JP2011102457A - Electroconductive woven fabric, and touch sensor device by using electroconductive woven fabric - Google Patents

Electroconductive woven fabric, and touch sensor device by using electroconductive woven fabric Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2011102457A
JP2011102457A JP2010176276A JP2010176276A JP2011102457A JP 2011102457 A JP2011102457 A JP 2011102457A JP 2010176276 A JP2010176276 A JP 2010176276A JP 2010176276 A JP2010176276 A JP 2010176276A JP 2011102457 A JP2011102457 A JP 2011102457A
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Prior art keywords
conductive
yarn
fabric
yarns
touch sensor
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JP2010176276A
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JP5668966B2 (en
Inventor
Takahiro Horiba
Masato Hoshino
Sakura Hoshiya
Tatsuji Ikeguchi
Hirotaka Mizuno
Koya Ohara
Yuki Shimagami
Akihisa Suzuki
Shoji Yamamoto
隆広 堀場
鉱也 大原
昌治 山本
祐樹 島上
さくら 星屋
正人 星野
寛隆 水野
達治 池口
陽久 鈴木
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Aichi Prefecture
Tsuchiya Co Ltd
愛知県
株式会社槌屋
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Application filed by Aichi Prefecture, Tsuchiya Co Ltd, 愛知県, 株式会社槌屋 filed Critical Aichi Prefecture
Priority to JP2010176276A priority patent/JP5668966B2/en
Publication of JP2011102457A publication Critical patent/JP2011102457A/en
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Abstract

A conductive fabric is realized that is flexible, low-cost, and capable of detecting pressure with high sensitivity. In addition, a conductive fabric having a woven structure in which a touch position can be easily detected is provided, and a touch sensor device including a signal detection circuit suitable for the structure of the conductive fabric and using the conductive fabric as a touch sensor is provided.
A conductive fabric 10 has a three-dimensional structure in which a conductive upper cloth 20 and a conductive lower cloth 22 in which conductive yarns 12 are woven are overlapped with each other and tied with pile yarns. And, either one of the warp and weft forming each conductive cloth 20, 22 is composed of conductive yarn regions 16 in which conductive yarns 12 are arranged and insulating yarn regions 18 in which insulating yarns 14 are arranged alternately. The other yarn is a configuration in which only insulating yarns are arranged. Then, the respective conductive cloths are overlapped in the direction in which the conductive yarns 12 cross each other, and the cell 24 that is a region where the conductive yarn regions 16 intersect is caused to function as a touch sensor.
[Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to a conductive fabric and a touch sensor device using the conductive fabric. More specifically, a conductive fabric having a structure designed to detect pressure with high sensitivity, and a signal detection circuit suitable for the structure of the conductive fabric, using the conductive fabric as a touch sensor. The present invention relates to a flexible touch sensor device.

  A cloth touch sensor has been proposed as a sensor that can follow a spherical surface or a free-form surface and can realize a large area at a low cost. Patent Document 1 discloses a touch sensor that uses a cloth woven with conductive yarn. It is described to be used as. The fabric described in Patent Document 1 is a plain woven fabric in which conductive fibers covered with an insulating material, so-called covering yarns, are woven vertically and horizontally, and the insulator itself around the conductive fibers when pressure is applied to the fabric. It operates as a touch sensor that detects a change in capacitance due to deformation or distortion of the sensor and detects pressure.

JP 2006-234716 A

  However, the cloth sensor described in Patent Document 1 has a problem that since the covering yarn itself is thin, the amount of deformation of the insulator due to pressure is small, and it is difficult to detect the pressure with high sensitivity.

  Therefore, the problem to be solved by the present invention is to realize a conductive fabric in which conductive fibers are woven, which can detect pressure with high sensitivity at low cost using a general-purpose conductive yarn. The present invention also provides a conductive fabric having a woven structure that is highly sensitive and that allows easy detection of the touch position, and includes a signal detection circuit suitable for the structure of the conductive fabric, and the conductive fabric is a touch sensor. It is providing the touch sensor apparatus used as.

In order to solve the above-described problems, the conductive fabric and the touch sensor device using the conductive fabric according to the present invention take the following means.
The first invention of the present invention is a conductive fabric woven with conductive yarn,
It is a conductive fabric in which at least two conductive cloths in which conductive yarns are woven are superposed on each other and integrated.
According to the first invention, by stacking the two conductive cloths, the distance between the conductive yarns of each cloth is increased on average as compared to the plain cloth, so that when the pressure is applied to the conductive cloth, Since the amount of distortion of the conductive yarn can be increased as compared with a plain woven fabric, and as a result, a large change in capacitance can be obtained, pressure can be detected with high sensitivity. And since it is the structure which can use a general electrically conductive thread | yarn, it has the flexibility which can follow a spherical surface or a free-form surface. In addition, since each conductive cloth can be a general conductive thread such as a conductive thread in which conductive fibers are covered with an insulator, a conductive fabric can be realized at low cost.

A second invention of the present invention is the conductive fabric according to the first invention,
The conductive yarn is a conductive yarn in which conductive fibers are covered with an insulator, and at least two conductive cloths are woven using the conductive yarn, and the conductive yarns are superposed on each other. Except at least a part of the overlapping portions, the respective conductive cloths are bundled and integrated with insulating yarns.
According to the second invention, the conductive cloth is woven using the conductive yarn in which the conductive fiber is covered with the insulator. Compared with the first invention, when the pressure is applied to the conductive fabric, In addition to the change in capacitance based on the change in the distance between the conductive yarns, a change in capacitance due to deformation of the insulator around the conductive fiber is also added, so a large change in capacitance can be obtained, Pressure can be detected with high sensitivity.

A third invention of the present invention is the conductive fabric according to the first invention,
The conductive cloths are connected with pile yarns to form a three-dimensional structure.
According to the third aspect of the invention, the conductive fabric has a three-dimensional structure in which the conductive fabrics are connected with pile yarns. Therefore, when pressure is applied to the conductive fabric, the pile yarns bend due to the pressure, The distance between the conductive yarns of the cloth and the electrostatic capacitance are greatly changed, and the pressure can be detected with higher sensitivity. And since it is the three-dimensional structure which tied the conductive cloth with the pile thread | yarn, the flexibility which can follow a spherical surface or a free-form surface is maintained.

A fourth invention of the present invention is a conductive fabric according to any one of the first to third inventions, wherein a resin is impregnated on a surface of the conductive fabric or between the conductive fabrics. It is characterized by that.
According to the fourth aspect of the present invention, the water resistance of the conductive fabric can be improved by impregnating the surface of the conductive fabric with the resin. And by impregnating resin between the conductive cloths inside the conductive fabric, it is possible to improve the strength and resilience of the conductive fabric. In addition, characteristics such as chemical substance absorbability of the impregnated resin can be added as characteristics of the conductive fabric.

A fifth invention of the present invention is a conductive woven fabric according to any one of the first to fourth inventions,
Any one of the warp and weft forming each conductive cloth has a configuration in which conductive yarn regions in which a plurality of conductive yarns are arranged and insulating yarn regions in which a plurality of insulating yarns are arranged alternately. And the other of the warp and weft yarns has a configuration in which only insulating yarns are arranged,
The conductive cloths are integrated by overlapping the conductive yarns in a direction in which the conductive yarns intersect with each other, and a cell that is an area where the conductive yarn regions of the conductive cloths intersect is made to function as a touch sensor. And
According to the fifth invention, in the cells in the region where the conductive yarn regions of the respective conductive cloths intersect, the conductive yarns in the two vertical and horizontal directions are closer to each other in the surface direction of the conductive cloth than the other parts. When the cell is touched, the change in capacitance is larger than when the other part is touched. By utilizing the capacitance change characteristic due to the structure of the conductive fabric, the cell of the conductive fabric can function as a touch sensor.

A sixth invention of the present invention is a touch sensor device using the conductive fabric according to the fifth invention as a touch sensor,
Applying a periodic signal that can be distinguished from each other for each conductive yarn region to the conductive yarn of the conductive yarn region of any one of the conductive fabrics,
Taking out the signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn area of the conductive cloth not applying the periodic signal via the electrostatic capacitance between the conductive yarn of each conductive yarn area of the conductive cloth to which the periodic signal was applied,
A signal detection circuit for detecting a touched cell by detecting a signal difference between the extracted signal and the applied signal is provided.
According to the sixth aspect of the invention, an accurate change signal of capacitance in each cell can be obtained. Therefore, it is possible to detect whether or not each cell of the conductive fabric is touched, and it is possible to provide a touch sensor device that uses the conductive fabric as a touch sensor.

7th invention of this invention is a touch sensor apparatus which concerns on the said 6th invention, Comprising: The periodic signal applied to the conductive yarn of the conductive yarn area | region of any one of said each conductive cloth is conductive yarn. The frequency is different for each region.
According to the seventh aspect of the present invention, the signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive cloth to which the periodic signal is not applied is taken out, and the signal difference is detected for each frequency, so that the conductive yarn of each conductive cloth is detected. It is possible to obtain an accurate capacitance change signal in each cell where the areas intersect, and to detect the presence or absence of a touch on each cell.

An eighth invention of the present invention is the touch sensor device according to the sixth invention, wherein the periodic signal applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of any one of the conductive fabrics is the conductive It is applied to the yarn area in a time division manner.
According to the eighth aspect of the invention, by extracting a signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive cloth to which the periodic signal is not applied and detecting the signal difference in a time division manner, the conductive yarn of each conductive cloth is obtained. It is possible to obtain an accurate capacitance change signal in each cell where the areas intersect, and to detect the presence or absence of a touch on each cell.

It is a figure which shows the electroconductive textile fabric in Example 1 with a photograph. It is a figure explaining the structure of the electroconductive textile fabric in Example 1. FIG. 1 is a view showing a cross section of a conductive fabric in Example 1. FIG. It is a figure which shows the pressure detection characteristic of the electroconductive textile fabric in each Example. It is a figure which shows the structure of the touch sensor apparatus in Example 1. FIG. It is the figure which implement | achieved the touch sensor which the LED corresponding to the cell position of an electroconductive textile fabric lights by pressure application using the touch sensor apparatus of Example 1. FIG. It is a figure which shows the structure of the touch sensor apparatus in Example 2. FIG. FIG. 10 is an explanatory plan view illustrating an exploded configuration of a main part of a touch sensor device according to a third embodiment. FIG. 9 is an explanatory plan view showing the configuration of the main part of the touch sensor device similar to FIG. 8 in an assembled state. FIG. 10 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line XX in FIG. 9. FIG. 10 is an explanatory plan view illustrating an exploded configuration of a main part of a touch sensor device according to a fourth embodiment. FIG. 12 is an explanatory plan view showing the configuration of the main part of the touch sensor device similar to FIG. 11 in an assembled state. It is the XIII-XIII line expanded sectional view of FIG. It is a plane explanatory view showing the composition of the principal part of the touch sensor device in Example 5 in an assembled state. FIG. 10 is an equivalent circuit diagram of one cell in the touch sensor device according to the fifth embodiment. It is the XV-XV line expanded sectional view of FIG.

  Hereinafter, modes for carrying out the present invention will be described according to examples.

[Configuration of conductive fabric]
First, the configuration of the conductive fabric 10 used in the touch sensor device 30 (see FIG. 5) according to the first embodiment of the present invention will be described.
FIG. 1 shows a photograph of the conductive fabric 10. The conductive fabric 10 has a three-dimensional structure in which two conductive cloths (conductive upper cloth 20 and conductive lower cloth 22) woven with conductive thread 12 are superposed on each other in a face-to-face manner and are connected with pile threads. Yes. The conductive yarn 12 is represented in gray in FIG. 1, and the insulating yarn 14 is represented in white in FIG.
The warp yarns forming the respective conductive fabrics 20 and 22 constituting the conductive fabric 10 are composed of conductive yarn regions 16 in which a plurality of conductive yarns 12 are arranged and insulating yarn regions 18 in which a plurality of insulating yarns 14 are arranged alternately. The weft yarn is configured such that only the insulating yarns 14 are arranged. In addition, it is good also as a structure by which only the insulating thread | yarn 14 was arranged for the warp yarn as a structure in which the conductive yarn area | region 16 and the insulating yarn area | region 18 were arranged alternately. When the conductive yarn 12 is arranged in the warp, only the insulating yarn 14 is used for the weft, so it is not necessary to replace the weft in the process of weaving the fabric. Further, when the conductive yarn 12 is arranged on the weft, the width of the conductive yarn region 16 can be adjusted in the process of weaving the cloth.
Examples of the weaving method include a weaving method using a dobby loom or a jacquard loom, but are not limited thereto.

Then, the conductive cloth in which the conductive yarn area 16 is formed by either one of the warp and the weft is cut into an appropriate size to obtain a conductive upper cloth 20 and a conductive lower cloth 22. In Example 1, as shown in FIG. 1, it is set as the structure formed in the conductive upper fabric 20 at three places so that the electroconductive yarn area 16 may turn sideways. In addition, the width | variety of the electrically conductive yarn area | region 16 and the space | interval of the electrically conductive yarn areas 16 in the electrically conductive upper cloth 20 are 1 centimeter, respectively.
An upper cloth electrode 21 for attaching a multiplexer 32 (see FIG. 5) is formed on the right end of the conductive yarn area 16 of the conductive upper cloth 20, and below the conductive yarn area 16 of the conductive lower cloth 22. A lower cloth electrode 23 for applying a periodic signal is formed at the side end.
In Example 1, polypropylene was used as the insulating yarn 14, Sanderlon (manufactured by Nippon Kashiwa Dye) as the conductive yarn 12, and polypropylene as the pile yarn.

The two conductive cloths, that is, the conductive upper cloth 20 and the conductive lower cloth 22, are overlapped with each other in a direction in which the conductive yarns 12 cross each other and are connected by pile yarns. FIG. 2 schematically shows a state in which the conductive yarn regions 16 of the conductive upper cloth 20 and the conductive lower cloth 22 are overlapped with each other in the conductive fabric 10. As shown in FIG. 1, a region where the conductive yarn region 16 of the conductive upper fabric 20 and the conductive yarn region 16 of the conductive lower fabric 22 intersect is named a cell 24.
FIG. 3 shows a cross section of the conductive fabric 10. A pile yarn layer 26 is formed between the conductive upper fabric 20 and the conductive lower fabric 22 of the conductive fabric 10 by pile yarns connecting the conductive upper fabric 20 and the conductive lower fabric 22. The pile yarn layer 26 is a layer having a gap and elasticity.

[Characteristics of conductive fabric]
As shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, the conductive fabric 10 has a conductive upper cloth 20 formed so that the conductive yarn area 16 is oriented horizontally, and the conductive yarn area 16 is oriented vertically. The formed conductive lower cloth 22 is bound by a pile yarn layer 26.
Therefore, in the region named cell 24 where the conductive yarn region 16 of the conductive upper fabric 20 and the conductive yarn region 16 of the conductive lower fabric 22 intersect, the conductive yarn of the conductive upper fabric 20 is compared with the other parts of the conductive fabric 10. 12 and the conductive yarn 12 of the conductive lower cloth 22 are close to each other in the surface direction of the conductive cloths 20, 22, so that the capacitance changes greatly due to the deformation of the conductive fabric 10. Since the conductive fabric 10 has a three-dimensional structure in which the conductive upper fabric 20 and the conductive lower fabric 22 are connected by the pile yarn layer 26, when the pressure is applied to the conductive fabric 10, the pile yarn layer 26 is caused by the pressure. The pile yarn is distorted, the conductive upper cloth 20 and the conductive lower cloth 22 approach, and the capacitance between the conductive yarn 12 of the conductive upper cloth 20 and the conductive yarn 12 of the conductive lower cloth 22 changes greatly. Therefore, it is considered that the conductive fabric 10 can detect pressure with high sensitivity.

[Configuration of touch sensor device]
Next, the touch sensor device according to the first embodiment will be described. FIG. 5 shows a configuration of the touch sensor device 30 using the conductive fabric 10 in the first embodiment.
As shown in FIG. 5, each of the conductive yarn regions 16 a, the conductive yarn regions 16 b, and the conductive yarn regions 16 c of the conductive lower fabric 22 of the conductive fabric 10 constituting the touch sensor device 30 includes a conductive yarn region. A first oscillator 40, a second oscillator 42, and a third oscillator 44 for applying a periodic signal to the conductive yarn are connected. A multiplexer 32 that extracts signals output from the conductive yarns in the respective conductive yarn areas is connected to the three conductive yarn areas 16d, the conductive yarn areas 16e, and the conductive yarn areas 16f of the conductive upper cloth 20 of the conductive fabric 10. Has been.
The multiplexer 32 is connected to a signal difference detection circuit 34 that detects a signal difference between a signal extracted from the conductive yarn of the conductive upper cloth 20 and the applied periodic signal. The signal difference detection circuit 34 is connected to the first oscillator 40, the second oscillator 42, and the third oscillator 44 in order to take the periodic signal as a reference signal, and controls the operation of the touch panel device 30. It is connected to the.

[Detection method of touched cell]
Next, a method for detecting the touched cell 24 will be described. A first megahertz sine wave indicated by f1 in FIG. 5 is applied from the first oscillator 40 to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region 16a of the conductive lower cloth 22, and the signal difference detecting circuit 34 is supplied with a sine of 1 megahertz. A wave is sent as a reference signal. From the second oscillator 42, a 1.5 MHz sine wave indicated by f 2 in FIG. 5 is applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region 16 b of the conductive lower cloth 22, and 1. A 5 MHz sine wave is sent as a reference signal. The third oscillator 44 applies a 3.9 megahertz sine wave indicated by f3 in FIG. 5 to the conductive yarns in the conductive yarn region 16c of the conductive lower cloth 22, and also applies to the signal difference detection circuit 34. A 3.9 MHz sine wave is sent as a reference signal. Note that the frequencies f1, f2, and f3 of the sine waves applied to the conductive yarns in the respective conductive yarn regions of the conductive lower cloth 22 are selected so as not to interfere with each other.

The multiplexer 32 then supplies the signal difference detection circuit 34 with the signals taken out from the conductive yarns 16d, 16e and 16c of the conductive upper fabric 20 separated for each conductive yarn region. Send it out.
When the cell 24 is touched and the capacitance of the cell 24 changes, the phase and amplitude of the periodic signal applied to the cell 24 change. Therefore, by examining the difference between the phase or amplitude of the periodic signal extracted from the cell 24 and the applied signal, the cell in which the change in the capacitance has occurred can be known.
In the first embodiment, the signal difference detection circuit 34 uses the signal difference between the three series of signals taken from each conductive yarn area of the conductive upper fabric 20 and the reference signal taken from each oscillator for each sine wave frequency. The phase difference is detected. From the detected phase difference, an accurate change in capacitance for each cell 24 is detected without crosstalk on the circuit, and the touched cell 24 is specified.

For example, as a result of detecting a phase difference with respect to a reference signal for each frequency of a sine wave with respect to three series of signals taken from each conductive yarn area of the conductive upper cloth 20, 1 MHz obtained from the conductive yarn area 16f If the change in capacitance corresponding to the change in phase difference is maximum in the sine wave, the cell 24 to which the touch signal is given is the cell 24 on the conductive yarn region 16f, and a 1 megahertz sine wave is generated. Since it is understood that the cell 24 is on the applied conductive yarn region 16a, the cell to which the touch signal is applied is the lower left cell 24 in FIG. 5 where the conductive yarn region 16a and the conductive yarn region 16f intersect. Can be identified.
FIG. 6 is an example in which a touch position indicator 48 in which an LED corresponding to the position of the cell 24 of the conductive fabric 10 is turned on by a touch signal is realized using the touch sensor device 30.

[Modification]
In Example 1, the signal difference detection circuit 34 detects the change in the capacitance of each cell 24 by detecting the phase difference of the signal difference between the signal captured from the conductive yarn area and the reference signal. The signal difference detection circuit 34 may detect an amplitude difference among the signal differences to detect a change in capacitance of each cell 24. Further, the change in capacitance of each cell 24 may be detected by detecting both the phase difference and the amplitude difference by the signal difference detection circuit 34.
In the first embodiment, a sine wave is used as the periodic signal, but a rectangular wave may be used as the periodic signal.

[effect]
According to the conductive fabric 10 used in Example 1, two conductive cloths (conductive upper cloth 20 and conductive lower cloth 22) woven with conductive thread 12 are stacked one above the other and tied together with pile threads. Because of the structure, the strain amount of the conductive yarn 12 when pressure is applied to the conductive fabric 10 can be increased. Therefore, the pressure can be detected with high sensitivity. And since it is the three-dimensional structure which tied the conductive cloth with the pile thread | yarn, it has the flexibility which can follow a spherical surface or a free-form surface. Moreover, since each conductive cloth can use general conductive yarns using conductive fibers such as Sanderon (manufactured by Nippon Shah Dye), the conductive fabric 10 can be realized at low cost. Can do.
And in the cell 24 in the region where the conductive yarn areas of the two conductive cloths intersect, the conductive yarns in the two directions are closer to each other in the surface direction of the conductive cloth than in other parts. The change in capacitance is larger than when touching other parts. Utilizing this capacitance change characteristic due to the structure of the conductive fabric 10, the cell 24 of the conductive fabric 10 can be made to function as a touch sensor.

  Then, a periodic signal having a different frequency for each conductive yarn region is applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive lower cloth 22, and the static yarn between the conductive yarn in each conductive yarn region of the conductive lower fabric 22 to which the periodic signal is applied. A signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive upper cloth 20 to which no periodic signal is applied is taken out via the capacitance. Then, for each frequency of the periodic signal, a phase difference or an amplitude difference or both a phase difference and an amplitude difference are detected from the signal difference between the extracted signal and the applied signal. As a result, an accurate capacitance change signal in each cell 24 can be obtained without crosstalk on the circuit. Therefore, it becomes possible to detect whether or not each cell 24 of the conductive fabric 10 is touched, and it is possible to provide a touch sensor device 30 that uses the conductive fabric 10 as a touch sensor.

Next, Example 2 will be described. FIG. 7 shows a configuration of the touch panel device 30A according to the second embodiment. The difference between the second embodiment and the first embodiment is that a signal having a single frequency generated by the oscillator 58 is time-divided as a periodic signal by the distribution multiplexer 56, and the conductive yarn region 16a of the conductive lower cloth 22 is electrically conductive. It is in the point applied to the yarn area 16b and the conductive yarn area 16c.
Then, the multiplexer 50 supplies the signal taken out from the conductive yarn area 16d, the conductive yarn area 16e, and the conductive yarn area 16f of the conductive upper cloth 20 to the signal difference detection circuit 52 in a state where the signals are separated into three series for each conductive yarn area. Send it out. The signal difference detection circuit 52 detects the phase difference from the signal difference from the reference signal acquired from the oscillator 58 for each time-divided time zone for the signal acquired for each conductive yarn area, An accurate change in capacitance for each cell 24 is detected without the above crossing line, and the touched cell 24 is specified.
The operation processing circuit 54 connected to the signal difference detection circuit 52 controls the operation of the touch panel device 30A as in the first embodiment.
The point that the amplitude difference may be detected from the signal difference and the point that the periodic signal may be a rectangular wave are the same as in the first embodiment.

  According to the second embodiment, as in the first embodiment, a flexible and highly sensitive touch sensor device using the conductive fabric 10 can be provided. Further, since only one oscillator can be used, the cost of the touch panel device can be reduced.

[Modification]
In each of the above examples, polypropylene was used for the insulating yarn, but for the insulating yarn, synthetic fibers such as polyester, nylon, rayon, polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyurethane may be used. May be used.
For the conductive yarn, metal fibers such as copper, aluminum, iron, stainless steel, nichrome, gold, silver, and titanium nickel alloy, PAN-based, and pitch-based carbon fibers may be used. In addition, as a conductive yarn, a yarn obtained by spinning a carbon, graphite, carbon nanotube, or the like as a conductive component in a resin such as polyester, nylon, or rayon used for an insulating yarn can be used. Further, as the conductive yarn, a yarn obtained by coating the surface of the insulating yarn with copper, aluminum, silver, gold or the like as a conductive component by a metal plating method can be used. Further, as the conductive yarn, a conductive yarn having a structure in which an insulating yarn is twisted on the conductive yarn or a conductive yarn having a structure in which an insulating resin is coated on the conductive yarn can be used. In particular, a resin-coated structure can improve moisture resistance and water resistance, and thus can improve sensor performance stability and prevent malfunction.

In each of the above embodiments, the periodic signal is applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive lower cloth 22 and the signal is taken out from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive upper fabric 20. A configuration may be adopted in which a periodic signal is applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region and a signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of the conductive lower cloth 22 is taken out.
And in each said Example, although it is set as the structure by which the conductive yarn area | region was formed in three places in each conductive cloth of a conductive textile fabric, the number of conductive yarn areas is not limited to this.
And about each said Example, the surface of the conductive fabric 10 can be impregnated with resin, and the water resistance of the conductive fabric can be improved. Then, the pile yarn layer 26 can be impregnated with a resin to improve the strength and resilience of the conductive fabric 10. Further, characteristics such as chemical substance absorbability of the resin to be impregnated can be added as characteristics of the conductive fabric 10.

In each of the above-described embodiments, the conductive fabric has a structure in which two conductive cloths are connected to each other with pile yarns. However, the two conductive cloths overlapped with each other and their insulating yarn regions intersect. It is good also as a structure which sewed with the insulation thread | yarn by a polypropylene etc. in the location and prevented the lateral shift. Alternatively, the conductive fabric may be formed by bonding two conductive cloths with a resin having elasticity. Also with these configurations, the conductive fabric can function as a touch sensor.
If the touch position determination is unnecessary and the touch pressure is to be detected with high sensitivity, conductive cloths composed of conductive threads consisting of at least one of the warp and weft threads are superposed one above the other. It is also possible to sew key points together with yarns to prevent misalignment or to connect them with pile yarns.

  Next, Example 3 is demonstrated based on FIGS. The feature of Example 3 is that a so-called covering yarn in which conductive fibers are covered with an insulator is used as a conductive yarn constituting the conductive cloth, and that two conductive cloths do not use a pile yarn. It is in the point which joined with a typical insulating thread. The conductive cloths 61 and 62 constituting the conductive fabric 60 of Example 3 are configured in the same manner as in Example 1, and the warp yarns forming the conductive cloths 61 and 62 are arranged with a plurality of conductive threads. The conductive yarn regions 63 and the insulating yarn regions 64 in which a plurality of insulating yarns are arranged are arranged alternately, and the weft yarn is configured such that only insulating yarns are arranged. As shown in FIG. 8 and FIG. 9, the conductive cloths 61 and 62 are overlapped with each other in such a manner that the conductive yarn areas 63 intersect with each other. A region where the conductive yarn regions 63 intersect with each other is a cell 65. Both conductive cloths 61 and 62 are bound and joined with a general insulating thread in a region other than the cell 65. In FIG. 10, conductive cloths in which covering yarns and insulating yarns are plain woven in the cells 65 are superposed one above the other. In regions 66 adjacent to both sides of the cells 65, conductive cloths in which covering yarns and insulating yarns are plain woven. In addition, the insulating cloth in which the insulating yarns are plain-woven with each other is superposed on top and bottom, and the two cloths are bound with the insulating thread 67.

The configuration for using the conductive fabric 60 as described above to form a touch sensor device is exactly the same as in the first embodiment. As shown in FIG. 9, first to third transmitters (not shown) for applying periodic signals are connected to the conductive yarn regions 63a, 63b, 63c of the conductive cloth 61, respectively. In addition, a multiplexer (not shown) that extracts a signal output from the conductive yarn in each conductive yarn region is connected to the conductive yarn regions 63d, 63e, and 63f of the conductive cloth 62.
The circuit for causing the conductive fabric 60 to function as a touch sensor device is exactly the same as in the case of the first embodiment, and the description thereof will be omitted.

According to the above configuration, the capacitance of the cell 65 to which pressure is applied changes, and can be taken out as an electrical signal by the same processing circuit as in the first embodiment. This change in capacitance in the cell 65 is caused by a decrease in the distance between the upper and lower covering yarns in the cell 65 in the low pressure region. In addition, in the high pressure region, capacitance changes due to deformation and distortion of the insulating yarn around the insulator covering the conductive fibers of the conductive yarn and covering yarn.
According to the third embodiment, since the conductive cloth is woven using the covering yarn, and the pile yarn is not used as in the first embodiment, it is affected by the stiffness of the pile yarn when used as a touch sensor. Therefore, pressure can be detected with high sensitivity even in a low pressure range.

In Example 3, the insulating yarns 64 and 67 were made of cotton, the conductive fiber of the covering yarn was Sanderlon (manufactured by Nippon Ashi dyeing), and the insulating material of the covering yarn was polyester. Any insulating yarn may be used as long as it is an insulating yarn. For example, synthetic fibers such as polypropylene, polyester, nylon, rayon, polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyethylene, and polyurethane may be used. Natural fibers such as wool may also be used.
Any conductive fiber may be used as long as it is a conductive thread. For example, metal fibers such as copper, aluminum, iron, stainless steel, nichrome, gold, silver, and titanium nickel alloy may be used. Further, PAN-based and pitch-based carbon fibers may be used. A yarn obtained by kneading and spinning carbon, graphite, carbon nanotubes or the like in polyester, nylon, rayon or the like may be used.

  Next, Example 4 is demonstrated based on FIGS. The feature of the fourth embodiment is that, compared to the third embodiment, cloths 71 and 72 in which conductive yarn regions 73 using covering yarns are crossed and woven in a lattice shape are overlapped so that the cells 75 at the intersections overlap each other. It is in the point where it is overlapped by face-to-face. The two cloths 71 and 72 that are overlapped are bound and joined with a general insulating thread in a region other than the cell 75. In FIG. 13, the conductive cloths in which the covering yarns are plain-woven in the cell 75 are stacked one above the other. In the regions 76 adjacent to both sides of the cell 75, the conductive cloths in which the covering yarns and the insulating yarns are plain-woven are vertically aligned. A state in which the two fabrics are further bound by an insulating thread 77 is shown.

The configuration for using the conductive fabric 70 as described above to form a touch sensor device is exactly the same as in the first embodiment. As shown in FIG. 12, the conductive yarn areas 73a, 73b, 73c, 73b, 73b, and 73c are connected to each other. First to third transmitters (not shown) for applying periodic signals are connected to 73c. In addition, the conductive yarn areas 73d, 73e, and 73f of the conductive cloth 71 and the conductive cloth 72 are connected to each other with the conductive yarn areas 73d, the conductive yarn areas 73e, and the conductive yarn areas 73f connected to each other. A multiplexer (not shown) for extracting a signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region is connected.
The circuit for causing the conductive fabric 70 to function as a touch sensor device is exactly the same as in the case of the first embodiment, and the description thereof will be omitted.

According to the above configuration, the capacitance of the cell 75 to which pressure is applied changes and can be taken out as an electrical signal by the same processing circuit as in the first embodiment. This change in capacitance in the cell 75 is caused by a decrease in the distance between the upper and lower covering yarns in the cell 75 in the low pressure range. In addition, in the high pressure region, the capacitance changes due to deformation and distortion of the insulator covering the conductive fibers of the covering yarn.
In the fourth embodiment, the upper and lower conductive cloths 71 and 72 of the cell 75 constituting the main part of the touch sensor device are woven with conductive yarns 73, and the corresponding parts of the third embodiment are the conductive yarn and the insulating yarn. And the area of the electrode as a capacitor is substantially widened, the capacitance is increased and the amount of change is also increased. Therefore, the sensitivity of Example 4 can be made higher than that of the sensor of Example 3.

Next, Example 5 will be described with reference to FIGS. The characteristics of the fifth embodiment are the same as those of the fourth embodiment.
A covering yarn prepared separately is inserted between the conductive yarn areas of the upper and lower conductive cloths. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 14, conductive yarn regions 86a in which a plurality of covering yarns 86 are arranged between the conductive yarn regions 83d, 83e, and 83f of the upper and lower conductive fabrics. 86b and 86c are inserted. The two cloths stacked one above the other are bound and joined with a general insulating thread in a region other than the cell 85. FIG. 16 shows a state in which the conductive fabrics in which the covering yarns are plain-woven in the cell 85 are stacked one above the other and the covering yarns 86 are inserted between the conductive fabrics. Moreover, in the area | region 87 adjacent to the both sides of the cell 75, the mode that the conductive cloth by which the covering thread | yarn and the insulating thread | yarn were plain-woven was piled up and down was further shown, and both the cloths were bound by the insulating thread | yarn 88.
The covering yarn 86 may be configured such that the conductive yarn regions 86a, 86b, 86c are inserted between the conductive yarn regions 83a, 83b, and 83c of the upper and lower conductive cloths. Further, the covering yarn 86 may be a plain woven fabric combined with an insulating yarn.

The configuration for using the conductive fabric 80 as described above to form a touch sensor device is exactly the same as in the first embodiment. As shown in FIG. 14, first to third transmitters (not shown) for applying periodic signals are connected to the respective conductive yarn regions 86a, 86b, 86c. In addition, in a state where the conductive yarn regions 83a, the conductive yarn regions 83b, and the conductive yarn regions 83c of the upper and lower conductive fabrics are connected to each other, the conductive yarn regions 83f, the conductive yarn regions 83e, and the conductive yarns of the upper and lower conductive fabrics are further connected. Each of the conductive yarn regions is connected to a region (83d), and a multiplexer (not shown) for extracting a signal output from the conductive yarn of each conductive yarn region is connected to each of the regions 83d. FIG. 15 shows an equivalent circuit diagram of one cell 85, in which the first oscillator 40 is connected to the conductive yarn area 86a, and the upper and lower conductive yarn areas are combined with the upper and lower conductive yarn areas 83d. In a state in which the combination of 83a is connected to each other, it is connected to the multiplexer 32 via the output terminal Vout. In FIG. 15, C 1 is a combined capacitance of the capacitance between the conductive yarn region 86a and the upper conductive yarn region 83d, and the capacitance between the conductive yarn region 86a and the lower conductive yarn region 83d. C 2 is the combined capacitance of the capacitance between the conductive yarn region 86a and the upper conductive yarn region 83a and the capacitance between the conductive yarn region 86a and the lower conductive yarn region 83a. Show.
A circuit for causing the conductive fabric 80 to function as a touch sensor device is exactly the same as that in the first embodiment, and the description thereof will be omitted.

According to the above configuration, the capacitance of the cell 85 to which pressure is applied changes, and it can be taken out as an electrical signal by the processing circuit. This change in capacitance in the cell 85 is caused by a decrease in the distance between the upper and lower covering yarns 83 in the cell 85 and the covering yarns 86 inserted therebetween in the low pressure range. In addition, in the high pressure region, the capacitance changes due to deformation and distortion of the insulating yarn covering the conductive fiber of each covering yarn.
In Example 5, the capacity change between the covering yarn 83 constituting the upper conductive cloth and the inserted covering yarn 86, and the covering yarn 83 constituting the lower conductive cloth and the inserted covering yarn 86, Therefore, the capacitance change amount increases. Therefore, the sensitivity of Example 5 can be made higher than that of the sensor of Example 1.

The test which evaluates the pressure detection characteristic of the electroconductive textiles 10, 60, 70 and 80 of Example 1 and Examples 3-5 was done. The test consists in connecting an LCR meter to the central cells 24, 65, 75 and 85 of the conductive fabrics 10, 60, 70 and 80 to detect the capacitance, and in the central cells 24, 65, 75 and 85. The capacitance of the central cells 24, 65, 75 and 85 was measured while changing the applied pressure. And for the comparison, the test which evaluates a pressure detection characteristic was done also about the electroconductive plain fabric equivalent to what was described in patent document 1. FIG. FIG. 4 shows the results of evaluating the pressure inspection characteristics. The horizontal axis in the figure indicates the applied pressure, and the vertical axis indicates the amount of change in capacitance.
The white triangle (Δ) mark in FIG. 4 shows the characteristics of a conductive plain fabric equivalent to that described in Patent Document 1, and the white square (□) mark shows the characteristics of the conductive fabric 10 of Example 1. ing. Further, the black triangle (▲) mark indicates the characteristics of the conductive fabrics 60, 70, and 80 of Example 3, the black square (■) mark of Example 4, and the black circle (●) marks of Example 5, respectively. . From FIG. 4, it can be confirmed that in the conductive fabrics 10, 60, 70 and 80, the capacitance changes greatly as the pressure increases. On the other hand, in the conductive plain woven fabric equivalent to that described in Patent Document 1, the change in capacitance due to the change in pressure is small compared to that in each example. From this graph, it can be confirmed that the conductive fabrics 10, 60, 70 and 80 can detect the pressure applied to the fabric with higher sensitivity than the conductive plain fabric.

  As mentioned above, although the form for implementing this invention was demonstrated according to each Example, the touch sensor apparatus using the conductive fabric and conductive fabric which concern on this invention is a range of the thought of the invention with various forms. It can be implemented. For example, the conductive fabric of each example is a double woven fabric in which two conductive cloths are stacked, or a triple woven fabric in which conductive yarns are inserted between the double woven fabrics. It is possible to make a multiple weave like Further, the weaving method of the cloth is not limited to plain weave, and various kinds such as twill weave and satin weave can be adopted.

10, 60, 70, 80 Conductive fabric 12 Conductive thread 14 Insulated thread 16 Conductive thread area 18 Insulated thread area 20 Conductive upper cloth 21 Upper cloth electrode 22 Conductive lower cloth 23 Lower cloth electrode 24 Cell 26 Pile thread layer 30 Touch sensor device 32 multiplexer 34 signal difference detection circuit 36 operation processing circuit 40 first oscillator 42 second oscillator 44 third oscillator 48 touch position indicator 50 multiplexer 52 signal difference detection circuit 54 operation processing circuit 56 distribution multiplexer 58 oscillators 63, 73, 83 covering Thread (conductive thread)

Claims (8)

  1. A conductive fabric woven with conductive yarn,
    A conductive fabric in which at least two conductive cloths in which conductive yarns are woven are superposed on each other and integrated.
  2. The conductive fabric according to claim 1,
    The conductive yarn is a conductive yarn in which conductive fibers are covered with an insulator, and at least two conductive cloths are woven using the conductive yarn, and the conductive yarns are superposed on each other. A conductive woven fabric characterized in that each conductive cloth is bundled and integrated with an insulating thread except for at least a part of the overlapping portions.
  3. The conductive fabric according to claim 1,
    A conductive fabric characterized in that each of the conductive cloths is connected with pile yarn to form a three-dimensional structure.
  4. The conductive fabric according to any one of claims 1 to 3,
    A conductive fabric, wherein a surface of the conductive fabric or each conductive fabric is impregnated with a resin.
  5. The conductive fabric according to any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein
    Any one of the warp and weft forming each conductive cloth has a configuration in which conductive yarn regions in which a plurality of conductive yarns are arranged and insulating yarn regions in which a plurality of insulating yarns are arranged alternately. And the other of the warp and weft yarns has a configuration in which only insulating yarns are arranged,
    The conductive cloths are integrated by overlapping the conductive yarns in a direction in which the conductive yarns intersect with each other, and a cell that is an area where the conductive yarn regions of the conductive cloths intersect is made to function as a touch sensor. Conductive fabric.
  6. A touch sensor device using a cell formed on the conductive fabric according to claim 5 as a touch sensor,
    Applying a periodic signal that can be distinguished from each other for each conductive yarn region to the conductive yarn of the conductive yarn region of any one of the conductive fabrics,
    Taking out the signal output from the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn area of the conductive cloth not applying the periodic signal via the electrostatic capacitance between the conductive yarn of each conductive yarn area of the conductive cloth to which the periodic signal was applied,
    A touch sensor device including a signal detection circuit that detects a touched cell by detecting a signal difference between an extracted signal and an applied signal.
  7. The touch sensor device according to claim 6,
    The touch sensor device according to claim 1, wherein the frequency of the periodic signal applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of any one of the conductive fabrics is different for each conductive yarn region.
  8. The touch sensor device according to claim 6,
    The touch sensor device according to claim 1, wherein the periodic signal applied to the conductive yarn in the conductive yarn region of any one of the conductive fabrics is applied to each conductive yarn region in a time-sharing manner.
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