US1871574A - Gas heater stove - Google Patents

Gas heater stove Download PDF

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Publication number
US1871574A
US1871574A US469596A US46959630A US1871574A US 1871574 A US1871574 A US 1871574A US 469596 A US469596 A US 469596A US 46959630 A US46959630 A US 46959630A US 1871574 A US1871574 A US 1871574A
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Prior art keywords
casing
air
gas
burner
gas heater
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Expired - Lifetime
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US469596A
Inventor
Myron W Wood
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Myron W Wood
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/006Air heaters having heat generating means using fluid combustibles

Description

Aug. 16, 1932. M. w. wooD @As HEATER sTov Filed July 21. 1930 INVENTOR YK Tlf ll/Oo Z ATTORNEY Patented ug'. 16, 1932 rentra Mxnon w. woon, or WICHITA, Kansas Gas rinnfrnn srovn Y Application filed July 21,
This invention relates to stoves and more particularly to gas heaters in which is used either natural or artificial gas.
Many years in studyingcombustion and in 5 experimenting with various fuels has disclosed thefact that complete combustion is never obtained in the same way when using different linds of fuel. It has been found when using natural or artificial gas a proper mixture cannot be obtained by mixing the gas and air before combustion and that the mixing process must be finished in the flame.
A primary object of the invention is to so construct a heater of this character that there will be a complete combustion of the fuel resulting in the elimination of all fumes as well as the utilization of all of the heat units contained in the fuel.
Another object is to so construct such a U heater that fresh air will be fed to the llame on all sides and throughout its entire height avoiding all possibility of the escape of any unburned gases with the heat. i
Still another obj ect is to provide a gas heater in which the cold air is drawn from the floor and so forced out after being heated'that it will travel all over the house and insure an even temperature throughout.
Another object is to so construct such a heater that it will consumev a minimum amount of fuel with the production of a maximum amount of heat while at the same time insuring completecombustion of the fuel.
In carrying out these objects, the invention is susceptible of a wide range of modification without departing from the spirit or sacrilicing any of the advantages of the claimed invention; there being shown in the drawing for illustrative purposes a preferred and practical form, in which:
Figure 1 represents a front elevation of a gas heater constructed in accordance with this invention;
Fig. 2 is a vertical section on a larver scale; and
Fig. 3 is a horizontal section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.
In the embodiment illustrated the heater constituting this invention comprises an annular base 1 supported by legs 2 and having leso. serieu y no, 1469.596. Y
an upstanding flange 3 with a cylindrical casing 4- rising from said ilange and bolted or riveted thereto. v A concentric shell vor inner casing 5 is Y mounted within the casing 4 and spaced ra- 55 dially therefrom being secured to the outer casing by spacer carried bolts 6 vand 7. The casings aand 5 form a double-walled air chamber ta extending throughout the height of the stoveand openat'bothY ends for the free 60 passage of air therethrough from the bottom towards the top.r v V Depending from casing 5 and secured by bolts@ thereto-is a loor'protecting pan 8, l the bottom 9 vof which has a central air inlet 65 opening 10. `An air deflecting plate 11 is arranged over and abovethe opening 10, being shown supported by legs 12. The side walls of the pan 8 have a plurality of series of air inletfape'rtures 13 s'o that'air will enter 70 the pan freely therethrough and through the bottom opening 10.
Centrally kdisposed within.V the casing 5 is a hollow inverted truncatedfcone-shaped open endedcasing l5 the smaller end of which is 75 located above andv adjacent the top of the pan 8 and is arranged within an annular burner 20. This smaller lower end of the casing 15 is secured to the burner by brackets 15a leaving suiiicient space between .the burner 80 and the cylinderto permit the free passage of Y air between them. The upper larger end of the casingl5 extends above the double-walled casino* of the stove and is outturned to form a flange 16 which overlies the ends of the cas- 85 ings 4- and 5 and operates as a defiector for the heated air passing upward as will be presently more fully described. rlhis casingv 15 is held in place by the bolts 7 whichunite p the upper ends of the/casings 4:. and 5 andg which Vare equipped with spacers 17 to hold the casings l15 and 5 in properly spaced rela-v tion.V n i .A top plate-.18 is spacedgabove casing 15 andv extends radiallybeyond the side walls 95 of the casing 1l. This-plate lis supported by a plurality of L-shaped brackets 19 which connect it to the casing asis shown clearly in Fig. 2. The plate 18 has a bowl or dishshaped central portion 14 which operates asa 100 spreader for the heated air rising through the casing l5.
The perforated burner 20 is held in position by bolts 2l and a gas supply pipe 22 with the gas outlet apertures formed in the upper wall thereof as is shown clearly in features of the invention resides in the com- Figs. 2 and p It will thus be seen thatthe casing 15 which has its smaller lower end extended just below the burner 2O flares gradually towards its top or upper end providing an upwardly and outwardly slanting llame tube for the following of the flame issuing from the burner. The flame following this tube heats the air passing upward through the casing l'which and when it contacts the top plate 18 is deflected outwardly into the surroundingVv atmosphere. TheV combustion chamber 20a which is formed between the inner shell or casing 5 andthe truncated inverted cone-shaped casing 15 decreases in width from its lower towards its upper end and the flame from the burner20 is caused to follow the flared wall of the casing 15. The fresh air filled with oxygen enters the combustion chamber 20a through the pan 8 on both sides of the burner 20 and passing upward therethrough mingl'es with the gas from the burner where it burns throughout the entire lengthof the flame tube or combusf tion chamber' 20c, thus insuring complete combustion of all the fuel elements. It will thus be seen that when the heat passes out of the top of the stove there can be no unburned gases commingled with it. The air entering yand passing on bothsides of theburner ring materially assists in they consumption of fuel elements. This upward passage of the heated air also operates todraw the cold air from the floor a-nd force it outheated at the top of the stove so that it will travelto the furthest corner of the house insuring an even temperature throughout.
The air passing upward through chamber '4a between the casings 4 and 5 operates to keep the outer `casing cool and protect it against the intense heat from the combustion. chamber so that should said outer casing be painted or enamelled it will not be discolored from the heat.
er 2O is so 'controlled and setV that it cannot be disturbed after once being adjusted and a proper amount suiicienttocommingle with the air entering in themanner above de- 4scribed is provided and hence cannot .be
tampered with by unauthorized persons.
A heater constructed as herein shown and described of this type of medium size will heat approximately live thousand cubic feet of room space in any climate and the burner used in connectionV with such a stove consumes only about two-thirds of the amount of gas which is used in one burner of an or- -dina-ry gas cook stove. Ithas also beenv Furthermore the supply of gas tothe burnfound that a heater constructed as herein shown and described will heat eight times the room space of the` ordinary gas heater on the market with the same consumption of gas.
It will thus be seen that one of the main plete combustion obtained by the air entrance tothe iiame all the way to the top of the` combustion chamber due to the llame being forced to follow up the slanting inner casing wall.
No unburned gases can get through. An-
other important feature is the circulation of the air whereby the cold air is drawn from the floor and forced out heatedbeing so deflected that it travels to the farthest corner of thehouse. A `Without further description it is thought that the featuresand advantages of the inventionwill be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and it will, of course, be understood that changes in the form, proportion and minor details of construction may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of the invention or its scope as claimed. Y i
I claim: Y Y 'i i A gas heater'comprisingan outer cylindrical casing', a pan secured to and depending from the lower ,end of said casing, and
having a bottom with a, central air inlet therein; an air deflector arranged above said opening, a hollow inverted truncated Vconeshaped open ended casing supported in said outer casing with its lower' smaller end terminating short of said outer casing and its upper end extended above it, said casingsbeing spaced radially from yeach other to form a combustion chambertapering towards its upper end, an annular burner arranged between the lower end of said inner casing and the outer casing spaced from both but nearer. to the inner casing whereby the flame is caused tofollow the inclined wall of the inner casing, the side walls of said pan being apertured to supply air to the combustion chambery outside the burner and feed the flame throughout its length. Y l
e e n MYRON W. VOOD.4
US469596A 1930-07-21 1930-07-21 Gas heater stove Expired - Lifetime US1871574A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2470519A (en) * 1946-09-13 1949-05-17 Anemostat Corp America Nozzle
US2855919A (en) * 1958-10-14 Heating units
US2883979A (en) * 1958-01-02 1959-04-28 Hunter Louvered stack for hot air heater
US2955590A (en) * 1958-04-10 1960-10-11 Jr Charles L Edwards Supplemental heating unit
US3623458A (en) * 1969-11-06 1971-11-30 Raypak Inc Stackless outdoor heater adapted for swimming pools

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2855919A (en) * 1958-10-14 Heating units
US2470519A (en) * 1946-09-13 1949-05-17 Anemostat Corp America Nozzle
US2883979A (en) * 1958-01-02 1959-04-28 Hunter Louvered stack for hot air heater
US2955590A (en) * 1958-04-10 1960-10-11 Jr Charles L Edwards Supplemental heating unit
US3623458A (en) * 1969-11-06 1971-11-30 Raypak Inc Stackless outdoor heater adapted for swimming pools

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