US20070298893A1 - Wearable Device - Google Patents

Wearable Device Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070298893A1
US20070298893A1 US11/744,320 US74432007A US2007298893A1 US 20070298893 A1 US20070298893 A1 US 20070298893A1 US 74432007 A US74432007 A US 74432007A US 2007298893 A1 US2007298893 A1 US 2007298893A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
wrist
user
sounds
section
flexure
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Abandoned
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US11/744,320
Inventor
Glenn Yu
Steven Moran
Kenneth Heimann
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Mattel Inc
Original Assignee
Mattel Inc
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US79803306P priority Critical
Priority to US81221306P priority
Priority to US84621006P priority
Application filed by Mattel Inc filed Critical Mattel Inc
Priority to US11/744,320 priority patent/US20070298893A1/en
Assigned to MATTEL, INC. reassignment MATTEL, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: YU, GLENN, HEIMANN, KENNETH R., MORAN, STEVEN
Publication of US20070298893A1 publication Critical patent/US20070298893A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/21Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types
    • A63F13/212Input arrangements for video game devices characterised by their sensors, purposes or types using sensors worn by the player, e.g. for measuring heart beat or leg activity
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/02Accessories
    • A63F13/06Accessories using player-operated means for controlling the position of a specific area display
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/20Input arrangements for video game devices
    • A63F13/24Constructional details thereof, e.g. game controllers with detachable joystick handles
    • A63F13/245Constructional details thereof, e.g. game controllers with detachable joystick handles specially adapted to a particular type of game, e.g. steering wheels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/80Special adaptations for executing a specific game genre or game mode
    • A63F13/803Driving vehicles or craft, e.g. cars, airplanes, ships, robots or tanks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/50Controlling the output signals based on the game progress
    • A63F13/54Controlling the output signals based on the game progress involving acoustic signals, e.g. for simulating revolutions per minute [RPM] dependent engine sounds in a driving game or reverberation against a virtual wall
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/10Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals
    • A63F2300/1012Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game characterized by input arrangements for converting player-generated signals into game device control signals involving biosensors worn by the player, e.g. for measuring heart beat, limb activity
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/60Methods for processing data by generating or executing the game program
    • A63F2300/6063Methods for processing data by generating or executing the game program for sound processing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2300/00Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game
    • A63F2300/80Features of games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions, e.g. on a television screen, showing representations related to the game specially adapted for executing a specific type of game
    • A63F2300/8017Driving on land or water; Flying

Abstract

An interactive wrist cover for simulating riding a vehicle, such as a motorcycle, is provided. The interactive wrist cover includes various components that respond to realistic driving or riding motions of the user by generating appropriate outputs, such as increasing engine speed sound in response to wrist flexure to simulate throttle operation, even if no handlebar is present.

Description

  • The present application claims priority to provisional application 60/798,033 filed May 4, 2006, titled “Gloves with integral sensors and electronics to simulate riding a motorcycle,” claims priority to provisional application 60/812,213, filed Jun. 9, 2006, titled “Gloves with integral sensor and electronics to simulate riding a motorcycle,” and claims priority to provisional application 60/846,210, filed Sep. 20, 2006, titled “Gloves with integral sensors and electronics to simulate riding a motorcycle.” The contents of these provisional applications are incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Various products attempt to give users a realistic and exciting simulated motorcycle driving experience. For example, one such product includes full-motion game controllers that may be used with video games. These devices enable a user to apply realistic driving motion to control operation of the video game.
  • Full-motion game controllers may include motorcycle handlebars that enable a user to utilize wrist flexure to control the throttle of a simulated motorcycle in a video game. In turn, the video game responds with video and sound corresponding to the user's actions.
  • Such prior art toy products may suffer from several problems. In particular, the play action can be restricted to operation of the video game. While the full action operation may include some user activity, the user remains predominantly sedentary apart from hand/wrist movement. Further, some users may wish to utilize their imagination and experience to simulate motorcycle driving outside of the video game environment.
  • SUMMARY
  • An interactive wrist cover for simulating riding a vehicle is provided. The interactive wrist cover includes various components that respond to a user's realistic driving motions by generating appropriate outputs, such as increasing engine speed sound in response to wrist flexure to simulate throttle operation, even when no handle bar is present. The components thereby enable a simulated vehicle operation in virtually any location, including within and outside the video game environment. For example, a user may utilize the wrist cover while riding a non-motorized vehicle, such as a bike, to make it feel as if the vehicle is in fact powered by an engine.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows an example pair of wrist covers worn by a user;
  • FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C show cross-sectional views of a wrist cover in a plurality of positions; and
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B show a high level flowchart of example operations performed by a wrist cover.
  • WRITTEN DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a pair of wrist covers 110, including right wrist cover 120 and left wrist cover 122, being worn by a user on each of a right hand 112 and a left hand 114. While the wrist covers are shown with various functional and decorative shapes and designs, modifications can be made to these elements without departing from the scope of this disclosure. For example, the wrist covers can be designed to simulate motocross racing styles, touring styles, etc. Furthermore, while FIG. 1 shows a pair of wrist covers, only a single wrist cover may be provided.
  • Right wrist cover 120 is shown having a right finger covering section 132, a right hand covering section 134, and a right forearm covering section 136. Section 132 is rotatably coupled to section 134 via rotary pin joint 140. Similarly, section 134 is rotatably coupled to section 136 via rotary pin joint 142. The pin joints may form a hinge, such that the different wrist sections are hinged relative to one another. While in this example a rotation joint having a single degree of freedom between the wrist covering sections is provided, various other flexible couplings may be used. For example, the rotatable couplings may include a flexible joint that rotates via bending a resilient coupling member, or may include a flexible fabric or leather coupling piece. Sections 132, 134, and 136 may be formed from various materials, such as plastic, rubber, etc.
  • The wrist cover 120 may be removeably coupled to the user's right hand 112 via plastic strap elements 160, 162, and 164. As shown in FIG. 1, strap 160 may be coupled to one side of right hand covering section 134 and positioned in front of the user's thumb so that it wraps around the user's palm (not shown). Further, strap 162 may be positioned on the same side of right hand covering section 134 but behind the user's thumb. Sections 160 and 162 may further include Velcro, making it possible for them to connect to strap 164, which is coupled to the other side of right hand covering section 134. Such a strap system enables the wrist cover to fit a variety of hand sizes, thereby facilitating easy attachment and detachment from the user. While this example illustrates three strap elements, various other approaches may be used to removably couple the wrist cover to the user, such as elastic bands, straps with a buckle, strings, snaps, buttons, etc.
  • Right hand covering section 134 is shown having an exterior housing 150 that may include an integral speaker cover 152, which, in turn may include a plurality of perforations or holes covering a speaker. As described in further detail herein, right hand covering section 134 may also include various sensors, batteries, electronics, and controllers, such as a speaker for generating sounds, lights for generating illumination, IR emitters and/or receivers, a control circuit and/or various other output generators. In one example, a control circuit may generate output, such as sounds, in response to various sensor inputs. Also, although not shown in FIG. 1, right hand covering section 134 may further include visual read-outs (such as a tachometer, speedometer, etc.), as well as input devices, such as buttons, knobs, dials, etc.
  • Right hand covering section 134 may also include a mode selection switch (not shown), having two, three or more switch options/positions for enabling a user to select an operation mode. As described in further detail with regard to FIG. 3, different operations may be performed in response to various sensor inputs depending on the mode selection. For example, the first mode may be a deactivated (or off) mode, the second mode may be a single increasing engine speed (or “rev”) mode, and the third mode may be an acceleration and cruising mode.
  • Right hand covering section 134 may be shaped and/or formed to fit around the back side of the user's right hand 112. Specifically, a bottom surface of section 134 may be concave to more closely fit the user. Likewise, sections 132 and 136 may also have bottom surfaces shaped to form fit the user, or may be formed of substantially planar shapes.
  • Joint 142 may include an integral cam element (see FIG. 2), which enables detection of the degree of relative rotation between right hand covering section 134 and right forearm covering section 136 via a sensor coupled in right hand covering section 134. While in this example a cam and deflection sensor are used, various other sensor configurations may be used to indicate flexure between sections 134 and 136. For example, a strain gauge mounted on a bending joint member may be used to measure angular deflection between sections 134 and 136. As another example, a rotary potentiometer may be used to measure the rotation of a joint 142. Still, other approaches may be used if desired.
  • In one example, a circuit in right hand covering section 134 may generate engine sounds, where the amplitude and/or frequency of the engine sounds are correlated to the degree of wrist flexure by the user, as measured via joint 142. The degree of wrist flexure may thus simulate increasing throttle actuation, which in turn produces increasing engine speed and/or power sounds. Such operation may enhance the experience of riding a bike or other activity in which the user may pretend to ride a motorcycle. In other words, as the right hand simulates the movements required to rev a throttle grip of a motorcycle, motorcycle engine sounds are emitted from a speaker embedded on the wrist cover. These sounds may correspond to the amount of simulated rotation of the imaginary throttle, with more rotation resulting in a faster and/or more powerful sounding engine. Alternatively, a contact switch may be coupled to joint 142, such that upon actuation of a cam element, a revving engine speed sound is produced upon contact, irrespective of the degree of rotation past the point of initial switch contact.
  • FIG. 1 further shows wrist cover 122 coupled to left hand 114, with similar left finger, hand, and wrist covering sections 172, 174, and 176, respectively, and joints 180 and 182. Left wrist cover 122 may be symmetric, or asymmetric, with respect to wrist cover 120.
  • For example, left wrist cover 122 may have similar wrist flexure sensing and output generation as right wrist cover 120, wherein engine or honking horn sounds are produced, or it may include additional and/or alternative features. In the example of FIG. 1, a sensor may measure finger deflection of user's left hand 114 via the degree of rotation between left hand covering section 174 and left finger covering section 172, and, in turn, communicate this information to a circuit in left hand covering section 174. Further, left hand covering section 174 may generate shifting sounds in response to the finger flexure to further enhance the simulation of motorcycle riding. In other words, as the left hand is moved to simulate pulling a motorcycle clutch lever, shifting sounds may be generated.
  • In still another example, right wrist cover 120 may also include a sensor to measure finger flexure via joint 140, and further generate braking sounds in response to the sensed finger flexure.
  • By providing multiple aspects of motorcycle riding between the pair of wrist covers, it is possible to enable increased riding simulation and enable skill development, as well-coordinated movements of the right and left hands may result in smooth shifting and acceleration sounds.
  • In some examples, communication may be provided between two wrist covers. For example, wired or wireless communication from wrist cover 120 to and from wrist cover 122 may be provided, such as via infrared (IR) communication, visible light communication, ultrasonic or audible sound communication, or radio frequency (RF) communication. For example, the wrist covers may communicate the amount of deflection of various joints. Such operations may enable one or both wrist covers to generate output, such as sound, in response to the coordinated operation of the left and right wrist cover.
  • In this way, it may be possible to for a user to develop further skill as the wrist covers 110 generate outputs, such as sounds, responsive to well-coordinated movements of the right and left wrist covers together, while also generating output such as mechanical noises and engine sounds associated with poorly executed shifting in a real motorcycle in response to poor coordinated movements of the left and right wrist covers.
  • As noted above, a simulated, electric or electronic visual indicator or indicators may be provided, such as on right or left hand covering section 164/174. These indicators may include a simulated tachometer or speedometer. In one example, a simulated tachometer may provide a readout of the simulated engine speed sounds, with corresponding changes reflecting the position of the right “throttle” wrist flexure and the fingers of the left “clutch” finger flexure.
  • While FIG. 1 shows example wrist covers that do not completely cover the arm, hand, or fingers, various alternative configurations may be used. For example, form fitting gloves may be used with corresponding sensors (e.g., position bump switches) placed on the palm and/or back of the wrist sections of the gloves. Thus, as the user's hand moves in selected ways, the switches are closed, or other types of sensors are actuated, causing associated sounds, visual effects, or other actions to occur as described herein. Further, while the above described embodiment is directed to motorcycle riding, various other vehicular configurations may be used, such as for a snowmobile, jet-ski, construction equipment, etc. Further, various sounds and or sensor effects may be used in addition to engine and braking sounds, such as horn sounds, crashing sounds, vibration, etc.
  • FIG. 2 shows a side cross-sectional view of an example wrist cover 120 with like components labeled as in FIG. 1, where the wrist cover is shown in three different positions. Further FIG. 2 shows spring loaded cam element 220 rotating about joint 142, as well as internal compartment 210, which may house electronics, batteries, etc. As the spring loaded cam is rotated counterclockwise against a stop (not shown), and thus in the example where cam 220 is coupled to an internal position detection sensor (not shown), the sensor indicates a non-flexed position.
  • Specifically, FIG. 2A shows the wrist cover in a position before a user has initiated wrist flexure, and before surface 222 of forearm section 136 has contacted cam element 220.
  • FIG. 2B shows the wrist cover in a position after the user has rotated from the position of FIG. 2A, where surface 222 has just contacted, but not moved, cam 220. Again, in the position of FIG. 2B, the spring loaded cam 220 is rotated counterclockwise against the stop, and the sensor indicates a non-flexed position.
  • FIG. 2C shows the wrist cover in a position after the user has further rotated from the position of FIG. 2B and generated sufficient wrist flexure to actuate cam 220 to the point of activating the internal position sensor. As such, the sensor indicates that wrist flexure is detected.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, a routine is described that may be performed by circuits or a processor embedded in a wrist cover, such as embedded within wrist cover 120. The following process may be performed by code stored within computer readable storage media, or may performed by electronic circuits, etc. In the example depicted in FIG. 3, various operating modes may be selected by a user that produce varying wrist cover performances in response to user inputs. Specifically, three distinct operating modes may be selected, including:
      • mode 1: which represents an inactive state,
      • mode 2: which represents a single engine rev mode, where upon actuation of a user's movement (e.g., wrist flexure), a single increasing engine speed (or rev) is generated; and
      • mode 3: which represents an accelerating and/or decelerating engine speed, along with shifts, and then a sustained cruising engine speed and transmission sound and/or idling sound.
  • In this example, various sound recordings of various durations are selectively played back through a speaker in a wrist cover, where the various recordings represent one or more components of the sounds produced during the above modes, and differing playback operations are, in turn, provided in these different modes. The operation according to FIG. 3 thus enables numerous play patterns using a single-position wrist flexure sensor and a three-position mode selector switch.
  • In 310, the routine reads a mode selection switch, and determines a user-selected mode, such as mode 1, 2, or 3. When mode 1 is selected, the routine continues to 312 and no sound or other output is emitted, where mode 1 may be referred to as “off.” When mode 2 is selected, the routine continues to 314, and when mode 3 is selected, the routine continues to 316.
  • Mode 2 provides a single engine increasing engine speed sound, or “rev,” in response to detection of user input, such as wrist flexure. When wrist flexure is not detected, no sound is produced, unless a “rev” is in progress, in which case the “rev” plays to completion, and then no sound is produced. In this example, the single increasing engine speed sound recording is referred to a recording 1. While a single recording is repeatedly used in this example, the routine may alternatively utilize a plurality of different recordings, which are randomly selected for playback, or played in a specified order.
  • Mode 3 provides a more complex play pattern, in which a continuous idling sound (recording 2) is played when no wrist flexure is detected. Upon detection of wrist flexure, an accelerating engine and transmission recording (recording 4) is played, where the engine repeatedly increases in speed as if repeatedly shifting to higher gears. Then, assuming wrist flexure is still detected, upon reaching the last, or highest gear, a cruising sound recording (recording 5) is continuously played. Further, upon detection that wrist flexure is removed or stopped, a deceleration engine and transmission recording (recording 3) is played. Then, assuming wrist flexure is still not detected, upon completion of the deceleration, the idling recording (recording 1) is again repeatedly played.
  • Returning to the details of FIG. 3A, in 314, the routine determines a user body position, such as a wrist position as measured at joint 142. In this example, a single position sensor is used that indicates either wrist flexure is detected (position 2), or is not detected (position 1); however, a continuously variable angle or position sensor may also be used as noted herein. If position 1 is detected (e.g., no wrist flexure), the routine continues to 320 to determine whether playback of recording 1 is in process. If so, the routine continues to 322 to continue playback of recording 1; otherwise, the routine continues to 324 and no output or sound is produced. In other words, if recording 1 has begun playing due to wrist flexure, but the wrist flexure is stopped, playback of recording 1 continues until completion of the recording.
  • Likewise, if position 2 is detected (e.g., wrist flexure), the routine continues to 326 to determine whether playback of recording 1 is in process. If so, the routine continues to 322 to continue playback of recording 1; otherwise, the routine continues to 328 to initiate playback of recording 1. In other words, upon detection of wrist flexure, playback of recording 1 is initiated, unless it is already being played. Further, after the completion of playback of recording 1, no sound is produced even if wrist flexure is continued. Thus, a single increasing engine speed sound is generated.
  • When mode 3 is selected, the routine determines wrist flexure position in 316. When position 1 is detected, the routine continues to 330 to determine whether the previous position of the user's wrist was position 2 upon the last execution of the routine. If so, the routine continues to 332 in FIG. 3B to initiate playback of recording 3. Otherwise, the routine continues to 334 to determine whether playback of recording 3 is completed, or still in progress. If it is in progress, the routine continues to 336 to continue the playback of recording 3. If not, the routine continues to 338 to playback recording 2, or continue/repeat playback of recording 2.
  • In mode 3 when position 2 is detected, the routine continues to 340 in FIG. 3A to determine whether the previous position of the user's wrist was position 1 upon the last execution of the routine. If so, the routine continues to 342 in FIG. 3B to initiate playback of recording 4. Otherwise, the routine continues to 344 to determine whether playback of recording 4 is in progress. If not, the routine continues to 346 to initiate playback of recording 5. If so, the routine continues to 348 to continue playback of recording 4.
  • In this way, even though a 2-position wrist sensor is used, a wide variety of play patterns and simulated motorcycle riding operation may be provided. While FIG. 3 represents an example operation of the right wrist cover 120, similar operations may also be provided by left wrist cover 122. Alternatively, the left wrist cover may utilize a 2-mode switch, where during a first mode the wrist cover is deactivated (or “off”) and during a second mode a horn sound is generated upon detecting wrist flexure.
  • While the present invention has been described in terms of specific embodiments, it should be appreciated that the spirit and scope of the invention is not limited to those embodiments. For example, the disclosed wrist covers may communicate with a video game console and be used to control operation of a vehicle, such as a motorcycle, in the video game. The scope of the invention is instead indicated by the appended claims. All subject matter which comes within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims is to be embraced within the scope of the claims.

Claims (20)

1. An article of manufacture worn by a user, comprising:
a first section;
a second section coupled to the first section, the second section and the first section shaped to be worn proximate to a wrist of the user;
a sensor configured to indicate relative motion between the first and second section corresponding to wrist flexure of the user; and
an output generator coupled to the sensor, the output generator providing vehicle sounds in response to the relative motion indicated by the sensor.
2. The article of claim 1, where the first section is shaped to be worn on a back of hand of the user, and the second section shaped to be worn on a forearm of a user, and where the first and second sections are rotatably coupled to one another via a hinge, with the sensor providing an indication of relative rotation about the hinge.
3. The article of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of stored sounds, where the output generator selectively plays the sounds responsive at least to actuation of the user's wrist as detected by the sensor, where the sounds include engine speed sounds so as to simulate a hand throttle actuator of a motorcycle.
4. The article of claim 1 wherein the sensor is a 2-position sensor that indicates whether or not wrist flexure is detected.
5. The article of claim 1 further comprising a mode selector coupled to the output generator, where the output generator provides different output sounds responsive to wrist flexure depending on a mode indicated by the mode selector.
6. The article of claim 1 wherein the sensor measures a degree of rotation, and the output generator provides sounds responsive to a degree of rotation detected by the sensor.
7. The article of claim 1 wherein the vehicle sounds include transmission and engine sounds.
8. The article of claim 7 wherein an increasing engine speed sound is provided by the output generator.
9. The article of claim 1 wherein the output generator is integrally embedded in the second section.
10. A pair of removable interactive wrist covers worn by a user, comprising:
a first wrist covering, comprising:
a first hand covering section;
a first forearm covering section rotatably coupled to the hand covering section;
a speaker coupled to an exterior of the hand covering section, and
a first sensor coupled to the first hand covering section and the first forearm covering; and
first electronics actuating the speaker to generating a plurality of engine sounds, where the electronics selectively generate the plurality of engine sounds response to flexure and non-flexure of a user's first wrist as indicated by the first sensor; and
a second wrist covering, comprising:
a second hand covering section;
a second forearm covering section rotatably coupled to the hand covering section;
a speaker coupled to an exterior of the hand covering section, and
a second sensor coupled to the second hand covering section and the second forearm covering; and
second electronics actuating the speaker to generating a horn sounds, where the electronics selectively generate the horn sound response to flexure and non-flexure of a user's second wrist as indicated by the second sensor.
11. The pair of claim 10 wherein each of the first and second wrist covering has at least a strap coupled to the hand covering section to removeably couple the wrist covering to the user.
12. The pair of claim 11, where each of the forearm covering sections is shaped to cover only a portion of the user's arm, and each of the hand covering sections is shaped to cover at least a portion of a back of the user's hand without completely covering a user's fingers and palm.
13. The pair of claim 12 wherein the first electronics generate engine shifting sounds responsive to the flexure and non-flexure of the user's wrist as indicated by the first sensor.
14. A method of operation of an article of manufacture, the article worn by a user, comprising:
receiving an input via the article, the motion generated by action of the user, the action corresponding to movements used to operate a vehicle; and
producing an output in response to the input, the output simulating a vehicle output that correlates to the vehicle operation movements.
15. The method of claim 14 wherein the movements include wrist flexure.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein the output includes a plurality of engine sounds, the method further comprising selectively producing the plurality of engine speed sounds responsive to wrist flexure indicated by the input.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein the input includes an indication of whether a user's wrist is flexed or not.
18. The method of claim 17 wherein the output is responsive to the indication, and whether the indication has changed.
19. The method of claim 17 wherein output includes an increasing and decreasing engine sounds and transmission shifting sounds.
20. The method of claim 17 wherein increasing engine speed sounds are generated upon detection of wrist flexure, and decreasing or idle speed sounds are generated upon detection of the absence of wrist flexure.
US11/744,320 2006-05-04 2007-05-04 Wearable Device Abandoned US20070298893A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US79803306P true 2006-05-04 2006-05-04
US81221306P true 2006-06-09 2006-06-09
US84621006P true 2006-09-20 2006-09-20
US11/744,320 US20070298893A1 (en) 2006-05-04 2007-05-04 Wearable Device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/744,320 US20070298893A1 (en) 2006-05-04 2007-05-04 Wearable Device

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US20070298893A1 true US20070298893A1 (en) 2007-12-27

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US11/744,320 Abandoned US20070298893A1 (en) 2006-05-04 2007-05-04 Wearable Device

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US (1) US20070298893A1 (en)
CN (1) CN201436044U (en)
CA (1) CA2587585A1 (en)
DE (1) DE202007006364U1 (en)
FR (1) FR2900757B1 (en)
GB (1) GB2437823A (en)

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US20120270655A1 (en) * 2011-04-25 2012-10-25 Rhode Island Hospital Device controller with conformable fitting system
WO2014059416A1 (en) * 2012-10-12 2014-04-17 Hallmark Cards, Incorporated Context-based interactive plush toy
WO2015084082A1 (en) * 2013-12-04 2015-06-11 주식회사 퓨처플레이 Method, device and system for recognizing posture or motion, and non-temporary computer-readable recording medium
US20150179188A1 (en) * 2013-12-20 2015-06-25 Speech Morphing, Inc. Method and apparatus for hearing impaired assistive device
US9421475B2 (en) 2009-11-25 2016-08-23 Hallmark Cards Incorporated Context-based interactive plush toy

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GB0708263D0 (en) 2007-06-06
FR2900757A1 (en) 2007-11-09
FR2900757B1 (en) 2009-02-13
CN201436044U (en) 2010-04-07

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