US2872981A - Method and apparatus for edge forming sheet material - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for edge forming sheet material Download PDF

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Publication number
US2872981A
US2872981A US631895A US63189556A US2872981A US 2872981 A US2872981 A US 2872981A US 631895 A US631895 A US 631895A US 63189556 A US63189556 A US 63189556A US 2872981 A US2872981 A US 2872981A
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blank
cutting
folded
guide
edge
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US631895A
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William B Fitzpatrick
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HARRISON SIMPSON Co
HARRISON-SIMPSON Co
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HARRISON SIMPSON Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D3/00Cutting work characterised by the nature of the cut made; Apparatus therefor
    • B26D3/10Making cuts of other than simple rectilinear form
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D1/00Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor
    • B26D1/01Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work
    • B26D1/12Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis
    • B26D1/14Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter
    • B26D1/24Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter coacting with another disc cutter
    • B26D1/245Cutting through work characterised by the nature or movement of the cutting member or particular materials not otherwise provided for; Apparatus or machines therefor; Cutting members therefor involving a cutting member which does not travel with the work having a cutting member moving about an axis with a circular cutting member, e.g. disc cutter coacting with another disc cutter for thin material, e.g. for sheets, strips or the like
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/202With product handling means
    • Y10T83/2074Including means to divert one portion of product from another
    • Y10T83/2083Deflecting guide
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/465Cutting motion of tool has component in direction of moving work
    • Y10T83/4766Orbital motion of cutting blade
    • Y10T83/4795Rotary tool
    • Y10T83/4801With undulant cutting edge [e.g., "pinking" tool]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6476Including means to move work from one tool station to another
    • Y10T83/6489Slitter station
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/727With means to guide moving work
    • Y10T83/741With movable or yieldable guide element
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/727With means to guide moving work
    • Y10T83/741With movable or yieldable guide element
    • Y10T83/743Opposed to work-supporting surface

Description

Feb. 10, 1959 w. B. FlTzPATRlcK METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EDGE FORMING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Dec. 31, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet l Feb. 10, 1959 w. B. FxTzPA-TRICK METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EDGE FORMING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Dec. 31, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 I a .L A mi am A, f. e @E 5 WAM sind 4FM n h41 eae Feb. 10, 1959 w. B. FlTzPATRlcK 2,872,981
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EDGE! FORMING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Deo. 5l', 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 aa" v United States Patent METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EDGE FORMING SHEET MATERIAL Application December 31, 1956, Serial No. 631,895
3 Claims. (Cl. 164-61) This invention relates, in general, to a method and machine for cutting sheet material to provide decorative edge portions of the form employed in greeting cards and stationery. In particular, the invention is concerned with an edge forming machine for decoratively cutting preformed greeting card `and stationery stock wherein two layers of sheet material are folded over upon one another such that they are connected together in hinged relationship.
The method of cutting with this edge forming machine of the invention is based upon the idea` of rst cutting the edges of the top and bottom layers of a piece of folded stock along a line of cutting which is parallel to the line of folding of the sheet, and then simultaneously cutting the folded sheet along its two remaining edges and also along a third line of cutting which divides the folded sheet into two component parts.
I am aware that various edge forming machines have been proposed for carrying out successive cutting operations wherein a first cutting operation is followed by other cutting steps directed along lines of cutting which r-un at right angles to the first line of cutting. However, such machines, when used to decoratively cut folded greeting card and stationery stock, are not satisfactory and will not produce a commercially acceptable product. The reason for this is due to the difficulty in constantly holding two hinged layers of material against one another while being moved at high speed and guided to the cutting station.
It will readily be appreciated that cutting a folded blank along lines of cutting which start at the 4line of folding of the blank and run at right angles to this line of folding will automatically press the component layers together as cutting takes place. However, a somewhat different situation arises with respect to cutting those edges of the component layers which lie opposite to the line of folding. The folded edge must be forced against a side guide and constantly held there while the blank advances to the cutting station.
Conventional machines for registering a ysingle sheet against a side guide while advancing the sheet to the cutting station fail to hold a folded sheet properly so that the top layer lies completely in contact with the bottom layer. Either the top layer buckles or slides -slightly with respect to the bottom layer just before cutting occurs. In either case, the cut at one layer will not coincide precisely with the cut of the other layer and a commercially acceptable product is not obtained. This dillic-ulty is materially increased as the speed of handling of folded blanks is stepped up to commercially acceptable speeds and a further complication is clogging or interference from the narrow strip of waste material produced by the cut.
It is an object of the invention to provide an edge forming machine for decoratively cutting greeting cards and stationery blanks and to devise means for cutting folded layers of sheet material to provide decorative edges on each layer which coincide with one another.
Zl Patented Feb. 10, 1959 ICC Another object is to provide a mechanism for holding folded stock and guiding the stock to a cutting station While maintaining the two layers of each folded sheet in complete contact with one another. Another object of the invention is to provide a rapid method of forming a decorative edge in which method relatively narrow waste strips are removed from successive blanks without interference and each of the Waste strips is simultaneously guided to a waste disposal station as the respective blank passes along a horizontal path of movement. Still another object of the invention is to devise a method of decoratively cutting folded sheets of stock so as to divide the folded stock into two components. The invention also aims to devise a mechanism which is of simplified construction and capable of rapidly handling folded blanks of material and applying on at least three sides of the folded sheet decorative edge portions.
These and other objects and novel features will be more fully understood and appreciated from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig.` l is a plan view of the edge forming machine of the invention;
Fig. 2 is a view showing a folded sheet material blank of the type employed in carrying out the edge forming method of the invention;
Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2 but showing a folded blank with one decorative edge having been ap` plied thereto;
Fig. 4 is another view similar to Figs. 2 and 3 but further showing a folded blank having been cut along lines of cutting which extend transversely of the blank;
Fig. 5 is a View similar to Figs. 2-4, inclusive, but showing the blank of Fig. 4 separated into two portions;
Fig. 6 is a detail vertical cross-sectional view of the rst cutting station;
P Figl. 7 is a cross-section taken on the line 7-7 of Fig.` 8 is -a detail Vertical sectional view of the second cutting station;
Fig. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 9--9 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 10 is a detail cross-sectional view of the edge forming mechanism;
Fig. l1 is a detail plan View of the structure of Fig. 10; and
Fig. l2 is another plan View of the structure shown in Figs. 1() and 1l but further indicating a strip of waste being diverted away from the mechanism.
In accordance with the invention, I have devised a machine for high speed edge forming of folded sheet material blanks of the stationery and greeting card type. The method of edge forming in its preferred form is characterized by two successive cutting steps carried out one after the other in rapid succession. A first cutting step takes place along a line of cutting which is parallel to the line of folding of the blank with the folded edge of the blank being held against a suitable guide. Thereafter, three cutting steps are simultaneously carried out along lines of cutting which start at the folded edge of the blank and run at right angles to this folded edge so as to intersect the rst line of cutting. As a result, the single folded blank is divided into two parts and each part is formed with a decorative edge along three sides.
In contrast with such a method of generally producing decorative edges on a greeting card or stationery blank, it should be kept in mind that the conventional procedure involves the preparation of a hollow four-sided die which will decoratively cut and form four edges of an unfolded blank. This blank is thereafter required to be folded upon itself to provide two layers of sheet material which are hinged together and which have decorative edges on three sides. It is pointed out that the cost of `making one such conventional die is a considerable factor and that, once the die has been made, it can only be used for one size of greeting card or stationery blank and, since there is a constant demand for a relatively wide range of sizes, an extremely heavy cost is involved to provide a series of conventional dies which can be employed to cut any particular decorative design.
In the method of the invention, cutting a folded blank is based on the idea of using a plurality of small rotary cutters which can be, not only much more cheaply made than hollow square dies, but can be moved through a wide range of positions of adjustment to adapt their use for any required size of greeting card or stationery blank. It will be apparent that there are significant advantages, therefore, in using a rotary die type of edge forming apparatus and, particularly so, when applying these rotary type dies to a blank which has already been folded. As pointed out above, the difficulties encountered in dealing with a folded blank have prevented successful use of rotary type dies and the art has continued to utilize the conventional hollow type four-sided die for decoratively cutting greeting card and stationery blanks. In order, therefore, to make practical the use of rotary type cutting dies, I have further devised special register, guide and gripping devices for maintaining both portions of a folded blank firmly against one another while cutting takes place. This involves exerting a vertically directed force against the uppermost portion of the blank and, at the same time, urging both the upper and lower portions of the blank in a laterally offset direction against a guide as the two portions are being advanced to a cutting station. A somewhat similar handling of the blank must also be provided for when the blank moves to the second cutting station.
In the drawings, Figs. 2 to 5, inclusive, illustrate somewhat diagrammatically a folded blank and indicate diagrammatically edge forming steps of the invention which result in dividing the blank in Fig. 2 into two separate members, as shown in Fig. 5. Figs. l and 6-12, inclusive, illustrate a preferred form of edge forming machine of the invention for carrying out the edge forming steps indicated in Figs. 2-5, inclusive. This edge forming n1achine includes, in general, two cutting stations and conveyor means for passing the folded sheet material blank through these cutting stations. The cutting means of the iirst cutting station comprises a rotary cutter R and a cooperating rotatable anvil R together with special guide and gripper means for leading folded blanks between the members R and R in such a position as to enable the cutter R to remove a narrow strip of waste material and form decorative edges which extend generally parallel to the line of folding of the respective blanks.
From this first cutting station, blanks are conveyed to a second cutting station which extends generally in a direction at right angles to the first cutting station. In this second cutting staiton, the three cuts above preferred to are accomplished, as shown in Figs. l and 8, by means of a rotary cutting die R2 and respective rotary anvil R2', a rotary cutter R3 and anvil R3', and a rotary cutter R4 and anvil R4.
Considering in detail the parts included in the first cutting station, attention isdirected to Figs. 1, 6 and 7. As shown therein, a machine frame F, consisting of a rectangularly shaped enclosure, is employed to support a vertically adjustable table 2. Over this table runs a conveyor belt 4, which is supported on a shaft 6 at one end and on a shaft 8 at the other end. Both of these shafts are rotatably supported through the frame F, as best shown in Fig. l. Also at one side of the frame F is mounted a motor 10 which drives a belt 11 and pulley 12 fast on a shaft 14. A gear 15 in mesh with a second gear 16 turns the shaft 8 and thus supplies motor power for the conveyor belt 4. The cutter R is fixed on an extension 17 of the shaft 14. The anvil R' is rotatably supported on a stud 18 which passes through an arm 19, as best shown in Fig. 7, in a position such that the top of the anvil just projects through an opening 20 formed in the table 2 at a point immediately below the cutter R. The arm 19 is in turn pivotally supported at 21 in a hanger 22 solidly attached to the underside of the table 2. At its oppositeend, the arm 19 is engaged by a lever element 23 which is fulcrummed at 24 and which has its opposite end supported for vertical adjustment in a clamp 25 threaded on an adjustment bolt 26 in turn threaded through a lower section of the machine frame. By adjusting the screw 26, a suitable tension may be exerted to force the anvil R against the cutter R to carry out desired cutting.
As one suitable means of feeding a folded blank of material to the cutting station thus described, I may provide a feed attachment A, best shown at the lower righthand side of Fig. 1 and which includes a pair of conveyor belts 28 and 29 which are arranged to advance a folded blank of material toward the table 2 and the conveyor belt 4 which is moving in a direction at right angles to the direction of travel of the belts 28 and 29. A sheet of greeting card or stationery stock, generally indicated by the arrow B, is folded, as shown in Fig. 2, to provide two layers B1 and B2 which are hinged together along a line of folding B3. This folded blank B is conveyed by the feed mechanism A, preferably in an inclined path of travel down onto the conveyor belt 4 in a position such that the folded edges B3 comes into contact with a vertical guide 30 supported in an upright position on the table 2 in spaced relation to an adjacent side of the frame F, as shown in Fig. l. This guide consists of a bar of rectangular cross-section formed with adjustment lugs 31 and 32 which may be moved toward and away from the adjacent side of the frame F into desired positions of lateral adjustment for the guide 30 and secured in place by means of screw fastened clamps 33 and 34. The importance of this adjustment feature of the guide will be hereinafter discussed in greater detail.
The blank B, as it moves onto the conveyor belt 4, is immediately carried in a direction `from right to left, as viewed in Fig. 1 and, in this ligure, the blank B is shown in one position of forward movement in the direction of the cutting station. As the blank B moves into contact with the guide 3i) its folded edge comes into contact with theinner face of the guide 30 and simultaneously the belt 4 starts the blank in a direction from right to left, as shown in Fig. 1, towards the first cutting station.
At this point, the folded edge B3, as a result of its movement and Contact with the guide 3l), tends to open and the uppermost layer B2 seeks to extend upwardly at an angle to the lbottom layer B1. To prevent the blank from opening too far and to insure that the two layers are brought together into a substantially closed position, I provide blank engaging elements 36 and 37.
The element 37 may, for example, consist of a thin strip of spring steel or other resilient material mounted on a block 41 (Fig. 1) and having an inclined bottom edge which extends rearwardly and upwardly to a point sufficiently high to overlie the top layer B2 in any opened position it may assume. The supported edge of the blank B, i. e., the left edge, as viewed in Fig. l, if fully opened will come into contact with the element 37 and be `forced downwardly into a partly lclosed position in which it can pass .under the element 36. lf the top layer is not fully opened, it may pass directly into Contact with the element 36. In either event, substantial closure of the two layers isachieved.
The element 3e may consist of a resilient wire like member reversely bent and located immediately above the conveyor belt 4, as shown in Fig, l, and is supported at one end of a second blank engaging mechanism 38, as
. best shown in Fig. 7.y The element 36 is formed with a curved extremity which operates to receive and guide an upper layer B2 of the blank so that the upper layer moves toward the lower layer B1 in closely spaced relationship, as shown in Fig. 7.
Concurrently with engagement of the blank B against the elements 36 and 37, a further engagement takes place between the free edges of the blank which extend parallel to the line of folding and a special traversing guide 40 which forms an important part of the apparatus of the invention.
The traversing guide 40 comprises a thin sheet of spring steel or similar resilient material which is curved, as shown in Fig. 1, and also fastened at an intermediate portion to the block 41. The latter member is supported at the end of an L-shaped arm 42. At its opposite end, the arm 42 is anchored in a cylindrical cam element 44, slidably disposed on the shaft 17 and resiliently maintained in one position by a coil spring 43. At one end, the cam element 44 is formed with indented cam surfaces which engage against mating cam surfaces on another cylindrical cam element 46 fast on the shaft 17.
Rotation of shaft 17 and cam 44 operates to periodically displace the cam element 44 against its spring 43 to produce a continuous traversing movement of the L- shaped arm 42 relative to the path of travel of the conveyor belt 4. When this operation is carried out at suiciently high speed, it will be apparent that therein produced a rapid oscillating motion which is transmitted through the arm and block 41 to the traversing guide 40.
With the block 41 is close proximity to the surface of the table 2, the bottom of guide 40 extends below the free edges of the blank layers B1 and B2, when supported on the conveyor belt 4. It will be evident, therefore, that by suitably adjusting the space between the xed guide 30 and the traversing guide 40 to the width of a blank and then moving the blank along the oscillating guide 40, there is produced at the free edges a constant succession of pulses which act in a lateral direction to repeatedly force the blank against-the stationary guide 30.
It will be appreciated that portions of the two blank layers, having passed the engaging element 36, will have to be held down in `some manner in order to avoid buckling, especially when the traversing action of the guide 40 takes place. To deal with this requirement, I further provide hold-down means operating in cooperating relationship with the means for compacting and advancing folded layers of a blank and with the means for simultaneously exerting successive laterally directed forces along the free edges of the blank.
The hold-down means of the invention consists of a mechanism for exerting vertically downwardly directed pressure centrally against the top layer of the blank so that it is constantly held against the bottom layer on the conveyor belt in fully compacted relationship.
It is pointed out that, in exerting a downwardly directed pressure against the top of the blank, the effect of the traversing forces exerted along the edges of the blank tends to become neutralized unless there is an opportunity for lateral displacement of the blank to take place freely relative to the hold-down means and without the layers becoming separated from one another.
To deal with this requirement, I have devised means in the hold-down apparatus for rolling engagement with the blank in a manner particularly suited to cooperating with the traversing guide 40. The means for rolling contact consists of a series of spaced ball members which are supported for rolling contact with the top of the blank in such a manner that the balls exert downwardly directed forces at several points along the blank and yet they permit, by reason of their rolling contact, lateral displacement of the blank without interference from frictional forces.
The ball type hold-down mechanism is shown in Figs. 1 and 7 and includes a bracket 50 detachably,secured to the table 2 at the inside of the frame F. This bracket extends inwardly in spaced relation above the table 2 to support a block 52 consisting of a block of metal or other suitable material which lies immediately above the conveyor belt 4 and 'forms an integral part of hold-down mechanism 38. Through the block 52 are formed a series of openings which define ball sockets for loosely receiving respective steel balls S4, 56, 58. The size of the openings in each case is chosen so that the balls may actually rest upon the conveyor belt or the surface `of a blank passing between the Shoe and the belt. A reversely bent retaining cap 60 is fastened to the shoe and overlies the several balls, as shown in Fig. 7.
By means of this arrangement, I have found that intermediate portions of each of the two layers of the blank B passing between the shoe and the conveyor belt may be rmly held) in contact with one another at successive points up to a region closely adjacent to the line of nip of the rotary cutter die R and the anvil R'. At the same time, as successive pulses are exerted on the edges of the blank, the rolling contact of the balls 54, 56 and 5S permit the blank to be constantly crowdedy against the stationery guide 30. Thus, there are exerted forces for advancing the blank; vholding both layers in vertically compacted relationship; and periodically forcing the blank laterally against the stationery guide, all of these actions taking place nearly simultaneously and being continued throughout the interval of time when the 'blank is being conveyed to theviirst cutting station.
As the blank B continues to advance through the holddown mechanism 38, its forward edges come into rolling contact with the rotary cutter die R and the anvil R'. With the spacing of the stationery guide and the traversing guide properly chosen to correspond to a desired width of blank, the rotary cutting die R will remove a narrow strip of material from each of the layers and will simultaneously form on the blank B a special form of decorative edge generally indicated by the numeral B4 and indicated diagrammatically in Fig. 3.
Figs. 6, 7, and l0-12 inclusive illustrate the cutting step on a larger scale. As shown in these igures, the table 2 has supported therethrough in the opening 20a curved stripper element 66 which is formed with a tapered point 67 arranged to lie immediately above the edge portions of the layers B1 and B2 which are to be removed by the cutter R. The stripper element is supported in some convenient manner as, for example, on adjustment screws 68 and 69 in turn mounted at the underside of the hanger 22.
In operation, the blank B passes between the cutter R and the anvil R' along the table 2 in a substantially horizontal plane of travel. The waste edges E produced by the action of the die R are guided along the curved underside of the stripper 66 as particularly shown in Fig. l0. However, as this occurs, the remainder of the blank continues in its horizontal plane of travel, as shown in Fig. l2, and the entire length of waste material is guided down along the stripper to drop into a suitable hopper or other waste collecting device.
By means of this particular arrangement, I iind it is possible to completely separate the waste material from two layers of the folded blank at high speed and there is avoided interference or clogging by this waste strip. However, in order to do this successfully, it is very important to adjust the pressure Ibetween the anvil and the 4cutting die to a correct valuel by means of the threaded member 26 and the clamp 25 which acts on the arm 19.
If too great a pressure is applied, the layers of the blank twist and turn on one another between the die and anvil and only a partial cut is obtained. On the other hand, if too little pressure is exerted, the die will not cut through both vlayers of material uniformly and the stock in one layer or the other is then drawn sideways and becomes creased in a manner such that the machine necessarily jams. An important factor in arriving at the correct cutting pressure is the guiding away of the cut olf strip of waste along a downwardly directed path while the remainder of the body of the blank continues in a substantially horizontal plane of travel. By thus inducing separation of the waste from the blank at the precise point of cutting, both layers can be cleanly eut with a proper adjustment or pressure. It is pointed out, therefore, that these two devices, that is, the waste removal stripper element and the tensioning means for the rotary cutter and anvil, work together to provide for a clean cut through both layers of a blank which is moving through the cutting station at high speed.
From the cutting station described, the blank next travels forwardly on the conveyor 4 and passes under another curved blank engaging element 7 0 which projects above the belt and which may, for example, consist of a thin spring steel member of the class already described. This blank engaging element 7) is also provided with an inclined under edge which operates to maintain the top layer of the blank in substantially closed relationship with the bottom layer thereof. j
As the rear edge of the blank passes through the cutting station, it will be seen that there is an opportunity for the blank to stop or slow down and thus interfere with travel of succeeding blanks. To prevent this, I further provide a driving roll 72 which is adjustably mounted in a slide 73 mounted for sliding movement on the side of the frame F and being secured by means of a screw 74. The slide supports a pivoted arm 75 in which is rotatably mounted the roll 72 and a spring 76 resiliently holds the roller against the table and a second conveyor belt 78.
The two members, the belt 78 and the roller 72, function to continue movement of the blank in a direction from right to left, as viewed in Fig. l, until the blank strikes against a transversely extending guide wall 80 in a position to advance to the second cutting station. In this position, the blank has left the table and the folded edge of the blank is unsupported. Due to the action of gravity, the folded edge drops down upon a pair of right angularly disposed conveyor belts 81 and S2, as shown in Fig. 9. The belts 8l and 82 are located at a lower level and are received about pulleys on a shaft 83. The guide wall 80 initially guides one end of the blank B while the other end comes into contact with an adjustable guide strip 84 detachably secured by clamping means 85 similar to the clamping means 33 already described.
In this new position of advancement, it will be ob served that the folded edge B3 of the blank constitutes the leading edge. Therefore, when this edge enters the second cutting station to be engaged by the dies R2, R3 and R4, the blank will necessarily be flattened out and each layer compacted to a considerable degree. Nevertheless, it is desirable to provide means for engaging the blank at points above the conveyor belts 81 and 82 in order to maintain a more rapid travel of the blank to the second cutting station. For this purpose, I provide a cross piece 87 which is channelled at its underside to provide for sliding adjustment on the two sections of the frame extension F, best shown in Fig. l. This cross piece includes pivoted arms S8 and 89 which support through their extremities a shaft 90 on which are carried rolls 91 and 92. These rolls, by the weight of the carriage and their own weight, exert a sufficient pressure on the blank to enable the belts to operate more efficiently.
After engagement by these rolls 91 and 92, the blank may advance to another hold-down apparatus consisting of two sets of ball and shoe units 93 and 94. respcc tively. These ball and shoe units are supported in some convenient manner as, for example, by a bracket attachment secured to the cross piece'? and each unit correspends in construction and operation to the hold-down mechanism 38 `already described in connection with the first cutting station.
Arranged at either side of the ball and shoe units are side guides 95 and 96 which guide the two opposite ends of the blank toward the second cutting station in register with the three cutting dies R2, R3 and R4. The side guide 96 is stationary while the side guide 9S is of a traversing nature similar to the traversing guide 40, being mounted on a block 97 fixed to an oscillating arm 9S actuated by cam elements 99 and 190. These cam elements may, for example, be driven through the shaft 192, which in turn is driven by pinions 104 and 196 from shaft 8. A spring 10S resiliently retains the arm 98, as shown in Fig. l.
With the adjustable stationary guide 96 and the reversing guide 95 set at a spacing suitable for providing a desired length of blank to be cut, the folded edge of the blank is advanced in register with the three cutting dies R2, R3 and R4 to pass between the curving dies and the anvils R2', R3 and R4. As soon as the folded edge of the blank B is engaged by the three cutters simultaneously, the traversing guide operates to maintain the trailing portions of the blank in register against the stationary guide 96. The nip of each rotary cutter with its respective anvil operates to progressively compact the two layers of the blank against one another. Figs. 8 and 9 show the three cutters in relation to the respective anvils and coveyor belts 81 and 82. Fig. 9 shows the blank B being dropped down onto the conveyor belts in readiness to be gripped by the rollers 91 and 92.
It will be observed that, in passing through this second cutting station, there will be removed from the blank two waste strips. A stripper arrangement corresponding to that shown in Figs. l0, 1l `and l2 may be provided at either side of this second cutting station, being located below a second table member 01. The details of these additional stripper units have not been included in the drawings as they correspond to the stripper structure shown in Figs. 10 to 12, inclusive.
in adjusting the three cutting dies R2, R3 and R4, a similar requirement for correctcutting pressure is present as was the case with respect to the cutting pressure for the cutting die R. In order to selectively control each of the cutters R2, R3 4and R4, therefore, I provide at the `under side of the table 161 separate tensioning devices for each of the three anvils, R2', R3 and R4'. These tensioning devices again are similar to the tension Idevice shown in Fig. 7 for the anvil R'. One tensioning device is shown in Fig. 9 and includes a clamp portion 25 carried by an adjustment screw 26 which operates fulcrumed lever 23 engaged against an arm 19 for the anvil R3. These separate tensioning devices are especially important in connection with making three cuts simultaneously as it is found that, if one tension setting is out of balance with respect to either of the other two settings, the two layers of the blank will not be cut through cleanly and creasing and jamming will occur. By trial, the correct setting for cach anvil may be arrived at, and here `also the waste stripper elements cooperate with these tensioning devices in the same manner as has been described with respect to the tensioning apparatus at the lirst cutting station.
Fig. 4 shows the blank B with three dccoratively cut edges, including the edge B4 obtained at the first cutting station and the two new decorative edges B5 and B6 obtainedv at the second cutting station. In addition, the blank B is divided along a central line of cutting B7. As the blank leaves the second cutting station, it passes to another conveyor belt 106 and the two component -farts of the blank are separated to form two greeting card or stationery components B8 and 89, as suggested in Fig. 5 and also in Fig. l.
From the foregoing description of the invention, it will be apparent that I have provided a method and means for handling folded greeting card and stationery stock and maintaining the folded layers in properly compacted `relationship so that successful handling and cutting can take place. Thus, there is made available a new method land apparatus for producing four decoratively cut edges on a single sheet of greeting card or stationery stock. Moreover, the requirement for folding after cutting, as is now present in handling conventional four-sided hollow dies is eliminated.
The practical adaptation of rotary cutting dies to the step of decoratively cutting a folded blank is made possible by reason of the simultaneous guiding and gripping steps which have been described in `detail in advancing the blank to the first cutting station.
An outstanding advantage of thus adapting rotary cutting dies to decoratively edge forming folded blanks is the wide range of adjustability which can be realized in connection with using one -or more cutting dies and two guides. It is again noted that one guide can be adjusted into any position to provide a desired dimension of blank cutting and the other guide can be used as a means for producing a traversing action while the blank portions are held in compacted relationship `and moved along a conveyor at a high rate of speed. Obviously, the use of one set of relatively cheaper dies than those of conventional construction can be employed to produce a wide range of sizes of stationery and greeting card products and this adjustment can be carried, out for a single cut or for a plurality of cuts. Furthermore, the nature of the rotary die construction lends itself to wide variation in the form of decorative cut which can be accomplished and, in using a plurality of dies, various combinations of cuts and impressions or figures may be produced. Still another advantage is the possibility of forming a sheet without using the intermediate cutting die at the second cutting station, there being thus produced a single folded sheet which is decoratively edge formed on four sides when the folded portions are opened apart from one another.
This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 476,725, filed December 2l, 1954.
It should be understood that the structure shown in the drawings is intended to be illustrative of one suitable combination of elements operating in conjunction with one another to handle folded greeting card and stationery blanks and that various changes in the structural features and operation of this apparatus may be resorted to in keeping with the spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:
1. In a machine for cutting a folded blank to provide decorative edge portions of the form employed in greeting cards and stationery, a frame, a cutting apparatus mounted in the frame and including a rotary cutting die and an anvil member supported below the rotary die in cutting relationship therewith, a conveyor for receiving the folded blank and advancing it between the rotary die and the anvil, a stationary guide located at one side of the conveyor in a position to slidably guide the folded edge of said blank in predetermined spaced relationship to the rotary cutting die whereby a strip of waste material is removed to form a decorative edge, means extending above the conveyor for engaging the top layer of said folded blank in varying positions of angularity with respect to the bottom layer of the blank and progressively depressing the top layer against the bottom layer, a movable guide for engaging against those edges of the said top and bottom layers which are parallel to the line of folding of the blank and pressing the blank against the stationery guide while the top and bottom layers are in a compacted position, and stripper means for removing a strip of waste material produced by the cutting die out of the path of travel of the blank and including a shaft for driving said rotary cuting die, power driven means for turning said shaft, an oscillating cam mechanism 10 supported on the shaft in close proximity to the rotary die, an arm fixed to said cam mechanism and having said movable guide support at the extremity thereof.
2. In a machine for cutting a folded blank to provide decorative edge portions of the form employed in greeting cards and stationery, a frame, a shaft in the frame, power driven means for rotating the shaft, a cutting apparatus mounted in the frame and including a rotary cutting die fast on the shaft and an anvil member supported below the rotary die in cutting relationship therewith, a conveyor for receiving the folded blank and advancing it between the rotary die and the anvil, a stationery guide located at one side of the conveyor in a position to slidably guide the folded edge of said blank in predetermined spaced relationship to the rotary cutting die whereby a strip of waste material is removed to form a decorative edge, means extending above the conveyor for engaging the top layer of said folded blank in varying positions of angularity with respect to the bottom layer of the blank and progressively depressing the top layer against the bottom layer, va traversing guide for engaging against those edges of the said top and bottom layers which are parallel to the line of folding of the blank and pressing the blank against the stationery guide while the top and bottom layers are in a compacted position, said traversing guide including a curved guide element an arm for supporting the guide element at one end thereof and a cam mechanism mounted on said shaft for producing a periodic traversing motion of arm and guide element, and stripper means for removing waste material produced by the cutting die out of the path of travel of the blank.
3. In a machine for cutting a folded blank to provide decorative edge portions of the form employed in greeting cards and stationery, a frame, a shaft in the frame, power driven means for rotating the shaft, a cutting apparatus mounted in the frame and including a rotary cutting die fast on the shaft and an anvil member supported below the rotary die in cutting relationship therewith, a conveyor for receiving the folded blank and advancing it between the rotary die andthe anvil, a stationery guide located at one side of the conveyor in a position to slidably guide the folded edge of said blank in predetermined spaced relationship to the rotary cutting die whereby a strip of waste material is removed to form a decorative edge, means extending above the conveyor for engaging the top layer of said folded blank in varying positions of angmlarity with respect to the bottom layer of the blank and progressively depressing the top layer against the bottom layer, a traversing guide for engaging against those edges of the said top and bottom layers which are parallel to the line of folding of the blank and pressing the blank againstv the stationery guide while the top and bottom layers are in a compacted position, said traversing guide includinga curved guide element, an arm for supporting the guide element at one end thereof and a cam mechanism mounted on said shaft for producing a periodic traversing motion of arm and gulde element, and stripper means for removing waste material produced by the cutting die out of the path of travel of the blank, and means for cutting the blank along a plurality of lines of cutting which extend at right angles to the line of folding of the blank.
References Cited in the tile of this 'pii'tcnt UNTED STATES PATENTS 585,998 Adams July 6, 1897 704,472 Dear Iuly 8, 1902 1,734,385 LaBombard et al Nov. 5, 1929 1,984,224r Maxant Dec. 11, 1934 2,070,402 Herschman Feb. 9, 1937 2,240,996 Maxant May 6, 1941 2,347,254 Cox Apr. 25, 1944
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3238825A (en) * 1963-02-18 1966-03-08 American Mach & Foundry Method of feeding and cutting filters
US20040161274A1 (en) * 2002-10-28 2004-08-19 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Sheet processing apparatus
US20100258017A1 (en) * 2009-04-10 2010-10-14 Kersey Kevin T Print Media Slitter

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US585998A (en) * 1897-07-06 Robert noble adams
US704472A (en) * 1900-12-31 1902-07-08 William Y Dear Machine for cutting and collating paper.
US1734385A (en) * 1926-03-22 1929-11-05 Specialty Automatic Machine Co Automatic card-cutting machine
US1984224A (en) * 1933-08-17 1934-12-11 William T Maxant Pinking machine
US2070402A (en) * 1936-11-14 1937-02-09 Harry C Herschman Pinking machine
US2240996A (en) * 1938-08-17 1941-05-06 William T Maxant Pinking machine
US2347254A (en) * 1942-08-04 1944-04-25 Williams And Marcus Company Sheet scoring and severing machine

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US585998A (en) * 1897-07-06 Robert noble adams
US704472A (en) * 1900-12-31 1902-07-08 William Y Dear Machine for cutting and collating paper.
US1734385A (en) * 1926-03-22 1929-11-05 Specialty Automatic Machine Co Automatic card-cutting machine
US1984224A (en) * 1933-08-17 1934-12-11 William T Maxant Pinking machine
US2070402A (en) * 1936-11-14 1937-02-09 Harry C Herschman Pinking machine
US2240996A (en) * 1938-08-17 1941-05-06 William T Maxant Pinking machine
US2347254A (en) * 1942-08-04 1944-04-25 Williams And Marcus Company Sheet scoring and severing machine

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3238825A (en) * 1963-02-18 1966-03-08 American Mach & Foundry Method of feeding and cutting filters
US20040161274A1 (en) * 2002-10-28 2004-08-19 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Sheet processing apparatus
US7134370B2 (en) * 2002-10-28 2006-11-14 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Sheet processing apparatus
US20100258017A1 (en) * 2009-04-10 2010-10-14 Kersey Kevin T Print Media Slitter

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