US20100179003A1 - Golf tee - Google Patents

Golf tee Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100179003A1
US20100179003A1 US12/351,734 US35173409A US2010179003A1 US 20100179003 A1 US20100179003 A1 US 20100179003A1 US 35173409 A US35173409 A US 35173409A US 2010179003 A1 US2010179003 A1 US 2010179003A1
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US
United States
Prior art keywords
golf
stem
tee
golf ball
golf tee
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/351,734
Inventor
Brian Steinhobel
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BONFIT AMERICA Inc dba BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA
Original Assignee
BONFIT AMERICA Inc dba BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by BONFIT AMERICA Inc dba BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA filed Critical BONFIT AMERICA Inc dba BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA
Priority to US12/351,734 priority Critical patent/US20100179003A1/en
Assigned to BONFIT AMERICA, INC. DBA BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA reassignment BONFIT AMERICA, INC. DBA BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: STEINHOBEL, BRIAN
Publication of US20100179003A1 publication Critical patent/US20100179003A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees
    • A63B57/16Brush-type tees
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials

Abstract

A golf tee having a stem constructed of a rigid plastic material having a first end terminating in a tip adapted to penetrate the earth and a second end which supports a golf ball supporting member having a plurality of upwardly directed extensions arranged to support a golf ball. The golf ball support member may be constructed of a flexible plastic material which is over molded on the stem at the end thereof opposite the earth penetrating tip. The golf ball supporting member may be constructed of a plurality of upwardly extending fingers or a plurality of tooth shaped outwardly flared members.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to a golf apparatus and equipment used in playing the game of golf on a golf course or practicing golf on or off the golf course and more specifically is directed to a new and improved golf tee which is extremely stable when inserted into the ground and allows a golf ball to be driven off the tee with a minimum of interference between the golf tee and the golf ball.
  • 2. Description of Prior Art
  • Golf tees have been available in numerous designs shapes and sizes and have been used in playing the game of golf for a substantial period of time. Golf tees are permitted under the rules of play for golf by the United States Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Association. The purpose of using the tee in playing the game of golf is to raise and support the golf ball off the ground when driving or otherwise hitting the golf ball from the teeing area on a golf course or on a practice range. It is believed that the utilization of a tee from the teeing area on a golf course was allowed by those who make the rules governing play because the grass appearing in and around a teeing area on a golf course is dissipated as a result of the continued use thereof by the players whereas the remainder of the golf course is initially covered with grass which provides a soft lie for the golf ball so that it may be struck and the lie would not usually impart undesirable characteristics to the flight of the golf ball.
  • The flight of the golf ball is dependent on certain factors such as the height in which the ball is teed off the ground, back spin imparted to the ball, wind conditions and dimple construction on the ball itself It has now been recognized that the interaction between the golf ball and the tee which supports the golf ball can impart undesirable characteristics to the flight of the ball. For example, most tees have conventionally been made of solid wood with a circular shaped cup top supported by a stem that is inserted into the earth. It is very difficult to always tee the golf ball at exactly the same height from the surface of the earth for a particular club that is being utilized. This has become even more difficult as the length of tees has increased because of the larger size of the golf club heads, particularly for drivers. In addition, the concavity of the standard tee allows for a substantial amount of surface contact between the tee and the ball. The friction between the ball and the concave surface will prematurely impart a spin to the ball and it is usually an undesirable spin. This spin may be accelerated by natural wind conditions in existence at the time of play. It is well known that the golf ball flight can be determined in part by the initial spin which is imparted to the ball at the time of contact. It is therefore desirable for the ball to have limited contact with the tee to mitigate the undesirable spin conditions. In addition, as the golf club head approaches the impact area it generates a great deal of wind which may cause initial undesirable movement of the golf ball before impact. Various golf tees have been developed in an attempt to overcome this undesirable feature of the golf tee. Examples, of such tees are those which utilize a plurality of bristles extending from the head of the golf tee upon which the golf ball rests. In other instances, there is provided a golf tee having a central stem with three fan shaped flutes extending vertically upwards ending in a point shaped vertice for holding the golf ball. An additional embodiment of prior art golf tees includes a tapered spike made of rigid plastic material with a head. A rotatable collar is secured to the head and supports a plurality of finger like elements constructed from a semi-rigid plastic material. The collar can rotate on the head and is designed to support the golf ball. These prior tees are subject to wear and they either break when struck by the golf club or after extended use the bristles become so flexible that they can no longer adequately support the golf ball or it is not possible to cause the golf ball to be teed at exactly the same height each time a particular club is utilized.
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • An improved golf tee having a stem constructed of rigid plastic material terminating in a pointed tip adapted to penetrate the earth and having a second end terminating in a head shaped member. A golf ball supporting member of a flexible plastic material is permanently secured to the head shape member of the stem and the golf ball supporting member includes a plurality of upwardly directed extensions constructed of flexible plastic material arranged to support the golf ball.
  • In accordance with a more specific aspect of the present invention, the golf ball supporting member is over molded and permanently secured to the head shaped member of the stem.
  • In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention, the upwardly directed extensions of the golf ball support member include three tooth shaped extensions flared outwardly from the stem each of which terminates in a tip which is utilized to support the golf ball.
  • In accordance with a further aspect of the present invention, the upwardly directed extensions of the golf ball supporting member include a plurality of spaced apart fingers disposed peripherally about the head shaped end on the stem.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1 a, 1 b, and 1 c illustrate one embodiment of a golf tee constructed in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of an elongated central support stem which is a component of the tee as illustrated in FIGS. 1 a, 1 b and 1 c;
  • FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of a golf tee of the present invention taken about the lines 3-3 of FIG. 1 a;
  • FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c illustrate an alternative embodiment of a golf tee constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the golf tee taken about the lines 5-5 of FIG. 4 b; and
  • FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of a golf tee shown in FIG. 4 a taken about the lines 6-6 thereof.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The golf tee of the present invention is constructed of molded plastic material and provides a plurality of points of contact at the distal ends of upwardly directed flutes or fingers which are spaced apart so that they support a golf ball. The spaced apart feature of these upwardly extending members provides an open space beneath the golf ball which insures that the gust of air created by the approaching club face will not prematurely set the ball in motion. In addition, by utilizing the points of contact at the distal ends of the upwardly extending members minimal contact is provided between the ball and the tee, thus eliminating the undesirable spin which may otherwise be imparted to the golf ball by the contact of the ball with the head of the tee. The tee of the present invention may have a plurality of heights which allow the utilization of the tee with various golf clubs including the large headed drivers that are currently in existence and favored by many golfers.
  • Referring more particularly to FIGS. 1-3, there is illustrated one embodiment of a golf tee constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention. As is therein illustrated the golf tee 10 includes a stem member 12 constructed preferably of a rigid plastic material having a tapered point 14 which enables the stem to be inserted into the earth by the user. The upper end of the stem includes a head shaped member 16 which may be formed as a radially outwardly extending flange 18 (FIG. 2) having a peripheral edge 20 and a flat top 22. The stem 12 may be formed with a plurality of ribs 24, 26 and 28 protruding therefrom. Such ribs add additional strength to the stem and also assist in easier penetration of the stem into the earth by the user. Extending upwardly from the head 16 is a ball support member 30 which is permanently secured to the head 16. In this embodiment of the golf tee of the present invention, the ball support member 30 includes a plurality of upwardly directed extensions terminating at their distal ends and spaced apart tips 32-42 (FIG. 3) upon which the golf ball rests and is supported. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that by having the golf ball supported only by the tips of the distal ends of the upwardly extending extensions, which in this embodiment appear as a plurality of fingers, there is little interference, if any, by the tee with the spin or other rotation of the golf ball when it is struck by the golf club.
  • As is illustrated in FIGS. 1 a, 1 b and 1 c, the upwardly directed extensions or fingers forming the ball supporting member 44, 46 and 48 may vary in length and provide a tee for use with various clubs. For example, the longer fingers 44 would be used with the large headed drivers having 460 cc volume which are popular among golfers at the present time. The shorter fingers as shown at 46 in FIG. 1 b would used with a smaller headed driver or to keep the ball lower in the event of driving into the wind or the like. In addition, even shorter fingers such as shown at 48 in FIG. 1 c would be used to support the ball for being struck by a fairway wood such as a three wood, 5 wood or the like or possibly even a low lofted iron or hybrid club.
  • As is shown more clearly in FIGS. 2 and 3 in accordance with the preferred form of this embodiment of the golf tee constructed in accordance with the present invention the stem and the ball supporting member are two separate elements of the tee which are bonded together to form an integrated or unitary golf tee. The stem as shown in FIG. 2 is constructed of a rigid plastic material and preferably is constructed of a polycarbonate plastic. The ball supporting member 30 is constructed from a flexible plastic material which is over molded and bonded to the head 16 of the stem 12.
  • In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the tee of the present invention the ball support member 30 is constructed from polyurethane plastic material. Depending upon the height of the upwardly directed extensions or fingers of the ball support member the hardness ranges between 60 and 90 durometers as measured on the Shore scale A. The shorter fingers 48 as shown in FIG. 1 c for example would be 60 durometers in hardness while the longer fingers 44 as shown in FIG. 1 a would be 90 durometers in hardness. The longer fingers are harder in order to provide better support for the golf ball while being able to position it a distance from the ground greater than that allowed by the shorter fingers.
  • In accomplishing the over molding the ball support member 30 is constructed preferably by injection molding which allows the polyurethane plastic material to extend downwardly and wrap around the outwardly extending radial flange 18 as is illustrated at 50 in FIG. 3. As is clearly shown, the plastic material forming the ball support member 30 extends across the upper flat surface 22 of the stem 12 as illustrated at 52 and around the peripheral edge 20 of the flange 18. The fingers extend upwardly and are formed unitarily with the remainder of the ball support member 30. By way of chemical interaction and reaction the polyurethane material which forms the flexible ball support member 30 bonds to the polycarbonate material of the stem member 12. If desired, a mechanical interlock can be created by providing ridges and/or grooves in the flange 18 into which the polyurethane plastic material would flow. It has however been found that such is not necessary as a result of the chemical bonding which occurs between the polycarbonate and the polyurethane plastic materials during the over molding process. The number of fingers may vary as desired so long as the fingers will support the golf ball without undue deformation. It has been found that utilizing a polyurethane plastic material having a 90 durometer hardness for the longer fingers 44 as shown in FIG. 1 a that it is preferable to have 10 fingers equiangularly spaced about the periphery 20 of the outwardly directed flange 18. It should be noted particularly as illustrated in FIG. 3 that the fingers are wider at the base 52 of the over molded material than at the distal ends 32-42. This upwardly tapering construction of the fingers assists in ejecting the finished over molded golf tee from the mold at the completion of the molding process.
  • Referring more particularly to FIGS. 4-6, there is illustrated an alternative embodiment of the golf tee constructed in accordance with the present invention. As is therein illustrated the golf tee 60 includes a stem 62 which is constructed of a rigid plastic material and which terminates in a pointed tip 64 which enables the stem to be inserted into the earth by a golfer during use. The upper portion 66 of the stem 62 terminates in a head shaped member 68 extending upwardly. Surrounding the head shape member 68 is a golf ball supporting member 70 which may be constructed of a flexible plastic material which is over molded and surrounds and is bonded to the head 68 of the stem 62 as with the embodiment of the tee shown in FIGS. 1-3. The stem 62 is preferably constructed of a rigid plastic material such as polycarbonate while the ball support member 70 is preferably constructed from a flexible plastic material such as polyurethane having a hardness of 60 durometer. The over molding of the polyurethane over the head 68 results in a bonding of the ball support member to the stem 62.
  • The ball support member 70 includes upwardly directed extensions which in the presently preferred embodiment include three tooth shaped members 72, 74 and 76 which terminate at their distal ends 78, 80 and 82 in points or tips. As shown, the distal ends 78, 80 and 82 are flared outwardly from the longitude axis of the stem 62 in such a manner that the golf ball is supported only at the tips of the distal ends 78, 80 and 82 of the tooth shaped members. This provides minimal contact between the golf ball and the tee thus providing minimal disturbance of the flight of the golf ball from the tee. It is also noted that by flaring the tooth shaped members 72, 74 and 76 radially outwardly from the longitude axis of the stem 62 space is provided underneath the golf ball and the between the upwardly directed extensions to provide for the movement of air as generated by the movement of the driver head toward the golf ball so that this additional air does not interfere with the golf ball by moving it prior to being struck by the driver head.
  • As shown in FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c the stem 62 may have varying lengths for use with different clubs. As an example, the longer length as shown in FIG. 4 a would be for use with the large headed drivers having 460 cc in volume which are preferred and most popular by golfers at the present time. The shorter stem as shown in FIG. 4 b would be useful with drivers of a smaller size while the shorter tee as shown in FIG. 4 c would be used for fairway woods or hybrids or possibly even low lofted irons as may be desired by the golfer.
  • As shown more particularly in FIG. 4 a, the stem may have a protrusion 84 positioned intermediate the tip 64 and the top 66. This protrusion 84 may be positioned at any point along the stem which will provide an indication to the golfer as to how much of the stem should be inserted into the earth to provide the desired positioning of the ball above the surface of the earth. As illustrated more particularly in FIG. 6 the protrusion 84 may be recessed as shown at 86 to provide a gripping area for the thumb or other finger of a user to assist in inserting the stem 62 into the earth.
  • It should also be noted that the outer surface 88 of the tooth shaped extensions 78, 80 and 82 for the ball support member have an outer surface which is contiguous with the outer surface 90 of the stem 62.
  • Although the presently preferred embodiment of the golf tee as shown in FIG. 4-6 includes the ball support member being over molded on the head 68 of the stem 62 it should be understood that the golf tee having the outwardly flared tooth shaped member 78, 80 and 82 may be constructed of a unitary, rigid, molded plastic material without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • There has thus been disclosed a golf tee which is constructed of a molded plastic material and which includes a stem constructed of rigid plastic material which is adapted at one end to penetrate the earth and at a second end having a plurality of upwardly directed extensions arranged to support a golf ball at the distal ends thereof. The upwardly directed extensions may be a plurality of fingers or a plurality of tooth shaped members each spaced apart so that a golf ball is supported by the distal ends of the fingers or tooth shaped members and wherein space is provided between the fingers or tooth shaped members to thereby mitigate any disturbance of the ball prior to it being struck by the golf club.

Claims (17)

1. A golf tee comprising:
(A) a stem constructed of a rigid plastic material and having a first end terminating in a tip adapted to penetrate the earth and a second end terminating in a head shaped member;
(B) a golf ball supporting member constructed of a flexible plastic material permanently affixed to said head shaped member of said second end; and
(C) said golf ball supporting member having a plurality of upwardly directed extensions arranged to support a golf ball;
2. A golf tee as defined in claim 1 wherein said upwardly directed extensions include three tooth shaped extensions flared outwardly from said stem.
3. A golf tee as defined in claim 2 wherein said golf ball supporting member is over molded on said stem.
4. A golf tee as defined in claim 1 wherein said upwardly directed extensions include a plurality of fingers disposed peripherally about said head shaped member.
5. A golf tee as defined in claim 4 wherein said head shaped member comprises a radially outwardly extending flange having a peripheral edge.
6. A golf tee as defined in claim 4 wherein said golf ball supporting member is over molded on said head shaped member.
7. A golf tee as defined in claim 2 wherein said golf ball supporting member surrounds and is bonded to said head shaped member.
8. A golf tee as defined in claim 5 wherein said golf ball supporting member surrounds said head shaped member and is over molded thereon.
9. A golf tee as defined in claim 3 wherein said tooth shaped extensions have an outer surface contiguous with an outer surface of said stem.
10. A golf tee as defined in claim 9 wherein said tooth shaped extensions each have a distal end, said distal ends being spaced apart by an amount such that golf ball is supported only by said distal ends.
11. A golf tee comprising:
a stem having a first end terminating in a point for insertion into the earth;
said stem having a second end terminating in a plurality of upwardly extending discrete tooth shaped extensions each having a base permanently attached to said stem and a distal end flared outwardly from said stem and arranged to support a golf ball.
12. A golf tee as defined in claim 11 further comprising a protrusion from said stem disposed between said first and second ends for indicating the extent said tee should be inserted into the earth.
13. A golf tee as defined in claim 12 wherein said protrusion is recessed to provide a gripping area for a finger of a user to insert said tee into the earth.
14. A golf tee as defined in claim 13 wherein said discrete tooth shaped members are three in number and said distal ends are spaced apart by an amount such that a golf ball is supported only by said distal ends.
15. A golf tee comprising:
a stem formed from a molded rigid plastic having a point at one end and having a radially outwardly extending head having a peripheral edge at the other end;
a golf ball supporting member including a plurality of discrete fingers disposed equiangularly about said periphery of said head and extending upwardly and terminating at distal ends upon which a golf ball is supported.
16. A golf tee as defined in claim 15 wherein said ball support member is over molded on and bonded to said head.
17. A golf tee as defined in claim 16 wherein said stem is formed from polycarbonate plastic and said ball support member if formed from polyurethane plastic having a hardness of between 60 and 90 durometer as measured on the Shore scale A.
US12/351,734 2009-01-09 2009-01-09 Golf tee Abandoned US20100179003A1 (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8167741B1 (en) 2011-09-01 2012-05-01 Murken Roger E Golf tee extender
US20130196793A1 (en) * 2012-01-27 2013-08-01 Luke MURPHY Baseball holder for a batting tee
US20150290508A1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2015-10-15 Robert Dorsey Base-less, Low-Resistance Golf Mat Tee
US9248354B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-02-02 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9254427B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-02-09 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9320951B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-04-26 Elwha Llc Active golf tee

Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US638920A (en) * 1899-07-01 1899-12-12 George F Grant Golf-tee.
US1573911A (en) * 1925-12-28 1926-02-23 William A Budrow Golf tee
US1670627A (en) * 1925-12-07 1928-05-22 Nieblo Mfg Co Inc Golfing tee
US1679579A (en) * 1927-12-27 1928-08-07 Robert R Lundy Golf-ball tee
US3633919A (en) * 1970-04-29 1972-01-11 Frank J Liccardello Golf tee having a separable turf-inserting part
US4893818A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-01-16 Patrick Liccardello Golf tee
US5195743A (en) * 1991-10-10 1993-03-23 Walsh Jr Thomas J Golf club cleaner and tee
USD346190S (en) * 1992-03-20 1994-04-19 Folker Joseph G Golf tee
US6053822A (en) * 1998-12-03 2000-04-25 Kolodney; Jeffery D. Golf tee
US6139449A (en) * 1998-01-27 2000-10-31 Cardarelli; Venanzio Golf tee
USD485317S1 (en) * 2002-04-15 2004-01-13 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD486538S1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-02-10 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD488525S1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-04-13 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD491619S1 (en) * 2002-08-07 2004-06-15 Jason Lee Crouse Golf tee
US20050187041A1 (en) * 2004-02-25 2005-08-25 Haruo Kawashima Attachment for golf tee
USD511193S1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-11-01 Werner Trawoeger Golf tee
US20060264272A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Calderon Luis Jr Golf spike
USD542366S1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2007-05-08 Iacono John R Golf tee
US20070149324A1 (en) * 2005-12-28 2007-06-28 Chang-Tien Tsai Golf tee
US20080182684A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2008-07-31 Francis Carroll Golf tee with rigid stake and flexible crown
USD603005S1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2009-10-27 Bonfit America, Inc. Golf tee
USD605713S1 (en) * 2008-10-14 2009-12-08 Golf Gifts & Gallery, Inc. Golf tee
USD610640S1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-02-23 Bonfit America, Inc. Golf tee

Patent Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US638920A (en) * 1899-07-01 1899-12-12 George F Grant Golf-tee.
US1670627A (en) * 1925-12-07 1928-05-22 Nieblo Mfg Co Inc Golfing tee
US1573911A (en) * 1925-12-28 1926-02-23 William A Budrow Golf tee
US1679579A (en) * 1927-12-27 1928-08-07 Robert R Lundy Golf-ball tee
US3633919A (en) * 1970-04-29 1972-01-11 Frank J Liccardello Golf tee having a separable turf-inserting part
US4893818A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-01-16 Patrick Liccardello Golf tee
US5195743A (en) * 1991-10-10 1993-03-23 Walsh Jr Thomas J Golf club cleaner and tee
USD346190S (en) * 1992-03-20 1994-04-19 Folker Joseph G Golf tee
US6139449A (en) * 1998-01-27 2000-10-31 Cardarelli; Venanzio Golf tee
US6053822A (en) * 1998-12-03 2000-04-25 Kolodney; Jeffery D. Golf tee
USD485317S1 (en) * 2002-04-15 2004-01-13 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD491619S1 (en) * 2002-08-07 2004-06-15 Jason Lee Crouse Golf tee
USD488525S1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-04-13 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD486538S1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2004-02-10 Venanzio Cardarelli Golf tee
USD511193S1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2005-11-01 Werner Trawoeger Golf tee
US20050187041A1 (en) * 2004-02-25 2005-08-25 Haruo Kawashima Attachment for golf tee
USD542366S1 (en) * 2005-03-14 2007-05-08 Iacono John R Golf tee
US20060264272A1 (en) * 2005-05-17 2006-11-23 Calderon Luis Jr Golf spike
US20070149324A1 (en) * 2005-12-28 2007-06-28 Chang-Tien Tsai Golf tee
US20080182684A1 (en) * 2007-01-23 2008-07-31 Francis Carroll Golf tee with rigid stake and flexible crown
USD605713S1 (en) * 2008-10-14 2009-12-08 Golf Gifts & Gallery, Inc. Golf tee
USD603005S1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2009-10-27 Bonfit America, Inc. Golf tee
USD610640S1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2010-02-23 Bonfit America, Inc. Golf tee

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8167741B1 (en) 2011-09-01 2012-05-01 Murken Roger E Golf tee extender
US20130196793A1 (en) * 2012-01-27 2013-08-01 Luke MURPHY Baseball holder for a batting tee
US8858369B2 (en) * 2012-01-27 2014-10-14 Luke MURPHY Baseball holder for a batting tee
US9248354B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-02-02 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9254427B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-02-09 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9320951B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-04-26 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US20150290508A1 (en) * 2014-04-09 2015-10-15 Robert Dorsey Base-less, Low-Resistance Golf Mat Tee

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Legal Events

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AS Assignment

Owner name: BONFIT AMERICA, INC. DBA BRUSH-T NORTH AMERICA, CA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:STEINHOBEL, BRIAN;REEL/FRAME:022447/0438

Effective date: 20090317

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION