FR3023679A1 - Damping helmet - Google Patents

Damping helmet Download PDF

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Publication number
FR3023679A1
FR3023679A1 FR1401633A FR1401633A FR3023679A1 FR 3023679 A1 FR3023679 A1 FR 3023679A1 FR 1401633 A FR1401633 A FR 1401633A FR 1401633 A FR1401633 A FR 1401633A FR 3023679 A1 FR3023679 A1 FR 3023679A1
Authority
FR
France
Prior art keywords
helmet
cap
pads
layer
characterized
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
FR1401633A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Stephane Latruffe
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Salomon SAS
Original Assignee
Salomon SAS
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Salomon SAS filed Critical Salomon SAS
Priority to FR1401633A priority Critical patent/FR3023679A1/en
Publication of FR3023679A1 publication Critical patent/FR3023679A1/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers ; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/04Parts, details or accessories of helmets
    • A42B3/10Linings
    • A42B3/12Cushioning devices
    • A42B3/125Cushioning devices with a padded structure, e.g. foam
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers ; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/04Parts, details or accessories of helmets
    • A42B3/06Impact-absorbing shells, e.g. of crash helmets

Abstract

The invention relates to a helmet (10) comprising: - an outer shell (11), - a cap (13) disposed inside the shell, the cap having, an upper portion (131) intended to cover at least the crown portion of the skull, the cap comprising a first layer (132) of thickness "e" substantially covering the upper portion and a plurality of studs (133) projecting from the first layer towards the head, a height "h" The first layer and the studs forming a single piece (13). The height of the studs is greater than the thickness of the first layer.

Description

The invention relates to a protective helmet for sporting activity. Such activities may include alpine skiing, ski touring or snowboarding. The invention also extends to the practice of climbing, mountaineering, cycling or the practice of snowmobiling. Generally, a helmet forms a protection of the head, to protect the skull from shocks that it could suffer when the user falls, when an object is projected in its direction or during a collision with an object. or a third party. A classic helmet construction includes an outer shell and an inner cap. The outer shell is generally rigid, and is for example made by molding / injection of a thermoplastic material such as ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) or PC (PolyCarbonate). Usually, the inner cap is made of an expanded material such as EPS (Expandable PolyStyrene) or EPP (Expandable PolyPropylene). In order to guarantee good comfort for the user, the helmet is generally equipped with an internal cap which may, for example, be made of foam covered with fabric. The inner cap is attached to the inside of the inner cap. A helmet is intended to reduce the risk of injury to the skull of the user, while having the least weight possible so as not to harm the comfort of the user. A good helmet must therefore satisfy two contradictory requirements, on the one hand, comprise the most damping material possible and, on the other hand, be as light as possible to be easily portable and not to impede the user. To ensure the safety of users, there are several standards generally defining tests and acceptance thresholds that are applied to the homologation headsets in the associated discipline. Depending on the sporting activity, the normative requirement may differ. Thus, a standard covers a specific activity. From these requirements, there are features that the helmet must provide to provide the required protection. For example, these characteristics correspond to properties of penetration resistance and shock absorption properties as a function of the activity performed, in different areas of the helmet. Thus, it appears a strong need to design a helmet with a good damping in its summit part, this zone being often a critical zone for the success of test 10 in order to obtain a homologation. In this zone, the damping characteristics of the helmet depend mainly on the design of the inner cap. The most common cap construction is in the form of an envelope reproducing the morphology of the skull. To obtain the desired damping, suitable materials are used and / or the thickness of the envelope is varied. This results in a design that can weigh down the helmet, source of discomfort for the user. Other constructions propose to report independent pads, directly on the outer shell (US 4,766,614), on an inner shell (GB 2,240,255, US 4,239,136) or associated with the cap (US 7,774,866, EP 0 423 379). In all cases, these pads are sized to operate in compression. The damping is thus achieved by crushing the pads. In some embodiments, these pads are used to wedge the head. These different constructions, incorporating studs reported, are complex and expensive to achieve. One difficulty relates to the attachment and maintenance of the pads on the helmet. Another construction provides an inner cap with ventilation channels defining protrusions protruding towards the user's head. This type of structure is characterized by a cap having a relatively thick layer 35 from which extend the projections on a low height. The damping is here made by the thick layer, the projections having a channeling role of the air flow ensuring the ventilation of the top of the skull. In this construction, to obtain the desired properties, the reliefs have a height less than the thickness of the cap. EP 2 716 175 illustrates this type of helmet. The object of the invention is to provide an improved helmet. One goal is to provide a lightweight helmet structure, having good damping property. Another goal is to provide a helmet whose structure comprises few assembled components. Another purpose is to provide an economical helmet whose process of realization is simple.

For this purpose, the subject of the invention is a helmet comprising: an outer shell, a cap, disposed inside the shell, the cap having an upper part intended to cover at least the summit part of the skull, the cap comprising a first layer of thickness "e" substantially covering the upper part and several studs projecting from the first layer towards the head, a height "h", the first layer and the pads forming one and the same room.

The helmet is characterized by the fact that the height of the pads is greater than the thickness of the first layer. This structure allows to have, with few parts, a cap attached to an outer shell, a lightweight helmet with good damping characteristics. This construction allows a good anchoring of the pads on the cap and the height of the pads allows deformation by bending and / or buckling, which improves the damping properties of the helmet. In addition, the helmet is compact and has an outfit. This helmet is light and ventilated thanks to this specific construction. It also allows the use of simple cap, removable, can easily be changed. Optionally, the invention may have any of the following optional features taken alone or in combination: The thickness "e" of the first layer is between 1 and 17.5 millimeters. - The height "h" of the studs in the upper part is between 10 and 35 millimeters. - The average section of the pads is between 0.5 and 5 square centimeters. - Several pads of the upper part are dimensioned so that their height "h" is greater than the smallest dimension characterizing the average section of these pads. - The studs are randomly distributed in the upper part. - The top of the studs is intended to be in contact with the head or a cap covering the head. - The pads have a substantially parallelepiped shape. - The cap is made of a material among the EPS, the EPP.

Embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of nonlimiting examples, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: - Figure 1 is a perspective view of a main embodiment of a helmet according to the invention; - Figure 2 is a bottom view in perspective of the inside of the helmet; - Figure 3 is a bottom view of the helmet; - Figure 4 is a sectional view along line IV-IV of Figure 3; - Figures 5 to 6 are partial sections illustrating different modes of deformation of the pads according to the invention. The helmet 10 comprises an outer shell 11, a collar 12, a cap 13, ear cushions 14 and a jugular strap 15.

In the rest of the description, terms such as "horizontal", "vertical", "longitudinal", "transversal", "superior", "lower", "up", "down", "before" will be used. , "Back", "anterior", "posterior". These terms should in fact be interpreted relatively in relation to the position that the helmet occupies on the head of a user in normal posture, and the normal direction of advancement of the wearer. The helmet comprises an upper portion 101 for covering at least the "top part" of the skull, that is to say the top of the skull. It is defined by an area covering an upper part of the frontal bone and an upper part of the parietal bone. In this example, this upper portion 101 of the helmet is composed of an upper portion 111 of the outer shell and an upper portion 131 of the cap. The outer shell 11 is monolithic, that is to say made in one block. Here it is made of polycarbonate (PC). Alternatively, it is made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), a material loaded with carbon fibers or natural fibers. The outer shell 11 is molded, for example, injected. The cap 13 is here also monolithic. It is made of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS, which comes from the English "Expandable PolyStyrene"). It may alternatively be expanded polypropylene (EPP, which comes from the English "Expandable PolyPropylene") or other material, preferably foamed material. It is attached to the outer shell 11 to cover an inner surface 112 of the outer shell 11. The cap 13 is designed to also surround the head of a user. The construction of its internal envelope will be detailed later. The cap 13 may be a separate part of the outer shell 11, and assembled with the outer shell 11. 25 Alternatively, it may be overmolded on the outer shell 11, it is called so-called thermoforming technology or "in-mold". To improve comfort, the outer shell 11 and the cap 13 may comprise openings positioned vis-à-vis so as to allow the arrival and / or evacuation of a flow of air ensuring the ventilation of the skull of the user. In this example, the lower part of the helmet is delimited by the flange 12 fixed on the cap. This flange marks the lower edge of the outer shell 11 together with the lower edge of the cap 13. The flange is optional, the invention also applying to helmets having no flange delimiting the lower edge of the helmet.

The cap 13 has a structure comprising two levels in the direction of the thickness. The first level forms a first layer 132 of thickness "e" covering the skull of the user. This first layer substantially reproduces the shape of the outer shell. The outer surface 1321 of this first layer is fixed on the inner surface 112 of the outer shell. This assembly can be achieved by gluing, melting, overmoulding or other technology. The thickness e of this layer is not necessarily constant over the entire internal surface of the helmet. For example, it may be thicker on the upper part of the cap and less thick on the lower part, namely, the front, side and rear. As we have seen previously, the first layer 132 may include openings for aeration of the skull. The second level of the structure of the cap comprises a set of reliefs 133, 134 projecting from the inner surface 1322 of the first layer 132, in the direction of the head of the user. The shape of these reliefs varies according to their positioning. In the lower part of the cap (the front, side and rear parts), the reliefs form blocks 134, for example parallelepipedal of variable thickness. Thus, each block is slightly thick in its lower part and thicker in its upper part. The blocks are regularly distributed on the inner lower periphery of the cap 13. Channels are thus formed between the blocks. These channels are used for the circulation of air for ventilation of the skull. In the upper part 131 of the cap (top part), the reliefs form studs 133. In the illustrated example, these studs are parallelepipeds having a height "h" substantially constant. These parallelepipeds, however, have different sections, relative to each other. In a variant, they may have identical sections. Alternatively, these pads may take other polyhedral or cylindrical forms. It can be truncated pyramids, cylinders, truncated cones. Similarly, the height of these studs is not necessarily constant. It is thus possible to provide areas where the height of the pads is greater in order to obtain, for example, more damping. Again, channels are formed between the pads. These channels are used for the circulation of air for ventilation of the skull. According to the embodiment described, the distribution of the pads is random in the upper part 131. Alternatively, the distribution can follow a regular pattern.

The total thickness "T" of the cap corresponds to the sum of the thickness "e" of the first layer and the height "h" of the reliefs, blocks 134 or pads 133. The total thickness "T" may vary depending on the parts of the cap concerned.

The invention also resides in the fact that, in the upper portion 131 of the cap, a majority of pads have a height sufficient to obtain a deformation complementary or alternative to the compression of the pad, in order to improve the damping properties of the pad. helmet. This deformation can be "buckling" or bending. In this case, the pads are sized and arranged so that they can not only compress but also deform in a non-axial direction. Thus, the pads do not deform only by compression as in the majority of the constructions of the prior art. Figures 5 and 6 illustrate examples of deformations of these pads following an impact materialized by the vector "F". The stud 133, biased by the effort "F", bears against the skull or the cap, represented here by the plane "P". The stud 133 then deforms in compression, initially, then in a non-axial direction, in a second step, because of its dimensioning. In Figure 5, the deformation is similar to a buckling. In Figure 6, the deformation is similar to a flexion. The deformation of the stud may be different from one pad to the other depending on the impact zone and the dimensions of the pad. It is not necessary that all the studs respect the recommended ratio, the absorption of the shock can be cashed by a few pads. The damping properties are nevertheless better if there are many studs having a height greater than the thickness of the first layer. To obtain this complementary or alternative deformation, the proposed construction comprises sufficient anchoring of the base of the studs and a height of the studs allowing this additional deformation. The first layer 132 of thickness "e" and allows to secure the pads together to create a monobloc structure and homogeneous. In addition, in order to obtain a satisfactory deformation, the height "h" of the pads is greater than the thickness "e" of the first layer. Moreover, to obtain a complementary or even more efficient deformation, some studs placed in zones of preferred deformations have a height "h" greater than the smallest dimension characterizing the average section of these studs. The smallest dimension may be a side of a square section, the smallest height of a parallelogram section, the diameter of a cylinder. The higher the height is, the more it will facilitate the desired additional deformation. The pads can then more easily deform in a non-axial direction. According to one embodiment having a good damping, the section of the base of the pads is substantially the same as the section of the top of the pads. It is therefore best to avoid having pyramid-shaped studs or tilted cones. If this is not the case, the stud will essentially deform in compression which is not the desired behavior. Surprisingly, it has been found that compared to conventional "full" caps, that is to say without pads, the damping properties of a cap comprising such pads are significantly better at thickness. equivalent total. For example, the acceleration measured at the head following an impact on the crown portion is at least 15% less between a cap with studs and a cap without studs. Thus the pads 133 act as shock absorbers (crashbox) similar to car bumpers.

The kinetic energy generated by the shock is thus dissipated by these pads in addition to the absorption inherent in the material of the cap. This double dissipation improves the damping compared to a cap without pads of equivalent thickness. The damping therefore results mainly from the deformation of the pads 133 and weakly via the thickness of the first layer 132. The first layer serves essentially to create a monobloc structure by connecting the pads together.

In these examples, the height ratio "h" on thickness "e" is greater than one. Good damping results are obtained with a thickness "e" of between 1 and 17.5 millimeters and / or with a height "h" of between 10 and 35 millimeters, the previously defined ratio to be respected. For comfort, the total thickness "T" of the cap is preferably less than 40 millimeters. Similarly, the average section of the pads is preferably between 0.5 and 5 square centimeters. With a small section, the pad deforms more easily in a non-axial direction. With a larger section, the stud deforms less in a non-axial direction. However, the top 1331 of the stud has a larger contact area with the skull which is more comfortable because the transmitted stress is lower. A good compromise is a section between 1 and 4 cm2. According to a preferred embodiment, the first layer 132 is characterized by a small thickness "e", less than 10 millimeters. This small thickness makes it easy to adapt the shape of the shell to that of the outer shell while favoring high-damping pads. In addition, the reduced thickness of the first layer and the spacing of the pads reduce the amount of damping material effective and necessary. As a result, it helps to lighten the helmet, which is a very important element, even fundamental, for a sports helmet. It was found that, unlike conventional helmet constructions, it was not necessary to have a continuous thickness over the entire surface of the cap to achieve a good level of protection.

The cap is a "monolithic" piece in the sense that the first layer 132 and the pads 133 form a single piece. Nevertheless, the cap may be constructed in several parts, each comprising a first layer and reliefs. By being a single block, it greatly simplifies the realization of the cap. On the other hand, it reduces the number of components of the helmet compared to a helmet with many studs reported. To further simplify the realization of the cap, the pads are designed so that the cap can be unmolded by a simple movement of the tool. This means, in this example, that the pads are oriented so that their height extends substantially in a vertical direction. Thanks to the invention, the cap can be made using an economic material, the EPS and or EPP, making the most of its damping properties. Thanks to the obvious of the inner envelope of the cap by the realization of the pads, it reduces the volume of material of the cap and therefore the weight of the helmet. This lightening brings wearing comfort to the user without denying the required safety. The reduction of damping material is then compensated by the potential of deformation of the pads. In this example, the top 1331 of the pads 133 is intended to be in contact with the head or a cap covering the head.

Generally, the helmets incorporate a cap making the interface between the head of the user and the cap. This brings a better comfort because the cap can be made of a material more pleasant to the touch. In addition, it can easily be changed if it deteriorates, for example, by prolonged contact with sweat. In the illustrated embodiment, the pads are full. Alternatively, one can consider to hollow out the pads to further lighten the structure. In this case, the cap would consist of hollow studs.

In summary, the studs 133 of the upper part 131 of the cap serve two main functions, on the one hand, shock absorption and, on the other hand, ventilation of the skull.

The invention is not limited to these embodiments. It is possible to combine these embodiments. The invention is not limited to the embodiment previously described but extends to all the embodiments covered by the appended claims.

Claims (10)

  1. REVENDICATIONS1. Helmet (10) comprising: - an outer shell (11), - a cap (13) disposed inside the shell, the cap having, an upper portion (131) intended to cover at least the summit portion of the skull , the cap comprising a first layer (132) of thickness "e" substantially covering the upper part and several studs (133) protruding from the first layer towards the head, a height "h", the first layer and the studs forming a single piece (13), characterized in that the height "h" of the pads is greater than the thickness "e" of the first layer.
  2. 2. Helmet (10) according to claim 1, characterized in that the thickness "e" of the first layer is between 1 and 17.5 millimeters.
  3. 3. Helmet (10) according to claim 1, characterized in that the thickness "e" of the first layer is less than 10 millimeters.
  4. 4. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, 25 characterized in that the height "h" of the pads in the upper part is between 10 and 35 millimeters.
  5. 5. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the average section of the pads is between 0.5 and 5 square centimeters.
  6. 6. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that several pads of the upper part are dimensioned so that their height "h" is greater than the smallest dimension characterizing the average section of these pads.
  7. 7. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the pads are randomly distributed in the upper part.
  8. 8. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the top (1331) of the pads is intended to be in contact with the head or a cap covering the head.
  9. 9. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, 10 characterized in that the pads have a substantially parallelepiped shape.
  10. 10. Helmet (10) according to one of the preceding claims, characterized in that the cap is made of a material 15 among the EPS, the EPP.
FR1401633A 2014-07-18 2014-07-18 Damping helmet Pending FR3023679A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR1401633A FR3023679A1 (en) 2014-07-18 2014-07-18 Damping helmet

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
FR1401633A FR3023679A1 (en) 2014-07-18 2014-07-18 Damping helmet
EP15001744.0A EP2974612B1 (en) 2014-07-18 2015-06-12 Damping helmet
JP2015140226A JP2016023400A (en) 2014-07-18 2015-07-14 Cushioning helmet
US14/802,463 US20160015111A1 (en) 2014-07-18 2015-07-17 Impact-absorbing helmet

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
FR3023679A1 true FR3023679A1 (en) 2016-01-22

Family

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
FR1401633A Pending FR3023679A1 (en) 2014-07-18 2014-07-18 Damping helmet

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US20160015111A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2974612B1 (en)
JP (1) JP2016023400A (en)
FR (1) FR3023679A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (3)

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FR3049826B1 (en) 2016-04-12 2018-04-13 Salomon Sas Sport helmet
US10369452B2 (en) * 2017-03-20 2019-08-06 Chris Jimenez Padding assembly
US10349696B2 (en) * 2017-07-27 2019-07-16 Kenneth K. OGATA Football helmet

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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP2974612A1 (en) 2016-01-20
US20160015111A1 (en) 2016-01-21
EP2974612B1 (en) 2017-11-01
JP2016023400A (en) 2016-02-08

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