame i -s provided with a suitable opening large gli to pass the necessary volume of air ed to play the instrument. The portion oi' the body 45 directly below the valve frame 88 manner similar`" to the vvpreviously described plates;l 1"except that theyA do n'oth'avegthe lever portions 1,3 thereon or the slots 16 therein. The

valveplates' 9| y are madeto't over and securely. covertheducts 5 3 thereunder- A small auxiliary spring` 94 siniilar to thespring 1 4 is mounted on the hinge pinto keep the valveV plateslll in the normally. closedposition. The hinge pin, which connects ftheVY two plate s 9| does not extend Y shaped recessl which receives tfalV bottoni partofthe Vframe 8 8 and abuttingledges ofthe valve'plates 9 througnthehody er the instrumentar; does the pin 12. This pininstead lis short and enables the through the opening 5|l,j without Qtherfastening means' when the instrument is being assembled.

WhenQthe valve button 81 is depressed thelower horizontal bar oripartof thelrec'taneular. frame 88 pauses. the. two, contieuousjedss `0f the@platesV 9| t eliminiert@ y, s hapiedresess 18.1 L The'` two., plates vthen' pivot on the two lateral and parallel two' plates are caueed to rise and ,thus deflect the.

air currentdo'wn and through its vparticular duct.v

Th'eiigures 1 4 and 1 5 show the modified 4form of Cil the val v e inthe normalposition, that is, when the adjacent'Y compensator duct is closed and l themainair passage 5| clear. The Figures and i7 show 'the'sarne valve in the depressed position and with the lparticular compensator duct opei1 and 'i nte rconnected with themain air pas Sage 5|.

It beobservedthat, because of the small parte of the plates that drop into the openings 51 or 8| and the relatively larger parts thereof thatnse to cl ose the passage@ I an improved vleverage l effec-tfis obtained'and'which-effect makesv theninstrument more responsive .to the players touch. The plates 1 tand 9| are therefor faster in operation and are played vbystrokes which are shorter and morev effective.

Modified form Where the columnof air is moving toward theA rear of `the instrument. Also the three air valves |60 operate on vthe side of themain air channel instead of onthe. top thereof yas shown in the eQQ-eoe@ portion '|42j to the frontend porton |43.,.thence.

"d to"thej topfpQrtionll'l,fand thence rear?,

forwarder gnijegmquthpiece |4155 From. this .point itpasses upward' inftheftopfportion |411 and thence forward again ,tof .theVV loell portion .145.

The portion omheen channel indicated'byme character |52 is tapered and flared as shown in the yFigure 19 loefore terminating inthe horn belli 'I'he'air passage 5 2 also lies slightly above tside of the rectangular portion 4 offtheaij passage |5| below it. The main air passage 1 v145| V.heretofore` referred to may have" and to the le a cross wsect'ion'pof anyhzshape 4which permitsy the free and uninterrupted'flow ,of air.'v However', the portion fof the Ypassage designated by. thel character v` |5| ,Y which passes through thev top portion v|4| and through thenddle section4 'y 'gf the instrument should have a rectangu lar cross s'ectionfto accommodate the speciali valves v|l0 hereina'tfter. described in detail. drawinesA 'show an instrument having a roundl cross sectioned air passagebeforethe hornv bell.:

a planoi'convex cross-section through the lorottornV portionV |42 and theaforementioned rectarigl'ilar-V ly cross-'sectioned portion |5| betweenthe two'.

The toppernen "of the instrument'muj thesis the portion 'immediately above the rectangularv me'trica'lf'That isf'the` bodymember |404con4 tains one half' o'f the air passage |52 and the.

other part of the body A|80 hereinafter described in detail' contains the other half of the air sage designated byY the character |92.

The lwer'p'art of the instrument 'is not divided so evenly.' Instead it contains' all' of the air passages" |49 and |5|.

Like'the preferred form ofthe instrument the mouthpiece portion |41 maybe' requipped with a special metalmouthpiece and similarly the Y main 'air passage |49 is provided'-with a small,

. particularly the yp'art immediately above the air valve and opening |59'at the Vfront end of the;

lower portionf`l42, .which is used to: remove any moisture'ih the instrument. l 4

The top portion 4| of the instrument and passage |5|` contains or has three'internally threaded' hollow portions |50 vvwhich receive theA previously mentioned specially designed valves |60. The bottom portion of the instrument |42' that is the portion 'immediately below Ythe *air passageportion 5| is provided 'with two lat- Y weightof the/instrument and also to aocomrnodatethe players ngers, so that it rmay beplayed preferred form ofthe invention or at loottorn` thereof'asshown in the co-pending patent apv plication Serial No. 398,775.

The right hand or main portionof the body is molded out., of a' plastic materialsimilar to the body portions 40 heretofore referred to. This portion of the body isV broadly designated by the'character |40 and is clearly vshown in the Figures k18, 19, 30 and 32. It has atop portion 4|, a bottom portion 42 a frontk portion'l43', a rear portion |44 and a middle sec'- tion |45, correspondingk to the portions 4|,A 42, 43, 44 and 4 5 heretofore referred to.V The upper rear part of the instrument has a mouth piece |41 and the upper front portion has a bell |46 in the conventional manner. The main air channel or passage |49 starts at the mouthpiece portion |41 and passes downward across or through the rear end portion |44 to the bottom thereof. Thence, it passes forward through the bottom eral'openings .|48l and Maa to decrease the in the s amemannerthat prior arttuhular metal instruments are played.

The sidewall -of the instrument; above the main air passage |4| and at the hollowed portions |50 made to receive'the valves |553, have side openings |51 therein which coincide with cer# tain similar openings |64 in the valve body |58 and with certain openings llia, Iemand |58`a` in channelled members 22,V 23 and 25 hereinafter deseribedin detail. All of these matched openingsarethe same size as the air passage |5| and compensator ducts |53, |54 and |55 and permits, the column `of air to iiow freely therethrough without any obstruction when a valve |60 is depressed.

The compensator air ducts |53, |54 and |55 which are used to change the tone of the instrument are molded or formed in three channelled members which are illustrated in the Figinclusive.

Wardl to a point, in" niet@ portion |411 sughny.,

practically# These memH bers containing the ducts are mounted on the right hand side of the instrument as shown in the Figures 20, 29 and 31. The long channelled member 22 which contains the duct |55 is mounted longitudinally on the side of the instrument and is so positioned that its terminal |56a coincides with the openings |56 in the aforementioned sidewalls and the opening |64 in the valve members.

The intermediate channel member 23 which contains the short duct |54 is mounted on the side of the instrument and is so mounted that the ends or termini |51a thereof coincide with the opening |51 in the side wall of the body member |49. Similarly the channelled member 25 contaning the duct |53 is mounted with its terminal |56a coinciding with the openings |56 of the body member. The channelled members 22, 23 and 25 are mounted longitudinally in line and are located substantially on the top portion |4| of the instrument.

The left hand side of the instrument is not symmetrical or even in shape with the right hand portion as is the case in the preferred form of instrument heretofore described. The left hand portion |80 of the instrument is clearly illustrated in the Figures 26, 27 and 28. r1`he Figures 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 and 34 show it attached to or associated with the right hand side |40. The right and left sides of the instrument as well as the channelled members 22, 23 and 25 are cemented together to make a one piece instrument body. The left body portion |80 also has a top portion |8|, a bottom portion |82, a front end portion |63, a rear end portion |84 and a -i middle section |65 which coincide with the portions |4|, |42, |43, |44 and |45 previously referred to. 1t also has two finger openings |88 and |83a which coincide with the openings |48 and |48a. The lower part of vthe member |80 namely the part through which the finger openings |SS and |88a pass is substantially flat and closes or forms the side Wall of the air passages :d and The top portion |8| is projected outwardly to the side of the lower por tion as shown in the Figures 26, 27, 28, 80 and 32 and contains the second half of the air passage indicated by the characters |81, |89 and one half of the flared bell portion |92.

rfhe special valves used with this style of instrument are shown in detail in the Figures 29, 33, 38 and 3'1. Each member has a rectangular body portion |60. The body portion is box-like and has an open bottom and four side walls between which the valve stemv and parts move. The top of the body is provided with a round tubular collar-like portion |6| just below which, thre is a somewhat constricted throatlike portion 62 through which the valve stem |66 slides. The body portion |60 has two openings |64 in one side wall thereof which openings coincide with the aforedescribed openings |56, |51 and |58 of the body members |46. The two end Walls, that is, the forward and rearward laterally extending walls of each body member |60 have openings |63, at the lower edges thereof which openings coincide with the air passage |5| so that the column of air can pass freely.

The valve stem |66 is threaded at its top end to receive the nger button |61. The bottom portion is flattened and formed into a laterally extending plate |68 which is positioned in the instrument body so that it may move up and down during play between the two ends or terminals |56a, |51a and |58c of each of the ducts |55, |54 and |53 respectively. The extreme bottom of the valve stem |66 has a horizontal or nat plate |69 which moves up and down during play in the main air passage |5|. The collar portion |5| of the valve member contains a small coiled spring |65 which nts between the throat |62 and the button |61. This spring tends to raise the valve stem |66 and its lateral and horizontal elements |68 and |69 respectively.

Normally the plate |69 is at the top or ceiling of the air passage |5| and permits the air currents in the passage to pass through without any obstruction, deviation or deflection whatsoever. When the valve |66 is depressed the horizontal plate |69 lies on the floor of the air passage |5| and the air currents thereat are deflected by the laterally extending plate |68 through the rst of the particular duct openings. For example, in the case of the middle valve, the air is caused to pass successively through the openings |64, |51, |51a then through the short duct |54 and back to the main passage |5| through the openings |5111, |51 and |64 which are on the other side of the plate |68. The inside sidewalls of the valve bodies |60 may be provided with two aligned vertical grooves to accommodate the vertical side edges of the plate |68 so that the valve will operate smoother and also to make better air closures at those points.

It will be observed that the valve mechanism are interchangeable and may be very easily repaired or replaced. The valve bodies and stems are inserted in the openings |59 in the top of the instrument and are held in place by threaded collars or rings |1| which t around the collar portions |6l. The top portion of the rings are hexagon shaped to facilitate the use of a simple wrench when needed.

The modified form of the instrument also differs from the preferred form, in that the operation of the valve more nearly resembles the operation of the valves in prior art instruments. The movement of the valve actually coincides with the movement of the players ngers. No leverage takes place in the valve and the valve is not caused to move faster than the players fingers. The extent of finger motion is exactly the same as the stroke of the valve stem. For this reason by simply depressing the valve half or part way it is possible to obtain'musical effects which are not obtainable on the previously described preferred form of instrument, as this causes air to pass both through the main air passage |5| and through a compensator duct at the same time.

While these inventions have been described and illustrated in their preferred forms and while certain specic words and phrases have been used herein, it is to be understood that the disclosure is not to be considered in a restricted sense, as there may be many other forms or modifications of the invention which might also be considered to be within the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. A musical instrument, comprising. in combination, a body member including,r top, bottom, front and rear end portions and having a circuitous air passage therein, the air passage terminating into a mouthpiece at the said rear end portion and into a bell at the said front end portion, the said passage having a substantially straight part thereof extending longitudinally through the said top portion, the body member also having a set of compensator ducts therein opening into the aforesaid straight part, and a 13. A musical instrument of the type deiined in claim 12 and further characterized by the said air passage, compensator ducts and air valve members being in the same vertical plane.

14. A musical instrument, comprising in combination, a body member including top, bottom, front and rear end portions and having an air passage therein terminating in a mouthpiece at the rear end portion and running downwardly therethrough to the bottom portion, thence forwardly therethrough to the front. end portion, thence upwardly therethrough to the top portion, thence rearwardly therethrough to the rear portion, thence forwardly through the top portion to the front portion terminating in a bell, the portion of the air passage running rearwardly through the top portion having a side wall thereat; channelled members mounted on the body member and forming with the said top portion compensator air ducts opening into the said air passage at the side wall thereof; and a plurality of air valve members mounted on the body member top portion extending therethrough and operating in the portion of the air passage running rearwardly through the top portion and in a manner permitting the compensator ducts to be opened or closed at the said side wall.

15. In a wind instrument of the type having a longitudinal air passage therethrough and compensator air duct termini opening therein, a f' with the forked member and normally permitting the leaf members to assume the said iirst position.

16. In a wind instrument of the type having a longitudinal air passage therethrough and compensator air duct termini opening therein, a valve, comprising in combination, co-acting leaf members hingedly mounted in the said instrument between the termini, the said leaf members closing the termini and opening the air passage when in a rst position and opening the termini and closing the passage when in a second position, a frame member operatively engageable with the leaf members and movable across the air passage, a body portion receiving the frame member and mounted on the instrument substantially above the leaf members, and a spring device mounted in the body portion and engageable with the frame member and normally permitting the leaf members to assume the said rst position.

17. In a wind instrument of the type having a longitudinal air passage therethrough and compensator air duct termini opening in the side thereof, a valve, comprising in combination, a body member having side openings coinciding with the said duct termini openings and having end openings coinciding with the longtudinal air passage, a Valve stem including a blade portion movably mounted in the body member, the said blade portion being movable across the air passage between the end openings and between the said side openings and in a manner permitting the closing oi the duct and opening of the air passage when in a rst position and the opening of the duct and closing of the air passage when in a second position, and a spring means mounted on the body portion and engageable with the valve stem normally permitting the blade portion to assume the said rst position,

JOSEPHUS THOMPSON. MORTON S. BROCKMAN.

US2320203A 1942-05-22 1942-05-22 Musical instrument Expired - Lifetime US2320203A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2918895A (en) * 1957-03-14 1959-12-29 Roy D Buell Fluid powered horn
US3886837A (en) * 1973-06-18 1975-06-03 Mark S Veneklasen Musical horn acoustic path modifications
US20160322035A1 (en) * 2014-01-25 2016-11-03 Zhengzhou Aucs Co., Ltd Wind Instrument Trumpet and Its Manufacturing and Molding Methods

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2918895A (en) * 1957-03-14 1959-12-29 Roy D Buell Fluid powered horn
US3886837A (en) * 1973-06-18 1975-06-03 Mark S Veneklasen Musical horn acoustic path modifications
US20160322035A1 (en) * 2014-01-25 2016-11-03 Zhengzhou Aucs Co., Ltd Wind Instrument Trumpet and Its Manufacturing and Molding Methods
US9761206B2 (en) * 2014-01-25 2017-09-12 Zhengzhou Aucs Co., Ltd Wind instrument trumpet and its manufacturing and molding methods

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