US2266140A - Chain-stitch sewing machine - Google Patents

Chain-stitch sewing machine Download PDF

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US2266140A
US2266140A US267958A US26795839A US2266140A US 2266140 A US2266140 A US 2266140A US 267958 A US267958 A US 267958A US 26795839 A US26795839 A US 26795839A US 2266140 A US2266140 A US 2266140A
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needle
oil
bar
feed
thread
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US267958A
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Frederick F Zeier
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Singer Co
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Singer Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B27/00Work-feeding means
    • D05B27/02Work-feeding means with feed dogs having horizontal and vertical movements
    • D05B27/04Work-feeding means with feed dogs having horizontal and vertical movements arranged above the workpieces
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B1/00General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both
    • D05B1/02General types of sewing apparatus or machines without mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both for making single-thread seams
    • D05B1/06Single chain-stitch seams
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B71/00Lubricating or cooling devices
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B73/00Casings
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B57/00Loop takers, e.g. loopers
    • D05B57/02Loop takers, e.g. loopers for chain-stitch sewing machines, e.g. oscillating

Description

Dec. 16,1941. F. F. ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April 15, 1939 ll Sheets-Sheet 1 Dec. 16, 1941. IF. F. ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE 11 Sheets-Shet 2 Filed April 15, 1939 N: 3mm E'ede '05 Zeier Dec. 16, 1941. F. F. ZEIER STITCH SEWING nmcgnm Filed April is, 1939 CHAIN- 11 Sheets-Sheet 3 De c. 16, 1941.
F. F, ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April 15, 1959 ll Sheets-Sheet 4 Dec. 16, 1941, A. F. ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April 15 1959 ll Sheets-Sheet 5 fiederiek ZZez'er Dec. 16, 1941. F. F. ZEIER 2,266,140
CHAIN- STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April is, 1939 11 Sheets-Sheet 7 7 I vl7Ig!IIIIlllllllllllllllllllwggll 1 1$?i I A & /////////////////////4 Dec. 16, 1941. F. F..ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April 15, 1939 ll Sheets-Sheet 8 liederic I'Zeief Dec. 16, 1941.
F. F. ZEIER 2,266,140
CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE Filed April 15, 1939 ll Sheets-Sheet 9 -1 151 I iw-m Dec. 16, 1941. F. F. ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE 11 Sh e'ets-Sheet 16 Filed April 15, 1939 l hderiel 1. Z826? Dec. 16, 1941. F. F. ZEIER CHAIN-STITCH SEWING MACHINE 11 Sheets-Sheet 11 Filed April 15,1939
I80 270 OF T/lf MAM SHAFT Patented Dec. 16, 1941 CHAIN-STITCH snwmc MACHINE Frederick F. Zeier, Fairfield, Conn., assignor to The Singer Manufacturing Company, Elizabeth, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey 7 Application April 15,
28 Claims.
This invention relates to sewing machines, more particularly of the chain-stitch straightaway-feed type designed for accommodating comparatively heavy materials, and has for an object to provide an organized sewing machine of the type-in question having improved characteristics enabling it to be commercially operated at speeds considerably in excess of those of previous machines of this type, without undue wear and tear on the various parts.
A second object of the invention is to provide an improved and novel looper operating mechanism, wherein the looper is given a variable motion such that it will cooperate with a needle having work-feeding movements regardless of the amplitude of these movements.
With the above and other objects in view, as will hereinafter appear, the invention comprises the devices, combinations, and arrangements of parts hereinafter set forth and illustrated in the accompanying drawings of a preferred embodiment of the invention, from which the several features of the invention and the advantages attained thereby will be readily understood by those skilled in the art.
Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a longitudinal vertical section through the frame of a machine embodying the invention, showing the internal mechanism.
Fig. 2 is a rear side elevation of the sewing machine with the oil drip-pan removed.
Fig. 3 is a front end elevation with the bed and work-supporting plate in section.
Fig. 4 represents a vertical section taken substantially along the line 4-4, Fig. 1.
Fig. 5 represents a horizontal section taken substantially along the line 5-5, Fig. 3.
Fig. 6 is a detail view in'elevation of the feedframe in which is ioumaled the reciprocatory needle-bar.
Figs. 7 and 8 are enlarged fragmentary views of the thread-loop seizing end of the spreaderblade disclosed in Fig. 3 in position adjacent to and above the looper;
Fig. 9 is a top plan of the machine-bed with the bracket-arm and work-supporting plate removed therefrom to expose the mechanism within the bed.
Fig. 10 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line Ill-l0, Fig. 9.
1939, Serial No. 267,958
Fig. 13 is a horizontal section through the head of the machine taken substantially along the line I3-l3, Fig. 3.
Fig. 14 is a vertical section taken substantially 5 along the line I l-l4, Fig. 1, showing the oil-' metering device which is adapted to govern the amount of lubricant directed to the needle-bar crank and link.
Fig. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective view of the lower portion of the oil-metering stem disclosed in Fig. 14.
Fig. 16 is an enlarged horizontal section taken along the line Iii-l6, Fig. 14. 7 1
Fig. 17 is a rear end elevation of the-machine with the balance-wheel removed.
Fig. 18 is an end elevation of the counterbalance needle-bar crank showing clearly the eccentricity of the undercut recess formed there- Fig. 19 is a fragmentary front side elevation of a portion of the bracket-arm and head, showing the needle-thread controlling devices.
Fig. 20 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 20-20, Fig. 9.
Fig. 21 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 21-21, Fig.9.
Fig. 22 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 22-22, Fig. 9.
Fig. 23, is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 23-23, Fig. 9.
Fig. 24 is a top plan of the machine-bed with the work-supporting plateremoved to expose the lubricant-distribution system.
Fig. 25 is a front side elevation of the machinebed-partly in section.
Fig. 26 is a top plan of the work-supporting plate secured upon the machine-bed.
Fig. 2'7 is a front side elevation of the machinebed and work-supporting plate.
Fig. 28 is a front side elevation of the drip-pan which is adapted to enclose the machine-bed.
Fig. 29 is an enlarged vertical section taken substantially along the line 29-29, Fig. 26.
Fig. 30 is a front end elevation of the loopermechanism showing the paths of travel of certain of its elements, together with the corresponding path of travel of the point of the needle.
Fig. 31 is a front end elevation of the lower four-motion feeding mechanism showing the paths of travel of certain of its elements, together with the corresponding path of travel of the point of the needle. e
Fig. 32 is a disassembledperspective view of the looper-mechanism and its actuating crank.
Fig. 33 is a graph showing two curves representing displacement, or velocity, of the looper and needle, together with a curve illustrating the velocity of a point traveling in simple harmonic motion.
The detailed description which follows is broken down into sections so as to facilitate a quick understanding of the various mechanisms of the machine and their operations. It should be understood that the present invention is not limited to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings for it is capable of other embodiments which come within the scope of the ap-- pended claims.
Frame and general structure The frame of the machine illustrated forms the subject of a divisional application Serial No. 362,907, filed October 26, 1940.
The hollow frame, which is preferably cast in two pieces, comprises a rectangular bed I from one end of which rises a standard 2 of an overhanging bracket-arm 3 terminating in a head 4.
The rectangular bed I is composed of vertically disposed front and rear side walls and 6, and end walls 1 and 8. Intermediate the end walls 1 and 8 are two dividing walls 9 and III which separate the bed I into three rectangular compartments II, I 2 and I3. Disposed in compartments II and I2 are the stitch-forming mechanism and the feeding mechanism, together with connections for actuating the same. Each of these two compartments is open at the bottom to permit the precipitation of spent oil, lint and dirt from the mechanism within these compartments. By reference to Fig. 1, it will be seen that compartment |3 forms the lower portion or sump of a lubricant chamber and is closed at the bottom by means of a removable circular sheetmetal cover-plate l4.
Secured upon the rear end-portion of the bed I is the standard 2 of the bracket-arm 3. The standard has integrally formed therewith a vertical internal partition l5 which extends from the rear end wall 8 of the bed I to a cover-plate |6 secured upon the top of the bracket-arm 3, and divides the space within the standard into the oil or splash-lubrication chamber l3 and a belt compartment l1. The open face of the standard is closed by means of a sheet-metal plate |8 which is adapted to protect the operator from contacting the driving belt housed within the belt compartment l1. In, order to facilitate removal of the plate l8, it is provided with two keyholeslots |9 entered by the spacing studs 28 threaded into the partition l5, and with a finger-hole 2|, whereby the plate l8 may be easily grasped.
The bracket-arm 3 at the standard end is provided with an internal partition 22-and at its head end is provided with an internal partition 23, which partitions define a compartment housing the eccentrics and some of the connections for actuating the needle and top feeding mechanisms. In addition, partitions 22 and 23 provide bearing lugs for the ball-bearing 24 and the bearing bushing 25 in which is journaled the main or arm-shaft 26. To lend support to the end-portion of the arm-shaft 26 adjacent the standard 2, there is provided an additional ballbearing 21, and supporting means therefor which is mounted in the vertical internal partition l5 of the standard 2. The supporting means for the ball-bearing 21 comprises a bushing 28 fixed in the partition l5 by the set-screw 29 and having an axial bore 38, the diameter of which is slightly in excess of the diameter of the arm-shaft 26. The bushing 28 is formed at one end with a reduced end-portion 3| upon which is press-fitted the inner race 32 of a commercial ball-bearing 33. Press-fitted upon the outer race of the ballbearing 33 is a belt-sprocket 34 of which the hub 35 is secured by set-screw 36 upon the arm-shaft 26. Fixed upon the end of the arm-shaft 26 is the usual belt-driven balance-wheel 31. With the ball-bearing supporting means above described, it will be obvious that the bushing 28, ball-bearing 33 and belt-sprocket 34 may be assembled as a unit and conveniently applied to the machine by merely tightening the set-screws 29 and 36.
Longitudinally of the bed I there is journaled in the bushing 38, ball-bearing39 and ball-bearing 48, the lower rotary main-shaft 4| having secured upon one end thereof a belt-sprocket 42 of the same diameter as the belt-sprocket 34. These two belt-sprockets 34 and 42 are connected by means of a conventional clip-belt 43 to rotate at a ratio of one-to-one. It will be seen from Fig. 1 that the belt-sprocket 42, as in the case of belt-sprocket 34, in effect acts as a support for the end of the lower main-shaft 4| through the medium of the ball-bearing and the stationary bushing 44 secured in the wall 8 of the bed I. The main-shaft 4| at its forward end-portion has secured thereto eccentrics and a crank for actuating the mechanism located within the bed I.
- Referring now to Figs. 26 to 29, inclusive, it will be observed that the bed I is provided with a work-supporting plate 45 detachably secured by means of four screws 46. In order that access may be had to the mechanism beneath the worksupporting plate 45, and to facilitate threading the looper, the work-supporting plate 45 is fitted with a removable cover-plate 41 held in position by the latch 48. This latch 48 yieldingly maintains the two corners 49 of the cover-plate 41 seated in undercut recesses formed in the worksupporting plate 45. The latch 48 is maintained in engagement with the cover-plate 41 by a bowed spring 50 the ends of which bear against a retaining strap 5| fastened beneath the worksupporting plate by the screws 52. Endwise movement of the latch 48 is controlled by the stop-pin 53 of which the head enters an enlarged aperture 54 in the latch 48. Chatter of the coverplate 41 is minimized in the present case by using only three point contact between the cover-plate 41 and the work-supporting plate 45, aided by the use of a strip of rubber or felt 55 on the latch 48. To facilitate removal of the cover lat 41, the latter is formed with two finger-holes 56. In removing the cover plate 41, the operator inserts a finger in each of the holes 56 and shifts the plate 41 to the right, Fig. 29, thereby disengaging the two corners 49 of the cover-plate from their respective recesses and permitting the same to be tilted and removed.
The machine bed I is adapted to be placed in an open-topped box-like drip-pan 51 having secured around its upper edge an L-shaped gasket 58 which prevents metal-to-metal contact between the machine-bed and the drippan 51. It
will be understood that the surplus oil supplied to the various bearings through piping later to be described, is collected in the drip-pan which periodically is drained through the plug 59 and cleaned out. The gasket 58 not only prevents the egress of oil from the drip-pan 51, but also functions as a vibration dampening expedient.
and a removable drip-pan. This construction is particularly advantageous in assembling and adjusting the machine, since it exposes all the mechanism within the bed.
Needle-bar mechanism -wise reciprocation, a needlebar 64 carrying at its lower end a needle 65. The lower end of the vibratory frame 62 is steadied in its movement by an L-shaped bracket 62' which is secured to the machine-head 4. Clamped upon the needle-bar 64 intermediate the lugs 63 is the usual split collar 66 having a hollow pin 61 connected by a tubular link 88 to a hollow crank-pin 69 carried by a counterbalanced crank 18 secured upon the end of the arm-shaft 26. A unique and novel oiling system has been devised for lubricating the needle-bar mechanism, and this system will bedescribed in detail under the appropriate section of lubrication.
To assist in feeding the work through the machine, the needle is adapted to vibrate in the line of feed in timed relation with the various feeding elements. The vibratory movement of the needle is derived from an adjustable eccentric '|I mounted upon the arm-shaft 26 through connections clearly disclosed in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. Embracing the eccentric II is a short rearwardly extending pitman I2, the end of which is connected to the upper end of a vertically disposed lever I3 clamped at its lower end upon the end of a rock-shaft l4 journaled in spaced lugs of the rear wall of the head 4. Pinned upon the other end of the rock-shaft I4 is the upper end of the depending lever 16 connected at its lower end by a horizontal link 11 to a split projection I8, see Fig. 6, formed upon the frame 82.
To 'provide for changing the amplitude of vibration of the needle, i. e., to change the length' of stitch, provision must be made to permit adjustment of the amount of movement imparted to the needle. In the present case, the eccentric is constructed so that its eccentricity may be conveniently adjusted to give the desired stitchlength. The constructive features of the adjustable eccentric used inthe machine chosen for illustration need not herein be described, since the eccentric is disclosed and claimed in the United States patent to W. Myers, No. 2,128,031, issued Aug. 23, 1938. To assist in effecting adjustment of the eccentric H, there is provided in the top of the bracket-arm 3 a detent '19 which is adapted to be depressed by the operator and to enter a suitable stop-notch in the adjusting member of the eccentric 1|, permitting the operator to turn the balance-wheel3l and adjust the eccentricity of the eccentric. The structural details of-the detent I9 will not be described in detail, since it is disclosed in the United States patent to W. Myers, No. 2,063,264, dated Dec. 8, 1936, but its operation in connection with the presentthis specification in connection with the lower four-motion feeding mechanism.
As described above, it will be understood that as the arm-shaft is rotated the needle-bar 64 is reciprocated endwise and at the same time .is vibrated in the line of feed by the eccentric II and the connections actuated thereby.
Top-feeding mechanism Assisting the needle in advancing the work through the machine, is a top four-motion feeding mechanism which is designed to cooperate with the presser-mechanism. This feeding mechanism, which forms the subject of a divi--' sion'al application Serial No. 332,441, filed Apr. 30, 1940, comprises a feed-dog 88 carried in the usual way upon the lower end of a feed-bar 8| slidable in a vertical dovetailed guideway 82 formed in the vibratory frame 82. Referring to Figs. 5 and 6, it will be observed that in order to take up wear, and also to facilitate manufacture, one side of the dovetailed guideway 82 is in the form of a detachable gib 83 secured by screws 84 threaded into the vibratory frame 62.
Disposed adjacent the feed-dog 88 is a presserfoot 85 attached to the lower end of an endwise movable presser-bar 86 journaled in a fixed bushing in the head 4 of the machine. Clampe-tl upon the upper end of the presser-bar 86 is a horizontal guide-arm 81, Fig. 13, the free end of which is adapted to enter the usual presser-bar guide-slot 88 provided in the rear wall of the machine-head 4. This guide-slot 88, in the present case, is preferably formed of two parallel hardened steel runners 89 and 88 secured one upon the outside of the wall of the machine-head 4 and the other upon the inside of the wall of the machine-head by screws 9| and 92.
Positioned directly above the upper ends of th feed-bar 8| and presser-bar 86 is an inverted T- shaped angle-lever 93 provided at the junctionof the limbs thereof with a horizontally disposed fulcrum-pin 94 which is journaled in the end of the arm 95 freely fulcrumed upon the rock-shaft 14 adjacent the lever 16. The ends of the substantially horizontal limb of the angle-lever 93 are provided with pivot-pins 96 and 91. Pin 96 is connected by a depending link 98 to the upper end of the feed-bar 8|, and pin 91 is connected by a depending link 99 to a lifting pin I 88 carried by the presser-bar guide-arm 81. The upstanding limb of the angle-lever 93 is connected by the curved link I8I to the slotted rock-lever I82 pinned upon one end of a feed-advance rockshaft I83 journaled in a lug I84 integral with the rear wall of the machine-head 4. Clamped upon the other end of the feed-advance rock-shaft I83 is the upstanding rock-lever I85, the upper end of which'is connected by a. pitman I86 actuated by an eccentric I81 secured upon the armshaft 26.
Referring now to Figs. 3 and 12, it will Ice'seen head of the screw I89 carriedby the arm 95. The
other end of the leaf-spring I88 is apertured to receive the retaining pin 8 of the lug III, and intermediate the ends of the spring I88 there is provided an adjusting screw II2 for regulating the amount of pressure applied by the spring. It will be readily understood that the purpose of the arrangement will be more fully described later in 75 leaf-spring I88 is to maintain either the presser- .the curved link IN.
foot 85 or the feed-dog 80 in engagement with the work upon the work-supporting plate 45.
Considering the top feeding mechanism in the position illustrated in Fig. 3, the operation thereof is as follows: Rotation of the arm-shaft 26 imparts to the angle-lever 93, through the eccentric I 01 and connections actuated thereby, a constant oscillatory motion about the axis of the fulcrumpin 94. When the presser-foot 85 engages the work, or the throat-plate as shown in Fig. 3, and
the rock-lever I02 moves in a clockwise direction about the axis of the feed-advance rock-shaft I03, the pin 91 of the angle-lever 93 becomes the pivot-point about which the angle-lever turns. Further movement of the rock-lever I02 in the same direction raises the feed-bar 8I through the link 98 and also elevates to a small extent the spring-biased end of the arm 95. When the feed-dog 80 carried by the feed-bar 8| is thus lifted from the work, the vibratory frame 62, which carries the needle-bar 64 and the feed-bar 8I, is shifted to the right through the vibration of the lever 16, Fig. 3, or, in other words, given its feed-return movement. At the end of this feedreturn movement, the oscillation of the rock-lever I02 in a counterclockwise direction causes a turning of the angle-lever 93 about the pivot-pin 94 in a clockwise direction, which results in a lowering of the feed-dog 80 into contact with the work, in which position the pin 96 carried by the anglelever 93 becomes the pivot-point about which the angle-lever turns. Further movement of the rock-lever I02 in the counterclockwise direction raises the presser-bar 86 through the link 99. When the presser-foot. is thus raised from the work, the vibratory frame 62 carrying the needlebar 64 and the feed-bar 8| has imparted to it, through its actuating connections previously described, the feed-advance movement. This sequence of operations above described is repeated in timed relation with a, lower four-motion feeding mechanism which will later be described, and it will be understood that an improved work-feeding mechanism has been provided that will operate efliciently at high speeds.
In order that the amount of elevation of the.
presser-foot and feed-dog may be varied to compensate for materials of various thickness, the
rock-lever I02 is slotted and has clamped thereto Adjustment of the end of the link MI in the slot I02 of the rock-lever I02 varies the amount of oscillation imparted to the angle-lever 93 which controls the height to which the presser-foot 85 and feed-dog 80are raised.
It will be observed that the angle-lever 93 is connected by the two depending links 98 and 99 to the feed-bar 8I and presser-bar 86, respectively. The provision of these two links renders the top feeding mechanism exceedingly flexible and prevents any binding of the presser-bar or feed-bar in their respective guides. To facilitate assembly of the top feeding mechanism, the pivot-pins 96 and 91 as well as several others are held against axial displacement by conventional thin sheet-metal resilient retainers I I3 which are seated in peripheral grooves formed in the endportions of the pivot-pins.
From Figs. 1 and '3, it will be seen that in order to obtain a comparatively long stitch, the feed-bar'8l is spaced to the left of the vertical plane containing the longitudinal axes of the needle-bar 64 and the presser-bar 86, and also rearwardly of the needle-bar 64 so that the feedbar 8| can move backwardly during the feedstroke to a position substantially at the side of the presser-bar 86. With the view of obtaining a more smoothly acting top feeding mechanism, and to minimize the endwise movement of the feed-bar 8| during the vibration of the frame 62,
The lower four-motion feeding mechanism, which operates in synchronism with the needlefeed and top-feed mechanisms, comprises a feedadvance and -retum rock-shaft II 4 and a feedlift rock-shaft IIS disposed on opposite sides of the lower main-shaft 4I journaled in the bed I.
The feed-advance and -retum rock-shaft H4 is joumaled in two bushings I I6 and H1 fixed in the walls I and 9, respectively, of the bed I. Clamped upon the inner end of the rock-shaft H4 is a depending rock-lever II8, the lower end of which is connected by a pitman II9 to an adjustable eccentric I20 upon the lower main-shaft 4|. The elements of the eccentric I 20 are identical with the eccentric H on the upper mainshaft, and with the disclosure in the United States patent to W. Myers. No. 2,128,031, dated Aug. 23, 1938, previously referred to in the description of the needle-bar mechanism. Secured by screws I2I upon the outer end-portion of the rock-shaft H4 is the usual upstanding feedrocker I22 carrying at its upper end a hollow fulcrum-bar I23 held against endwise movement by the cap-screws I24 threaded into the feed-rocker I22. Journaled upon the fulcrum-bar I23 is the bifuracted end of a feed-bar I25 formed with a guideway I26 entered by the shank of the lower feed-dog I21, the shank having threaded into it a clamp-screw I28 for securing the feed-dog I21 in vertically adjusted position. Formed in the feed-dog I21 is a needle-aperture I21 which is adapted to receive the needle 65 and back up the same during feeding of the work.
The feed-lift rock-shaft H5 is supported at its outer end by a pintle. I 29 fixed in the wall 1 of the bed I, and at its inner end by a pintle I30 fixed in a lug I3I integral with the wall 6 of the bed I, see Fig. 22. Depending from the inner end of the feed-lift rock-shaft H5 is a rocklever I32, the lower end of which is connected by a short pitman I33 actuated by an eccentric I34 fastened upon the lower main-shaft 4|. Extending horizontally and forwardly from the outer end of the feed-lift rock-shaft I I 5 is a rock-lever I35, the free end of which is connected by the depending links I 36 to the free end of the feedbar I 25.
In a machine having an upper feeding mechanism and a lower feeding mechanism each deriving its work-advancing movements from independent adjustable eccentrics means must be provided to enable the two feeding mechanisms to remain in unison during the adjustment of the stitch-length. From Fig. 10, it will be observed that the adjusting element of the eccentric I20 is held stationary by means of a pivotally mounted detent I31 having an offset finger-plate I38 overlying the free end of a spring-wire I39 which normally maintains the detent I31 elevated into inoperative position. Access to the detent I31 may be had by removing the coverplate 41 of the work-supporting plate 45. In adjusting the stitch-length of the upper and lower feeding mechanisms. the balance-wheel is manu-' ally turned until the detent 19 on the bracketarm 3 registers with the stop notch in the eccentric H of the upper feeding mechanism, in which position the detent is depressed and turned, thereby locking the same in latching position. This leaves one hand of the operator free so that the detent I31 for the adjustable eccentric I20 upon the lower main-shaft 4| may be manually held in latching position while the balance-wheel is turned with the other hand of the operator until the required amount of eccentricity has been obtained. To resume sewing, the detent I31 is released, as is also the detent 19. It is obvious from the above description that efiicient means have been provided whereby the separate eccentrics for the upper and lower feeds may be concomitantly adjusted to vary the eccentricity thereof.
Fig. 31 shows the loci of travel of the various elements of the lower feeding mechanism, as well as that of the point of the'needle. Particular attention is called to the comparatively fiat upper half of the locus F, which is the path of travel of a point on the feed-dog I21. This comparatively fiat portion of the locus F is the path of travel of a point on the feed-dog I21 above the throat-plate, and the advantages of such a flat path of travel of the feed-dog are appreciated by those skilled in the art.
An efficient lubricating system has been incorporated in the machine to oil the moving parts of the lower feeding mechanism, and this system will be described in detail later under the appropriate section of lubrication.
Looper mechanism The looper-mechanism of the present machine is of the two-motion type and the looper is oscillated in a vertical plane parallel to the direction of feed about a fixed axis, the loop-seizing motion being in a-direction opposite to the direction of the feed of the work through the machine. The looper-mechanism comprises a looper I40 of'which the cylindrical shank MI is secured in a carrier I42 fixedly clamped upon an oscillatable sleeve I43 journaled upon a tubular supporting rod I44 fixed in the bushings I45 and 5 I46 in the walls 1 and 9, respectively of the bed I. The oscillatable sleeve I43 is actuated from the lower main-shaft 4| through connections adapted to give the looper I40 a variable motion. These connections comprise a depending rock-lever I41 fastened by screws I40 upon one end of the oscillatable sleeve I43, one of the screws I48 engaging the flat I49 milled in the sleeve I43. Disposed in the lower end of the depending lever I41 is a hollow pin I50 upon which is journaled the lower end of a link I5I. The upper end of the link I5I is journaled upon a hollow pin I52 fixed in the lower end of a second link I53 which is journaled at its upper end upon a hollow crankpin I54 carried by a counterbalanced crank I55 fixed upon the outer end of the lower main-shaft 4 I Freely fulcrumed upon the oscillatable sleeve I43 intermediate the depending rock-lever I41 and a securing split-ring I56 is a collar I51 provided with a substantially horizontal cylindrical guide-rod I58 slidably received in a suitable control-sleeve I59 formed in' the link I53.
It will be observed from Fig. 30 that the loopercarrier I42 is directly connected to the countera balanced crank I55-through connections I41, I5I
and I53, and that the amount of movement imparted to the looper-carrier I42 is controlled by the cylindrical guide-rod I58 which maintains and forces the link I53 into predetermined positions as the crank I55 is rotated. ln other words, the effective leverage between the crank I55 and looper-carrier I42 15 so varied that the looper I40 travels at a variable velocity, the instantaneous values or which are plotted in Fig. 33. In this figure, the ordinate represents displacement of the looper and needle, and the abscissa repre-.
sents degrees of rotation of the main-shalt beginning at the lowermost point of the needle-bar stroke. By comparing the velocity curve of the looper with the velocity curve of a point traveling in simple harmonica motion, Fig. 33, it will be observed that the slope of the'looper curve from the needle-loop shedding position to the needle-' loop seizing position is relatively steep, indicating a very marked and rapid change in the speed of the looper. This change in speed of the looper of the present machine at this portion of the stitch-forming cycle is desirable and, in fact, necessary since, from Fig. 30, it will be seen that the looper and needle at the loop-shedding point are each moving in the same direction (direction of feed) and that before the eye of the needle rises above the point of the looper the latter and then advance to loop-seizing position in a relatively short time. InFig, 30, the. locus A is the path of travel of the point of the needle at maximum stitch-length, -while locus B is the path of travel of the point of. the needle at minimum stitch-length.
From the above description considered in connection with Figs. 30, 32 and 33, it will be understood that a novel two-motion looper-mechanism is provided that will impart to the looper a variable motion of such a character as td render the looper-mechanism particularly applicable to a. needle-feed machine.
Spreader mechanism To assist in stitch-formation, the two-motion looper I40 has cooperating therewith a spreader I60 which is adapted to distend the looperthread to form the usual triangle with the previous needle thread-loop for entrance by the descending needle. The spreader I60 at its free end is formed with two laterally spaced threadengaging notches I6I and I62, see Figs. 6 and 7.
slotted as at I63, see Fig. 9, andsecured by aclamp-screw I64 upon one end' of a reciprocatory supporting rod I65 journaled in a fixed bushing I66 in the wall 9 of the bed I. Attached for endwise adjustment upon the other ,end of the supporting rod I65 is a head I61 (Fig. 10) con nected by a link I68 to an upstanding rock-lever I69 formed integral with an oscillatable transverse sleeve I10. This sleeve I10 is preferably journaled upon a hollow rod I1I fixed at its opposite ends in lugs I12 and I13 formed upon the walls 5 and 6, respectively, of the bed I; the sleeve I 10 being held against endwise movement upon the hollow rod I1I by a collar I14. Formed integral with the sleeve I 10 at the end remote from the rock-lever I69 is a second rock-lever I15 provided in its free end with a short rod I16 a split socket I18 formed in the upper end of a relatively short pitman I19 actuated by an ec-.
centric I80 secured upon the lower main-shaft 4|, see Fig. 11.
The eccentric I80 is timed so that the spreader is reciprocated crosswise of the line of seam The presser-foot 85 and the top feed-dog 80 are adapted to be raised either by the usual hand-controlled lifting lever or by knee or foot operated mechanism.
The preferred form of hand-controlled lifting lever is best illustrated in Figs. 2, 3, 12 and 13. It comprises a rearwardly extending lever I8I provided with a handle I82 at its free end, and at its other end is formed integral with or otherwise secured to a relatively long hub I83 of the lifting cam I84 journaled upon a stud-pin I85 projecting from the machine-head 4. As the lever I8I is raised, the lifting cam I84 is adapted to engage under the presser-bar guide-arm 81 which is clamped upon the presser-bar 86, there by elevating the presser-foot from the work. The raising of the presser-bar guide-arm 81 transmits a lifting force through the link 99 and the angle-lever of the upper feeding mechanism' to the free end of the-arm 95, which causes the same to turn in a counterclockwise direction about the rock-shaft 14 in opposition to the leafspring I08. The turning of the arm 95 in a counterclockwise direction obviously elevates the top feed-bar 8| which is connected to the arm 95 through the link 98 and the angle-lever 93. From the abov it will be understood that a raising of the lever I8I will elevate both the presser-foot 85 and the top feed-dog 80.
The presser-bar guide-arm 81; as previously described, is provided with a lifting pin I00, the inner end of which enters a vertically disposed clearance slot I88 formed in the lower end of a link I81 connected at its upper end to the horizontal arm I88 of a bell-crank lever pivoted upon a fulcrum-stud I89 projecting from the rear wall of the machine-head 4. Fastened upon the upstanding arm.l90 which forms the other limb of the bell-crank'lever is a comparatively long wire link I9I secured at its other end to an upstanding arm I92 formed with a hub I93 journaled upon a supporting pin I94 fixed in the rear wall of the standard 2. Formed upon the outer end of the hub I93 is an inclined block I95 channeled to receive either the foot-actuating lever I99, shown in full lines in Fig. 2, orthe kneeactuated lever I91, shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2.
, The provision of a presser-lifter mechanism adapted to receive interchangeably either a footactuated lever or a knee-actuated lever is of course advantageous, since it enables the sewing machine to be set up as desired by individual operators.
The hand-controlled lifting lever I 8| can be actuated independently of the kneeor foot-operated mechanism for a major portion of its arc of movement by virtue of the clearance slot I86 formed in the link I81. It will be appreciated that a raising of the hand-controlled lever I8I results in a moving of the pin I00 from the lower end of the clearance slot I88 to the upper end of the clearance slot, without imparting any movement to the kneeor foot-operated mechanism until the pin engages the upper end of the clearance slot I88. In order to maintain the link I81 in its lowest position, the arm I90 of the bellcrank lever has bearing against it a spring I98 which is coiled about and secured to the fulcrumstud I89 of the bell-crank lever.
In order that the needle-thread may be relieved of its tension when the presser-foot and top feeding foot are raised, the upper end of the upstanding arm I92 (Figs. 12 and 17) has fixed thereto a cam-arm I98 which when actuated by either the hand-lifting lever I8I or the 'kneeor footoperated mechanism engages the end of the tension-releasing pin I99 and shifts the same endwise in opposition to the coil-spring 200. The endwise movement of the releasing pin I99 separates the tension-disks 20I of the usual tension device 202 supported upon a plate 203 secured upon the cover-plate I6.
Thread-handling mechanism The mechanism of the present machine for controlling the needle-thread T is best shown in Fig. 19. The thread T traveling from the supply passes first through the intermittent tension 202, the nipper 204, take-up 205, thread-controller 206, auxiliary tension device 201, thread-guide 208 and finally to the eye of the needle 85. The intermittent tension 202 is of conventional design and is actuated as described in the previous section entitled Presser-foot lifting mechanism. The nipper 204, a cross-section of which is shown in Fig. 12, comprises a supporting pin 209 carryingat its outer end two opposed thread-disks 2 I0 and at its inner end is formed with a head 2 straddling a roller 2I2. The roller 2I2 is normally held in contact with an actuating cam 2I3 on the arm-shaft 26 by a coil-spring 2 which acts between the head 2 of the pin 209 and an adjustable nut 2I5 threaded into a stationary sleeve 2| 8 fixed in the bracket-arm 3. Mounted upon the outer end of the sleeve 2 I Ii is a U-shaped plate 2I'1'prevented from turning by the screw 2I8 threaded into the bracket-arm 3. The limbs of the U-shaped plate 2I8 are each provided with a single thread-eye 2! for guiding the thread T". It will be understood that as the arm-shaft 28 is rotated, the actuating cam 2 I3 fixed thereto intermittently moves the supporting pin 209 endwise, whereby the thread-disks 2I0 are separated and the thread T may be drawn therebetween.
From the nipper, the thread T" is led to the take-up 205. This take-up comprises an arm 220 fastened directly upon the upper end of the needle-bar 64 by means of the screw MI and having at its free end a thread-eye 222 through which passes the thread 'T The thread-controller 206 comprises an am 223 forming a continuation of the split collar 68 to which is conment by a screw 229 upon the needle-bar link 68. The thread-controlling arm 228 is formed with a thread-slot 230 having a thread take-up portion 230', the thread T passing through the thread-slot in its travel from one of the threadeyes 221 to the other thread-eye 221. It will be seen from Fig. 3 that the arm 223 supporting the thread-eyes 221 and the thread-controlling arm 228, as a result of the way in which each is supported, have a differential action relative to each other, which action effects a periodic take-up of the thread T During the descending stroke of the needle 65 and prior to the penetration of the work by the needle, the thread-controlling arm 228 moves downward relative to the thread-eyes 221 in the member 226 and during this downward movement the take-up portion 230 retains possession of the thread and takes up slack thread between the thread-controller 206 and the eye of the needle 65. This take-up action is desirable so as to hold the thread T against the blade of the needle 65 in the vicinity of the eye thereof as, the needle penetrates the-work. During the upstroke of the needle 65, the thread-controlling arm 228 moves upwardly relative to the threadeyes 221 and this relative upward movement is beneficial in that the resulting thread take-up action assists the needle insetting the previously a formed stitch.
A thread pull-off 23I is secured upon the bracket-arm 3 and this pull-off 23I has'an olfset free end 232 over which the needle-thread T is laid as the take-up 205 reciprocates with the needle-bar 64. The effectiveness of this thread pull-off 23I may be regulated by simply loosening the. clamping screw 233 and turning the pull-off about the pivot-screw 234, see Fig. 19. The function of the above described pull-oft is to draw a short length of thread T from the supply so that the. thread-loop cast out by the needle 65 at the beginning of its upstroke will be sufficiently large so that the 'beak of the looper I40 can unerringly enter the same.
The control of the looper-thread T from any suitable supply is accomplished as illustrated in Fig. 9. The looper-thread T is led through the guide-tube 235 to the split thread-eye 236 of the tension-device 231, then through the single disk rotary take-up 238, to the thread-guiding tube 239, thence to the looper I40. The single disk rotary take-up 238 is of conventional design and is substantially the same as the take-up disclosed in the United States 'patent to A. B. Clayton, No. 2,095,212, issued Oct. 5, 1937. It will be observed from Figs. 1, 9 and'22 that the plate 240 supporting the thread-guides of the rotary takeup 238 is mounted upon a bracket 24I which is rigidly secured upon the reduced, extended end 242' of the pintle I in the lug I3I of the bed I. To facilitate placing the looper-thread T in the thread-guiding tube 239, the latter is formed with a helical slot 243, see Fig. 9, as are also the two freely rotatable sleeves 244 mounted upon the ends of tube 239. Inplacing the thread in the tube 239, the end sleeves 244 are turned until the slots therein are in register with the helical slot 243. The thread T is then laterally introduced into the tube 239 and the sleeves 244 turned in order to lock the thread in the tube.
From theabove description it will be understood that only one needle-thread and one looprality of needle-threads and a plurality of looperthreads.
Lubrication In order that the machine may be operated at high speed there is provided an automatic lubricating system which thoroughly oils all the hearing points in the machine. This lubricating system forms the subject of a divisional application Serial No. 339,438, filed June 8, 1940. In the bed I and standard 2 of the machine is an oil-chamber I3 having a sump closed at the bottom by means of a removable circular cover-plate I4, see Fig. 1. Oil, isintroducedinto the chamber I3 throughan oil-cup 245 threaded into the wall I0 of the bed, the level of the oil being determined by the top of the oil-cup 2'45. Contacting the oil contained in the chamber I3-is an oil-sling in the form of a ring 246 running on a grooved driving collar 241 secured upon the lower mainshaft 4!. This oil-sling during the operation of the machine creates an oil-mist throughout the entire oil-chamber I3 of the machine and the oil suspended in this atmosphere is deposited upon an inclined collector plate 248 at the top of the chamber I3. The oil upon the collector plate 248 runs off the same and into an open-topped reservoir 249 sustained in position at the upper end of the chamber I3 by two retaining screws 250. Projecting into the reservoir 249 is a horizontal lubricant-conduit 25I which extends lengthwise of the bracket-arm 3 and terminates in the partition 23 adjacent the machine-head 4.
Mounted upon the conduit 25I adjacent the partition 23 is a block 252', see Fig.4, held against and 260 of the pitment 12 and I06 to the pivot-- points. It will be understood from theabove that oil is conducted from the conduit 25I to some of the bearing points in the top feeding mechanism, and that the amount of oil delivered .is effectively controlled by metering screws 26I in the block 252 which are adapted to compress and so vary the porosity of the wicks 2'56.
Referring now to Fig. 14, it will be seen that intersecting the conduit 25I in the partition 23 is a horizontal transversebore 262 opening into a vertical bore 263 extending through the bearing bushing 25 in the'partition 23 and opening into the arm-shaft bearing surface of the bushing 25 Adjacent the bottom of the vertical bore 263 in the bearing bushing 25, see Fig. 1, is a relatively small horizontal bore 264 terminating in a peripheral groove 265 formed in the reduced end-portion 266. of the bushing 25. The reduced end-portion 266 of the bushing 25 extends into i an undercut recess 261 in the counterbalanced needle-bar crank 10 which recess, as shown in Fig. 18, is eccentrically located withrespect to opening into the central bore 269 of the hollow crank-pin 69, which central bore 269 is connected by radial ducts to a central bore 210 of the hollow I needle-bar link 68. It will be understood that oil is conducted from the lubricant conduit 25I, through the bores 262 and 263 to the bearing surface in the bushing 25, and that oil is also conducted from the vertical bore 263 through the bore 264 to the peripheral groove 265, where the oil drips ofi into the undercut recess 261 and by centrifugal force is caused to move along the inclined side of the recess 261 to the point which is at the greatest distance from the axis of rotation of the arm-shaft 26 where it enters the radial bore 268 and is finally distributed to the bearings at the opposite ends of the needle-bar link 68.
In order to effectively control the amount of lubricant to be conveyed to the bearing bushing 25 and the needle-bar mechanism, two metering devices 21I and 212 are used. The metering device 21I, best shown in Figs. 14, and 16, comprises a hollow stem having at its upper end a flange 213 maintained setaed in a cavity 214 in the bracket-arm 3 by a lock-nut 21.5. At its lower end, the stem is provided with a head 216 having three vertical grooves 211, 218 and 219. Grooves 211 and 218 open into the bottom surface of the head 216 and permit the oil in the vertical bore 263 to drain into the shaft bearing in the bushing 25. Groove 219 is provided so that the oil.
contained in the vertical bore 263 may drain into the horizontal bore 264 in the bearing bushing 25. To vary the volume of oil delivered to the horizontal bore 264 it is only necessary to loosen the lock-nut 215, insert a screw-driver in the slot 280 in the top of the stem and turn the same to bring the groove 219 out of register more or less with the horizontal bore 264 in the bearing bushing 25. By thus varying the size of the opening between the head 216 of the metering device and the horizontal bore 264 more or less oil is delivered to the needle-bar mechanism. The stem of the metering device is made hollow and is provided with several radial ducts 28I so that the shaft bearing in the bushing may be manually oiled after the machine has been at rest for a considerable period of time. The metering device 212 disclosed in Fig. 1 is preferably a screw-stud having an attenuated body 282 and an enlarged head 283 which fits snugly within the central bore 269 of the hollow crank-pin 69.
It will be understood that by turning the screwstud out of the central bore 269, the enlarged head 285 will move across the outer end of the bore 268 in the needle-bar crank 10 and thereby materially reduce the amount of oil delivered to the' needle-bar crank-pin 69 and link 68.
In the event that the undercut recess 261 in the counterbalanced needle-bar crank 10 becomes flooded with oil, the excess is thrown off by the oil-sling 1.0 which is formed on the needle-bar crank 18 and returned within the bracket-arm 3 by the inclined drainage duct 284 in the bearing bushing 25. Any excess oil collected in the bracket-arm 3 is returned to the lubricant-chamber I3 through the drainage duct 285 in the partition 22.
Considering now the lubricating of the mechanisms beneath the work-supporting plate 45, it will be observed in Figs. 1'1. 24 and 25 that in the lower portion of the lubricant-chamber I3 there is provided an oil-collecting plate 286 having two troughs 281 and 288 formed therein. Trough 281 is provided with an aperture which overlies a reservoir 289, and trough 288 is provided with an aperture which overlies a reservoir 290. Each of these reservoirs is preferably split at one end and wedged in the end-wall 8 of the bed I by a tapered screw 29I. Secured to the other end of the reservoirs are lubricant-mains 292 and 293, one of which is fitted with a regulating screw 29 I for controlling the amount of oil delivered thereby. Projecting from the main 292 are oil-pipes 294, 295, 296 and 291, and projecting from the main 293 are oil-pipes 298, 299, 300, 30I and 302. Each of the oil-pipes projecting from the lubricant-mains is wick-filled and is adapted to distribute the oil by capillary attraction to the various wick-filled pockets and oil-holes in the connections and bearings in the mechanism within the bed.
Tracing the flow of oil from each oil-pipe, it will be seen from Figs. 22 and 24 that oil-pipe 294 delivers oil to an oil-hole in the lug I'3I integral with the rear wall 6 of the bed I and that the oil is led from the oil-hole into a central bore 303 in the stationary pintle I30 and then into a central bore 304 in the feed-lift rockshaft H5, lubricating the supporting bearings therefor. Oil-pipe 295, see Figs. 10 and 24, delivers oil to the oil-hole 305 in the supporting lug I12 for the hollow rod I1I upon which is journaled the sleeve I10. Oil-pipe 296, see Figs. 23 and 24; delivers oil to an oil-hole 306 in the wall 9 of the bed I, the oil lubricating the bushing II1 through the duct 306' and ultimately finding its way through the duct 306" along a central bore 301 in the rockshaft II4, lubricating all the bearings therefor, as well as other bearings for,the feed-rocker I22 and feed-bar I25. Oil-pipe 291, see Figs. 20 and 24, conveys oil to an oil-hole 398 in the wall 9 of the bed I, the oil-hole 308 terminating in the bearing surface of a bushing 38 in which'is journaled the lower main shaft 4|. The surplus oil in this shaft bearing is collected at one end of the bushing 38 upon a reduced portion 3I0 thereof. This reduced portion 3I0 is received in an undercut 3 formed in the inner face of the looper-actuating crank I55 and the oil collected on the reduced portion 3I0 drips into the undercut 3H and is conveyed by a central bore 3I2 and radial ducts 3I3 in the crank-pin I54 to the sleeve I59 and the guide-rod I58. Surplus oil from the sleeve I59 and guide-rod I58 lubricates the hollow pin I52.
Oil-pipe 298, see Figs. 9, lland 25. delivers -oil to a wick-filled pocket -3I4 in the pitman I33 which connects the feed-lift rock-shaft II 5 with the eccentric I34 on the lower main-shaft 4|. Oil in the wick-filled pocket 3I4 lubricates the eccentric I34 and the pivot-pin at the opposite end of the pitman I33. Oil-pipe 299, see Figs. 11, 24 and 25, delivers oil to a laterally projecting wick 3J5 carried by the pitman I19 which actuates the spreader mechanism. The wick 3I5 contacts the surface 'of' the eccentric I and eflecticely lubricates the same. Oil-pipe 300, see Figs. 23, 24 and 25, delivers oil through an oil-hole 3I6 in the end-portion of the feed-advance and -return rock-shaft II4 into the central bore 301, thereby assisting in furnishing oil to lubricate most of the bearings 'for the lower feeding mechanism. Oil-pipe 30I, see Figs. 10 and 24, conveys oil to a wick-filled pocket 3" formed in the pitman I I9 which connects the feed-advance and -return rock-shaft I I4 with the adjustable eccentric I20 on the lower main-shaft M, the oil in the pocket 3I1 lubricating the adjustable eccentric and being conveyed by the longitudinal bore 3I8 to the opposite end of the pitman I I9. Oilpipe 302, see Figs. 21 and 24, delivers oil through an oil-hole 3I9 to a central bore 320 in the tubular supporting rod I, the oil in the central bore 320 being conducted by radial ducts 32| to a cut-out 322 in the sleeve I43 uponwhich is bearing points without attention by the operator,-
except of course when the' machine has been idle for a considerable period of time in which case priming holes have been provided, whereby the operator may initially ofl the machine. Obviously any surplus oil which is thrown ofl by the operating parts within campartments H and I! in the bed I, or collected on the operating parts when they are not in operation, is collected in the drip-pan 51 which may be periodically cleaned out.
To facilitate retaining the oil-sling ring 246 in operative position upon the driving collar 241, the oil-collecting plate'286 is preferably formed with a horizontally disposed retaining finger 322 (Fig. 17) which overlies the oil-sling ring 245 and prevents the same from becoming dislodged from the driving collar 2" during shipment of the machine.
The invention is not to be understood as limited to the specific embodiment thereof shown and described.
Having thus set forth the nature of the invention, what I claim herein is:
1. In a sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame in which said needle-bar is iournaled adapted to be vibrated in the line of feed; a needle carried 4. In a sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame carrying said needle-bar and adapted to be vibrated in the line of feed; a needle secured to said needle-bar; complemental stitch-forming mechanism including a chain-stitch looper having loopseizing and loop-shedding movements only cooperating with said needle; work-feeding mechanism including means forengaging the work upon opposite sides thereof; and means for operating said work-feeding mechanism in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said .needle-bar is carried.
5. In asewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame carrying said needle-bar and adapted to be vibrated in the line of feed; a needle secured to said needlebar; complemental stitch-forming mechanism including a two-motion chain-stitch looper cooperating with said needle and adapted to oscillate in a plane parallel to the line of feed; workfeeding mechanism including means for engagby said needle-bar; complemental stitch-forming mechanism including a chain-stitch looper having loop-seizing and loop-shedding movements only cooperating with said needle; work-feeding mechanism including means for engaging the work upon opposite sides thereof; and means for operating said work-feeding mechanism in syn- ,chronlsm with the vibratory frame in .which said needle-bar is' journaled.
2. In a sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame in which said needle-bar is journaled adapted to be vibrated in the line of feed; a needle carried by said needle-bar; complemental stitch-forming mechanism including a, chain-stitch looper hav-- ing loop-seizing and loop-shedding movements only cooperating with said needle; and workfeeding mechanism operated in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said needlebar is journaled; said feeding mechanism includmg a feed-dog provided with an aperture for receiving the needle, thereby permitting said feed-dog to back up said needle during the feeding of the work.
3. In a sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame in which said needle-bar is joumaledadapted to be vibrated in the line of feed; a needle carried by said needle-bar; a "thread enchaining looper cooperating with said needle in the formation of chain-stitches and confined to movement substantially in the line of feed; and work-feeding mechanism operated in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said needle-hands jour-' naled; said feeding mechanism including a feeddog provided with an aperture for receiving the needle, thereby permitting said feed-dog to back up said needle during the feeding of the work.
ing the work, upon opposite sides thereof, and means for operating said work-feeding mechanism in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said needle-bar is carried.
6. .In a sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame carrying said needle-bar and adapted to be vibrated .in the line of feed; a needle secured to said needle-bar; a thread enchaining looper cooperating with said needle in the formation of snreader movable in a fixed path arranged trans-.
versely to the plane of movement of the looper for-engaging the looper-thread and positioning the same so that the needle will pass into the looper-thread loop: and work-feeding mechanism operated in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said needle-bar is carried.
8. In a sewing machine the combination of an I endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame carrying said needle-banand adapted to be vibrated in the. line of feed; a needle secured to said needle-bar; a two-motion chain-stitch looper movable in a vertical plane and cooperating with said needle in the formation of stitches; a loopsoreader movable in a fixed path arranged transversely to the plane of movement of the looper for engaging the looper-thread and positioning the same so that the needle will pass into the looper-thread loop; work-feeding mechanism including means for engaging the work upon opposite sides thereof; and means for operating said work-feeding mechanism in synchronism with the vibratory frame in which said needle-bar is carried.
9. In a-sewing machine the combination of an endwise reciprocatory needle-bar; a frame carry--
US267958A 1939-04-15 1939-04-15 Chain-stitch sewing machine Expired - Lifetime US2266140A (en)

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US267958A US2266140A (en) 1939-04-15 1939-04-15 Chain-stitch sewing machine
FR868565D FR868565A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-02-19 Chain stitch sewing machine
GB663740A GB537161A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-12 Chain-stitch sewing machine
GB672940A GB539249A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-13 Looper mechanism for sewing machines
GB675540A GB535543A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-15 Sewing machine frame
US33244140 US2291129A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-30 Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
US33943840 US2317240A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-06-08 Lubricating system for sewing machines
US36290740 US2325928A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-10-26 Sewing machine frame
CH254773D CH254773A (en) 1939-04-15 1946-11-21 Chain stitch sewing machine.

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US267958A Expired - Lifetime US2266140A (en) 1939-04-15 1939-04-15 Chain-stitch sewing machine
US33244140 Expired - Lifetime US2291129A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-30 Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
US33943840 Expired - Lifetime US2317240A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-06-08 Lubricating system for sewing machines
US36290740 Expired - Lifetime US2325928A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-10-26 Sewing machine frame

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US33244140 Expired - Lifetime US2291129A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-04-30 Feeding mechanism for sewing machines
US33943840 Expired - Lifetime US2317240A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-06-08 Lubricating system for sewing machines
US36290740 Expired - Lifetime US2325928A (en) 1939-04-15 1940-10-26 Sewing machine frame

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CN102206907A (en) * 2010-03-29 2011-10-05 飞马缝纫机制造株式会社 Sideslip mechanism of decorative needle bar of sewing machine
CN103981650A (en) * 2014-05-27 2014-08-13 新杰克缝纫机股份有限公司 Swing seat component with bearing
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US2721528A (en) * 1951-05-26 1955-10-25 Union Special Machine Co Lubrication system for sewing machines
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US2905118A (en) * 1955-04-26 1959-09-22 United Shoe Machinery Corp Chain stitch sewing machines
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GB1048849A (en) * 1964-09-02 1966-11-23 Singer Co Improvements in sewing machines
DE1902000A1 (en) * 1969-01-16 1970-08-27 Union Special Maschinenfab Hook lubrication for sewing machines
DE6924107U (en) * 1969-06-16 1969-10-09 Pfaff Ag G M SEWING MACHINE WITH A TOP TRANSPORT DEVICE
IT1037779B (en) * 1975-04-30 1979-11-20 Singer Co Sewing machine bed - with prepainted sheet metal cover over casting with top pads and nonmetallic cushions
JP6802898B2 (en) 2016-08-02 2020-12-23 サン−ゴバン パフォーマンス プラスティックス コーポレイション bearing

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2744482A (en) * 1951-06-08 1956-05-08 Hess Otto Sewing machine
DE975241C (en) * 1953-11-17 1962-01-04 Kochs Adler Ag Drive for the hook of a lockstitch sewing machine
US2884883A (en) * 1956-02-16 1959-05-05 Union Special Machine Co Four motion looper for sewing machines
US3285210A (en) * 1962-10-13 1966-11-15 Pfaff Ag G M Looper drive for chain stitch sewing machines
US3628481A (en) * 1969-05-13 1971-12-21 Pfaff Ag G M Automatic looper thread control mechanism for chainstitch sewing machines
DE3313981A1 (en) * 1982-04-21 1983-10-27 Rockwell Rimoldi Spa GRIPPER ACTUATING DEVICE FOR SEWING MACHINES
CN102206907A (en) * 2010-03-29 2011-10-05 飞马缝纫机制造株式会社 Sideslip mechanism of decorative needle bar of sewing machine
CN102206907B (en) * 2010-03-29 2014-07-16 飞马缝纫机制造株式会社 Sideslip mechanism of decorative needle bar of sewing machine
ITRM20130595A1 (en) * 2013-10-29 2015-04-30 Teknomac S R L Sewing machine and its hook device.
WO2015063804A1 (en) * 2013-10-29 2015-05-07 Teknomac S.R.L. Sewing machine and crochet device thereof
CN103981650A (en) * 2014-05-27 2014-08-13 新杰克缝纫机股份有限公司 Swing seat component with bearing

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB535543A (en) 1941-04-11
CH254773A (en) 1948-05-31
US2291129A (en) 1942-07-28
FR868565A (en) 1942-01-07
US2317240A (en) 1943-04-20
US2325928A (en) 1943-08-03
GB537161A (en) 1941-06-11
GB539249A (en) 1941-09-02

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