US2135139A - Garment - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2135139A
US2135139A US148741A US14874137A US2135139A US 2135139 A US2135139 A US 2135139A US 148741 A US148741 A US 148741A US 14874137 A US14874137 A US 14874137A US 2135139 A US2135139 A US 2135139A
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Prior art keywords
coat
garment
pattern
sleeve
skirt
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Expired - Lifetime
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US148741A
Inventor
Mollie S Levinson
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Mollie S Levinson
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Priority to US148741A priority Critical patent/US2135139A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D1/00Garments

Description

Nov. 1, 1938. M. s. LEVINSON GARMENT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 17, 1937 F NAL. H1.
Nov. 1, 1938. M. s. LEVINSON 2,135,139
GARMENT Filed Ju1 1e 17, 1957' s Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 1,1938. M. s. LEVINSON GARMENT Filed June 17, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Nov. 1, 1938 UNITED S' TAT ES 2,135,139 I GARMENT;
Mollie S. Levinson, Chicag0, Ill. Application June .17, 1937, Serial No. 148,741
3 Claims. (01. 3-93 9 The invention broadly relates to garments and to the method of making the same, and'more particularly to coats such as rain coats.
In the art of making coats,- the goods or blank material comes in certain widths and it constitutes an object of the invention toprovide a new feature whereby the garment may be cut out witha minimum of waste.
-A further object aims at cutting out two garments at a time so that the remnants may be utilized for making the collars, or other acces sories.
It is also an object of the invention to provide certain details of construction and arrangement tending to enhance the utility and efficiency of the device of the character specified.
With these and other important objects in view, which-will become apparent from a perusal of .theinvention, the latter comprises the steps of a novel-method and the means forcarrying out the method, as described inthe following specification, particularly pointed out in the claims forming a. part thereof, and illustrated in the accompanying-drawings, in which:
Fig. liis a front elevational view of my invention.
Fig. 2 is an enlargedsection throughthe sleeve taken on the line 2-2 of- Fig. 1. t
Fig. 3 is an enlarged section taken on the-line -3-3-of Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is an enlarged section 4-4 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 5 is an enlarged section taken on the taken on the line line 5-5 of Fig. 1.
Fig.6 is an enlarged section taken on the line 66- of Fig. 1.
Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a bag for the garment. 7
Fig. 8 is an enlarged detailed section through the sleeve cuff taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 1.
Figs. 9 and 10 are plan views of the blank material, illustrating the lay-out of the patterns for the garment.
Fig. 11 is a partial view similar to Fig. 9 illustrating a variant form of patternlay-out.
Fig. 12 is a plan view of the pattern of a modified form of the coat and sleeve portions.
Fig. 13 is a plan view of the coat and sleeve patterns of a further variation.
Fig. 14 is a plan view of a still further variant form of pattern, and
Fig. 15 is a plan view illustrating a pattern of the skirt portion of a garment.
Referring to Figs. 9 and 10, I have illustrated the lay-out of a pattern for a garment which,
blank material,
such that very little waste in this instance, represents a rain-coat." The generally designated bynmneral 10, may be, for example, waterproof silk, or any other suitable material. The material usually comes in a standard width; approximately one yard wide, and the 1 pattern "for: the garment is laid out to utilize allthe material, without any waste.
It is of advantage to lay outthe pattern-for two coats simultaneously. The patterns include top coat and sleeve portion, generally designated by I I, which includes the back portion 12,: sleeve portions 13 and front portion l 4,'-Whi-ch is split as at I 5, from one edge tothe cut-out portion '16, representingfithe neck opening! Adjacent sleeves are, of course, out to'divide. one garment from the other. "Thaiemaining material provides for the pattern of a pair of collars I l which come in two sections. 7
There are "four-patterns of a lining or reinforcement forthe cuiTs of the sleeves; generally represented by numeral l8, =and four patterns for the facing indicated b-y l9. 'I'he belts for the garment-are indicated by numerals -l'iland 'fl.
, The belt zl is-inone piece, whereasthe belt is in two pieces.
The pattern for the bag,- illustrated in Fig. 7, isindicated by.- numeral "22.
' In Fig. -10 are illustrated the patterns for the lower skirt portion ofthe coat which, -in preferred form, includes back panels orpatterns-'23 and front panels or tively. g
As will be seen, the lay-out of the patterns is material is left, which material is utilized, for of the belt and. otherwise.
Referring to Figs. 1 to 8, which shows the completed coat in cross-sections thereof, it will be noted that the upper coat 1 and sleeve portion is upper surface com- PATENT OFMCE .30 patterns -24 and 2-5, respect example, for the loops made of one piece and is seamedaonly as at 26 {#0 l8 (Fig. 8) which is seamed as at 21 to the' turned in edge of the sleeve 13. It is further seamed within the sleeve. Along the out, I 5 of the upper coat portion (Fig. 3) are attached the facings l9, l9, which are adapted, first, to provide an overlapping edge, and further, to support any suitable buttoning or fastening means.
For example, they may be in the form of an eyelet 29 through which flexible buttons 30 or other fastening means may pass. However, they may be provided with buttons and button holes, respectively.
Referring to Fig. 6, I have illustrated the construction and fastening of the collar H, which is herein illustrated as being formed of two sections Ila and [1b. One edge is lapped over and sewed together as at 3|. The other overlapped edge of the collar portion Fla and I'll) is attached, as at 32, to the cut-out collar opening IS.
The skirt portion is formed by'the back panel 23 and front panels 24 and 25 which are seamed together in any suitable manner.
The skirt proper is attached to the upper coat portion H, for example, asillustrated in Fig. 4.
First, it is seamed as at 33 and the edges, sur--v rounded by a binding tape 38, are sewn together as at 39. The coat portion may be gathered in as illustrated in Fig. l, to producev a blouse effect. The hem of the skirt portion may all be seamed as illustrated in Fig. 5. For example, they may be turned inwardly and seamed as at 40.
Note that the front panel 25 overlies the panel 24 a considerable distance and its upper corner may be provided with a fastening means 4|, similar to the fastening means of the top portion, previously described.
The belt 20 or 2|, as the case may be, is held in position at the waistline of the garment by suitable loops 42, which may be sewed in at the seams 25 of the sleeves l3 and to the skirt panels.
The .coat may be folded and inserted into a bag formed by the pattern 22, previously described- The bag, indicated by numeral 43 (Fig. '7) may be provided at its edge and seams with binding tape 44 for reinforcement and with strings or bands 45 for tying the bag after the coat has been inserted. v
Referring to the modified form of Fig. 11, the pattern of the coat portion, indicated by numeral 46, may be cut at its back along the line 41. In the completed coat, the edgesalong the line 41 are sewn together and the general shape of the upper portion remains the same.
Fig. 12 shows the coatpanel or pattern which is cut into three pieces and includes a back panel 48, partially .including the sleeves, and front panels 49 and 50, respectively, also partially including the sleeves. and 52 are sewn together in any suitable fashion to complete the coat.
Fig. 13 illustrates avariant form of pattern lay-out of the upper coat panel; The coat panel,
indicated by numeral 53 is, however, minus sleeves which are thereafter sewn along the edges 54.
The sleeves, indicated by numeral 55, may be laid out on the material, diagrammatically indicated in Fig. 13 and are attached to edges 54, as indicated in dotted lines at'the left side, illustrated in Fig. 13.
The edges along the cuts 5! Fig. 14 illustrates a pattern for a coat which may include the upper coat portions 51 and back skirt portion 58 and front panels 59. The
sleeves 60 are attached to the edges 6| of the.
dot and dash, lines 63 and sewn together, if desired.
In the preferred form, indicated in Figs. 1 to i 10, the skirt is formed with three panels 23, 24 and 25, which is of advantage; first, since the panel portions may be laid out on the material to provide very little waste material-and second, it produces, in effect, a pleasing, flaring skirt for the coat.
The coat portions II and I 2, including the sleeves l3, are preferably made of one piece, as illustrated in Fig. 9, to obtain an unbroken upper surface andthus prevent-water from seeping through the seams, which fault is ordinarily present in raincoats.
The saving obtained in laying out the patterns, as illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10, is approximately one square yard per coat.
While the drawings show preferred embodiments of the invention, numerous changes and alterations may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. 7
I, therefore, do not limit myself to the details of construction and arrangement, nor to the particular sequence of steps of the method, but claim my invention as broadly as the state of the art permits.
Iclaim:
1. The method of forming blanks for coat manufacture, including the steps of laying out the blouse portion on the bolt cloth with the body portion arranged transversely and the sleeve portions longitudinally in the direction of the warp, and cutting the blanks from the material.
2. The method of forming blanks for coat manufacture from a material of waterproof .silk and of standard width, including the steps of laying out a pair of blouse portions on the material with the body portions arranged transversely and the sleeve portions longitudinally in the direction of the warp, and cutting the blanks from the material. r j
3. The method of forming blanks for coat manufacture, including the steps of laying out the blouse portion integral with the sleeve on the bolt cloth with the body portion'arranged transversely and the sleeve portions longitudinally in the directionof the warp, and cutting the blanks from the material.
" .MOLLIE s. LEVINSON.
US148741A 1937-06-17 1937-06-17 Garment Expired - Lifetime US2135139A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3009160A (en) * 1959-05-12 1961-11-21 Bertram N Linder Coat front and method of forming same
DE1256173B (en) * 1961-07-19 1967-12-14 Nikolaus Mueller Process for the automatic cutting of pieces of fabric from a length of fabric

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3009160A (en) * 1959-05-12 1961-11-21 Bertram N Linder Coat front and method of forming same
DE1256173B (en) * 1961-07-19 1967-12-14 Nikolaus Mueller Process for the automatic cutting of pieces of fabric from a length of fabric

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