US2283989A - Method of charging and conditioning dehydrators - Google Patents

Method of charging and conditioning dehydrators Download PDF

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Publication number
US2283989A
US2283989A US211849A US21184938A US2283989A US 2283989 A US2283989 A US 2283989A US 211849 A US211849 A US 211849A US 21184938 A US21184938 A US 21184938A US 2283989 A US2283989 A US 2283989A
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casing
dehydrator
dehydrating
cap
air
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US211849A
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Guy J Henry
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Guy J Henry
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D53/00Separation of gases or vapours; Recovering vapours of volatile solvents from gases; Chemical or biological purification of waste gases, e.g. engine exhaust gases, smoke, fumes, flue gases, aerosols
    • B01D53/26Drying gases or vapours
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S210/00Liquid purification or separation
    • Y10S210/06Dehydrators

Description

G. J. HENRY 9 39 METHOD OF CHARGING AND CONDITIONING DEHYDRATQRS Filed June 4, 1938 J7 5 Z7 Z8 15 10 l 16 i I I 4/ 19 2 5 12 2X1 i $55 55 55 it INVENTOR. BY 625/ Jfieizly,

ATTORNEYS Patented ma auucounmom across;

GuyJ. Henry, Chicago, ill.

The present invention relata to an improved method oi-charsing, drying and sealing dehydrators and refers in particular to the packing of a dehydrator with granular dehydrating material in such a manner as to assure the user of full utility of the apparatus. 1

A principal object of the invention is the packing of a dehydrator with a granular dehydrating substance by a method which involves the combined use of vacuum and pressure.

An additional object of the invention is to pro- Application June 4, 1938, Serial No. 211,849

vide a method for charging dehydrators and conment surrounded by the granular dehydrating agent and the latter being maintained under superatmospherlc pressure before use, the trlbuting element being provided with means for allowing escape of the air within the dehydrator through the distributing element before the dehydrator is used.

These and other objects will be observed upon a consideration of the $0110 description of a preferred embodiment of the invention and by reference to the drawing, in which the single figure is a longitudinal sectional view a dehydrator constructedcharged, dried and sealed in accordance with the invention.

The dehydrator shown in the drawing includes a cylindrical c It constituting a fluidtreating chamber and having 8. cl inlet end H provided with an orificed inlet connection 9?. Connection it may be secured to the a r by welding, soldering or in any other suitable manner to provide an air-tight or fluid-tight seal.

The inlet connection l2 has a cylindrical is extending through the end of the cylinder and inwardly thereof. Connected with the extension !8 is a longitudinally extending fluid tribution member M which consists of a pervious metallic cylinder of. 4 s tiall'y less diameter than the diameter of the her and having perforations of somewhat smaller the particles of the treating agent which is] in the cylinder. The endofthe ution mber M is provided withn'clo sum it.

The opposite-end 01' the cylinder to from the closed end H is provided'with a closure ta Is. The closure cap is has internal {dehydrating fit over the open end of the casing it. After the various elements of the dehydrator are .ubled the cap portion it may be sealed to'the casing in any suitable manner such as by soldering the flange I 8 to the casing wall.

The central part oi the casing head 86 is pro vlded with an orificed outlet member 89 which is soldered or welded in position in an opening through the casing head, as indicated in the drawing. The outer portion of the outlet member 89 is provided with. a threaded closure cap 26 having a gas-tight seat 2! fitting against.

the end of the outlet member.

The inlet connection 02 also is provided with a threaded closure cap indicated at 22, this cap being similar to 'cap'fiil except that it is provided with gas escapeopening 23 which is spaced from the seat 2! sufiiciently to prevent escape of gas from the dehydrator while theseat ii is fitted against the end of the inlet opening it. Opening 23 also is positioned so as to allow escape of gas from the dehydrator when the cap is unscrewed. The construction of the cap and opening is such that when the casing it is held undersuperatmospheric pressure and cap22 is loosened irom closed position, there will be a distinct sound caused by escape of air through the orifice 23.

Internally'oi the casing Ill adjacent the outlet member 99 is a screen 25. This screen is held in position in the casing by a split ring it: and rests against a shoulder provided by the casing cap it. Internally oi the ring 28 is a spring 21 which flange I! and a spaced external flange it which .60

presses inwardly against a second course screen or retention member 2a, the latter being held against a felt or metallic wool pad 29 which bears against the body lid of dehydrating material contained in the casing, thereby maintaining the dehydrating agent in compact condition.

In accordance with my improved loading method the casing it initially is provided with the inlet member l2 and internally extending distribution member Id. The casing then is loaded with a granular dehydrating agent such as activated alumina, calcium chloride, or silica gel. These dehydrating agents are examples of the many uess which may be used in the apparatus. 1 i the loading operation the easing this subjected to a vibration which insures that the w cles of the dehydrating agent are led in comct relation. The vlbratory movement also causes the particles of the delay ing agent to brace against each other to re -operation is complete.

" Granular materials of this nature many times will shift their position after being placed in a container so as to reduce the uniformity of the distribution of the material. In particular, the dehydrating agent 30 is packed with care about essence Many changes from and without closing the tortuous passages between the particles of. the dehydrating agent.

After the dehydrating agent is packed properlythe retention member ifi'and pad 29 are placed in position and spring El, ring 28 and retention member 25 likewise are assembled by the DWI-n ator. Thereafter the cap it is placed in position and sealed to the casing to complete the assembly operation. The tension of spring 2'? v maintains the compactness of the dehydrating agent after the loading operation.

After the particles of dehydrating agent'have oeen packed in the casing and the head it has been assembled, air under pressure is blown through the dehydrator from the outlet connec tion it. This air picks up dust particles produced in the packing operation and removes them through the inlet connection, this removal being facilitated by the absence of a pad similar to pad '28 at the inlet end.

The dehydrator assembled as described then is placed in a vacuum oven for conditioning. The reduced pressure and heat conditions the particles of dehydrating agent to insure the full and expected use or the dehydrator. the vacuumand heat and the time during which the dehydrator is subjected to the reduced pressure andheat may vary widely, as will be understood.

After completion of the vacuum oven treatment for conditioning the dehydrating agent, the seal cap at on the outlet end of the dehydrator is turned into closed position and the particles of dehydrating agent are subjected to the action of dehydrated airunder superatmospheric pres,-

sure, as by passing such air through opening 23 in cap 22 while the latter is only' partially screwed down-on the inlet connection. Replacement or the vacuum by the dehydrated air pres sure further conditions the particles of dehydrating agent, and in accordance with my improved I method the casing i0 is closed .while the particles are maintained under superatmospheric pressure. Cap 22 is tightened while the air pressure still is on. This causes theparticles of dehydrating agent to be maintained under superatmospberic pressure until the dehydrator is ready for use.

When it is desired to couple the dehydrator into a fluid system in which it is to act in its normal capacity, the cap 22 adjacent the inlet connections initially is removed. As the cap is unscrewed, the air under pressure in the dehydrating agent is allowed to escape so that when the dehydrator is coupled in the system it is under normal pressure. The escape of the air iiom the casing ll causes a distinct sound as it passes through the opening 2!,thereby assurin the user the dehydrator is in good condition and ready gor use. The packing operation and bandling of the dehydrator before its period of use j tends to cause the formation or more. or less powder irqm the granular dehydrating agent. By initially opening the cap on the inlet memher to which the distributing element II. is attached, this powder is incorporated in the escaping air -and thereby removed from the casing so that the dehydrator is used.

The extent ofv it cannot enter-the fluid system in which.

the invention as described herein for the purpose of explanation may be made without departing from the scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

I claim: 1

l. The method of preparing a dehydrator ior use, which comprises loading a dehydrator casing with granular dehydrating material, subjecting the dehydrating material to the action of a vacuum after being loaded into the dehydrator casing, following the vacuum treatment by subjecting the dehydrating material to the action of air under pressure, and closing the casing to entrap the air under superatmospheric pressure and to maintain the dehydrating material under such condition before use.

2. The method of preparing a dehydrator for use, which comprises loading a dehydrator having an internally extending distribution member with a granular dehydrating agent, subjecting the casing to a vibratory movement to compact the granular dehydrating agent about said distributional member, closing the casing, subjecting the dehydrating material in the casing to a vacuum, following the vacuum treatment by subiecting the dehydrating material to the action of dehydrated air under pressure, and sealing the dehydrating material underpressure.

3. The method of preparing a dehydrator for use, which comprises loading an open-ended dehydrator casing with granular dehydrating material, subjecting the dehydrating material to vibratory packing, assembling the casing with a closure, blowing air under pressure through the casing to remove dust, subjecting the loaded dehydrating material to the action of heat and reduced pressure, following said last named treatment by subjecting the dehydrating material to the action of dehydrated air undersuperatmospheric pressure, and closing-the casing while the dehydrating material is being subjected to the air under pressure. l

4. In the conditioning of a dehydrator filled with granular dehydrating agent, the steps which comprise consecutively blowing air through saiddehydrating agent under pressure, subjecting said agent to heat and reduced pressure, and scaling said agent in an atmosphere of compressed dehydrated air.

5. In the conditioning of a dehydrator, the

steps which comprise loading a dehydrator casing with a granular dehydrating material, subjecting the dehydrating material in said casing to action 01- air under superatmospheric pressure. and closing the casing while the dehydrating ma- ".terial is under said pressure.

6. A dehydrator of thetype described, comprising a casing, an internally extending distributional member, said casing being packed with a granular dehydrating agent about said distributiom-l member, inlet and outlet connections on said casing, an orlflced closure member for said inlet connection, and means for sealing the closure member, said dehydrating agent being maintained in the casing under superatmospheric- 'z. A dehydrator of the type described, com

GUY J.

US211849A 1938-06-04 1938-06-04 Method of charging and conditioning dehydrators Expired - Lifetime US2283989A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2469367A (en) * 1942-09-17 1949-05-10 David S Burgess Canister and distributor therefor
US2507028A (en) * 1945-05-26 1950-05-09 Niles Bement Pond Co Dehumidifying device
US2548335A (en) * 1947-04-24 1951-04-10 Weatherhead Co Refrigeration accumulator and dehydrator
US2548965A (en) * 1947-10-03 1951-04-17 Gen Motors Corp Fluid filter
US2608269A (en) * 1948-04-06 1952-08-26 Southwick W Briggs Oil separator
US2620892A (en) * 1950-05-05 1952-12-09 Stover William Arthur Spherical dehydrator
US2727585A (en) * 1950-01-10 1955-12-20 W E Moore And Company Apparatus for the treatment of gases
US2750041A (en) * 1954-09-20 1956-06-12 Meyer Herman Refrigerant drying cartridge
US2767803A (en) * 1952-12-11 1956-10-23 Henry Valve Company Inc Strainer casing construction
US2781912A (en) * 1954-03-01 1957-02-19 Kenneth M Newcum Drier-filter
US2875901A (en) * 1954-11-26 1959-03-03 Edward W Bottum Filter
US3175342A (en) * 1963-01-16 1965-03-30 Parker Hannifin Corp Filter dryer unit for cleaning sealed refrigerating systems after motor burn outs
US3186150A (en) * 1962-10-01 1965-06-01 Mc Graw Edison Co Apparatus for the treatment of gases
US3224845A (en) * 1965-12-21 Controlled wetting oex n nonxaqueous f fluids
US3246758A (en) * 1963-01-30 1966-04-19 Watsco Inc Hygrometric indicator for desiccants
US3258899A (en) * 1962-02-06 1966-07-05 Puregas Equipment Corp Apparatus for fractionating gaseous mixtures
US3385446A (en) * 1967-09-29 1968-05-28 Ward Becker Lab Inc Liquid filtering device
US3407936A (en) * 1965-06-07 1968-10-29 Parker Hannifin Corp Spring loaded dryer
US3902746A (en) * 1973-12-26 1975-09-02 Parr Mfg Inc Curl seal
US4277259A (en) * 1980-02-11 1981-07-07 Thermo Electron Corporation Air-sampling cartridge
US4377398A (en) * 1977-04-21 1983-03-22 Motorola Inc. Heat energized vapor adsorbent pump
US5281257A (en) * 1992-12-11 1994-01-25 Purus Inc. System for increasing efficiency of vapor phase pollutant removal with on-site regeneration and pollutant recovery
EP1109613A1 (en) * 1998-08-31 2001-06-27 Advanced Technology Materials, Inc. Process for fabricating a sorbent-based gas storage and dispensing system, utilizing sorbent material pretreatment
WO2002051525A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2002-07-04 Matheson Tri-Gas Methods and apparatus for removing trace impurities from inert and non-reactive gases and reactive gases and fluids
US6425946B1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2002-07-30 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Method and apparatus for removing trace impurities from a gas using superactivated carbon material

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3224845A (en) * 1965-12-21 Controlled wetting oex n nonxaqueous f fluids
US2469367A (en) * 1942-09-17 1949-05-10 David S Burgess Canister and distributor therefor
US2507028A (en) * 1945-05-26 1950-05-09 Niles Bement Pond Co Dehumidifying device
US2548335A (en) * 1947-04-24 1951-04-10 Weatherhead Co Refrigeration accumulator and dehydrator
US2548965A (en) * 1947-10-03 1951-04-17 Gen Motors Corp Fluid filter
US2608269A (en) * 1948-04-06 1952-08-26 Southwick W Briggs Oil separator
US2727585A (en) * 1950-01-10 1955-12-20 W E Moore And Company Apparatus for the treatment of gases
US2620892A (en) * 1950-05-05 1952-12-09 Stover William Arthur Spherical dehydrator
US2767803A (en) * 1952-12-11 1956-10-23 Henry Valve Company Inc Strainer casing construction
US2781912A (en) * 1954-03-01 1957-02-19 Kenneth M Newcum Drier-filter
US2750041A (en) * 1954-09-20 1956-06-12 Meyer Herman Refrigerant drying cartridge
US2875901A (en) * 1954-11-26 1959-03-03 Edward W Bottum Filter
US3258899A (en) * 1962-02-06 1966-07-05 Puregas Equipment Corp Apparatus for fractionating gaseous mixtures
US3186150A (en) * 1962-10-01 1965-06-01 Mc Graw Edison Co Apparatus for the treatment of gases
US3175342A (en) * 1963-01-16 1965-03-30 Parker Hannifin Corp Filter dryer unit for cleaning sealed refrigerating systems after motor burn outs
US3246758A (en) * 1963-01-30 1966-04-19 Watsco Inc Hygrometric indicator for desiccants
US3407936A (en) * 1965-06-07 1968-10-29 Parker Hannifin Corp Spring loaded dryer
US3385446A (en) * 1967-09-29 1968-05-28 Ward Becker Lab Inc Liquid filtering device
US3902746A (en) * 1973-12-26 1975-09-02 Parr Mfg Inc Curl seal
US4377398A (en) * 1977-04-21 1983-03-22 Motorola Inc. Heat energized vapor adsorbent pump
US4277259A (en) * 1980-02-11 1981-07-07 Thermo Electron Corporation Air-sampling cartridge
US5281257A (en) * 1992-12-11 1994-01-25 Purus Inc. System for increasing efficiency of vapor phase pollutant removal with on-site regeneration and pollutant recovery
EP1109613A1 (en) * 1998-08-31 2001-06-27 Advanced Technology Materials, Inc. Process for fabricating a sorbent-based gas storage and dispensing system, utilizing sorbent material pretreatment
EP1109613A4 (en) * 1998-08-31 2004-06-30 Advanced Tech Materials Process for fabricating a sorbent-based gas storage and dispensing system, utilizing sorbent material pretreatment
US20030041734A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-03-06 Funke Hans H. Method for producing an ultra-low emission carbon material
US20030024394A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-02-06 Funke Hans H. Method for producing a preconditioned ultra-low emmission carbon material
US20030024395A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-02-06 Funke Hans H. Gas purifier system for removing trace impurities from a reactive fluid
US20030024390A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-02-06 Funke Hans H. Method and apparatus for removing trace impurities from inert, non-reactive and reactive liquids
US20030024396A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-02-06 Funke Hans H. Gas purifier system containing an ultra-low emission carbon material
US20030033936A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-02-20 Funke Hans H. Method for removing impurities from process gas stream
US6425946B1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2002-07-30 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Method and apparatus for removing trace impurities from a gas using superactivated carbon material
US6547861B2 (en) * 2000-12-26 2003-04-15 Matheson Tri-Gas,, Inc. Method and materials for purifying reactive gases using preconditioned ultra-low emission carbon material
US6710012B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-03-23 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc, Method for producing an ultra-low emission carbon material
US6709482B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-03-23 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Method for reducing trace impurities from a reactive fluid using preconditioned ultra-low emission carbon material
US6720282B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-04-13 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Method for producing a preconditioned ultra-low emission carbon material
WO2002051525A1 (en) * 2000-12-26 2002-07-04 Matheson Tri-Gas Methods and apparatus for removing trace impurities from inert and non-reactive gases and reactive gases and fluids
US6783577B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-08-31 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Gas purifier system containing an ultra-low emission carbon material
US6783576B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-08-31 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Gas purifier system for removing trace impurities from a reactive fluid
US6790358B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-09-14 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Composition for removing trace impurities from inert, non-reactive and reactive liquids
US6797036B2 (en) 2000-12-26 2004-09-28 Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc. Method for removing impurities from process gas stream

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