US20060100038A1 - Tee stopper - Google Patents

Tee stopper Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060100038A1
US20060100038A1 US10/984,446 US98444604A US2006100038A1 US 20060100038 A1 US20060100038 A1 US 20060100038A1 US 98444604 A US98444604 A US 98444604A US 2006100038 A1 US2006100038 A1 US 2006100038A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
stopper
golf tee
fitting
shaft
turf
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/984,446
Inventor
David Rose
Craig Rose
Original Assignee
David Rose
Craig Rose
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by David Rose, Craig Rose filed Critical David Rose
Priority to US10/984,446 priority Critical patent/US20060100038A1/en
Publication of US20060100038A1 publication Critical patent/US20060100038A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees

Abstract

There is disclosed a golf tee. The golf tee may comprise a shaft and a stopper. The shaft may comprise a length. The shaft may comprise an outer diameter. The stopper may comprise a length. The stopper may comprise an inner diameter. The inner diameter may fit the outer diameter. The ratio of the stopper length to the shaft length may be less than or equal to ⅛.

Description

    NOTICE OF COPYRIGHTS AND TRADE DRESS
  • A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright protection. This patent document may show and/or describe matter which is or may become trade dress of the owner. The copyright and trade dress owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by any one of the patent disclosure as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent files or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright and trade dress rights whatsoever.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to golf tees.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Golf has long been an American pastime. According to the National Golf Foundation, more than 26 million people in the United States play golf.
  • Golf is a game whose object is to sink a golf ball into each of the 9 or 18 successive holes on a golf course by using as few strokes of a golf club as possible and avoiding various natural or artificial hazards or obstacles. A golf club is a long-shafted club with a head of wood, steel, or other metal alloy, used to hit the ball in golf. A stroke is to propel a golf ball with a controlled swinging blow.
  • A golf tee is a peg with a concave top used to position a golf ball above the ground before striking it at the beginning of play on a hole.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf tee.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a stopper.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Throughout this description, the embodiments and examples shown should be considered as exemplars, rather than limitations on the apparatus and methods of the present invention.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a perspective view of a golf tee 100. The golf tee 100 may include a cup 105, a shaft 110, a tip 115, and a stopper 120. Typically, the cup 105, the shaft 110, and the tip 115 are manufactured from a single piece of rigid material such as wood, plastic, or composite wheat. The golf tee 100 may be coated with a varnish or paint.
  • The golf tee 100 has a top end 160 and a bottom end 170. The cup 105 may be disposed at the top end 160 of the golf tee 100. The cup 105 may include a concave surface 130. The concave surface 130 may be disposed as a top surface of the cup 105. The concave surface 130 may be adapted to support a golf ball (not shown). A golf ball may rest on top of the concave surface 130. The golf ball may be struck by a golf club, thereby launching the golf ball from the concave surface 130.
  • The tip 115 may be disposed at the bottom end 170 of the golf tee 100. The tip 115 may be tapered to a point 135. The golf tee 100 may be inserted into the ground, tip 115 first. The tip 115 may provide for precise insertion of the golf tee 100 into the ground.
  • Commonly, the ground of a golf course includes turf. Turf is the upper stratum of earth that is filled with the roots of grass and other small plants forming a thick mat. The turf of a golf course may be natural or it may be a placed piece, cut or pared off from an upper stratum of earth with its green growth preserved. Turf is generally soft. Typically, it requires little force to insert the golf tee 100 into turf.
  • The shaft 110 may be integral to the cup 105 and the tip 115. The shaft 110 may include a generally cylindrical geometry. The shaft 110 may include an outer diameter 145 and a length 140. The outer diameter 145 may be 3/16″ or other dimension. The length 140 of the shaft 110 may be selected to provide a height 125 of the golf tee 100. Golf tees are typically manufactured with a height 125 of between approximately 1½″ and 4½″, in a variety of increments. Golfers may have a preference for a specific height 125. Typically, beginner or novice golfers prefer the golf tee 100 to be longer.
  • The length 140 of the shaft 110 may be selected based on various factors, such as the quality of the turf. Factors that affect the quality of the turf may include hardness of the turf, density of the turf, length of the grass of the turf, moisture content of the turf, and other characteristics of the turf. The length 140 of the shaft 110 may be selected so that when the golf tee 100 is at least partially inserted into the turf, the turf provides support to hold the golf tee 100 and a golf ball in place.
  • Many golfers believe that a key to consistent performance is to limit variation in playing conditions. For a golfer to accurately stroke the golf ball, the golfer may prefer that the golf ball rest on the golf tee 100 at a specific height above the ground. The selection of the specific height above the ground may be based on the selection of golf club, type of golf ball, the experience of the golfer and other factors.
  • With the advent of the new larger headed drivers proper teeing height of the ball becomes a focus. The height of the teed up ball may match the best striking spot on the driver head for optimum results. Since the new age drivers may be large and vary in depth from top to bottom it has become very difficult to tee the ball at the height necessary to achieve the proper trajectory for maximum driving distance. Balls teed too low or too high tend to result in shorter and less accurate drives. Since the larger head drivers require longer tees it may be difficult to judge the correct tee ball height without readjusting the tee against the driver head.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, there is shown a plan view of the stopper 120. A stopper is an accessory which fits to a shaft of a golf tee and aids the golfer in inserting the golf tee into turf no further than a desired depth. The stopper 120 may be a part of the golf tee 100 or separate. Referring now to both FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, the golfer may position the stopper 120 along the shaft 110 at any desired circumference. The golfer may insert the golf tee into the ground to a position where the stopper 120 abuts the ground, thereby positioning the concave surface 130 at a set optimal height above the ground.
  • The stopper 120 may include an elongate geometry. The stopper 120 may define an opening 205. The opening 205 may include dimensions selected to allow the shaft 110 to slide through when force is applied. The opening 205 may include a cross-sectional shape of a circle, a triangle, an oval, a square, a star, or other regular or irregular shape. The opening 205 may be a pinhole. The size of the opening 205 may be equal to or smaller than the outer diameter 145 of the shaft 110. For example purposes, the opening 205 may be a cylindrical bore and have an inner diameter 210 of approximately ⅛″, or other dimension. If the inner diameter 210 has approximately the same dimensions as the outer diameter 145, when the stopper 120 is placed on the shaft 110, the stopper 120 may form a friction fit with the shaft 110. If the diameter 210 has smaller dimensions than the outer diameter 145, when the stopper 120 is placed on the shaft 110, the stopper 120 may form an interference fit with the shaft 110.
  • An interference fit is where a shaft is forced into a surface defining an opening, the surface is deformed to a larger dimension, and the surface applies a compressive force against the shaft resulting in friction between the body and the shaft. Typically, interference fits are characterized by a diametral interference of approximately 0.001 to 0.002 units per unit of shaft diameter. A friction fit is characterized by diametral interference of less than approximately 0.001 to 0.002 units per unit of shaft diameter.
  • The dimensions of the opening 205 may be selected such that the force required for the stopper 120 to slide along the shaft 110 is larger than the force to insert the golf tee 100 into the turf. When the golf tee 100 is inserted into the turf, the stopper 120 may abut the turf. The fit between the stopper 120 and the shaft 110 may prevent the stopper 120 from sliding along the shaft 110. Thus, when the golf tee 100 is inserted into the turf to a depth where the stopper 120 abuts the turf, the concave surface 130 may be at the golfer's desired height above the ground.
  • The stopper 120 may include a cross sectional shape of a circle, a triangle, a square, a polygon, an oval, a star, a set of radially extending appendages, or other regular or irregular shape. For example purposes, the stopper 120 of FIGS. 1 and 2 has a circular cross section. The stopper 120 may include an outer radius 215. The outer radius 215 may be selected such that a cross section of the stopper 120 may have sufficient surface area to prevent the golf tee 100 from inserting into the ground beyond the desired depth when the stopper 120 abuts the turf. For example, the outer radius 215 may be equal to or larger than the outer diameter 145 of the shaft 110.
  • The stopper 120 may be constructed of an elastomer, a plastic, or other material. The material may be selected to provide elasticity such that a golfer may manually insert the shaft 110 into the stopper 120 and create an interference fit with or without tools, the ability to be repositioned without fatiguing or deforming plastically, and/or the ability to be repositioned manually without the need for tools. The stopper 120 may be sufficiently soft so as not to scratch or dent a golf club if a golf club strikes the stopper 120. Common elastomer materials which provide strength include natural rubber, styrene butadiene, neoprene, nitrile, ethylene propylene, epichlorohydrin, polyacrylate, butyl rubber, chlorobutyl rubber, and millable gum polyurethane. The stopper 120 may be manufactured using an extrusion process, a cutting process, a bending process, an injection molding process, a stamping process, a machining process, an other process, or combinations thereof. The stopper 120 may be marketed as a disposable accessory. To minimize production costs, the stopper 120 may be extruded, cut into thin pieces and pierced, or extruded with a hole in the center.
  • The stopper 120 may include a length 150. The length 150 may be selected based on ability to be manufactured, ability to be handled, or ability to remain rigid. The length 120 may be selected so that when the golf tee 100 is inserted into the turf and the stopper 120 abuts the turf, the stopper 120 protrudes only a small height above the ground. Thus, if a golf club is swung and misses the ball, it will be unlikely that the golf club will hit the stopper 120. Therefore, the stopper 120 will not present a risk of scratching, denting or otherwise damaging the golf club. For example purposes, the ratio of the length 150 of the stopper 120 to the length of the shaft 140 may be approximately ⅛ or other ratio.
  • The stopper 120 may alternatively have a solid geometry of a hemisphere or other non-elongate irregular geometry. The stopper 120 may alternatively be or include a spring clamp or spring clip. A spring clamp or a spring clip may be constructed of a plastic, a composite, a soft metal, or other material. The material for the spring clamp or spring clip may be selected in order not to scratch, deform, or damage the golf club should the golf club strike the spring clamp or spring clip. If the stopper 120 is a plastic clamp, the stopper 120 may extend radially a sufficient length from the shaft 110 such that the stopper 120 prevents the golf tee from inserting into the turf beyond a predetermined depth.
  • Although exemplary embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art that a number of changes, modifications, or alterations to the invention as described herein may be made, none of which depart from the spirit of the present invention. All such changes, modifications and alterations should therefore be seen as within the scope of the present invention.

Claims (19)

1. A golf tee comprising:
a shaft comprising a length and an outer diameter
a stopper comprising a length and an inner diameter, the inner diameter fitting the outer diameter
wherein the ratio of the stopper length to the shaft length is less than or equal to ⅛.
2. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the fitting is selected from the group comprising a friction fitting and an interference fitting.
3. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the fitting causes the stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the stopper abuts the turf.
4. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the stopper is constructed of an elastomer material.
5. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the stopper is constructed of a plastic material.
6. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the stopper comprises an outer radius, the outer radius is equal to or larger than the outer diameter.
7. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein the stopper comprises an appendage extending radially from the inner diameter.
8. The golf tee of claim 1, wherein
the fitting is a friction fitting,
the fitting causes the stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the stopper abuts the turf,
the stopper is constructed of an elastomer material,
the stopper comprises an outer radius, the outer radius is equal to or larger than the outer diameter.
9. A golf tee comprising:
an elongate rubber stopper comprising a length, the elongate rubber stopper defining an opening,
a shaft comprising a length and a circumference, the circumference disposed within the opening
the elongate rubber stopper fitting at least part of a circumference of the shaft
wherein the ratio of the elongate rubber stopper length to the shaft length is less than or equal to ⅛.
10. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein the fitting is selected from the group comprising a friction fitting and an interference fitting.
11. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein the fitting causes the stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the stopper abuts the turf.
12. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein the elongate rubber stopper is constructed of an elastomer selected from the group comprising natural rubber, styrene butadiene, neoprene, nitrile, ethylene propylene, epichlorohydrin, polyacrylate, butyl rubber, chlorobutyl rubber, and millable gum polyurethane.
13. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein the elongate rubber stopper comprises an outer radius, the outer radius is equal to or larger than the outer diameter.
14. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein the elongate rubber stopper comprises an appendage extending radially from the inner diameter.
15. The golf tee of claim 9, wherein
the fitting is a friction fitting,
the fitting causes the elongate rubber stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the elongate rubber stopper abuts the turf,
the elongate rubber stopper is constructed of neoprene,
the stopper comprises an outer radius, the outer radius is larger than the outer diameter.
16. A golf tee comprising:
a shaft comprising a length and a circumference
a stopper comprising a length, the stopper defining an opening
wherein the circumference is disposed within the opening, the elongate stopper fitting at least part of the circumference
wherein the ratio of the stopper length to the shaft length is less than or equal to ⅛.
17. The golf tee of claim 16, wherein the fitting is selected from the group comprising a friction fit and an interference fit.
18. The golf tee of claim 16, wherein the fitting causes the stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the stopper abuts the turf.
19. The golf tee of claim 16, wherein
the fitting is an interference fitting,
the fitting causes the stopper to resist sliding along the shaft when the golf tee is inserted into a turf and the stopper abuts the turf,
the elongate rubber stopper is constructed of plastic,
the stopper comprises an appendage extending radially from the circumference.
US10/984,446 2004-11-08 2004-11-08 Tee stopper Abandoned US20060100038A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/984,446 US20060100038A1 (en) 2004-11-08 2004-11-08 Tee stopper

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/984,446 US20060100038A1 (en) 2004-11-08 2004-11-08 Tee stopper

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US20060100038A1 true US20060100038A1 (en) 2006-05-11

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US10/984,446 Abandoned US20060100038A1 (en) 2004-11-08 2004-11-08 Tee stopper

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2007149576A3 (en) * 2006-06-23 2008-03-20 Scott M Joffe Golf tee height stopper
US20090088274A1 (en) * 2007-10-02 2009-04-02 Gilles Blais Height adjustible golf tee
US20100210376A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 O'sullivan Sr James Paul Long lasting golf tee
US20110244990A1 (en) * 2010-04-06 2011-10-06 Gibbs Brian J Golf Training Tee
US8597141B1 (en) * 2011-06-02 2013-12-03 Isaac S Daniel Smart golf tee

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1616059A (en) * 1926-11-15 1927-02-01 John D Mulvehill Golf-tee guard
US1625911A (en) * 1926-10-05 1927-04-26 Harold L Richards Golf tee
US1936625A (en) * 1931-07-01 1933-11-28 Goldman Benjamin Golf tee and support therefor
US3516664A (en) * 1967-04-26 1970-06-23 Monsanto Co Golf tee holder
US3883144A (en) * 1974-01-11 1975-05-13 Malcolm Lazow Golf tee
US5186455A (en) * 1992-01-27 1993-02-16 Rosetta James A Protective collar for golf tees
US6475107B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2002-11-05 Darrel R. Sand Golf tee height set apparatus

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1625911A (en) * 1926-10-05 1927-04-26 Harold L Richards Golf tee
US1616059A (en) * 1926-11-15 1927-02-01 John D Mulvehill Golf-tee guard
US1936625A (en) * 1931-07-01 1933-11-28 Goldman Benjamin Golf tee and support therefor
US3516664A (en) * 1967-04-26 1970-06-23 Monsanto Co Golf tee holder
US3883144A (en) * 1974-01-11 1975-05-13 Malcolm Lazow Golf tee
US5186455A (en) * 1992-01-27 1993-02-16 Rosetta James A Protective collar for golf tees
US6475107B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2002-11-05 Darrel R. Sand Golf tee height set apparatus

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2007149576A3 (en) * 2006-06-23 2008-03-20 Scott M Joffe Golf tee height stopper
US20090088274A1 (en) * 2007-10-02 2009-04-02 Gilles Blais Height adjustible golf tee
US20100210376A1 (en) * 2009-02-18 2010-08-19 O'sullivan Sr James Paul Long lasting golf tee
US20110244990A1 (en) * 2010-04-06 2011-10-06 Gibbs Brian J Golf Training Tee
US8597141B1 (en) * 2011-06-02 2013-12-03 Isaac S Daniel Smart golf tee

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