US20060118009A1 - Soil conditioner - Google Patents

Soil conditioner Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060118009A1
US20060118009A1 US11007658 US765804A US2006118009A1 US 20060118009 A1 US20060118009 A1 US 20060118009A1 US 11007658 US11007658 US 11007658 US 765804 A US765804 A US 765804A US 2006118009 A1 US2006118009 A1 US 2006118009A1
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Prior art keywords
soil
oil
conditioning product
soil conditioning
binder
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Abandoned
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US11007658
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Jonathan Hubbs
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Stabilizer Solutions Inc
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Stabilizer Solutions Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01CCONSTRUCTION OF, OR SURFACES FOR, ROADS, SPORTS GROUNDS, OR THE LIKE; MACHINES OR AUXILIARY TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
    • E01C7/00Coherent pavings made in situ
    • E01C7/36Coherent pavings made in situ by subjecting soil to stabilisation
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K17/00Soil-conditioning materials or soil-stabilising materials
    • C09K17/14Soil-conditioning materials or soil-stabilising materials containing organic compounds only
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K17/00Soil-conditioning materials or soil-stabilising materials
    • C09K17/40Soil-conditioning materials or soil-stabilising materials containing mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01CCONSTRUCTION OF, OR SURFACES FOR, ROADS, SPORTS GROUNDS, OR THE LIKE; MACHINES OR AUXILIARY TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
    • E01C13/00Pavings or foundations specially adapted for playgrounds or sports grounds; Drainage, irrigation or heating of sports grounds
    • E01C13/06Pavings made in situ, e.g. for sand grounds, clay courts E01C13/003
    • E01C13/065Pavings made in situ, e.g. for sand grounds, clay courts E01C13/003 at least one in situ layer consisting of or including bitumen, rubber or plastics
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01CCONSTRUCTION OF, OR SURFACES FOR, ROADS, SPORTS GROUNDS, OR THE LIKE; MACHINES OR AUXILIARY TOOLS FOR CONSTRUCTION OR REPAIR
    • E01C5/00Pavings made of prefabricated single units
    • E01C5/003Pavings made of prefabricated single units characterised by material or composition used for beds or joints; characterised by the way of laying

Abstract

The invention includes soil conditioning products comprising (a) a carrier, an oil and a polymeric binder, (b) a carrier and an oil, (c) a carrier and a gel, or (d) a carrier, a gel and a polymeric binder. Other constituents may be added to any of these soil conditioning products. The resulting soil conditioning product may be added to soil as a granular material, rather than as a gel or liquid.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention relates to products that can be used to condition soil, processes for making the products, surface materials comprising the products and soil, and processes for making the surface materials. Soil conditioning products according to the invention preferably include (a) a carrier, an oil and a polymeric soil binder, (b) a carrier and an oil, (c) a carrier and a gel, or (d) a carrier, a gel and a polymeric binder.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • As used herein and throughout, the terms in quotations below are defined as follows:
      • a. The term “soil” refers to particulate surface material of the earth, whether or not it contains organic matter, and includes one or more of sand, silt, clay and crushed rock such as decomposed granite.
      • b. The term “sand” refers to any granular material formed by the disintegration of rocks to form particles smaller than gravel but coarser than silt. Sand may or may not include organic matter.
      • c. The term “silt” refers to any unconsolidated sedimentary material with rock particles usually 1/20 millimeter or less in diameter, and being generally smaller than sand but coarser than clay. Silt may or may not include organic matter.
      • d. The term “clay” refers to any (1) inorganic earth surface material that is plastic when moist but hard when fired and that is comprised primarily of hydrous aluminum silicates and/or other minerals, or (2) substance having the properties of clay. Clay includes dry or wet materials and may or may not include organic matter.
      • e. The term “organic binder” refers to any organic matter that tends to bind soil particles together when mixed with the soil particles, wetted and subsequently dried. Organic binders include dried and ground plantago.
      • f. The term “carrier” refers to any material that is granular (or particulate) at room temperature and that, when mixed with oil and polymeric binder, forms a soil conditioning product that may be mixed with soil as a granular material rather than as a liquid. The carrier is preferably an organic binder such as dried and ground plantago.
      • g. The term “fibers” refers to any fibers, ribbons or strips of material used to add mechanical strength to soil.
      • h. The term “oil” means any substance, such as soy bean oil, cotton seed oil, petroleum oil, or mineral oil, into which a polymeric binder can be dispersed or dissolved and that when mixed with a carrier and a polymeric binder yields a soil conditioning product. In the context of this invention, “oil” could be an aqueous solution, depending upon the nature of the carrier and the polymeric binder.
      • i. The term “polymeric binder” or “polymeric soil binder” means a soil binder that binds together soil particles and that can be dispersed or dissolved into the oil.
      • j. The term “soil conditioning product” or “soil conditioner” means any mixture of carrier, oil and polymeric binder, carrier and oil, carrier and gel, or carrier, gel and polymeric binder (each may include other constituents, such as was), that is a granular material (rather than a liquid) at least at temperatures between 60° F.-100° F. and that can bind together soil particles.
      • k. The term “surface material” means any mixture of soil and a soil conditioning product according to the invention.
  • It is known to mix organic binder with soil to create an improved surface material and such a process and product are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. Re. 35,989 to Hubbs et al. A basic description of one process according to that invention is to mix dried and ground plantago with soil, place the mixture on the ground in preferred depths of 2″-6″; wet the mixture, compress it and allow it to dry. The resulting surface is hard and this product and process may be used, for among other things, to form a surface on highway berms, parking lots, golf cart paths, walking paths, or baseball infield base paths. While this product has been successful, it must be wetted thoroughly and compacted to create a good surface. Operator error in either of these steps can lead to a less than desirable finished product. Further, before being wetted there is no adhesion between the soil and organic soil binder, so it is difficult to position the material on a slope since the mixture tends to slide down the slope. Additionally, the resulting surface is not water resistant.
  • Another known way to condition soil is to simply use a polymeric binder. Known polymeric binders are usually solid, tacky materials at temperatures below 100° F. and must be heated (into a syrup-like consistency) and mixed with soil, which is a time consuming and difficult process. U.S. Pat. No. 5,559,166 to Beardon discloses a ground surface material comprising sand and at least one of clay or silt and a binder including an interpolymer polymeric binder dissolved or dispersed in a non or low aromatic oil. The binder is generally fluid at soil treating conditions and an aqueous emulsion of the binder may be sprayed onto existing dirt.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,792,133 to Hawkins et. al., discloses a substitute ground surface material comprising about 94 percent sand or a like material which is added to a polymeric binder comprising 10 percent polymeric material, such as ethylene vinyl acetate, polystyrene, nylon, polypropylene or polyvinyl chloride, dissolved in an oil that is generally a non-free flowing grease at normal track operating conditions.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,852,870 to Hawkins et al. discloses a substitute ground surface material suitable for use as the rakable “cushion” portion of a horse or dog race track. As disclosed, the substitute ground surface material comprises about 94 percent sand or a like material which is added to a binder comprising 10 percent styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer dissolved in an oil that is generally non-free flowing grease at normal track operating conditions. Other disclosed polymers include polypropylene. The resulting coated substitute ground surface material, which is permanently capable of being raked, is then laid as a cushion layer over a subsoil or suitable porous graded base, with the top of the cushion maintained by raking.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,968,024 to Hawkins discloses a substitute ground surface material suitable for use as the rakable “cushion” portion of a horse or dog race track. As disclosed, the substitute ground surface material comprises 98 percent sand or a like material which is added to binder comprising 20 to 40 percent styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer dissolved in an aromatic oil that is generally free-flowing at normal track operating conditions. The resulting coated substitute ground surface material, which is permanently capable of being raked, is then laid as a cushion layer over a subsoil or suitable porous graded base, with the surface maintained by raking and light rolling.
  • EP 0 419 170 A3 published Mar. 27, 1991 discloses a substitute ground surface material suitable for use as the rakable “cushion” portion of a horse or dog race track. As disclosed, the substitute ground surface material comprises from 93.5 to 98 weight percent sand or a like material which is added to binder comprising 10 to 60 weight percent styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer dissolved in an aromatic oil that is generally free-flowing at normal track operating conditions. The resulting coated substitute ground surface material, which is permanently capable of being raked, is then laid as a cushion layer over a subsoil or suitable porous graded base, with the top of the cushion maintained by raking.
  • The disclosures of U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,746,546 and 6,821,332 to Hubbs are incorporated herein by reference.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to soil conditioning products, processes for making same, surface materials including soil and a soil conditioning product, and processes for making same.
  • A soil conditioning product according to the invention preferably includes (a) a carrier, (b) oil, and (c) a polymeric binder. Optional soil conditioning products include (d) a carrier and oil, (e) a carrier and gel, or (f) a carrier, gel and a polymeric binder. Other constituents may be added to any of these soil conditioning products.
  • The carrier is a granular material, comprised of fine particles, that preferably absorbs at least some of the oil and enables the soil conditioning product itself to be granular, such that it may be mixed with soil more easily than a gel or liquid. The carrier is preferably a granular, organic soil binder and is most preferably dried and ground plantago, particularly dried and ground plantago comprising 80% or more plantago seed husks.
  • An oil may be any substance into which the polymeric binder dissolves or disperses. Examples of oils suitable for use in the present invention are: a non or low aromatic oil such as paraffinic oils or low-aromatic naphthenic oils, soy bean oil, cotton seed oil, and mineral oil. The polymeric binder is sufficiently tacky to adhere soil particles, can be dissolved or dispersed in the oil, and preferably comprises an interpolymer.
  • A preferred process for making a soil conditioner comprises the steps of heating oil or gel to a temperature at which the polymeric binder disperses or dissolves into it, and then mixing the oil/polymer or oil/gel formulation with the carrier to form a soil conditioner that can be added to soil as a granular material.
  • A process for making a surface material comprises mixing the soil conditioner according to the invention, in granular form, with soil. The granular soil conditioner could be mixed with soil using known mixing techniques such as pug mill blending, raking, hoeing or bucket blending.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • FIG. 1 a shows a method for making a soil conditioning product according to the invention.
  • FIG. 1 b shows an alternate method for making a soil conditioning product according to the invention.
  • FIG. 2(a) shows a method for making a surface material according to the invention.
  • Figure(b) shows an alternate method for making a surface material according to the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a soil conditioning product comprising (a) a carrier, oil and a polymeric binder, (b) a carrier and oil, (c) a carrier and gel, or (d) a carrier, gel and polymeric binder. Other constituents may optionally be included in any of these soil conditioning products. Each of these components is described below.
  • Carrier
  • A surface material according to the invention includes one or more carriers and, as used herein, “a carrier” refers to one or more carriers. The carrier is any granular (or particulate) material that when mixed with oil, oil and polymeric binder, gel or gel and polymeric binder forms a soil conditioning product that can be added to soil as a granular substance rather than as a liquid. The carrier is preferably one or more organic binders, such as dried and ground plantago (also known as “psyllium”). If dried and ground plantago is used, it preferably includes plantago seed husk and most preferably 80% or more plantago seed husk. Other binders, either organic or inorganic, may be utilized. In the preferred embodiment, the binder is one that absorbs part of the liquid component of the oil, gel and/or polymeric binder so that the resulting soil conditioning product can be added to soil as a granular material. The amount and type of binder included is chosen, to provide the desired consistency of the soil conditioning product.
  • Oil
  • As used herein, “an oil” refers to one or more oils. The purpose of the oil is to dissolve or disperse the polymeric binder therein and create a mixture of oil and polymeric binder that can be mixed with the carrier to form a substance that can then be mixed with soil as a granular material rather than as a gel or liquid. Among the suitable petroleum oils are those containing low or no aromatic fractions, and that are generally fluid at temperatures between 30° and 120°. Examples of oils suitable for use in the present invention include paraffinic oils and low-aromatic naphthenic oils. A commercially available example of a paraffinic oil includes Exxon's 150 SE solvent extracted bright stock FN-2507, and of a low-aromatic naphthenic oil includes Cyclolube No. 2290 available from Witco. Additionally, soy oil, cotton seed oil, or mineral oil may be used and HT-100 mineral oil from IGI is most preferred. The oil could also be an aqueous-based solution, depending upon the nature of the carrier and polymeric binder.
  • Polymeric Binder
  • A polymeric binder according to the invention is any substance that may be dissolved or dispersed in the oil and that provides cohesion between soil particles (i.e., it binds soil particles). The polymeric binder helps to seal the outer surface of the finished surface material, because of the particle adhesion it provides, and because it preferably is water resistant.
  • Polymeric binders suitable for use in the present invention include interpolymers of butene, ethylene and/or propylene with ethylenically unsaturated monomers, including vinyl acetate, methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate and the like. Other polymeric binders suitable for use in the present invention include amorphous polymers that are soluble or dispersable in an oil according to the invention. Commercially available examples of suitable poly alpha-olefin interpolymers include Vestoplast 608 or 708 from Huls. The most preferred polymeric binder is VESTOPLAST® SI, and is supplied by CREANOVA Inc., Turner Place, Box 365, Piscataway, N.J. 08855. Its Environmental & Regulatory Affairs, Information Number is 908-981-5016.
  • Gel
  • A gel according to the invention can be used in place of oil, or in addition to the oil, or in place of the oil and polymeric binder, depending upon the viscosity of the gel, its ability to bind soil particulates, its ability to make the resulting surface water resistant, and whether, when mixed with a carrier, the resulting mixture can be added to soil as a granular material.
  • A preferred gel is Petox 310, which has the consistency of soft petroleum jelly.
  • Soil
  • Soil according to the invention is one or more of clay, sand, silt, decomposed granite, and gravel, and may or may not include organic matter.
  • A preferred clay comes dried in packages and is called “Mud Gel Wyoming Bentonite” sold by Baroid Drilling Fluids, P.O. Box 1675, Houston, Tex. 77251. However, it is believed that any clay could be used to practice the invention and the clay could either be dry or moist. Clay is typically used to provide particles that are cohesive when wetted to form a malleable, and sufficiently firm, surface material. A clay surface can be extremely firm when dry.
  • Virtually any decomposed granite (also referred to as “D.G.”) having sand particles may be used, including ¼″ D.G. or D.G. finely screened to 2 mil size.
  • Wax (Optional)
  • Among the waxes that may be used to practice the invention is IGI 422. IGI 422 is a microcrystalline-based slack wax. It has the tackiness and flexibility that are common with some grades of microcrystalline waxes. It is recommended for use as a coating or for impregnating for waterproofing, sweeping compounds, metal protection, lubricating, polishing, tanning, and has the following physical properties:
    ASTM SPECIFICATIONS
    TEST METHODS METHOD Minimum Maximum TYPICAL
    Drop Melt Point D 127 166 (74.4)
    ° F. (° C.)
    Congealing Point D 938 153 (67.2) 167 (75) 160 (71.1)
    ° F. (° C.)
    Kinematic Viscosity, D 445 16.0  23.0 19.5
    cSt @ 210° F.
    (98.9° C.)
    Saybolt Viscosity, D 2161 81.9 111.4 96.4
    SUS @ 210° F.
    (98.9° C.)
    Solvent D 3235* 20.0
    Extractables*, Wt %
    Flash Point (P.M.), D 93 464 (240)  504 (262) 
    ° F. (° C.)
    Color D 1500  3.0

    *Modified test method. 1 g sample/30 mls solvent (60% MEK, 40% Toluene)

    FDA Status: IGI 422 is Not Intended for Food Contact.
  • IGI 1266U is another wax that may be used to practice the invention. IGI 1266U is a relatively high melting, refined paraffin wax and may be used for applications which do not require a wax meeting FDA specifications. IGI 1266U has the following physical properties:
  • Physical Properties
    ASTM SPECIFICATIONS
    TEST METHODS METHOD Minimum Maximum TYPICAL
    Congealing Point D 938 154 (67.8) 160 (71.1) 157 (69.4)
    ° F. (° C.)
    Kinematic Viscosity, D 445  6.7 7.8 7.3
    cSt @ 210° F.
    (98.9° C.)
    Saybolt Viscosity, D 2161 48.1 51.8  50.1
    SUS @ 210° F.
    (98.9° C.)
    Oil Content, Wt % D 721 1.0
    Color D 1500 L1.0
    (Off-white/
    tan)
    Odor D 1833 2
    Needle Penetration, D 1321 12
    dmm @ 77° F.
    (25° C.)

    FDA Status: IGI 1266U is Not Intended for Food Contact.
  • Each of the above-described waxes are sold by The International Group, Inc. (“IGI”), with locations at: 85 Old Eagle School Road, P.O. Box 384, Wayne, Pa. 19087 and 50 Salome Drive, Agincourt, Ontario, CANADA M2S 2A8.
  • The purpose of the wax is to help make the surface material malleable and to add more cohesiveness between the soil particles. Any wax capable of performing these functions may be used.
  • Additionally, either of the above-identified waxes (or any wax suitable for practicing the invention) may be provided in an emulsion such as an emulsion with water, the procedure for making such an emulsion being known to persons skilled in the art of emulsifying materials such as wax. The emulsion can then be stored and/or shipped in any suitable containers, such as cans, tanks or drums. The emulsion can be added to a mixture of soil and soil conditioner according to the invention in any fashion, such as by pouring or spraying it onto the mixture.
  • Making the Soil Conditioning Product
  • Turning now to the drawings, FIGS. 1(a) and 1(b) depict some preferred methods of making soil conditioning products according to the invention. First, if a polymeric binder is used, oil or gel is heated to a temperature at which the polymeric binder will dissolve or disperse into the oil or gel. This is preferably a temperature of between 250° F.-400° F., and most preferably 265° F.-280°
  • Preferably, 1-30% of polymeric binder by weight is dissolved or dispersed into the oil or gel, but up to 90% of polymeric binder by weight could be used. Then, the resulting mixture is mixed with the carrier, preferably in a pug mill, and preferably while the mixture is still at 250° F.-400° F., at a weight ratio of about 25% to 80% carrier to mixture and, most preferably, from 40% to 60%, by weight of carrier.
  • It is also possible to first mix the carrier and oil together first and then add the polymeric binder at an elevated temperature.
  • Additionally, just oil or gel could be added to the carrier, preferably by first heating the oil or gel and then mixing it with the carrier in the same weight ratios as above.
  • Optionally, wax could be dissolved or dispersed in the oil or gel, or emulsified wax could be added to the carrier before or after the carrier is mixed with the oil, gel, oil/gel mixture, oil/polymeric binder mixture or gel/polymeric binder mixture.
  • Mixing with Soil
  • Soil conditioning products according to the invention may be blended or mixed in any manner used to mix or blend granular materials with soil. Among the suitable techniques are mixing in a pug mill, bucket mixing (also called bucket blending) using a front-end loader or bulldozer, hand or machine tilling in situ or to form a premix, using a pharmaceutical blender, or using a concrete mixer. Other materials, such as other soil materials, organic binder or other organic materials, rubber particles or fibers may be added to, or be present in, the mixture and may be present in the finished surface product. Preferably, a soil conditioning product does not have to be heated prior to mixing with soil.
  • It is preferred that between 5-50 pounds of a soil conditioning product according to the invention be added to one ton of soil, depending upon the consistency and type of the soil and the desired characteristics of the finished surface material. The surface material may also include rubber pieces, fibers, or other components to alter the property of the surface material.
  • The surface material may be applied to a surface in any manner, such methods of applying surface material being known to those skilled in the art. Generally, the material would be placed upon the surface at a desired depth and compacted or compressed, using any method, prior to use. It may also be graded, raked, watered and/or dried prior to use.
  • A surface layer utilizing the invention can be any depth and would generally be between 2″ and 6″ depending upon the application. For example, a layer of about 6″ in depth could be used for pitcher's mounds or equestrian racing tracks. A layer on a base path could be between ¼″ and 3″ deep. The invention may be used for virtually any surface application, especially surfaces such as baseball infields, soccer fields, hand ball courts, tennis courts, horse training arenas, exercising, horse jumping and racing surfaces, parking lots, highway berms and embankments, golf sand bunker liners, golf cart paths, walking or jobbing paths, or to bind and seal bricks or flagstone on walkways or other applications.
  • If the soil conditioning product includes just oil and/or a gel that alone cannot sufficiently bind the soil particles to provide the desired surface characteristics, the carrier should be an organic binder and the mixture of soil and soil conditioning product must be watered, preferably compressed, and then allowed to dry to provide the proper soil adhesion. In that case, the mucilage of the organic binder provides soil adhesion and the purpose of the oil and/or gel is to provide some water resistance and, perhaps some soil adhesion, depending upon the adhesive properties of the oil or gel. Further, any mixture according to the invention (even one with a polymeric binder) may be watered, preferably compacted, and allowed to dry to alter the final characteristics of the surface material, especially if an organic binder is used as the carrier.
  • The invention results in a soil conditioning product that can be added to soil as a granular material. Among the benefits of the invention are longevity, water resistance, and in some cases being able to form a suitable surface material without having to water it, especially if a polymeric binder is used.
  • Having now described preferred embodiments of the invention variations that do not depart from the spirit thereof will become apparent to others. The invention is thus not limited to the preferred embodiments but is instead set forth in the following claims and legal equivalents thereof. Unless stated otherwise in the claims, method steps may be performed in any order capable of providing a result according to the invention.

Claims (30)

  1. 1. A soil conditioning product for mixing with a soil, the soil conditioning product comprising (a) a carrier, (b) oil, and (c) a polymeric binder.
  2. 2. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the carrier is an organic binder.
  3. 3. The soil conditioning product of claim 2 wherein the carrier includes dried and ground plantago.
  4. 4. The soil conditioning product of claim 3 wherein the carrier includes dried and ground plantago seed husk.
  5. 5. The soil conditioning product of claim 4 wherein the carrier comprises 80% or more dried and ground plantago seed husk.
  6. 6. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 that further comprises wax.
  7. 7. The soil conditioning product of claim 6 wherein the wax is an emulsified wax.
  8. 8. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the polymeric soil binder comprises amorphous olefin.
  9. 9. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the polymeric soil binder is Vestoplast 608.
  10. 10. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the polymeric soil binder is Vestoplast 708.
  11. 11. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the oil is mineral oil.
  12. 12. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the polymeric soil binder is IGI HT-100 oil.
  13. 13. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the oil is soy bean oil.
  14. 14. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the polymeric soil binder is cotton seed oil.
  15. 15. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the oil is petroleum oil.
  16. 16. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the oil is paraffinic oil.
  17. 17. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the oil is low-aromatic, vapthenic oil.
  18. 18. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the percentage by weight of oil to polymeric binder is between 10% to 90%.
  19. 19. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 that comprises between 20% to 80% by weight of carrier.
  20. 20. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 that further comprises a gel.
  21. 21. The soil conditioning product of claim 1 wherein the carrier, oil and polymeric binder are mixed together in a pug mill.
  22. 22. A soil conditioning product comprising an organic binder mixed with oil.
  23. 23. The soil conditioning product of claim 22 that further comprises wax.
  24. 24. A soil conditioning product comprising an organic binder mixed with gel.
  25. 25. The soil conditioning product of claim 24 that further comprises a polymeric binder.
  26. 26. The soil conditioning product of claim 24 that further comprises wax.
  27. 27. A surface material comprising:
    (a) soil; and
    (b) a soil conditioning product, the soil conditioning product comprising (i) a carrier, (ii) oil, and (iii) a polymeric binder.
  28. 28. The surface material of claim 27 wherein the soil comprises one or more of the group consisting of sand, silt, crushed stone, clay and gravel.
  29. 29. The surface material of claim 27 that further comprises organic matter.
  30. 30. A method of making a soil conditioning product, the method comprising the steps of:
    (a) heating an oil to a temperature at which a polymeric binder will dissolve or disperse therein;
    (b) adding polymeric binder to the oil and allowing it to dissolve or disperse therein; and
    (c) mixing the oil and polymeric binder mixture with a carrier to form a granular soil conditioning product.
US11007658 2004-12-07 2004-12-07 Soil conditioner Abandoned US20060118009A1 (en)

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US11007658 US20060118009A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2004-12-07 Soil conditioner

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11007658 US20060118009A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2004-12-07 Soil conditioner
CN 200580041950 CN101103090A (en) 2004-12-07 2005-12-07 Soil conditioner
CA 2590040 CA2590040A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2005-12-07 Soil conditioner
PCT/US2005/044469 WO2006063159A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2005-12-07 Soil conditioner
EP20050853399 EP1838809A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2005-12-07 Soil conditioner
JP2007544639A JP2008523172A (en) 2004-12-07 2005-12-07 Soil improvers
US11452107 US20070048096A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2006-06-12 Soil conditioner
US12549239 US20090317195A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2009-08-27 Soil conditioner

Related Child Applications (1)

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US11452107 Continuation-In-Part US20070048096A1 (en) 2004-12-07 2006-06-12 Soil conditioner

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US20060118009A1 true true US20060118009A1 (en) 2006-06-08

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EP (1) EP1838809A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2008523172A (en)
CN (1) CN101103090A (en)
CA (1) CA2590040A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2006063159A1 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2007146317A2 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-21 Stabilizer Solutions, Inc. Soil conditioner
US20100088957A1 (en) * 2008-10-09 2010-04-15 Hubbs Jonathan W Natural turf with binder
US20100216639A1 (en) * 2009-02-20 2010-08-26 Hubbs Jonathon W Gypsum soil conditioner
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US20100216639A1 (en) * 2009-02-20 2010-08-26 Hubbs Jonathon W Gypsum soil conditioner
WO2013036834A2 (en) * 2011-09-09 2013-03-14 Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc. A chemical method and composition for soil improvement
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CN101103090A (en) 2008-01-09 application

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