US20070249433A1 - Golf tee - Google Patents

Golf tee Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070249433A1
US20070249433A1 US11/331,556 US33155606A US2007249433A1 US 20070249433 A1 US20070249433 A1 US 20070249433A1 US 33155606 A US33155606 A US 33155606A US 2007249433 A1 US2007249433 A1 US 2007249433A1
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Prior art keywords
golf
tee
stem
golf tee
ball
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Abandoned
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US11/331,556
Inventor
Mark DeSmit
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Desmit Mark
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Priority to US11/331,556 priority patent/US20070249433A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials

Abstract

A golf tee for use in teeing a golf ball during a round of golf or practice is disclosed. The golf tee includes a stem portion engaged to an elongated base portion. The stem portion includes a flexible tubular-shaped body defining a cavity. The body includes a flared portion terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface. The base portion has a first end terminating in a point adapted for insertion into a tee box. The stem portion and base portion may be integrally constructed by an injection molding process. The golf tee is shaped and constructed to reduce inhibiting forces against ball flight when a ball resting upon the engaging surface is struck by a club. Depth gauge indicia may be imprinted on an exterior surface of the golf tee for use to insert the golf tee to a pre-determined depth.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This non-provisional application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/643,646, entitled “Golf Tee,” filed Jan. 13, 2005, which is hereby incorporated in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to golf equipment and more particularly to an improved golf tee for use in teeing a golf ball during a round of golf or during driving practice.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Golf is an outdoor recreational game that was invented in Scotland at some time pre-1500 and is enjoyed worldwide today. Each hole begins with a tee box and concludes with a manicured grass area known as a green. It is conventional to begin play at each hole from the tee box by driving or stroking a golf ball with the head of a golf club. The tee box is a well-traveled area that often does not provide a desirable grass surface for ball striking. As a result, a player is permitted by rule to elevate his ball above the ground upon a golf tee. In this elevated position, a properly struck ball will travel farther and on a more predictable path as compared to a ball struck while resting upon the ground. As a result, the use of golf tees in playing the game of golf and in practicing golf is essentially compulsory.
  • It is accepted that distance off the tee is an important factor in determining success in the game of golf. Distance increases of only several yards are consider material by many players. Therefore, any equipment improvement adding driving length is significant regardless of apparent relevant scope, such as for example, a 5 yard increase to a 225 yard drive.
  • Most golf tees are made of white birch, other suitable woods, or high density plastics. Conventional tees are about 2⅛ inches in length and are defined by a head and a connecting stem. In order to accommodate the increasing size of driver heads, extended length tees are also available. The stem of a conventional tee may be ⅛ to 3/16 inches in diameter. Advertising is often printed along the narrow stem. The stem terminates in a point at one end for insertion into the ground. At an opposing end, the head has a circular-shaped top surface which is slightly concave and adapted to mate to and support a golf ball. To tee up a golf ball, a player will typically hold the ball with his palm, then using his fingers, press the tee head's concave surface in contact with the ball. In this position, the tee is often supported by the stem between two fingers. Next, the tee stem point is inserted into the ground to a depth that varies based on a player's habits, skills or attentiveness.
  • When a golf ball is struck while upon a conventional tee, the tee inhibits movement of the ball in the direction stuck. Factors contributing to the tee's inhibiting forces include contact surface area with the ball, the coefficients of friction of the tee material, and the rigidity of the tee in an inserted position.
  • The present invention provides a new and improved golf tee. The golf tee has several benefits over tees known in the art, including increased ball flight and ground roll distance, enhanced depth insertion features, and increased advertising space. The increased ball flight distance is a factor of smaller ball contact surface area, the use of a material with reduced coefficients of friction, and a tee stem with decreased rigidity. The improved tee design also offers an increased surface area for advertising and is less prone to breakage.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In an illustrated embodiment of the invention, a golf tee for use in teeing a golf ball is disclosed. For several reasons, the present invention permits longer ball flight and longer ground travel after landing as compared to conventional wood tees. The tee is constructed of material having lower coefficients of friction than birch wood and other conventional materials. The ball engaging surface is much smaller than conventional tees. Further, the tee is made of an elastomeric material that allows the tee to be bendable in the direction of club head when a golf ball is resting upon the ball engaging surface.
  • In an embodiment, a golf tee including a stem portion and an elongated base portion is provided. The stem portion includes a flexible tubular-shaped body defining a cavity. The body includes a flared portion terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface. The base has a first end terminating in a point adapted for insertion into the ground. The tee further includes depth gauge indicia on an exterior surface of the golf tee for use by a player to insert the golf tee into the ground to a pre-determined depth. The stem portion and base portion are integrally constructed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) by an injection molding process. Other materials having similar properties can also be used.
  • A method of reducing spin on a golf ball struck off a golf tee is also disclosed.
  • Further features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description made with reference to the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of a golf tee of the present invention, showing the golf tee in application inserted into a tee box and supporting a golf ball;
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a golf tee made in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is an assembly view of the golf tee of FIG. 2, showing a three-piece assembly;
  • FIG. 4 is a side view, partially in section, of a golf tee made in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, showing an injection molded one-piece golf tee; and
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of the top portion of the golf tee of FIG. 4.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • This Detailed Description of the Invention merely describes embodiments of the invention and is not intended to limit the scope of the claims in any way. Indeed, the invention as described is broader than and unlimited by the preferred embodiments, and the terms used have their full ordinary meaning.
  • Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of a golf tee 10 made in accordance the present invention. The golf tee 10 is shown in application inserted into a tee box 12. The tee box shown is a conventional manicured tee box found on a golf course. The tee box 12 includes a thin grass layer 14 planted over ground base 16. It should be apparent to others with ordinary skill in the art that a tee box is defined as any area suitable for teeing a golf ball, such as for example, a designated area at the beginning of a golf hole, a practice tee area at a golf course, a driving range, or any natural or synthetic area suitable for inserting a tee.
  • The golf tee 10 is shown in FIG. 1 in relation to a standard sized golf ball 30. The dimensions of the golf tee 10 in relation to the golf ball 30 are for exemplary purposes only. It should be understood by others with ordinary skill in the art that the present invention can be practiced using various tee dimensions in relation to a standard sized golf ball.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, a golf ball 30 is shown resting upon the golf tee 10. The golf ball has an outer surface 32 having a repetitive dimple pattern. To be discussed in greater detail, the golf tee 10 includes a flexible stem portion 20. The pattern outer surface 32 rests upon a golf ball engaging surface 26 (see FIG. 2) when the ball 30 is placed on the tee 10 in a suitable position for striking with a golf club.
  • The golf tee 10 is adapted to reduce the energy lost at impact with a golf ball 30 and a golf club. A club head 80 having a head face surface 82 is shown in FIG. 1. When the club head 80 strikes the golf ball 30 in the direction A1, the flexible stem member 20 is bendable in the direction A2. It is believed that this bending motion reduces the energy lost at impact, and reduces the backspin on the golf ball. It is believed that these combined effects in turn create a lower ball trajectory having less air resistance, relative to a ball struck from a conventional tee.
  • It is believed the present invention reduces the amount of energy lost between the golf ball 30 and gold tee 10 after club impact. When a golf ball 30 is struck by a golf club 80, certain energy is lost overcoming the static friction between the golf ball surface 32 and the ball engaging surface 26. Once the golf ball 30 is in motion, additional energy is lost overcoming the kinetic friction between the golf ball surface 32 and the ball engaging surface 26. The present invention uses a tee constructed of a material having lower coefficients of static and kinetic energy than a conventional tee. Further, the tee 10 has a golf ball engaging surface 26 of reduced size. These factors combine to reduce the amount of energy loss relative to a conventional tee.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a perspective view of a golf tee 10 made in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is shown. FIG. 3 is an assembly view of the golf tee of FIG. 2, showing a three-piece assembly. As shown in FIG. 3, the tee includes a stem member 20 having a flexible tubular-shaped body. The thin-walled tube has a first end 22, best seen in FIG. 3, and an opposing second end 24. The second end 24 includes a flared portion 25 terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface 26. The inner diameter DF of the flare may vary in the practice of the present invention. For example, the inner diameter DF may be ¾ inches.
  • Referring again to FIG. 2, the tee 10 includes an elongated base 40. The base has a shape and size comparable to the lower portion of a conventional tee. The base has a first end 42 terminating at an insertion point 44 and a second end 46 (shown in FIG. 3). The second end 46 is engaged to the stem member 20 first end 22. The engagement is obscured by a depth gauge stripe 60 in FIG. 2. As suggested by the assembly view in FIG. 3, the second end 46 is inserted within the first end 22. The second end 46, once fully engaged, extends to an insertion line 28 indicated on the stem member 20.
  • The stem member 20 is constructed of a flexible plastic material that has coefficients of friction, both static and kinetic, less than processed birch wood. As mentioned, selection of such materials allows less energy to be lost when the golf ball 30 slides off the golf tee 10 after driver impact. As a result, it is believed that less spin is created and ball flight is increased compared to a ball struck off a conventional tee.
  • The stem member 20 material is an elastomer, allowing the tee to be reusable despite temporary deformations in shape while in use. The stem portion 20 will deform immediately after impact with a club head 80 but will return to essentially its same shape. Various plastics or nylon may be used to construct the stem member. Preferably, the stem member is constructed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Materials such as this permit the stem member 20 to be bendable in a direction of club head travel when the club is used to strike a golf ball resting upon the engaging surface 26.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the outer diameter of the stem member 20 is significantly larger than the outer diameter of the base 40. This increased diameter allows for greater surface area for advertising 50. It is well-known in the art and desired to include advertising on tee stems. In other embodiments, the outer diameter of the stem member 20 may be substantially the same as or smaller than the base 40.
  • The golf tee 10 further has a ring-shaped depth gauge stripe 60. The gauge stripe is located near the center length of the tee. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 2-3, the gauge stripe is constructed of a piece of heat shrink tubing, such as such as fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) or a similar material, that is shrunk over the insertion point of the base 40 second end 46 into the stem member 20 first end 22.
  • The gauge stripe is colored to contrast with the color of PTFE stem member 20. The gauge stripe 60 allows a player to insert the tee into the ground to a pre-determined depth. The depth is confirmed when a bottom indicia 62 visually reaches ground level. For example, as shown in FIG. 2, this insertion depth L1 may 1¼ inches, creating a ball elevation height L2 of 2¼ inches with a 4 inch tee. It is believed that tee performance can be maximized at certain pre-determined depths. It should be obvious to others with ordinary skill in the art that the other insertion depths, elevation heights and combinations thereof can be utilized in the practice of the present invention.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4, a perspective view, partially in section, of another embodiment of the present invention is shown. The one-piece tee 100 includes a stem portion 110 and a base portion 114 terminating in an end point 144, all integrally constructed by an injection molding process. A solid center portion 112 is illustrated at an area proximate to the attachment point of the stem portion 110 to the base portion 114. The stem portion 110 defines a shoulder 130 relative to an outer diameter of the base portion 114.
  • As best shown in FIG. 5, the stem portion 110 includes a flared portion 125 terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface 126. The stem portion 110 further includes a cavity 115 (see FIG. 4) defined by an inner surface 116. The inner diameter of the cavity can be substantially constant or variable throughout the majority of its length. As shown, the cavity narrows at a bottom portion 118 and terminates at a bottom surface 119. It should be apparent to others with ordinary skill in the art that various cavity shapes, depths, and widths may be utilized during the practice of the present invention. Relative to the cavity length Lc, the narrow wall thickness surrounding the cavity contributes to the bendable property of the stem member 110.
  • The tee 100 includes depth gauge indicia imprinted on an exterior surface thereof for use to insert the golf tee into a tee box to a predetermined depth. As shown, the tee 100 includes a ring-shaped depth gauge stripe 120 circumferentially placed about the stem portion 102. The stripe is colored and defines a depth insertion line 122. The strip may be imprinted on the outside surface of the tee 110. As shown, the insertion line 122 is above the bottom surface 119 of the cavity relative to the base portion 114. It should be apparent to others with ordinary skill in the art that other placements of the insertion line are possible in the practice of the present invention.
  • For exemplary purposes, the beneficial operation of the golf tee 100 will be discussed with respect to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. To begin use of the golf tee 100, a player inserts the tee into a tee box by any conventional manual technique to a pre-determined depth, such as for example, to the insertion depth L1 shown in FIG. 2. It is believed that the insertion depth line 122 increases the player's consistency and certainty in teeing the ball to a desired elevation. Further, it is believed that tee performance characteristics are maximized at this pre-determined depth.
  • In concert or immediately following insertion, a ball 30 is placed upon the golf tee 100. Next, a player uses a golf club to strike the golf ball 30 with the face 82 of a conventional golf club head 80 in the direction Al shown in FIG. 2. Struck properly, a ball will be lifted only slightly vertical. Therefore, the ball essentially travels across the tee surface in its initial path of movement.
  • When the ball is struck resting a conventional golf tee, several tee properties may inhibit flight of the ball. First, the amount of surface contact between ball and tee and the coefficient of static and kinetic friction of tee material contribute to frictional forces against the ball. Incidentally, these forces result not only in decreased club head momentum, but also increase undesirable extraneous backspin of the ball which increases driver trajectory and limits drive travel in the air and on the ground. As discussed, the golf tee 110 of the present invention utilizes a ball engaging contact surface 126 of reduced size and a low coefficients of friction material to reduce frictional forces against ball flight.
  • It is also believed at impact the golf tee 100 flexes in the direction of the club travel, removing little club head energy compared to conventional tees. The reduction in energy loss advantageously decreases resistance of the tee, rotations per minute, and air flight resistance. As a result, it is believed that greater distance in flight and ground travel after impact will result with use of a golf tee 100 of the present invention relative to a conventional tee.
  • Further, the rigidity of a golf tee effects ball take-off. A solid wooden tee does not bend when struck, slightly impeding golf head travel. In many cases, energy is lost in breaking the tee. In the present invention, the base portion 114 remains inserted in the ground while the flexible PTFE, or other resilient material, stem member 110 bends in the direction of club head travel on impact, then recovers more or less to its original position, ready for reuse. This feature is in contrast to conventional wood tees that are designed to fail.
  • As mentioned, another benefit of the present invention is that the tee is less prone to breakage. As a result, the tee can be reused and player expense is reduced. Furthermore, a player can now enjoy the security of using the same tee on the practice range as on the golf course. In other words, a player may strike ball after ball from a consistently repeatable ball height as the player warms up for a round. Subsequently, when a player begins his round he benefits from the knowledge and comfort that his ball will be teed at the same ball height on the golf course tee box as he practiced on the range. This feature of the present invention naturally increases player confidence and eliminates one variable of the tee shot.
  • Informal field experiments have been conducted of golf tees constructed in accordance with several embodiments of the present invention. In these experiments, golfers have found the performance of such tees to be superior to conventional tees.
  • While several embodiments of the invention has been illustrated and described in considerable detail, the present invention is not to be considered limited to the precise constructions disclosed. Various adaptations, modifications and uses of the invention may occur to those skilled in the arts to which the invention relates. It is the intention to cover all such adaptations, modifications and uses falling within the scope or spirit of the claims filed herewith.

Claims (32)

1. A golf tee for use in teeing a golf ball comprising:
a) a stem member having a flexible tubular-shaped body, a first end and a second end, said second end comprising a flared portion terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface; and
b) an elongated base having a first end terminating at an insertion point and a second end, wherein said elongated base second end is engaged to said stem member first end.
2. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member is constructed of a material having a coefficient of static friction less than processed birch wood.
3. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member is constructed of a material having a coefficient of kinetic friction less than processed birch wood.
4. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member is constructed of an elastomeric material.
5. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member is constructed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).
6. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member comprises advertising related text, logos or symbols.
7. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member is bendable in a direction of travel of a golf club used to strike a golf ball resting upon said engaging surface.
8. The golf tee of claim 1 further comprising a ring-shaped depth gauge circumferentially attached about said golf tee.
9. The golf tee of claim 1 further comprising a ring-shaped depth gauge circumferentially attached about said stem member first end and said base second end, wherein said gauge is a piece of heat shrink tubing.
10. The golf tee of claim 1 wherein said stem member first end and said base second end are engaged by a piece of heat shrink tubing.
11. The golf tee of claim 1 further comprising depth gauge indicia imprinted on an exterior surface thereof for use to insert said golf tee into a tee box to a pre-determined depth.
12. A golf tee for use in teeing a golf ball comprising:
a) a stem portion comprising an elongated hollow body defining a cavity, said body comprising a flared portion terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface;
b) a center portion engaged to said stem portion; and
c) an elongated base portion engaged to said center portion and having a first end terminating in a point adapted for insertion into a tee box.
13. The golf tee of claim 12 wherein said stem portion, said center portion and said base portion are integrally constructed.
14. The golf tee of claim 12 wherein said stem portion, said center portion and said base portion are integrally constructed by an injection molding process.
15. The golf tee of claim 12 wherein said center portion defines a shoulder relative to an outer diameter of said base portion.
16. The golf tee of claim 12 further comprising a ring-shaped depth gauge circumferentially disposed about said center portion.
17. The golf tee of claim 12 further comprising depth gauge indicia imprinted on an exterior surface thereof for use to insert said golf tee into a tee box to a pre-determined depth.
18. The golf tee of claim 17 wherein said indicia is a color.
19. The golf tee of claim 17 wherein said indicia is a depth insertion line transverse to a longitudinal axis of said golf tee.
20. A golf tee comprising an integral one-piece body constructed of an elastomeric material, said body having a solid elongated base portion for insertion into a tee box and a flexible tubular-shaped stem portion for supporting a golf ball.
21. The golf tee of claim 20 wherein said stem portion comprises a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface.
22. The golf tee of claim 20 further comprising depth gauge indicia imprinted on an exterior surface thereof for use to insert said golf tee into a tee box to a pre-determined depth.
23. The golf tee of claim 22 wherein said indicia is a color.
24. A golf tee comprising:
a) a stem portion comprising a flexible tubular-shaped body defining a cavity, said body comprising a flared portion terminating at a circular rim defining a golf ball engaging surface; and
b) an elongated base portion fixed to said stem portion and having an end point adapted for insertion into a tee box;
c) wherein said stem portion and said base portion are integrally constructed by an injection molding process.
25. The golf tee of claim 24 wherein said stem portion defines a shoulder relative to an outer diameter of said base portion.
26. The golf tee of claim 24 further comprising depth gauge indicia on an exterior surface of said golf tee for use to insert said golf tee into a tee box to a pre-determined depth.
27. The golf tee of claim 25 wherein said depth gauge indicia are disposed above a bottom surface of said cavity relative to said base portion.
28. A method of reducing spin on a golf ball struck off a golf tee comprising:
a) inserting a golf tee to a pre-determined depth in a tee box, said golf tee having a base portion for insertion into said box and a stem portion comprising a flexible tubular-shaped body defining a cavity;
b) placing a golf ball on a golf ball engaging surface defined by a flared portion terminating at a circular rim at an end of said stem portion;
c) striking said golf ball with a golf club; and
d) bending said stem portion in a direction of said golf club travel.
29. The method of claim 28 further comprising constructing said stem portion from a material having a coefficient of static friction less than processed birch wood.
30. The method of claim 28 further comprising constructing said stem portion from a material having a coefficient of kinetic friction less than processed birch wood.
31. The method of claim 28 further comprising indicating said predetermined depth by imprinting depth gauge indicia on an exterior surface of said golf tee.
32. The method of claim 28 further comprising returning said stem portion after golf club impact with said ball to the same position as before golf club impact with said ball.
US11/331,556 2005-01-13 2006-01-13 Golf tee Abandoned US20070249433A1 (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080188329A1 (en) * 2007-02-05 2008-08-07 Shang-Jaw Chiou Impact resistant golf tee
US20080274836A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Lee James S Golf Tee
US20080287219A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2008-11-20 John Gyorgyi Golf tee support apparatus
US20090111615A1 (en) * 2007-10-27 2009-04-30 Lance Lee Prickett Golf accessory
US20100113188A1 (en) * 2007-10-27 2010-05-06 Lance Lee Prickett Golf Accessory
US20100184533A1 (en) * 2009-01-20 2010-07-22 Richard Colonna Tee with word game
US20100216576A1 (en) * 2009-02-25 2010-08-26 Martin Sanders Golf tee
US20110053710A1 (en) * 2009-08-27 2011-03-03 Hartline John M Mesh Golf Tee
US20120214616A1 (en) * 2011-02-18 2012-08-23 Lipstock Elliot A Adjustable lenght golf tee
USD773571S1 (en) * 2015-02-03 2016-12-06 Billy Gene Bynum, III Golf tee
US9737773B2 (en) * 2015-12-16 2017-08-22 Creative Golf Innovations LLC Adjustable golf tee

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD764609S1 (en) * 2015-02-19 2016-08-23 Terry A. Cox Multi use golf tee

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US2011203A (en) * 1933-07-28 1935-08-13 Nippon Trading Company Golf tee
US3633919A (en) * 1970-04-29 1972-01-11 Frank J Liccardello Golf tee having a separable turf-inserting part
US3907289A (en) * 1974-05-15 1975-09-23 Sr David M Bondu Golf tee
US4948130A (en) * 1987-08-12 1990-08-14 Rydborn S A O Golf tee
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US5356146A (en) * 1993-04-09 1994-10-18 Blosser Daniel W Gauged golf tee
US5683313A (en) * 1994-01-19 1997-11-04 Velocity Golf Products, Inc. Vented golf tee
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US6053822A (en) * 1998-12-03 2000-04-25 Kolodney; Jeffery D. Golf tee
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US20050261087A1 (en) * 2004-05-18 2005-11-24 Walters James J ( Uni-Tee ) flexible - adjustable- reusable golf practice tee
US20060009312A1 (en) * 2004-07-09 2006-01-12 Konstantino Chotos Tubular golf tee
US20060276268A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-07 Chi-Chih Hung Golf tee

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080188329A1 (en) * 2007-02-05 2008-08-07 Shang-Jaw Chiou Impact resistant golf tee
US20080274836A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Lee James S Golf Tee
US20080287219A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2008-11-20 John Gyorgyi Golf tee support apparatus
US20090111615A1 (en) * 2007-10-27 2009-04-30 Lance Lee Prickett Golf accessory
US20100113188A1 (en) * 2007-10-27 2010-05-06 Lance Lee Prickett Golf Accessory
US20100184533A1 (en) * 2009-01-20 2010-07-22 Richard Colonna Tee with word game
US20100216576A1 (en) * 2009-02-25 2010-08-26 Martin Sanders Golf tee
US20110053710A1 (en) * 2009-08-27 2011-03-03 Hartline John M Mesh Golf Tee
US20110197421A1 (en) * 2009-08-27 2011-08-18 Hartline John M Method of Forming Mesh Golf Tee
US8771099B2 (en) * 2009-08-27 2014-07-08 John M. Hartline Mesh golf tee
US20120214616A1 (en) * 2011-02-18 2012-08-23 Lipstock Elliot A Adjustable lenght golf tee
USD773571S1 (en) * 2015-02-03 2016-12-06 Billy Gene Bynum, III Golf tee
US9737773B2 (en) * 2015-12-16 2017-08-22 Creative Golf Innovations LLC Adjustable golf tee

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