US20110168071A1 - System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat - Google Patents

System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat Download PDF

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US20110168071A1
US20110168071A1 US13/030,386 US201113030386A US2011168071A1 US 20110168071 A1 US20110168071 A1 US 20110168071A1 US 201113030386 A US201113030386 A US 201113030386A US 2011168071 A1 US2011168071 A1 US 2011168071A1
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foresail
sailboat
track
mast
bow
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US13/030,386
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Bradford G. Baruh
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Baruh Bradford G
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Priority to US92095707P priority
Priority to US11/788,785 priority patent/US20080190341A1/en
Application filed by Baruh Bradford G filed Critical Baruh Bradford G
Priority to US13/030,386 priority patent/US20110168071A1/en
Publication of US20110168071A1 publication Critical patent/US20110168071A1/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J2207/00Indexing scheme relating to details of circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J2207/40Indexing scheme relating to details of circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries adapted for charging from various sources, e.g. AC, DC or multivoltage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B15/00Superstructures, deckhouses, wheelhouses or the like; Arrangements or adaptations of masts or spars, e.g. bowsprits
    • B63B15/02Staying of masts or of other superstructures
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H9/00Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power
    • B63H9/04Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power using sails or like wind-catching surfaces
    • B63H9/08Connections of sails to masts, spars, or the like
    • B63H9/10Running rigging, e.g. reefing equipment
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G67/00Loading or unloading vehicles
    • B65G67/02Loading or unloading land vehicles
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/007Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations the wind motor being combined with means for converting solar radiation into useful energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/10Combinations of wind motors with apparatus storing energy
    • F03D9/11Combinations of wind motors with apparatus storing energy storing electrical energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/20Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus
    • F03D9/25Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus the apparatus being an electrical generator
    • F03D9/255Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus the apparatus being an electrical generator connected to an electrical general supply grid; Arrangements therefor
    • F03D9/257Wind motors characterised by the driven apparatus the apparatus being an electrical generator connected to an electrical general supply grid; Arrangements therefor the wind motor being part of a wind farm
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/381Dispersed generators
    • H02J3/382Dispersed generators the generators exploiting renewable energy
    • H02J3/383Solar energy, e.g. photovoltaic energy
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/381Dispersed generators
    • H02J3/382Dispersed generators the generators exploiting renewable energy
    • H02J3/386Wind energy
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/34Parallel operation in networks using both storage and other dc sources, e.g. providing buffering
    • H02J7/35Parallel operation in networks using both storage and other dc sources, e.g. providing buffering with light sensitive cells
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K7/00Arrangements for handling mechanical energy structurally associated with dynamo-electric machines, e.g. structural association with mechanical driving motors or auxiliary dynamo-electric machines
    • H02K7/18Structural association of electric generators with mechanical driving motors, e.g. turbine
    • H02K7/1807Rotary generators
    • H02K7/1823Rotary generators structurally associated with turbines or similar engines
    • H02K7/183Rotary generators structurally associated with turbines or similar engines wherein the turbine is a wind turbine
    • H02K7/1838Generators mounted in a nacelle or similar structure of a horizontal axis wind turbine
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, e.g. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S10/00PV power plants; Combinations of PV energy systems with other systems for the generation of electric power
    • H02S10/10PV power plants; Combinations of PV energy systems with other systems for the generation of electric power including a supplementary source of electric power, e.g. hybrid diesel-PV energy systems
    • H02S10/12Hybrid wind-PV energy systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, e.g. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S10/00PV power plants; Combinations of PV energy systems with other systems for the generation of electric power
    • H02S10/20Systems characterised by their energy storage means
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02SGENERATION OF ELECTRIC POWER BY CONVERSION OF INFRA-RED RADIATION, VISIBLE LIGHT OR ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT, e.g. USING PHOTOVOLTAIC [PV] MODULES
    • H02S20/00Supporting structures for PV modules
    • H02S20/30Supporting structures being movable or adjustable, e.g. for angle adjustment
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/50Photovoltaic [PV] energy
    • Y02E10/56Power conversion systems, e.g. maximum power point trackers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/72Wind turbines with rotation axis in wind direction
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/76Power conversion electric or electronic aspects
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E70/00Other energy conversion or management systems reducing GHG emissions
    • Y02E70/30Systems combining energy storage with energy generation of non-fossil origin

Abstract

A sailboat, which includes at least one hull; a mast; a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and a system for sailing windward, which includes a foresail beam attached to the mast of the sailboat at a mast end of the foresail beam and receives a leading edge of the foresail at a bow end of the foresail beam; and a foresail track, which extends from a starboard side to a port side of the sailboat and assists the foresail beam in movement from side to side.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/788,785, filed on Apr. 19, 2007, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/900,549 filed on Feb. 8, 2007, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/920,957 filed on Mar. 30, 2007, the contents, which are incorporated herein in their entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention generally relates to a system and method of reducing leeway drift of a sailboat as the sailboat reaches an upwind objective by adjusting the location and position of the foresail (i.e., headsail, jib, genoa, or spinnaker) and/or adjusting the depth of the keel and/or keel foil, and more particularly to a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail (headsail, jib, genoa, or spinnaker) on a sailboat by moving the location or position of the foresail and the forestay relative to the bow of the sailboat and/or by adjusting the depth of the keel and/or keel foil.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Typically, a sailboat includes a hull that sits in the water, a mast extending upwardly from the hull, sails supported by the mast, and either a centerboard or fixed keel extending downwardly from the hull into the water. The sails catch the wind and cause the hull to move forwardly through the water. Although, a sailboat cannot sail directly into the wind, a sailboat can sail in a generally windward direction. It can be appreciated that with skill and a combination of maneuvers, a sailor can maneuver a sailboat in almost any desired direction.
  • Because of the design of the sails, a sailboat can sail to windward, which is typically in a direction no less than about 15 to 25 degrees from the wind, depending upon the design of the boat and the skill of the sailor. Headway directly upwind or windward is typically achieved in a series of sequential maneuvers called tacks, in which the boat is first sailed windward with the wind over one side of the bow, and then turned through the wind so that the wind comes over the other side of the bow. In each tack, some headway upwind is achieved even though the boat does not move directly into the wind, and eventually the sailboat reaches an upwind objective after sailing a zig-zag course covering a distance greater than the straight line distance from the initial position to the upwind objective.
  • When a sailboat sails to windward, the forces on the sails can be resolved into a thrust component that moves the sailboat forwardly through the water and a drift component that pushes the sailboat sideways in a downwind direction. The sailboat therefore moves in a net direction that is forward, but also is slight downwind opposite to the net intended direction of movement. The sideways drift is called leeway or “slide slipping.”
  • The downwardly projecting centerboard or keel of the sailboat offers resistance to the leeway produced by the sideways sail force, but at least some leeway remains. This leeway is being constantly accumulated, as there is a downwind movement as long as the sailboat is being sailed into the wind. The leeway significantly increases the time required for the sailboat to sail from its downwind starting position to the upwind objective, as it forces the sailboat to sail much further to make up for the accumulated sideways movement.
  • Attempts have been made to reduce the amount of leeway. For example, a movable centerboard or fixed keel extending into the water below the sailboat presents a broad surface to resist sideways drift. There have also been attempts to modify the shape of the centerboard or keel to provide a lifting force to counteract the sideways drift. These attempts have been based upon the observation that the centerboard or keel moving through the water is somewhat similar to the wing of an airplane that creates a lift as the wing is moved through the air. The lift of an airplane wing causes the airplane to move upward against the force of gravity, and the corresponding lift of a sailboat centerboard or keel that extends downwardly can cause the sailboat to be lifted in the upwind direction, thereby countering the sideways drift producing the leeway.
  • Fixed keels are typically used in larger sailboats. The keels are usually filled with lead or other dense material to act as ballast for the sailboat. For example, the keels of 12-meter sailboats may extend 10 feet below the surface of the water, and weigh 40,000 to 50,000 pounds.
  • It would be desirable to have a system or method of adjusting or changing the relative position of the fixed connection of the foresail, such that the angle of attack in the windward direction is slightly altered in the direction of the wind. Accordingly, it would be desirable to have a system and/or method of changing the angle or direction of the boat in a windward direction and/or use of an extendable keel, which is capable of providing a lifting force to counteract leeway, and is sufficiently reliable to be acceptable for general and racing use.
  • In addition, it would be desirable to have a retractable solar panel system, which can provide a source of energy to the sailboat. The solar panel system can be attached to a nautical stay, wherein the stay is fixed at one end to a hull of the sailboat and at a second end to a mast of the sailboat. The solar panel system includes a plurality of solar panels, which are attached to a system for extending and retracting the plurality of solar panels, such that when not in use, the solar panels can be stacked.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with one embodiment, a system for sailing windward comprises: a moveable track fixture; a fixed track configured to receive the track fixture; and a control system for securing the location of the track fixture within the fixed track relative to a bow of a sailboat.
  • In accordance with a further embodiment, a sailboat comprises: a hull; a mast; a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and a system for sailing windward comprising: a moveable track fixture; a fixed track configured to receive the track fixture; a control system for securing the location of the track fixture within the fixed track relative to a bow of a sailboat; and a forestay attached to the track fixture, the forestay extending from an upper portion of a mast of a sailboat to the moveable track fixture on a bow of the sailboat.
  • In accordance with another embodiment, a method of reducing leeway drift of a sailboat as the sailboat reaches an upwind objective, the method comprises changing the relative position of a foresail to a bow of the sailboat without changing the relative position of a mainsail and the foresail to one another.
  • In accordance with a further embodiment, a sailboat comprises: at least one hull; a mast; a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and a system for sailing windward comprising: a foresail beam attached to the mast of the sailboat at a mast end of the foresail beam and receives a leading edge of the foresail at a bow end of the foresail beam; and a foresail track, which extends from a starboard side to a port side of the sailboat and assists the foresail beam in movement from side to side.
  • In accordance with another embodiment, a sailboat comprises: two or more hulls; a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and a system for sailing windward, which includes a foresail track, which receives a leading edge of the foresail and extends from one of the two or more hulls to another of the two or more hulls.
  • In accordance with a further embodiment, a sailboat comprises: two or more hull; a plurality of sails, and wherein the plurality of sails includes one or more foresails; and a system for sailing windward, which includes two or more foresail tracks, each of the two or more foresail tracks is configured to receive a leading edge of a foresail, and wherein each of the foresail tracks extend from one of the two or more hulls to another of the two or more hulls.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a sailboat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with one embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of the sailboat of FIG. 1 with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail.
  • FIG. 3A is a schematic view of a sailboat in accordance with one embodiment with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in comparison with a sailboat without a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the headsail, jib, genoa, or spinnaker.
  • FIG. 3B is a schematic view of a sailboat without a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the track system on a sailboat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail.
  • FIG. 5 is a top view of a sailboat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with another embodiment.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a multi-hulled boat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with a further embodiment.
  • FIG. 7 is a top view of a multi-hulled boat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with another embodiment.
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of a multi-hulled boat having one or more track systems for adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with a further embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • As described above, because of the design of the sails, a sailboat (or boat) 10 can sail to windward, in a direction no less than about 15 to 25 degrees from the wind, depending upon the design of the boat and the skill of the sailor. Headway directly upwind is achieved in a series of sequential maneuvers called tacks, in which the boat is first sailed windward with the wind over one side of the bow, and then turned through the wind so that the wind comes over the other side of the bow. In each tack, some headway upwind is achieved even though the boat does not move directly into the wind, and eventually the sailboat reaches an upwind objective after sailing a zig-zag course covering a distance greater than the straight line distance from the initial position to the upwind objective.
  • In addition, when a sailboat 10 sails to windward, the forces on the sails can be resolved into a thrust component that moves the sailboat forwardly through the water and a drift component that pushes the sailboat sideways in a downwind direction. The sailboat 10 therefore moves in a net direction that is forward, but also is slight downwind opposite to the net intended direction of movement. The sideways drift is called leeway.
  • The downwardly projecting centerboard or keel of the boat offers resistance to the leeway produced by the sideways sail force, but at least some leeway remains. This leeway is being constantly accumulated, as there is a downwind movement as long as the sailboat is being sailed into the wind. It can be appreciated that the leeway can significantly increase the time required for the sailboat to sail from its downwind starting position to the upwind objective, as it forces the sailboat to sail much further to make up for the accumulated sideways movement.
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a sailboat 10 with a system and method of adjusting the location and of at least one of the sails 40 of the sailboat 10, and more particularly a system and method of adjusting the foresail 40 (or headsail, jib genoa, or spinnaker) in accordance with one embodiment. As shown in FIG. 1, a sailboat 10 typically includes a hull 20 that sits in the water, a mast 50 extending upwardly from the hull 20, and at least one sail in the form of a mainsail 30 supported by the mast 50 and a boom 60, and an optional centerboard or keel 70 (FIG. 6)) extending downwardly from the hull 20 into the water. Typically, most sailboats 10 also include a second sail 40 in the form of a foresail, jib, genoa, or spinnaker The sails 30, 40 catch the wind and cause the hull 20 to move forwardly through the water. It can be appreciated that the sailboat can also include a mainstay 52, which preferably extends from an upper portion of the mast 50 to the bow 42 of the sailboat 10.
  • It can be appreciated that the use of the term “sailboat” 10 has a broad meaning and can include yachts, (large sailboats) and smaller vessels of many configurations, which use wind as the primary means of propulsion. Typically, some of the variations other than size are hull configuration (monohull, catamaran, and trimaran), keel type (full, fin, wing, centerboard etc.), purpose (sport, racing, cruising), number and configuration of masts, and the sail plan. The most common sailboat 10 is the “sloop” which features one mast 50 and two sails, a mainsail 30 and a foresail 40 or jib, genoa, or spinnaker. This simple configuration has been proven over time to be very efficient for sailing into the wind. The mainsail 30 is attached to the mast 50 and the boom 60, which is a beam or spar capable of swinging across the sailboat 10, depending on the direction of the wind. Depending on the size and design of the foresail 40, the foresail 40 is called a jib, genoa, or spinnaker. Although not common, a sloop or sailboat 10 can include two foresails from a single forestay 48 at one time (wing on wing). The forestay 48 is a line or cable running from near the top of the mast 50 to a point near the bow 42 (or front of the sailboat 10). It can be appreciated that the forestay 48 is attached at either the top of the mast, or in fractional rigs between about ¼ and ⅛ from the top of the mast 50. The other end of the forestay 48 is attached to the stern or bow 42 of the boat 10. The forestay 48 can be made from stainless steel wire, a solid stainless steel rod, a carbon rod, a galvanized wire or natural fibers.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the mainsail 30 is attached to the mast 50 and the boom 60. The boom 60 is typically a metal or wooden beam or spar, which is configured to stabilize the bottom of the mainsail 30. The boom 60 is attached to the mast 50 at a lower end 32 of the mast 50 and extends towards the stern 43 (or back of the sailboat 10). An outhaul or line 34, which is part of the running rigging of a sailboat 10, is used to extend the mainsail 30, and control the shape of the curve of the foot of the mainsail 30. The outhaul 34 runs from the clew (the back corner of the sail 30) to the end of the boom. The line is pulled taut to the appropriate tension (to provide the desired shape to the foot), and then secured to a cleat on the boom 60. The mainsail 30 is also attached to the top 36 of the mast 50. The mainsail 30 extends aftward and is secured the whole length of its edges to the mast 50 and to the boom 60 hung from the mast 50.
  • The foresail 40, which is also known as a headsail, jib, genoa, or spinnaker is secured to the top 46 of the mast 50 and is typically secured to the bow 42 of the sailboat 10. Typically, the foresail 40 is secured along its leading edge to a forestay 48 (strong wire) strung from the top 46 of the mast to the bowsprit 42 on the bow (nose) of the boat. Alternatively, the foresail 40 can be a genoa, which is a type of jib that is larger, and cut so that it is fuller than an ordinary jib. It can also be appreciated that fore-and-aft sails can be switched from one side of the sailboat 10 to the other, in order to alter the sailboat's course. When the sailboat's stern crosses the wind, this is called jibing; when the bow crosses the wind, it is called tacking. Tacking repeatedly from port to starboard and/or vice versa, called “beating”, is done in order to allow the boat to follow a course into the wind.
  • It can be appreciated that a primary feature of a properly designed sail is an amount of “draft”, caused by curvature of the surface of the sail. When the sail is oriented into the wind, this curvature induces lift, much like the wing of an airplane. Modern sails are manufactured with a combination of broadseaming and non-stretch fabric. The former adds draft, while the latter allows the sail to keep a constant shape as the wind pressure increases. The draft of the sail can be reduced in stronger winds by use of a Cunningham and outhaul, and also by increasing the downward pressure of the boom by use of a boom yang. A boom yang is a line or piston system on a sailboat used to exert downward force on the boom and thus control the shape of the sail. In British English, it is known as a “kicking strap”. The yang typically runs from the base of the mast 50 to a point about a third of the way out the boom 60. Due to the great force necessary to change the height of the boom 60 while a boat is under sail, a line based boom yang usually includes some sort of a pulley system. Hydraulic piston vangs are used on larger sailboats and controlled by manual or electric hydraulic pumps.
  • FIG. 2 shows a top view of the sailboat 10 of FIG. 1 with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40. As described above, the foresail 40 is typically attached to the bow 42 of the sailboat 10 via the forestay 48. In accordance with one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 2, the foresail 40 can be attached to a track system 100. The track system 100 is attached to the bow 42 of the boat 10 and is configured to change the location or position of the foresail 40 and the forestay 48 relative to the hull 20 of the boat 10 during a tacking maneuver.
  • It can be appreciated that tacking typically describes the position of a sailboat's bow with respect to the wind. For example, if the vessel's bow is positioned so that the wind is blowing across the starboard (right) side of the vessel, then the vessel is said to be on a starboard tack. If the wind is blowing across the port (left) side of the vessel, then the vessel is said to be on a port tack. It can be appreciated that by definition, this is opposite to the side, which the boom is carried, since it can be difficult when a boat is sailing downwind or nearly downwind from which side the wind is coming. In addition, a sailing vessel on a starboard tack always has the right-of-way over another sailing vessel on “port tack” by both the rules of the road and racing rules.
  • The track system 100 preferably includes a moveable track fixture 110, upon which the forestay 48 is securely fixed or attached, a fixed track 120 configured to receive the track fixture 110, and a control system 130 for securing the location of the track fixture 110 within the track 120 relative to the bow 42 of the boat 10. In accordance with one embodiment, the control system 130 for securing the location of the track fixture 110 can include a winch 140, a flexible wire or rod 150 attached to the track fixture 110, and a guide system 160. The winch 140 is preferably a mechanical device that is used to wind up the flexible wire or rod 150 (also called “cable”). In its simplest form, it consists of a spool and attached crank. The spool can also be called the winch drum. It can be appreciated that the winch 140 can include suitable gear assemblies and can be powered by electric, hydraulic, pneumatic or internal combustion drives. In addition, the winch 150 can include a solenoid brake and/or a mechanical brake or ratchet (not shown) that prevents the winch 150 from unwinding.
  • FIG. 3A shows a schematic view of a sailboat 10 in accordance with one embodiment with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40 in comparison with a sailboat 10 without a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40. As shown in FIG. 3A, the control system 130 is configured to adjust or change the relative location of the foresail 40 to the bow 42 of the boat 10 during tacking maneuvers, such that the bow 42 of the boat 10 can sail into the wind more than if the foresail 40 and forestay 48 is fixed to the bow of the boat 10.
  • FIG. 3B shows a schematic view of a sailboat without a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail. As shown in FIG. 3B, a typical sailboat 10 performs a tacking maneuver by sailing at an angle into the wind. However, as shown in FIG. 3A, if the relative position of the foresail 40 to the bow 42 of the boat 10 is changed or altered without change the relative position of the mainsail 30 and foresail 40 to one another, the bow 42 of the boat 10 can sail more into the wind resulting in a shorter distance or path of travel for the sailboat during tacking.
  • FIG. 4 shows a cross-sectional view of a portion of the track system 100 on a sailboat with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40 in accordance with one embodiment. The track system 100 preferably includes a track fixture 110, and a fixed track 120. The foresail 40 (not shown) is attached to the forestay 48, which is secured to the track fixture 110 at an upper end 112. As shown in FIG. 4, the track fixture 110 can include an upper end 112, a main body 114, an upper wheel 116, and a pair of lower wheels 118. The fixed track 120 can include an upper groove 122 configured to receive the upper wheel 116 and a pair of lower grooves 124 configured to receive the pair of lower wheels 118. The track fixture 110 moves from side to side (starboard to port) on the fixed track 120 resulting in the relative position of the forestay 48 (and the foresail 40) to the bow 42 of the boat 10 facing in a more windward direction during tacking maneuvers.
  • FIG. 5 shows a top view of a sailboat 10 with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40 in accordance with another embodiment. As shown in FIG. 5, a beam or spar system 200 comprised of a foresail track system 210, a foresail beam 220, and a pivot member 230. The foresail beam 220 is attached to the pivot member 230 (or mast 50) at one end (mast end) 222 and the other end (bow end) 224 of the foresail beam 220 moves from side to side (starboard to port). The foresail beam 220 is preferably attached to an optional foresail track system 210, which assists the foresail beam 220 in movement from side to side. The forestay 48 (not shown) is preferably securely fixed or attached to the bow end 224 of the foresail beam 220. In addition, a series of lines 226 can be used to control the bow end 224 of the foresail beam 220.
  • It can be appreciated that the system as shown in FIG. 5, the beam or spar system 200 can also include a control system 130 (not shown) comprised of a winch 140, a flexible wire or rod 150 attached to the track fixture 110, and a guide system 160. As described above, the winch 140 is preferably a mechanical device that is used to wind a wire rod or wire rope (also called “cable”). In its simplest form, it consists of a spool and attached crank. In addition, it can be appreciated that the winch 150 can also include gear assemblies and can be powered by electric, hydraulic, pneumatic or internal combustion drives. The winch 150 can also include a solenoid brake and/or a mechanical brake or ratchet, which prevents the winch 150 from unwinding.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a multi-hulled boat 300 with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with a further embodiment. As shown in FIG. 6, the multi-hulled boat 300 consists of two or more hulls 310, joined by a structure 320, the most basic being a frame, or other suitable structure, which spans from one hull 310 to the other hull 310. It can be appreciated that the multi-hulled sailboat 300 can be sail and/or engine-powered. In accordance with an exemplary embodiment, the two or more hulls 310 can have two differently shaped or sized hulls with lateral symmetry, or alternatively, two or more hulls with longitudinal symmetry. For example, a trimaran has a main hull 310 in the center and symmetric stabilizing hulls 310 on either side. The boat 300 also includes one or more rudders 302 to guide the boat 300.
  • It can be appreciated that a multi-hulled sailboat can have several advantages compared to a single-hull boat. For example, by increasing the distance between the center of gravity and the center of buoyancy provides higher stability compared to boats with a single hull, which allows multi-hulls to have narrower hulls and thus substantially less wave-forming resistance, which in turn results in greater speed without applying more effort. In the case of boats under sail, stability serves to hold the vessel upright against the sideways force of the wind on the sails. This stability is provided in multi-hulls by the weight of the boat itself, in contrast to mono-hull sailboat, which typically uses an underwater counterweight, a ballasted keel for this purpose, especially on larger sailboats. Multi-hull sailboats are typically much wider than the equivalent mono-hull, which allows them to carry no ballast, and the reduced weight also makes them faster than mono-hulls under equivalent conditions. It can also be appreciated that multi-hulls typically will not sink or be abandoned if flooded, as opposed to ballasted mono-hulls who do indeed sink when flooded. In addition, the comfort of more onboard accommodation space and more level boats under sail offer substantially improved conditions for crew and passengers, which contributes to the greatly increasing popularity of multi-hull sailboats during the past few decades.
  • As shown in FIG. 6, in accordance with an exemplary embodiment, the multi-hulled boat 300 includes a mast 330 and a track system 340. As described above, a leading edge of the foresail 40 is attached to the track system 330, which extends from one hull 310 to another hull 310. The track system 340 preferably has an arc shape thereto, which mirrors the movement of a leading edge of the foresail 40 during tacking maneuvers, such that the distance 342 from the mast 330 to the track system 340 remains constant at all times. In accordance with one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 6, the foresail 40 (FIG. 2) can be attached to the track system 340. The track system 340 is attached to each of the hulls 310 of the boat 300 and is configured to change the location or position of the foresail 40 relative to the hulls 310 of the boat 300 during a tacking maneuver. It can be appreciated that tacking typically describes the position of a sailboat's bow with respect to the wind. For example, if the vessel's bow is positioned so that the wind is blowing across the starboard (right) side of the vessel, then the vessel is said to be on a starboard tack. If the wind is blowing across the port (left) side of the vessel, then the vessel is said to be on a port tack. It can be appreciated that by definition, this is opposite to the side, which the boom is carried, since it can be difficult when a boat is sailing downwind or nearly downwind from which side the wind is coming. In addition, a sailing vessel on a starboard tack always has the right-of-way over another sailing vessel on “port tack” by both the rules of the road and racing rules.
  • The track system 340 preferably includes a moveable track fixture 110 as shown in FIG. 2, upon which the forestay 48 is securely fixed or attached, a fixed track 120 configured to receive the track fixture 110, and a control system 130 for securing the location of the track fixture 110 within the track 120 relative to the bow 42 of the boat 10. In accordance with one embodiment, the control system 130 for securing the location of the track fixture 110 can include a winch 140, a flexible wire or rod 150 attached to the track fixture 110, and a guide system 160. The winch 140 is preferably a mechanical device that is used to wind up the flexible wire or rod 150 (also called “cable”). In its simplest form, it consists of a spool and attached crank. The spool can also be called the winch drum. It can be appreciated that the winch 140 can include suitable gear assemblies and can be powered by electric, hydraulic, pneumatic or internal combustion drives. In addition, the winch 150 can include a solenoid brake and/or a mechanical brake or ratchet (not shown) that prevents the winch 150 from unwinding.
  • FIG. 7 shows a top view of a multi-hull boat 300 with a system and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail 40 in accordance with another embodiment. As shown in FIG. 7, a beam or spar system 350 comprised of a foresail track system 340, a foresail beam 352, and a pivot member 354. The foresail beam 352 is attached to the pivot member 354 (or mast 330) at one end (mast end) 356 and the other end (bow end) 358 of the foresail beam 352 moves from side to side (starboard to port). The foresail beam 352 is preferably attached to a lower portion of the mast 330 and extends approximately horizontal to a deck 304 of the boat 300. The foresail (not shown) includes a leading edge (or clew or free end), which is attached to the bow end 358 of the foresail beam 352, a trailing edge, and a top edge (or head), which is generally attached to an upper portion of the mast 330.
  • In accordance with another exemplary embodiment, the foresail beam 352 is preferably attached to an optional foresail track system 340, which assists the foresail beam 352 in movement from side to side. The forestay 48 (not shown) is preferably securely fixed or attached to the bow end 358 of the foresail beam 352. It can be appreciated that the system as shown in FIG. 7, the beam or spar system 350 can also include a control system 130 as shown in FIG. 2 comprised of a winch 140, a flexible wire or rod 150 attached to the track fixture 110, and a guide system 160. As described above, the winch 140 is preferably a mechanical device that is used to wind a wire rod or wire rope (also called “cable”). In its simplest form, it consists of a spool and attached crank. In addition, it can be appreciated that the winch 150 can also include gear assemblies and can be powered by electric, hydraulic, pneumatic or internal combustion drives. The winch 150 can also include a solenoid brake and/or a mechanical brake or ratchet, which prevents the winch 150 from unwinding.
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of a multi-hulled boat 300 having one or more track systems 340 for adjusting the location and position of the foresail in accordance with a further embodiment. As shown in FIG. 8, the sailboat 300 includes a plurality (i.e., two or more) track system 340, each of the track systems 340 configured to receive a foresail 40 (not shown). Each of the track systems 340 extends from one hull 310 to another hull 310. The track system 340 preferably has an arc shape thereto, which mirrors the movement of a leading edge of the foresail 40 during tacking maneuvers, such that the distance 342 from the mast 330 to each of the track systems 340 remains constant at all times. The track systems 340 are attached to each of the hulls 310 of the boat 300 and are configured to change the location or position of the foresail 40 relative to the hulls 310 of the boat 300 during a tacking maneuver. In accordance with an exemplary embodiment, each of the track systems 340 can also include a beam or spar system 350 as shown in FIG. 7. If one or more beam or spar systems 350 (FIG. 7) are used, each of the foresail beams 352 are preferably at a different height relative to the deck 320 and/or mast 330 so that the foresail beams 352 can move freely. It can be appreciated that if the sailboat 300 has more than one foresail 40, depending on the conditions, one or more of the foresails 40 can be used at any time, such as during tacking maneuvers.
  • It will be understood that the foregoing description is of the preferred embodiments, and is, therefore, merely representative of the article and methods of manufacturing the same. It can be appreciated that many variations and modifications of the different embodiments in light of the above teachings will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, the exemplary embodiments, as well as alternative embodiments, may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the articles and methods as set forth in the attached claims.

Claims (20)

1. A sailboat comprising:
at least one hull;
a mast;
a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and
a system for sailing windward comprising:
a foresail beam attached to the mast of the sailboat at a mast end of the foresail beam and receives a leading edge of the foresail at a bow end of the foresail beam; and
a foresail track, which extends from a starboard side to a port side of the sailboat and assists the foresail beam in movement from side to side.
2. The sailboat of claim 1, further comprising a control system for securing the location of the foresail beam within the foresail track system relative to a bow of the sailboat.
3. The sailboat of claim 1, further comprising a series of lines, which control the bow end of the foresail beam.
4. The sailboat of claim 1, wherein the foresail track system mirrors a movement of the bow end of the foresail beam's movement from starboard side to port side.
5. The sailboat of claim 1, further comprising a pivot member, which attaches the foresail beam to the mast.
6. The sailboat of claim 1, wherein the foresail beam is attached to a lower portion of the mast.
7. The sailboat of claim 2, wherein the control system comprises a winch, a flexible wire attached to the moveably track fixture, and a guide system.
8. The sailboat of claim 7, wherein the winch comprises a spool, which is attached to a crank.
9. The sailboat of claim 8, wherein the winch further includes a brake or ratchet that prevents the winch from unwinding.
10. The sailboat of claim 1, wherein the at least one hull comprises two or more hulls.
11. A sailboat comprising:
two or more hulls;
a plurality of sails, wherein at least one of the plurality of sails is a foresail; and
a system for sailing windward, which includes a foresail track, which receives a leading edge of the foresail and extends from one of the two or more hulls to another of the two or more hulls.
12. The sailboat of claim 11, wherein the foresail track extends from a starboard side to a port side of the sailboat and assists the foresail in movement from side to side.
13. The sailboat of claim 12, further comprising a control system for securing the location of the foresail within the foresail track system relative to a bow of the sailboat.
14. The sailboat of claim 13, further comprising a series of lines, which control a bow end of the foresail.
15. The sailboat of claim 12, wherein the foresail track mirrors a movement of the bow end of the foresail beam's movement from starboard side to port side.
16. The sailboat of claim 11, further comprising a control system for securing the leading edge of the foresail within the foresail track.
17. The sailboat of claim 16, wherein the control system comprises a winch, a flexible wire attached to the track fixture, and a guide system.
18. The sailboat of claim 17, wherein the winch consists of a spool, which is attached to a crank, and wherein the winch further includes a brake or ratchet that prevents the winch from unwinding.
19. A sailboat comprising:
two or more hull;
a plurality of sails, and wherein the plurality of sails includes one or more foresails; and
a system for sailing windward, which includes two or more foresail tracks, each of the two or more foresail tracks is configured to receive a leading edge of a foresail, and wherein each of the foresail tracks extend from one of the two or more hulls to another of the two or more hulls.
20. The sailboat of claim 19, further comprising:
a mast; and
at least two foresail beams attached to the mast of a sailboat at a mast end of the foresail beam, and wherein each of the at least two foresail beams are configured to receive the leading edge of the foresail at a bow end of the foresail beam.
US13/030,386 2007-02-08 2011-02-18 System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat Abandoned US20110168071A1 (en)

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US90054907P true 2007-02-08 2007-02-08
US92095707P true 2007-03-30 2007-03-30
US11/788,785 US20080190341A1 (en) 2007-02-08 2007-04-19 System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat
US13/030,386 US20110168071A1 (en) 2007-02-08 2011-02-18 System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat

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US13/030,386 US20110168071A1 (en) 2007-02-08 2011-02-18 System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat
PCT/US2012/025897 WO2012112990A2 (en) 2011-02-18 2012-02-21 System and method of adjusting the location and position of the foresail on a sailboat
US14/000,046 US20140035509A1 (en) 2011-02-18 2012-02-21 System for storing electrical power
US15/440,700 US20170264100A1 (en) 2011-02-18 2017-02-23 System for storing electrical power

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US14/000,046 Abandoned US20140035509A1 (en) 2007-02-08 2012-02-21 System for storing electrical power
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FR3025489A1 (en) * 2014-09-10 2016-03-11 Paul-Henri Decamp Rush for propulsion of a vehicle and vehicle comprising such rigging
WO2016038264A1 (en) * 2014-09-10 2016-03-17 Decamp Paul-Henri Rigging for propelling a vehicle and vehicle comprising such riggging
US20180022430A1 (en) * 2016-07-19 2018-01-25 Mx Production Command and control device for sails of sailboats or kite sails
US10689075B2 (en) * 2016-07-19 2020-06-23 Mx Production Command and control device for kites

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US20170264100A1 (en) 2017-09-14
WO2012112990A2 (en) 2012-08-23
WO2012112990A3 (en) 2012-12-27
US20140035509A1 (en) 2014-02-06

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