US1327915A - Book-trimmer - Google Patents

Book-trimmer Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1327915A
US1327915A US20865817A US1327915A US 1327915 A US1327915 A US 1327915A US 20865817 A US20865817 A US 20865817A US 1327915 A US1327915 A US 1327915A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
book
gage
books
trimming
shaft
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Edward R Kast
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING M
KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING MACHINE Co
Original Assignee
KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING M
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING M filed Critical KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING M
Priority to US20865817 priority Critical patent/US1327915A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1327915A publication Critical patent/US1327915A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D11/00Combinations of several similar cutting apparatus
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/444Tool engages work during dwell of intermittent workfeed
    • Y10T83/4564With means to produce plurality of work-feed increments per tool cycle
    • Y10T83/4567Including supplemental work-feed means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/444Tool engages work during dwell of intermittent workfeed
    • Y10T83/4577Work fed successively to plural tools
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/444Tool engages work during dwell of intermittent workfeed
    • Y10T83/4645With means to clamp work during dwell
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/546Interrelated tool actuating and work guide moving means

Description

E. R.KAST.

BOOK TRIMMER. APPLICATION FILED DIC24Il 19H. 1,327,915 Patented Jan. 13,1920.

6 SHEETS-SHEET I.

E.. R. KAST.

. BooK HUMMER.

APPLlcAnoN FILED Dsc.24, 1911. 1,327,915, Patented Jan.13,1920. I SHEETS-'4mm 2.

l E. R. KAST.

BOOK'TRIMMER. APPLICATION F'ILED DEC.24, |917.

ZZ Patented Jan. 13, 1920,l

e SHEETS-SHEET 3.

y61H01 man? E. R. KAST.

BOOK TRIMMER.

APPLlCATlQN FILED DEC.24, 19|?. 1,327,915.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

Patented Jan. 13, 1920.

APPLICATION FILED DEC-24,1917. v

'El Rl BOOK TRIMMER.

Patented Jan. 13, 1920.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

E. R. KAST.

BooK TRIMMER.

APPLlCATION FILED DEC.24| 1917-. 1,827,915. Patented Jan; 13, 1920.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 6.

uNrrEn sTATEs PATENTl oEEroE.

EDWARD R. KAST, OE rEARL RIVER, NEW roRr, lAssIci-Nort To KAST INSETTING AND GATHERING MACHINE COMPANY, or NEW YORK, N'. Y., A CORPORATION OE DELA- WARE.

To all 'whom t may concern:

Be it known that l, EDWARD R. KAST, a citizen of the United States yof America, and a resident of Pearl River, Nerv York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Book-Trimmers, which invention is fully set forth in the following specification. l

rIhe present invention is an improvement in book trin'nners, and has fory its object to provide a device of the character described which Will automatically, speedily, continuousl y and accurately trim the edges o-fea'ch y book as it is delivered from the book-forming machine.

The practice heretofore in connection With books gathered, inset or otherwise assembled, whether the signatures that constitute the book are gathered or inset manually, or mechanically by machines such as illustrated in my Patents Nos. 1,177,524, 1,17 7,525, and 1,236,181, has been to trim the' bo'oks` in batches on Well-known cutting or trimming machines; that is to say, the books are removed from the delivery of the machine, piled on trucks, carried to the trimmer, trimmed in batches, and then carried torthe mailingv or shipping department. This procedure has entailed great ezpense, inconnection with books like the Saturday Evening Post, for example, which are inset on machines such as illustrated lin `the, patents indicated; to say nothing of the valuable ioor space that has heretofore been occupied by huge piles of untrinnned books Waiting to vbe trimmed.

Further, in trimming saddle-stitched or inserted Work, on account of the roll of the back--that is to say, the increased thickness of the book at the stitched edge-Where the books are trimmed in batches of ten or more at a. time, which is the practice, the top book will, as a rule, be larger than the other books, and the intermediate books vvill be progressively smaller tovvard the bottom of the pile. Not only, therefore, are the boks of irregular size, but this variation results in an unnecessary increase in postage on the second-class mail matter.

A further 'bjection to V,this method of procedure results from the fact that, in trinimers now on the market, the cutting linife acts against a Ivoden or lead cutting stick which, aftershort use, has a lgroove formed therein; and it accordingly becomes necessary to leiter or adj'ast the 'knife to Goand BOOK-TRMIVIER.

Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Jellhl. 13, 1920. Application leii'Decc'mber 2.4.-., 1.91% Serial Nb'. @$3,658. i i

pensate for the depth of the groove, othervvvise the lowest or bottom book in the pile i'vill not be trimmed through. The Closest attention is required to insure that all the books aretrinnned and actually, inpractice, a 'larg'.fe number of the bottom books from the yari'ous piles-especially on the continuous type of trimmer-have to 'be re-trimmed for this reason. Always some books have to be re-trimmed because the operator does not know when to reset his knives or put in netv cutting sticks until he sees that some books are not being trimmed. Thisinvolves the use of skilled operators, loss of time and considerable eXpenseand annoyance.` 4

C Bythe use of the device of my present invention, each book istrimmed as itis delivered and trimmed as perfectly as though die-out, and all the books are alike in size; the large number of cutting-machine operators and the truckmen. heretofore employed are eliminated, With the result that they can be used for other necessary Work, to y say nothing of the greatsaving invo'lyed; the valuable loor space heretofore occupied by great piles of untrnnme'd books issaved for other uses; no books vhave to` be retrimmed; and no additional operators`,over

those heretofore used in connection `with the l' insetting machines alone, are necessary. y VAs a matter of fact, the girl Who formerly stood at the delivery of the insetting mach-iney to take off untrimmed books has simply moved to the delivery of the trimmer Where she takes off trimmed books; or, if desired, the

books may be delivered to a conveyer. which carries them direct tothe mailing `department, or other desired destination. *In'addition, the decrease in production of a bookforming machine, such as an insetting or gathering machine, Whether the books are inset or gathered manually or mechanically, equipped with the present invention, negligible, and at the most notyover tvvo per centum. y n y .Y n,

The present invention Will be better understood by reference tothe 4accompanying drav'vings, illustrating one -ezrpression of the inventive idea, and Whereinv i Figure 1 is a sideI elevation. the impreved trimming mechanism; v

2 is a detail perspective view, illustrating the knife Whichltrinis the edge of the book opposite the feld., and its associated mechanism g Fig. 3 illustrates the support and associated devices on which the books are deposited after they pass through the closing rollers which are arranged above the saddle;

Fig. 4 is a detailed perspective of the clamp which holds the book while the knife which trims the edge opposite the fold is operating, means for heading up or positioning the book for the second trimming, and associated mechanism; Figs. 5 and 6 are detailed views of the gagel or stop members which position the book for the first trimming;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the members which move the books into engagement with the first gage and which start the movement of the books after they have received the first trimming;

Figs. 8 and 9 are details of a tensioning device which operates on the upper feed belts to insure thatthe books shall be held against the second gage; and also cooperates with the header-up to position the book against said second gage;

I members which stop the books for the second trimming Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the clamps whichV holdthe book when it receives the second trimming;

Fig. 13 is a perspective view of the knives i which effect the trimming of the top and bottom of the book, and their associated mechanism Fig. 14 is a detached view of one of said knives and its support; and

Fig. 15 is a detached perspective view of the delivery` end of the trimmer.

Referring to the drawings, wherein likereference numerals indicate like parts, represents a support of any suitable bookforming machine on which the books are formed. By way of illustration this support is here shown as a saddle such as illustrated in my Patents Nos. 1,177 ,524, 1,177,525 and 1,236,181, along which the signatures are fed and on which they are preferably assembled and suitably bound, as by wire stitching for example. The means for feeding the signatures along the saddle and binding the same are not shown, as any desired means for this purpose may be employed.

.The books are delivered from the suppori. or saddle and closed if necessary after they are bound. As here shown a vertically reciprocating blade 21 elevates the books into thebite of closing rollers 22 and 23, which rlatter deposit the closed books on suitable supporting members folded edge foremost. The blade 21 is reciprocated by means of a bell-crank lever 24, pivoted at 25 to the frame of the machine. The short arm of said lever is engaged by a cam 26 keyed to shaft 27 (which is preferably a power shaft of the book-assenibling machine); and the long arm of said lever is pivotally connected to the blade at 28. A spring 29 has one end secured to the long'arin of said lever and the other end anchored to the base plate A of the machine. This spring acts to lower the blade 21 which is elevated to deliver the books to the closing rollers by the cam 2G. A stop 30 positions the books on the support ,immediately over the elevating means.

The closing rollers 22 and 23 are mounted on shafts 31 and 33, respectively, carried by suitable bearings on the machine frame ll. Shaft 31 carries a gear which `meshes with a gear 35 on shaft 33, so that the closing rollers rotate in the direction of the arrows, Fig. 1. These rollers are rotated from shaft 27 through the medium of a sprocket chain 36 which passes around a gear 37 on shaft 27 and around a pinion 38 on shaft 31.

The book when it leaves the closing rollers is deposited on supporting.members (Fig. 3) constituted by a plurality of plates 39, 39a, 39h, and 39c and fingers 40, 40DL and 40h, all of which ai'e screwed or otherwise suitably secured to the framework of the machine. When in position on these plates and fingers, the books are under two guide members 41 and 4la carried by a cross bar 42. r1`he ends of the fingers 40, a and 40b over which the books last passed on their way to the trimming mechanism are preferably slightly inclined upwardly.

Means are provided for positively engagi ing the books to remove them from said supporting members and to progress them into engagement with the first gage where the edge of the book opposite the fold is, trimmed; and preferably two feeding mechanisms are employed` one of which delivers the hooks, one ata time, to the other. The second feeding mechanism progresses the book into engagement with the first gage, and preferably this second feeding mechanism is driven at a higher speed than the first, so that the movement of the beck is suddenly increased when it comes under the influence of the second feeding mechanism.

As here shown, the books are removed from said support by means of a pair ofendless chains 43 and 43, which are provided respectively with a single lug or finger 44 vand 44, which lugs or`A fingers engage the rear edge of the book after it has come through the closing rollersl and positively progress the same into engagement with the second set of feeding mechanisms. Said endless chains 43 and 43a pass around sprocket wheels 45 and 45il keyed to a shaft ll f) y46 and around similar sprocket WheelsY (not shown) keyed to shaftBl. The movementof said chains is timed with the operation of the vertically-'reciprocating blade 21; that is to say, the lugs or fingers 44 and 44a move into engagement with the edge yof the book opposite the fold as soon as the book is deposited on said support by the closing rollers.

' The chains 43 and 43L feed the books into the bite of rollers 47 and '4S and belts 49, 50 and '51 on the one hand (Fig. 7 and rollers 52 Iand 53 and belt 54 on the other h and. '.As ywill be observed, rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54 engage the upper surface of the book, roller 52 coperating with lower roller 47 and roller 53 cooperating with lower roller 48. Belt 54 coperates with lower belt These belts and rollers, as Well as belts 49 and 51, are driven at a greaterI speed than are chains 43 and 43, the result being that the books are rapidly moved away from lugs 44 and 44, Which latter, accordingly,

freely clear the books as they pass. downwardly around the sprocket Wheels and 45a.' This speeding up of the books also has the advantage of expediting thev Work and conducing to an increased capacity for the machine. The rollers 52 and 58 are adjusted 'with respect toV their cooperating rollers 47 and 48, so that the books are firmly held therebetween, and are positively and rapidly moved into' engagement with the gage members 57 and 58, Fig. 5, against which they are' positioned .for trimming the Aedge of the book opposite the fold.- It is pointed out that the rollers 52 and 58 ldo not grip' thev upper surface of the book close enough to buckle the cover of thesame. Further, guide rods 59, which are vertically adjustable on the framework, also act to prevent any buckling.

In order to effect 'accurately 4the positioning of the books against'the gage, dogs 6(7) and 61 are provided. As Will-be observed from a-n inspection of Fig. 3, the

-bfoo'ks pass over these dogs as they are' re- -moved from vthe supporting members by :chains 43 and 431,fand as soon as the edge 'should the machine-become cloggedl at lthis point, the noses will -yield and prevent breakage. A

These dogs are operated from shaft 62 by suitable connections, asrhere shown cranks 63 and 63 of which are adjustably mounted on shaft 62, being connected at theirr free ends respectively with links 64 and "64, which latter are pivoted tor vsaid dogs or abutments. adjustable in order to vary the movement of said dogs or abutments'ivhen 'necessary or desirable. The shaft 62 is bscillated from shaft 65 through cam 66, slotted arm 67 carrying a roller 68, which latter e`n, ,1fages"v cam 66, and a crank '69 carried by shaft 62. The dogs 60 and 61 are moved `for- Wardly, that is to` say, in the directionl of movement of the books, by mea-ns of a spring 70, Which encircles rod 71. This rod is connected to shaft 62 by means of a crank arm 72. collar 7 3 carried by'said rod,l and the lower end of the spring abuts the base" of the machine. The cam 66 acts to move the dogs 60 and 61 rearwardly. Shaft 65 is driven from main shaft 74 through a gear 7 5 on the main shaftmeshing With Aa. gear 76 on shaft The gage hereinbefore referred to, and

against which vthe book is positioned for the trimming of the edge opposite the fold, v n. 1. v f l is'illustrated in detail in l* lgs. o and 6. As there shown, the gage members 57 and 5S n are identical in'construction', and arer'ockedy into and out of the path of movement cf the books.

Each of these gagev members' is pivoted on' a. pin 77 carried by a bracket arm 478, which is adjustablev lengthwise of the machine by means of the bolt andslot co-nneciton 79, in orderto accommodate' booksof various sizes. The lowery ends of tivo 4li'nksgSO and 80 are' connected to the gage justable around andV along shaft S2, which' latter is oscillated by a cam S3 on main shaft 7 4through link S4 and crank arm 85. A spring 86 causes the gage members to be swung into the path of the books, and said members are elevated out of the path Aof the books by cam 83. The upper yend of said spring abuts a stop S7 vsecured toY thema-- chine frame, and the lovver end ofthe spring engages a pivoted block 8S carried by the link 84.` j j When the book is positioned-against the gage members 57 and 58, as heretofore described, a clamp 89 descends'into engagement With the book to firmly hold they same While the edge ofthe book opposite the fold is trimmed. This clamp is illustrated in Figs. 1 and4. As shown, the same is verticallyreciprocated in a casting 90I mounted on the framei'vork' 'B of the machine.

the end portions 91 and 91 of said'clarnp rides on said, cam 92, the upper end of said' The cranks 63 and 63"are made 4 The uppery end'of said spring engages a arm being connected to a crank 95 carried by shaft 96. Shaft 96 has keyed thereon two other cranks 97 and 97 to the free end of which are connected reach-rods 98 and 98. The other end of each of said reach rods is suitably secured to the ends of the clamp 89.

The clamp 89 is pressed yieldingly but firmly into engagement with the book by suitable means, here shown as springs 99 and 100. The spring` 99 encircles a rod 101, one end of which passes loosely through a base 102, against which one end of said spring abuts. The other end of the spring engages collar 103 on said rod 101, and the other end of said collar is carried by a block 104, which is pivoted to the lower end of an arm 105 keyed to shaft 96. The spring 100 encircles rod 106, one end of which engages a perforated stop 107 fiXedly mounted on the framework, and through which the rod 106 loosely passes. The other end of said spring engages a collar 108 on the rod 106. One end of said rod 106 is fixedly secured in a block 109 pivoted to the lower end of an arm 110, the other end of which arm is keyed to shaft 96. It will therefore be seen that when, under the influence of cam 92, the shaft 96 is oscillated and the clamp 89 is elevated, the springs 99 and 100 will be compressed and that, when the low part 92 of the cam is engaged by roller 94, the springs 99 and 100 will expand, thus lowering the clamp 89 into firm but yielding engagement with the book.

The knife which effects the trimming of the edge of the book opposite the fold is a vertically reciprocating knife 111 (Fig 2) of the inclined guillotine type, and is mounted on a carrier 112 on which it has vertical adjustment by means of bolt and slot connections 113. This knife coperates with a lower knife 111 mounted Ona crossbeam. The downward movement of the knife to effect the cutting or trimming is secured in a positive manner through the 1nedium of links 114 and 114 connected to cranks 115 and 115, which latter are keyed to shaft 65.

The edge of the book opposite the fold has now been trimmed by a clean shearing cut, the book being held clamped and absolutely stationary at the time the cutting is effected. j

As above indicated, the books are moved .into engagement with the gage members 57 and 58 by rollers 47 and 48 and belts 49, 50 and 51, which engage the underside of the book, and rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54 which engage the upper surface of the book. These same means are utilized to initiate the movement of the books on their way to the second trimming mechanism, as soon as the gage members 57 and-58 are swung out of the path of movement of the books.v

In order to insure positive forward feed of the book at this time, means are provided for slightly lowering the rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54 into gripping engagement with the top of the book.

This movement of said belt and. rollers is effected by mounting the same onl a frame which is pivoted on afshaft 116, which latter is oscillated by a cam 117 provided with a slight depression 118, the oscillating move-y ment being transmitted to said shaft 116 by means of a slotted arm 119 andy crank arm 120. This crank is connected to the shaft 116 through the medium of a sleeve 121 through a bolt and slot connection 122, so that said crank may be adjusted to vary the degree of oscillation of said frame and thus compensate for books of various thicknesses. The crank 120 is secured in its adjusted position by adjusting screws 123 and 124 passing through iianges on said sleeve 121. The slotted arm 1-19 is provided with a roller 125 which rides the cam 117. Said arm is raised by the cam 117 to elevate rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54, and is lowered by means of a spring 126 encircling a rod 127,

one end of which spring engages an abutment 128 on the frame of the machine and the lower end of which rests against a setcollar 129 carried by said rod 127 which is connected to arm 119.

The oscillating frame is made up of arms 130 and 131, adjustably mounted on shaft 116, and constituting bearings for a shaft 132; and arms 133 and 134,l adjustably mounted on shaft 116 and constituting bearings for shaft 135. The rollers 52 and 53, as well as a belt pulley around which belt 54 passes, are mounted on shaft 132; and shaft 133 carries two belt pulleys around which pass belts 55 and 56, which latter are arranged above and Coperate with lower belts 49 and 51. In the position of the parts indicated in Fig. 7, the roller 125 is riding the unbroken surface of cam 117 and belts 55 and 56 are in gripping engagement with a book. As soon as the roller 125 enters depression 118 the frame is oscillated and the rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54 are lowered into gripping engagement with the book. This gripping by rollers 52 and 53 and belt 54 is only effected when it is desired to initiate the movement of a book which has been immobilized to effect the trimming of the edge opposite the fold.

The oscillation of the frame is very slight, the difference being simply that between the book when compressed `and when" uncompressed; that is to say, when the rollers 52 and engage the book to feed it into engagement with the gage mem-bers 57vand 58, the rollers do not compress the book. But after the first cut has been made and it is desired to give the book an initial impulse forward, roller 125 drops into depression Laarzen;k

118 with the result' that'the rollers 52. and-1v 53 ldescend into gripping engagement With the'upper surfaceof the book and compress` whereupon rollers 52. and 53 pass out of.,

grippingY engagement withl the'l book, and belts 55 and'.561areoscillatedinto gripping engagement to feed the same forward. intof contact with' a second: set of` gage` members Wherethe' top. and bottom of the book-are trimmed. o

Before describing in for effectingYV the trimmingofthe'. to'pvand bottomr ofthe books, the circuit and drive of the lower and upper belts willl bel described.v

As clearly shown in Figs. 1,' 7 lower: belts 49, 50 and 51 passfaround' belt pulleysona sha-ft 136 carried by arms 136` pivoted in bearings 137, which shaft 136 is arranged immediately below shaftl 132.` Thev lower belts then pass around a knurled part of shaft- 138, mounted inlsuitablebearin`gs,-at` the delivery of themachine- (Fig. 15), thence around a tensionV roller 139 (Fig. 1), idler roller146, and vthenceback to' the pulleys on shia-ft 136:y The tension:

rollers' 139 are carriedby afsWinging. frame pivoted at 141, to which' frame a tensioning Weight. 142 is attached; The said lower belts are drivenv from shaftv 138y which carries abeveli gear 143 .meshing With a-bevel gear 144' on one end'of a-.i'earwardly inclinedy shaft 145, thel otherl end ofivvhich Shaft carries afbevel gear '146"meshing'with a similar bevel gear 147 on' shortv shaft l 148-I mounted in ther framel off'the' machine.rv This shaft 147' carries a pinion 149 withy 'which meshes Shaft less, passi'e-arwiardly along. the machineA around an idler shaft- (Fig. 1), thence around tensioning rollers 156 mounted onan adjustableframe 157, the :position ofi `Which-y niay be varied-by means of-adjustingj bolts Said belts then* pass around pulleys.`y 159, 160 land161 (Figi 15)."carried: by shaft. 162, i belts: 55 and 5 6' thenfpassing ,aro-und .f thepulleysion shaft: 135 onk ther oscillating frame,l and` belt 54-thenl passing Iaroundl its pulley.v on shaft-132'.

TheA shaft. .162?is driven"- fromy shaft 138 througha train ofgears; A-gear1163ffcarl ried by shaft 138 meshes-*With a smallidler ing with a gear 166V on-shaft-162, gear 166, being of the same size as gear 163. Thls gear deta il. .the mechanism and 15, the

o'ear- 153r carried. by# shaftf- 154-1nounted drive between shafts 138 and 162 vinsures that the upper and lower belts shall be driven atthe same speed. Further, it' Will be observed that shaft 162 has bearings in blocks 167 and'168' that slide vertically in a casting.169'mounted on the frame of the machine; said: blocks 167 and 168 being yieldinglyheld in position by springs 170 and 17 0', thel other Aends of said springsen-l` gagingal plate 171 carried by said casting." 169. Shaft 162 may, accordingly, yieldA if necessary; and the arrangement of gears de.

scribed insures that shafts 138 and 162shall always remain in gear even though shaftz162 should. be displaced.

After the book has received the'rst trim' ming, it is moved along the 'machine as heretofore described by means of the' upperv belts 54, 55.` and 56, and lower belts49, 50l and 51, until it contactsWith-asecond gage which, as here shown, is constitutedby stop] members 1.72 and 173v (Fig. 10) mounted on a stub shafty 174. Through suitable connections these members aref'elevated into and depressed out of the path of movement of the hooks. As herel shown, said gage or stop members may be adjusted both length- Wise of the machine and laterally thereof for books 'of various Sizes. The stub shaft 1.7 4 passes through openingsin the forward'- ends of supportingarms 175 and 176, which latter in turn are adjustable on Va pair of plates 177 by means of bolt and slot connections 178. The plates 177 are laterally adjustablel along: the framework` of the machinein a slot 179, a squared portionA 177- on said plate engaging in said slot'179. The 'f bolts 178 projectthrough said slot 179` and intoy a second slot 180 arranged" therein; The plates 175 and 176 are-securely heldin their adjusted position by; meansofithexbolt and s loty connections 178, and also byimeans of screw members181-whichpassfthrough Y verticalears on plates 177'.

The gage or stopmembersf172 and 173` 110` roller 186011 a. slotted varm 187, the upper end 115,

of which is connected to a crank 188 on said shaft 182.v The cranks 183 and 183 are ad# justablelengthwise of' said shaft 182y for booksof various sizes, andthe'cam 185 isl also adjustable lengthwise of the shaft 154V 120 for the same purpose. The cam,` 185, through the connnections described, actsvto lower the `stop or ygage members-172and`17 outof the path of the book, kandsaid members-are-movedinto the path of the book to-l 125 stop the same by means of a s],)rin'g189 which encircles a rod 190. One end of said spring engages a stud 191 fixed on the frame of the' machine, and the other end asetcollar on said'rod 190. One end ofv said rod 130 190 is loosely connected to a crank 192 keyed to the shaft 182.

To insure a firm engagement of belts 55 and 56 with the upper surface of the book to positively feed the same along into engagement with said gage members 172 and 17 3, and also to insure an exact positioning of the books against said gage members so that the trimming of the top and bottom of the books shall be accurately performed, there are provided a pair of tensioning devices, here shown as rollers 193 and 193 (F ig. 9) which are positioned to press upon the edge of the book already trimmed, that is, the edge opposite the fold, when the folded edge lof the book engages the gage members. To secure this latter result these tensioning` devices coperate with a headerup, as hereinafter described. rl`he two devices are identical, the device provided with roller 193 being mounted between the upper and lower reaches of belt 55 and that provided with roller 193 between the upper and lower reaches of belt 56. These tensioning devices act on the books through the lower reaches of said belts and, in the positioning of the books and preventing of rebound of the same when the books hit the second gage members, perform substantially the same function as that of the dogs or albutments 60 and 61 with respect to gage members 57 and 58.

As shown in F 1, 8 and 9, each of these tension devices is carried by a guide rod 195 which in turn is supported vby across arm 196 on the frame of the machine. These guide rods 195'are arranged above the book when it is in position for the second trimming and assists in preventing buckling of the cover.v

i Each of the tensioning rollers 193 and 193 is carried by an arm 197 mounted loosely on a stud 198 carried by a split support 199 on rod 195. A spring 200 encircles the stud 198 and one end of said spring is fixedly secured to arm 197. The other end of said spring passes through an opening in a 'lmurled member 201. This member 201 held in position by a pin 202 engaging in depressions 203 in said member. When itl is desired to alter the tension of said roller 193, the member 201 is pressed inwardly against the tension of spring 2 00 until the pin 202 clears the depressions 203, whereupon the member 201 is rotated a half turn and the pin is again engaged with the depressions 203, thus holding the member in its adjusted position. The split support 199 is adjustable along the rods 195 and is held in adjusted position by means of a winged nut 204.

At this time when the folded edge of the book is in contact with the gage members 172 and 17 3 and the tension rollers are pressing onthe trimmed edge of the book, a

header-up 205 (Fig. 4) is moved into engagement with one of the edges of the book adjacent the foldwthe top or bottom o1"- the same-and, cooperating with the tension rollers which are pressing along the trimmed edge of the book, moves the latter to the exact position desired for trimming. y This header-up is operated from main shaft 74 through a cam 206. A slotted arm 207 carries a roller 208 which engages said cam, and the upper end of said arm is connected to a crank 209 mounted on shaft 210 which is provided with a second crank 211, which latter has an adjustable connection at 212 with a rod 213 on which the header-up 205 is carried. The cam 206 acts to move the header-up away from the book, and a spring 214 is provided to move the header-up into yielding engagement with the book. Said spring encircles a rod 215, the lower end of which projects into an opening in the framework ogE the machine. The lower end of said spring 214abuts said framework .and the upper end engages a collar 216 carried by said rod. The upper end of the rod is connected to a crank 217 keyed to shaft 210. It will therefore ybe seen that, when the header-up is moved away from the book, under the influence of cam 206, the spring 214 is compressed, so that the header-up is 9 moved into yielding engagement with the book by said spring when the roller 208 passes over the low part of the cani.v

The book has now been exactly positioned against the gage members 172 and 173 by the conjoint action of the tension rollers 193 and 193 and the header-up 205 and immediately clamps 218 and 218" are moved into firm but yielding engagement with the upper surfaces of the book to hold the same while the top and bottom thereof are being trimmed. These clamp members are carried by a cross beam 219, the ends of which are provided with bearing surfaces 220 and 220 that engage slideways provided in casting 221 (Fig. 1) carried by standards 222 and 223 on the main frame of the machine. The clamps are moved upwardly out of engagement with the books by a cam 224v (Fig. 10) mounted on shaft 154. A roller 225 carried in one end of an arm 226 rides said cam,and the other end of said arm is secured to a rock shaft 227. Keyed to each end of this rock shaft 227 are bell-crank levers 228 and 228. To one arm of each of said levers is secured the lower end of a reach-rod 229, the upper end of each of said reach-rods being pivotally connected to the cross bar 219 that carries the clamps 218 and 218. The other arm of each of said bellcrank levers 228 and 228 is provided with aperforated block 230 which is pivotally secured to said lever by means of a stud 231. A rod 232 passes through 'each of said blocks 230 and carries a spring 233, one end of which engages against a setcollar 234 carried by the rod 232 and the other end of which engages an abutment 236 carried by the base of the machine, said rod 232 sliding through said abutment 236. It will therefore be seen that the clamps are elevated out of engagement with the books by means of the cam and are forced into yielding engagement with the books by means of the springs 233. Said clamps are adjustable along bar 219 and are held in adjusted position by means of set-screws 237 and 237. l

After the clamps have engaged the books, knives 238 and 238 trim the top and bottom of the same. These knives are carried by a heavy rectangular frame 239, which frame is elevated and lowered by means of a pair of cranks 240 and 240 mounted on shaft 154,

and an identical pair of cranks 241 and 241 mounted on a sha ft 242. Each of the cranks 240, 240, 241 and 241 is connected to one corner of the rectangular frame :239 by means of reach-rods 243 whereby a powerful and uniform upward and downward movement is imparted to the four corners of the frame. The frame has bearing surfaces 239 that engage corresponding surfaces on standards 222 and 223 provided with suitable gibs for taking up wear in both directions. Shaft 242 carries a gear 244 similar to gear 153, the latter being driven from gear 244 through the intermediary of an idler gear 245. Gear 244 is driven from the main shaft 7 4 through an idler gear 246 (see Fig. 1). y

Each of the knives 238 and 238 is mounted on knife-carriers 247 (Figs. 13 and 14) which are laterally adjustable for different sizes of books along slots 248 and 249 by means of stay' bolts 250. The knives 238 and 238 are vertically adjustable to compensate for wear, and preferably Vthere is interposed between each knife' and its carrier 247, an intermediate plate 251 which is adjustably secured to said plate 247 by means of bolts 252, said bolts passing through slots 2 53 in the carriers 247 and slots 254 in the intermediate members 251. The bolts 252 likewise engage lin screw-threaded openings 255 in the knife blades. In order to hold the blades iXedly in their adjusted position, set bolts 256pass through screw-threaded openings 257 in a flange 258 of the intermediate member 251 and engage the top edge of the knife blade. These bolts may be manipulated through cut-out portions 259provided in the knife carriers 247.

The knives are of the usual inclined guillotine type whereby a shearing and perfect cut is assured, and coperate with appropriate bottom knives 238a (Fig. 9).

Assoon as the knives 238 and 238 perform their trimming function and the clamps 218 and 218 are raised from the drive mechanism of said insetting or gatheri .mg machine, so that the trimmer and the book-.forming machine are timed to operate in unison; that is to say, the books are delivered from the saddle or support 20 in timed relation to the various operations of the trimming mechanism. As shown in Fig. 1, a bevel gear 260 on a stub. shaft 261 meshes with asimilar bevel gear on shaft 74. Said stub shaft carries a large spur. gear 262 which in turn meshes with a gear, such as gear 20 of Fig. 2 of my Patent No. 1,177,524.

While the trimming mechanism has only been illustrated in association with one form of book-making machines, to wit, an insetter, it can be used in connection with practically all forms of book-making machines; and, further, it can advantageously be used alone as a separate, independent machine to which untrimmed books are fed manually by an operator.

It will be noted that when each of the trimming acts takes place, the book being operated upon is immobilized and clamped in position as the guillotine knives effect the trimming. This `insures the most perfect results in the trimming, ohviatingl the disadvantages thatr follow from moving books past the knives or the knives past the books. present invention keeps up the speed ofy production so that the books are trimmed as fast,` as they are produced and bound; and,

when it is-borne in mind that the books porting members shown in Fig. 3, from-v which they are promptly removed.' by the engagement therewith of lugs 44 and' 44zx carried by sprocket chains 43 111.61434 These chains deliver they bOOkS, folded edge foremost, into the bite of the upper and lower rollers and belts shown in' Fig. 7, which latter are driven at a higher speed than the chains 43 and 431 and, accordingly, rapidlyV withdraw the books from said chains sothat the lugs 44 and 44"L freely clear tlie rearfedge At the same time the device ofthe CIK thereof. The belts and rollers referred to progress they books into contact with the gage members 57 and 58 (Fig. against which each book is exactly positioned by means of the dogs or abutments 60 and 61 which engage the edge of the book opposite the fold as soon as said edge drops down in front of said dogs or abutments. As soon as the book is positioned the clamp 89 engages the book and thereupon the knife 111 coperating with lower knife 111 descends and trims the edge of the book opposite the fold.

After the knife 111 and the clamp 89 have ybeen elevated out of engagement with the book, the gage members 57 and 58 are rocked out of the path of movement of the book, whereupon the rollers 52 and 5b and belt 5d arel lowered into gripping engagement with the upper surface of the book to give the same an initial impulse forward toward the second trimming mechanism. This gripping is only momentary and sufficient to start the book forward, following which the belts 55 and 56 are lowered into gripping engagement with the book and feed the same into engagement with gage members 172 and 173. The tension rollers 193 and 193v act to prevent rebound of they book as the same hits the gage members, said members press` ing upon the trimmed edge O-f the book when the folded edge contacts the gage. At this moment the header-up 205 1l) engages one of the edges of the book adjacent the fold and, coperating with the tension rollers 193 and 198 exactly positions the book against the gage members 172 and 173. Thereupon the clamps 218 and 218 descend into engagement with the upper surface of the book, following which the knives 238 and 238', acting in conjunction with their associated lower knives, trim the top and bottom of the book.

Thereafter the knives and clamp are elevated, the gage members are depressed out of the path of movement of the book, and the latter is progressed by the belts outward y between shafts 13,8 and 162 onto any suitable or desired delivery.

lt will be observed that the knives are set and constructed to operate simultaneously, and that the forward and rear gage members are also set and constructed to operate simultaneously. The whole timing of the machine is 1 to 1, so that the books pass rapidly through the trimmer. During the normal operationv of the machine, on a book of the size ofthe cSaturday Evening Post, for example, there will be one book against the forward gage, a second book against the rear gage, a third book between the upper and lower belts that is just about to leave the trimmer, anda book that is being elevated between the closing rollers.

As heretofore indicated, the trimmer of the present application can be used in association with practically all forms of bookforming machines, such as gathering and insetting machines, the so-called perfect binder, etc.; and while, for the sake of clear-ness, one expression of the inventive idea has been illustrated and described in considerable detail, it will be understood that 'the invention is not limited thereto, but that the inventive idea is susceptible of eX- pression in Various mechanical embodiments within the limits of the appended claims.

lWhat is claimed is 1. In combination, a saddle on which books are assembled and bound, means for elevating the books from said saddle and closing the same, and means for trimming the edges of each book as it is delivered, said trimming mechanism operating in timed relation with said mechanism for delivering the books from the saddle.

2. ln combination, a saddle on which books are assembled and bound, means for elevating the books from said saddle and closing the same, and means for trimming the edges of each book as it is delivered comprising' a reciprocating knife for trimming the edge of the book opposite the fold, and a pair of reciprocating knives for trimming the two edges adjacent the fold, said trimming mechanism operating in timed relation with said mechanism for delivering the books from the saddle.

3. ln combination` a saddle along which books are conveyed, means for elevating the books from said saddle and closing the same, and knives for trimming the edge of each book as it is delivered, said `trimming knives operating in timed relation with said mechanism for delivering' the books from the saddle.

il. In combination, a saddle on which books are assembled, means for delivering the books from the saddle and closingl the same, a gage movable into and out of the path of movement of the books, means progressing each` book as it is delivered into engagement with said gage, a movable abutment holding said book against said gage, and a. vertically reciprocating knife for trimming the edge of the books opposite the fold.

ln combination, a support on which books are assembled and bound, a gage movable into and out of the path of movement of said books, an endless chain provided with means in the form of a lug for engaging one edge of the book to move the same toward said gage, additional means engaging the book to move it into contact with said gage, reciprocating means holding the book in engagement with said gage, and means for trimming the edge of the book op posite the fold.

G. In combination, a saddle ou which books are assembled and stitched, closing rolls arranged ,above said saddle, means for elevating said books into the bite ofy said closing rolls, a gage movable'into and outof the path of movement of said books, means moving said books 'into engagement with said gage, a vertically reciprocating: knife for trimming the edge opposite the fold, and feed rollers movable into gripping engagement with the top of said'book to move the same after the -operationof said knife;

7. In combination, a support for un trimmed books, a gage movable into andlout of the path of movement of said books, means for trimming the edge of the book op'- posite the fold when it is in contact With said gage, al pivoted frame, tvvo sets of bookfeeding means carried thereby, and means for rocking said frame to successively move said book progressing means into gripping engagementvvith said book. y

8.` In combination, a support for untrimmed books, a gage movableinto and-out of the path of movementy of said books, meansfor trimming the edge' of the bookop-y posite Vthe foldwhen it is in contact With said gage, a vpivot'ed frame, tvvo sets o'fbook#v feeding means carried thereby, and means for-rocking said frame in one 'direction to move one set of feeding means into gripping engagement With the book to initiate the movement of the same after the operation of said knife and in the opposite direction to engage the second set of feeding means with said'y book. i

9. In combination, a' support for untrimmed books, a gage movable into and out of the path of movementof` said books, a conveyer provided With means f' for engagingV the book to move the same' toward said gage, a second'conveyer driven ata higher speed than said first-mentioned conveyor and receiving the books therefrom and pro-- gressin'g the same into contact With said gage, and means for trimming the ed`ge`of the book opposite the fold.

10. In combination, av support vfor un@ trimmed books, Ya gage movablefinto and-ont of the path of movement of said books,"an endless conveyer provided With a lug for engaging one edge of the book to m'ove'the f same toward said gage, a second endless conveyer drivenat a higher, speed than said first-mentioned conveyer Vreceiving said books and moving them rapidlyf out of the path of said lug and into contact -vvith said gage, and means for trimming the edge yof the book opposite the fold.

11. In combination, a support ,for untrimmed books, a gage movable into andiout of the path vof movement of the books, means moving the books into` engagement with said gage, a moving member cooperating With said' gage to position the book against said gage, and a knife for trimming-the edgeofthe book oppositethe;foldaA 12. In combinatiomasupport for' books ment of the books cooperating With said gage to position the book against said gage, and a knife for trimming; the edge ofthe book opposite the fold. a A 13. In combination, a support for'books tobe trimmed, a gage movable 4into andvout of the path of movement of the books, means moving the books* intol engagementpwith said gage, a reciprocating member moving in the line of' movementof the booksf-over which the books are fedi cooperating ,with said gage to position the vbookf againstlsaid gage, and a knife for-'trimming the yedgeiof the book opposite the fold.'I n

14. In combination, a support for" Iiintrimmed books, a gage movable into and lout of the vpath-of movement'of the books, means movingthe books into engagement With said gage folded" edge foremost, as moving, member cooperating' with said', gage to: position the book against said gage, anda knife for riliiming vthe edge of the book opposit'ethe 15. In combination, afsupportforbooks to be trimmed, la gage movableintoand out of the path yof' movement-'of the books, means moving theI books into engagement vvith'said i' gage foldedfedgeA foremost, a member'moving inthe linefof movementfo-f` the books cooperating With said*v gage to position the book `against said gage, and a'4 knife for rilriming-ithe edge ofthe book oppositethe o.^

16. In combination, a support"fo1"books to be trimmed, a gage` movable into andiiout of the path o-f'movement of thebooks, means moving the `books intoeng'agement Withjs'aid gage'folded edge foremost, a're'ciprocating member moving' inv tl'iexiline of'movoment of the Vbooks `'over lvvhich the ibooksf are fed cooperating vvith said `gage to position the book against said: gage, and a 'km-fe for trimming the edge of the book oppositerthe fold. v i ,A

17.1 combination, a lvsupportv` for vbooks to betrimmedja gage movable'into and out ofthe path of movement ofthe books, means moving thel books' intoengagement vvith= said gage'y folded'edge' foremost, a' member: 'mov- 4ing in the line of movement ofthe books engaging the edge opposite."V the fold and coperaties-With saidfgage to position the book againstsaid gage, and a knife for trimm-ing theedge opposite the fold.

18: In combination, a." gage, bookiproygressing means engaging eachl book and moving itf'into engagement with Said'gage, a knife 'forl trimming,r the edge*` of the book opposite thefo'lfd', and meansoperating` fter said trimming for mov-ing saidVbkprogressing means into gripping engagement with the book to initiate a further movement ofthe book.

.'19, In combination, a gage, book-progressing means engaging each book and moving'v it into engagement with said gage, a knife for trimming theledge of the book opposite the fold, means momentarily operating after said trimming for moving said book-progressing means into gripping engagement with the book to initiate a further movement of the book, and additional means for continuing the movement of the book.

20. In combination, a gage, boolcprogressing means for moving. books into engagement therewith, a device pressing on each 'f book along the edge opposite that which is in engagement with' said gage, and means for trimming the edges of the book adjacent the fold. 21. Inv combination, a gage, book-progressing means engaging each book and moving it into engagement with said gage folded edge foremost, a knife for trimming the edge of the book opposite the fold, and means roperating after said trimming for moving said book-progressing means into gripping engagement with the book to initiate a furthermovement of the book.

22. In combination, a gage, book-pro gressing means engaging each book and moving it into engagement with said gage folded edge foremost, a knife for trimming the edge of the book opposite the fold, means momentarily operating after said trimming -for moving said book-progressing means into gripping engagement with the book to initiate a further movement of the book, and additional means for continuing the movement of the book. I l

23. In combination, a Igage, book-progressing means for moving books into enga'gement therewith folded edge foremost, a device pressing on each book along the edge opposite the fold when the book is in engagement with said gage, and means for trimming the edges ofthe book adjacent the fold.:

24. In combination, a gage, book-progressing means for moving books into engagement therewith, a device pressing on each book along the edge opposite that which is in engagement with said gage, a header-up coperating with said device to position the book, and means for trimming the edges of the book adjacent 'the fold.

25. In combination, a gage, book-progressing conveyers for moving books into engagement therewith folded edge foremost, a device engaging said conv'eyers and pressing on each book along the edge opposite .the :fold when the book is in engagement ywith said gage, and vertically reciprocating knives for trimmlng` the edges of the book .adjacent1 ythe fold.

26. In combination, a gage, bookeprogressing means for moving books into engagement therewith folded edge foremost, a def vice pressing on each book along the edgeopposite the fold when the book 1s 1n engagement with said gage, a header-np engaging one of the edges to be trimmed, said header-up.cooperating with said device to position the book against said gage, and means for trimming the edges of the book adjacent the fold.

27. In combination, a gage, book-progress ing conveyers for moving books into engagement therewith folded edge foremost, a device engaging said conveyers and pressing on each book along the edge opposite the fold when the book is in engagement with said gage, a header-up engaging one of the edges to be trimmed, said header-up coperating with said device to position the book against said gage, and vertically reciprocating knives for trimming the edges of the book adjacent the fold.

28. In combination, a gage, book-conveying means progressing each book into con,- tact with said gage folded edge foremost, a movable device engaging the book and acting to position the same against said gage, a knife for trimming the edge opposite the fold, a second gage into engagement with which each book is progressed, a device pressing on the trimmed edge when the folded edge engages said second gage, and knives for trimming the edges adjacent the fold.

29. In combination, a gage, book-convey- 100 ing means progressing each book into contact with said gage folded edge foremost, a movable device engaging the book and acting to position the same against said gage,

a knife for trimming the edge opposite the 105 fold, a second gage into engagement with which each book is progressed, a device pressing on the trimmed edge when the folded edge engages said second4 gage, a headerup engaging one of the edges to be trimmed '110 and coperating with said device to position the book against said second gage, and lmli/es for trimming 'the edges adjacent the 30. In combination, a gage, book-convey- 115 ing means progressing each book into contact with said gage folded edge foremost, a movable device engaging the book and acting to position the same against said gage,

a knife for trimming the edge opposite the 120 fold, and mechanism operating after said trimming to cause said book conveying means to grip each book to initiate the further movement of the same.

31. In combination, a gage, book-convey- 125 ing means progressing each book into contact withsaid gage folded edge foremost, a movable device engaging the book and acting to position the same against said gage,

a knifefor trimming the edge opposite the 130 fo1d,mechanism operating after said trimming to cause said book-conveying means to grip each book to initiate the further movement of the same, a second gage into engagement With Which each book is progressed, a device pressing on the' trimmed edge When the folded edge engages said .second gage, and knives for trimming the edges adj acent the fold.

32. In combination, a gage, book-conveying means progressing each book into contact with said gage foldededge foremost, a

movable device engagingv the book and acting to position the same against said gage,

a knife for trimming the edge opposite the fold, mechanism loperating afterv said trimming tov cause said book-conveying means to grip each book to initiate the further move# ment of the same, a second gage into engagement With which each book is progressed, a device pressing on the trimmed edge When the folded edge engages said second gage, a header-up engaging one` of the edges to be trimmed andy coperating With said devicey to position the book against said second gage, and knives for trimming the edges adjacentthe fold. l

In testimony WhereofI have signed this speoication.

EDWARD R. KAST. n

US20865817 1917-12-24 1917-12-24 Book-trimmer Expired - Lifetime US1327915A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US20865817 US1327915A (en) 1917-12-24 1917-12-24 Book-trimmer

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US20865817 US1327915A (en) 1917-12-24 1917-12-24 Book-trimmer

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1327915A true US1327915A (en) 1920-01-13

Family

ID=22775469

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US20865817 Expired - Lifetime US1327915A (en) 1917-12-24 1917-12-24 Book-trimmer

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1327915A (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3148574A (en) * 1959-04-06 1964-09-15 Harris Intertype Corp Trimming mechanism
US3213733A (en) * 1964-06-29 1965-10-26 F T Rosback Company Three knife book trimmer
US3722336A (en) * 1971-02-10 1973-03-27 North American Rockwell Feed, transport and delivery mechanism for book trimmers and the like
USRE28840E (en) * 1971-02-10 1976-06-08 Rockwell International Corporation Feed, transport and delivery mechanism for book trimmers and the like
EP0941817A1 (en) * 1998-03-11 1999-09-15 Grapha-Holding Ag Cutting machine for the automated trimming of printed products, like brochures, magazines or books
US20010023630A1 (en) * 2000-03-08 2001-09-27 Akira Nakajima Three-side trimmer
US20030079591A1 (en) * 2001-10-26 2003-05-01 Cote Kevin Lauren Registration apparatus for a sheet material article handler

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3148574A (en) * 1959-04-06 1964-09-15 Harris Intertype Corp Trimming mechanism
US3213733A (en) * 1964-06-29 1965-10-26 F T Rosback Company Three knife book trimmer
US3722336A (en) * 1971-02-10 1973-03-27 North American Rockwell Feed, transport and delivery mechanism for book trimmers and the like
USRE28840E (en) * 1971-02-10 1976-06-08 Rockwell International Corporation Feed, transport and delivery mechanism for book trimmers and the like
EP0941817A1 (en) * 1998-03-11 1999-09-15 Grapha-Holding Ag Cutting machine for the automated trimming of printed products, like brochures, magazines or books
US6536319B1 (en) 1998-03-11 2003-03-25 Müller Martini Holding AG Cutting machine for automatically trimming printed products such as brochures, magazines or books
US20010023630A1 (en) * 2000-03-08 2001-09-27 Akira Nakajima Three-side trimmer
US6520058B2 (en) * 2000-03-08 2003-02-18 Horizon International Inc. Three-side trimmer
US20030079591A1 (en) * 2001-10-26 2003-05-01 Cote Kevin Lauren Registration apparatus for a sheet material article handler
US20060032350A1 (en) * 2001-10-26 2006-02-16 Goss International Americas, Inc. Registration apparatus for a sheet material article handler
US7021185B2 (en) * 2001-10-26 2006-04-04 Goss International Americas, Inc. Registration apparatus for a sheet material article handler
US7384039B2 (en) 2001-10-26 2008-06-10 Goss International Americas, Inc. Registration apparatus for a sheet material article handler

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2874775A (en) Trimming machine for automatically trimming the three open edges of stapled booklets
US4484501A (en) Apparatus for cutting and trimming paper sheets or the like
US3881645A (en) Apparatus for the groupwise packaging of bags
US3748937A (en) Card scoring device
US2840223A (en) Article feeding means
US1076726A (en) Automatic continuous book-trimming machine.
US4076231A (en) Apparatus for trimming signatures
US1982880A (en) Automatic book cutting machine
US1006783A (en) Rotary cutting device.
US734215A (en) Paper-feed.
US2379911A (en) Article handling apparatus
US549111A (en) Dore h
US2813798A (en) Method for placing paper sheets between slices in a stack
US1236181A (en) Signature-gatherer.
US2751981A (en) Sheet forming and stacking apparatus
US3788180A (en) Slitter for display packages and similar products
US1239965A (en) Folding-machine.
GB124854A (en) Improvements in or relating to Machines for Removing Bark, Bast and similar Material from Logs and like Articles.
US2777562A (en) Machine for feeding books to a casing-in machine
US2737238A (en) Apparatus for cutting and creasing sheet material
US976640A (en) Sheet-feeding mechanism.
US1392683A (en) Machine for wrapping sweetmeats and the like
US3182537A (en) Paper cutting machine with counter controlled stacking means
US3240089A (en) Document handling apparatus
US2372020A (en) Wrapping paper cutting mechanism