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EP0158710A1 - Papermakers fabric with high wear resistant yarns - Google Patents

Papermakers fabric with high wear resistant yarns

Info

Publication number
EP0158710A1
EP0158710A1 EP19840112830 EP84112830A EP0158710A1 EP 0158710 A1 EP0158710 A1 EP 0158710A1 EP 19840112830 EP19840112830 EP 19840112830 EP 84112830 A EP84112830 A EP 84112830A EP 0158710 A1 EP0158710 A1 EP 0158710A1
Authority
EP
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
yarns
fabric
wear
polyester
high
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
EP19840112830
Other languages
German (de)
French (fr)
Inventor
Walter Mckinnon Palmer
Thomas Berg Fleischer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Huyck Corp
Original Assignee
Huyck Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21FPAPER-MAKING MACHINES; METHODS OF PRODUCING PAPER THEREON
    • D21F1/00Wet end of machines for making continuous webs of paper
    • D21F1/0027Screen-cloths

Abstract

Disclosed is a papermaker's fabric woven from high wear resistant polyester monofilament yarns having an intrinsic viscosity greater than 0.84. This polymer is preferably mixed with an imide stabilizer and TiO2.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    This invention relates to papermaker's fabrics and more particularly to a papermaker's fabric having high wear resistant cross machine direction monofilament yarns on the machine side or wear side of the fabric.
  • [0002]
    Forming fabrics for use in papermaking machines usually are in the form of a fine mesh cloth which has been woven endless or otherwise joined into an endless web. As a very basis of good quality paper resides in the web formation itself, the structure of the forming wire is of vital and decisive importance. At one time, all forming wires were manufactured from metal wires. These metal-wire cloths were useful in all kinds of papermaking machines and for all paper qualities.
  • [0003]
    Eventually, metal-wire cloths were replaced by single-layer cloths or wires of synthetic fiber threads. The advantage of synthetic threads beyond metal-wire threads primarily resides in their improved wear resistance. Single layer synthetic wires do, however, suffer from the disadvantage of having considerably higher elasticity and less stability than cloths made from metal-wires of corresponding coarseness.
  • [0004]
    With such synthetic materials, and in the case where the liquid suspension contains in addition to the cellulosic fibers, an abrasive filler material such as calcium carbonate, the problem arises that the mesh may become rapidly worn, and the working life thereof consequently appreciably reduced, due to abrasion occurring as the mesh moves against the rollers and suction devices.
  • [0005]
    The initial synthetic yarns used in papermaker's fabrics were multifilament yarns. These yarns which frequently were made out of nylon were chemically treated in order to improve the wear resistance of the fabric. (See U.S. Patent No. 3,032,441 issued to Beaumont et al.) The introduction of all monofilament fabrics further improved the wear resistance of forming fabrics by virtue of the higher apparent density of the monofilament yarns compared to the multifilament yarns.
  • [0006]
    Efforts to improve the wear resistance of the monofilament yarns have so far had only limited success. Attempts to improve the wear resistance of the monofilament yarns are taught by U.S. Patent No. 4,289,173 issued to Miller and West German Patent Application No. 25 02 466 in the name of Wandel. These patents disclose the use of alternative nylon and polyester yarns in the cross machine direction for improving the wear resistance of the fabric. The papermaking performance of such prior art fabrics has been reduced by a pronounced wire mark on the sheet side. Furthermore, the combining of nylon and polyester yarns have proven to be rather difficult due to the different bending stiffnesses exhibited by the two types of synthetic yarns. Such yarns will also tend to exhibit different crimp when used in the same fabric.
  • [0007]
    Attempts to improve the wear resistance by coating the fabric with an abrasion-resistant film as taught by U.S. Patent No. 4,421,819 issued to Baker have also met with limited success. The normal wear rates of the fabric will resume as soon as the thin wear resistant coating has worn through. In addition, if the coating applied to the fabric is too thick, the drainage passage through the coated fabrics is reduced by the thickness of the coating up to the point where the drainage passages become completely blocked.
  • [0008]
    The problem of reduced drainage capacity due to the coating of monofilament fabrics is a particularly serious problem with fine mesh fabrics used for fine paper applications and with dual layer---fabrrcs where the distance between surfaces of adjacent machine direction monofilament yarns is extremely small.
  • [0009]
    It is therefore a principal object of the present invention to provide a papermaker's fabric having improved abrasion resistance and therefore working life without appreciable adverse modification of texture and drainage characteristics of the fabric.
  • [0010]
    A further object of the present invention is to provide a papermakers fabric in which the abrasion resistance of the fabric is improved without applying a coating to the fabric.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    The papermaker's fabric of the present invention is woven from monofilament yarns manufactured from a high wear resistant polyester. The high-wear resistant yarns are produced from a very high viscosity polymer having an intrinsic viscosity higher than the intrinsic viscosity of the manufactured yarns which must be 0.84 or higher.
  • [0012]
    The high-wear resistant yarns are produced using normal extrusion conditions with the polymer temperature increased by about 10°F in order to handle the high viscosity polymer.
  • [0013]
    These and other features and objects of the present invention will be more fully understood from the following detailed description which should be read in light of the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0014]
    • Fig. 1 is a plan view of a single layer papermaker's fabric according to the present invention which diagrammatically shows the wear area of the fabric;
    • Fig. 2 is a plan view of a double layer papermaker's fabric according to the present invention which diagrammatically shows the wear area of the fabric;
    • Fig. 3 is a schematic representation of a yarn wire abrasion test;
    • Fig. 4 is a schematic representation of a wet roll abrasion test;
    • Figs. 5a and 5b are schematic diagrammatic representations of a double layer papermaker's fabric, as shown in Fig. 2, containing regular polyester yarns, before and after wet roll abrasion tests respectively;
    • Figs. 5c and 5d are schematic diagrammatic representations of a double layer papermaker's fabric, as shown in Fig. 2, incorporating the high-wear resistant polyester yarns of the present invention, before and after abrasion resistance tests respectively; and
    • Figs. 5e and 5f are schematic diagrammatic representations of a double layer papermaker's fabric, as shown in Fig. 2, containing alternating regular and nylon 6.6 cross machine direction yarns, before and after abrasion resistance tests respectively.
    DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0015]
    The papermakers fabric of the present invention, which may be a single (Fig. I), double (Fig. 2) or multi-layer fabric, includes high wear resistant polyester yarns in the bottom layer of the fabric. Preferably all or substantially all of the cross-machine direction yarns are composed of or formed of a high viscosity polyester monofilament. The high wear resistant yarns incorporated in the papermaker's fabrics of the present invention are produced from a very high viscosity polyester of intrinsic viscosity over 0.95 with the intrinsic viscosity of the yarns being 0.84 or higher, depending on the extrusion rates. A suitable high viscosity polyester is that marketed by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. The polyester may be mixed with an imide stabilizer and/or Ti02 and extruded into a monofilament.
  • [0016]
    The high wear resistant yarns of the present invention may be produced under the same extrusion conditions as regular cross machine direction polyester yarns. The only small adjustment needed is to use a polymer temperature about 10°F higher than normal to handle the high viscosity polymer. Productivities from such production are normal, and the high viscosity polymer costs only a few cents more per pound than regular, normal viscosity polyester polymer.
  • [0017]
    Many other features and aspects of the present invention will become apparent from the following non-limiting examples.
  • [0018]
    The fabrics in the following examples underwent two types of tests: the yarn wire abrasion test and the wet roll abrasion test. In the yarn wire abrasion test, schematically shown in Fig. 3, fifteen piano wires are distributed uniformally around a circle having a 7 1/2-inch diameter. The yarn or monofil to be tested is in contact with 90° of the "Squirrel Cage." The yarns are tensioned with a 1/2 pound weight, and the wires comprising the squirrel cage are rotated at 34 r.p.m. towards the weight. There are five positions on the wire tester and each has a counter which records the number of revolutions or cycles of the squirrel cage required to break or fracture the yarn. When the yarn breaks, the counter automatically stops. In the device of Fig. 3, the yarn is stationary and the wires rub along the length of the yarn.
  • [0019]
    To perform the wet roll abrasion test, shown in Fig. 4, a rectangular fabric sample, 4 inches by 1/4 inch, is held stationary on a wet rotating papermaker's roll with a 14-inch diameter. The water is added via a spray, and the fabric holder keeps the fabric strip tangential to the roll and provides a controlled pressure on the fabric. The surface speed of the roll is 1000 feet per minute. The test lasts for 10 or 20 minutes depending on fabric weight. The degree of abrasion is determined by the percent lost in tensile strength of the abraded fabric strip compared to the strength of the fabric before abrasion.
  • EXAMPLE 1
  • [0020]
    A 0.19 diameter high wear resistant (HWR) yarn of 0.87 Intrinsic Viscosity was produced from Goodyear polymer 1005A of Intrinsic Viscosity (I.V.) 1.0. The yarn was drawn 4.0 x and heat set in an oven at 420°F. on the extrusion line. This yarn had a low modulus of 0.65 gm/decitex for 1% extension and a free shrinkage of 12% in an oven at 392°F.
  • [0021]
    The abrasion of this 0.19mm HWR yarn was compared with a regular polyester 0.19mm yarn of I.V. 0.65 produced from Goodyear polymer 7201A with similar modulus of 0.63 and free shrinkage of 9%. The results of the yarn wire abrasion and wet roll abrasion tests were as follows:
  • [0022]
    The regular and HWR 0.19mm yarns were woven as cross machine direction yarns in a single layer fabric of the type shown in Fig. 1. The strength losses in the fabrics after the same number of revolutions of the wet roll were:
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • [0023]
    The 0.19mm HWR yarn of Example 1 was evaluated as the cross machine direction yarns in a double layer fabric of the type illustrated in Fig. 2. The strength losses in the fabrics after an identical number of revolutions of the wet roll were:
  • EXAMPLE 3
  • [0024]
    In additional tests, 0.17mm HWR and regular yarns were produced using the following conditions
  • [0025]
    These two yarns were evaluated in a double layer fabric similar but not identical to that shown in Fig. 2. In addition, a pick and pick fabric with alternating regular polyester and nylon 6.6 monofils on the bottom layer of the double fabric was woven across the same warp.
  • [0026]
    The worn areas on each of these three double layer fabrics both before and after wet roll abrasion are shown in Figs. 5a and 5b, 5c and 5d, 5e and 5f.
  • EXAMPLE 4
  • [0027]
    A 0.23mm HWR yarn of 0.87 I.V. was produced from Goodyear polymer 1005A using similar extrusion draws and oven temperature as the yarn of Example 1. This 0.23mm yarn had a modulus of 0.64 and a free shrinkage of 13%.
  • [0028]
    This 0.23 HWR yarn, along with regular 0.23mm polyester was woven as cross machine direction yarn in a monoplane fabric similar to the fabric of Fig. 1. The abrasion results were:
  • EXAMPLE 5
  • [0029]
    A coarse 0.36mm HWR yarn was obtained from a Goodyear polymer 9501A of I.V. 0.95. The 0.36mm HWR monofil had an I.V. of 0.84, a modulus of 0.61, and a free shrinkage of 15%. The yarn wire abrasion test results for this 0.36mm HWR monofil as compared to a regular 0.36mm monofil were:
  • [0030]
    Many features and aspects of the present invention can be seen from examples 1-5 set forth above. These examples show that the high-wear resistant yarns can withstand 75% to 125% more wire abrasion revolutions than similar regular polyester monofils of the same diameter. In addition, the fabrics composed of regular polyester yarns have strength losses on the wet roll from 25% to 50% more than fabrics utilizing the high-wear resistant yarns of the present invention. As seen in Fig. 5b a double layer fabric having regular polyester yarns in the machine direction shows some wear on these machine direction yarns. Figs. 5d and 5f, however, show that the use of high-wear resistant yarns or pick and pick regular polyester/nylon 6.6 yarns results in little or no wear of the machine direction yarns when the fabrics are subjected to the same number of revolutions of the wet roll. Finally, most of the physical properties of the high-wear resistant yarns are similar to regular polyester yarns so that few if any changes in winding, weaving or finishing are required to process the fabrics incorporating the high-wear resistant yarns. These high-wear resistant monofils do have slightly more free shrinkage then regular polyester monofils. Most importantly, however, as seen above, the main difference between regular and high-wear resistant yarns is that the high-wear resistant yarns have significantly higher abrasion resistance than the regular polyester yarns.
  • [0031]
    The foregoing invention has been described with reference to its preferred embodiments and a number of non-limiting examples. Although variations and modifications will occur to those skilled in the art, it is intended that such variations and modifications fall within the scope of the appended claims.
  • [0032]
    What is claimed is:

Claims (6)

1. A papermaker's fabric comprising high wear resistant polyester yarns on a wear side of the fabric, said polyester yarns having an intrinsic viscosity of at least 0.84.
2. The papermaker's fabric of claim 1 wherein said high wear resistant polyester yarns are monofilament yarns.
3. The papermaker's fabric of claim 1 wherein said polyester yarns include an imide stabilizer and TiO2.
4. An open mesh band for use as a papermaker's fabric comprising high wear resistant polyester yarns, on a wear side of the fabric, said polyester yarns having an intrinsic viscosity of at least 0.84.
5. An open mesh band of claim 4 wherein said high wear resistant polyester yarns are monofilament yarns.
6. An open mesh band of claim 4 wherein said polyester yarns include an imide stabilizer and TiO2.
EP19840112830 1984-03-26 1984-10-24 Papermakers fabric with high wear resistant yarns Withdrawn EP0158710A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US59335684 true 1984-03-26 1984-03-26
US593356 1984-03-26

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
EP0158710A1 true true EP0158710A1 (en) 1985-10-23

Family

ID=24374398

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
EP19840112830 Withdrawn EP0158710A1 (en) 1984-03-26 1984-10-24 Papermakers fabric with high wear resistant yarns

Country Status (3)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0158710A1 (en)
JP (1) JPS60215892A (en)
FI (1) FI844125L (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2202869A (en) * 1987-03-19 1988-10-05 Scapa Group Plc Improvements to papermachine and like clothing
EP0342563A2 (en) * 1988-05-14 1989-11-23 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Bending-resistant polyester filaments, their production and use
EP0351535A2 (en) * 1988-07-18 1990-01-24 F. Oberdorfer Siebtechnik GmbH Fabric for paper-making machines
WO1990012918A1 (en) * 1989-04-24 1990-11-01 Albany International Corp. Paper machine felts
EP0412196A1 (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-02-13 E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Comfortable fabrics of high durability
US5894867A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-04-20 Weavexx Corporation Process for producing paper using papermakers forming fabric
US5899240A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-05-04 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's fabric with additional first and second locator and fiber supporting yarns
US5937914A (en) * 1997-02-20 1999-08-17 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's fabric with auxiliary yarns
US5983953A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-11-16 Weavexx Corporation Paper forming progess
US6112774A (en) * 1998-06-02 2000-09-05 Weavexx Corporation Double layer papermaker's forming fabric with reduced twinning.
US6123116A (en) * 1999-10-21 2000-09-26 Weavexx Corporation Low caliper mechanically stable multi-layer papermaker's fabrics with paired machine side cross machine direction yarns
US6145550A (en) * 1997-08-01 2000-11-14 Weavexx Corporation Multilayer forming fabric with stitching yarn pairs integrated into papermaking surface
US6179013B1 (en) 1999-10-21 2001-01-30 Weavexx Corporation Low caliper multi-layer forming fabrics with machine side cross machine direction yarns having a flattened cross section
US6244306B1 (en) 2000-05-26 2001-06-12 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6253796B1 (en) 2000-07-28 2001-07-03 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6585006B1 (en) 2000-02-10 2003-07-01 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric with companion yarns
US6745797B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2004-06-08 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6837277B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2005-01-04 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6860969B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2005-03-01 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US7766053B2 (en) 2008-10-31 2010-08-03 Weavexx Corporation Multi-layer papermaker's forming fabric with alternating paired and single top CMD yarns
US7931051B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2011-04-26 Weavexx Corporation Multi-layer papermaker's forming fabric with long machine side MD floats
US8251103B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2012-08-28 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric with engineered drainage channels
WO2014139852A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Voith Patent Gmbh Monofilament yarn for a paper machine clothing fabric

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1814481A1 (en) * 1967-12-14 1969-07-03 Procter & Gamble Manufacture of woven fabrics made of polyester fibers
DE2407952A1 (en) * 1973-04-18 1974-10-31 Albany Int Corp Fabric for water removal in the papermaking
DE3224236A1 (en) * 1982-06-29 1984-03-08 Wangner Gmbh Co Kg Hermann Composite fabric as a covering for the sheet-forming region of a paper machine

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1814481A1 (en) * 1967-12-14 1969-07-03 Procter & Gamble Manufacture of woven fabrics made of polyester fibers
DE2407952A1 (en) * 1973-04-18 1974-10-31 Albany Int Corp Fabric for water removal in the papermaking
DE3224236A1 (en) * 1982-06-29 1984-03-08 Wangner Gmbh Co Kg Hermann Composite fabric as a covering for the sheet-forming region of a paper machine

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2202869A (en) * 1987-03-19 1988-10-05 Scapa Group Plc Improvements to papermachine and like clothing
GB2202869B (en) * 1987-03-19 1991-01-30 Scapa Group Plc Improvements to papermachine and like clothing
EP0342563A2 (en) * 1988-05-14 1989-11-23 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Bending-resistant polyester filaments, their production and use
EP0342563A3 (en) * 1988-05-14 1991-04-24 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Bending-resistant polyester filaments, their production and use
EP0351535A2 (en) * 1988-07-18 1990-01-24 F. Oberdorfer Siebtechnik GmbH Fabric for paper-making machines
EP0351535A3 (en) * 1988-07-18 1991-01-02 F. Oberdorfer Siebtechnik GmbH Fabric for paper-making machines
WO1990012918A1 (en) * 1989-04-24 1990-11-01 Albany International Corp. Paper machine felts
EP0768395A3 (en) * 1989-04-24 1998-01-28 Albany International Corp. Paper machine felts
US5169499A (en) * 1989-04-24 1992-12-08 Albany International Corp. Paper machine felts of a copolymer of 1,4-dimethylolcyclohexane, terephthalic acid, and isophthalic acid
EP0412196A1 (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-02-13 E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Comfortable fabrics of high durability
US5894867A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-04-20 Weavexx Corporation Process for producing paper using papermakers forming fabric
US5899240A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-05-04 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's fabric with additional first and second locator and fiber supporting yarns
US5983953A (en) * 1994-09-16 1999-11-16 Weavexx Corporation Paper forming progess
US6073661A (en) * 1994-09-16 2000-06-13 Weavexx Corporation Process for forming paper using a papermaker's forming fabric
US5937914A (en) * 1997-02-20 1999-08-17 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's fabric with auxiliary yarns
US6145550A (en) * 1997-08-01 2000-11-14 Weavexx Corporation Multilayer forming fabric with stitching yarn pairs integrated into papermaking surface
US6112774A (en) * 1998-06-02 2000-09-05 Weavexx Corporation Double layer papermaker's forming fabric with reduced twinning.
US6123116A (en) * 1999-10-21 2000-09-26 Weavexx Corporation Low caliper mechanically stable multi-layer papermaker's fabrics with paired machine side cross machine direction yarns
US6179013B1 (en) 1999-10-21 2001-01-30 Weavexx Corporation Low caliper multi-layer forming fabrics with machine side cross machine direction yarns having a flattened cross section
US6585006B1 (en) 2000-02-10 2003-07-01 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric with companion yarns
US6244306B1 (en) 2000-05-26 2001-06-12 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6253796B1 (en) 2000-07-28 2001-07-03 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6745797B2 (en) 2001-06-21 2004-06-08 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6837277B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2005-01-04 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US6860969B2 (en) 2003-01-30 2005-03-01 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric
US7931051B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2011-04-26 Weavexx Corporation Multi-layer papermaker's forming fabric with long machine side MD floats
US7766053B2 (en) 2008-10-31 2010-08-03 Weavexx Corporation Multi-layer papermaker's forming fabric with alternating paired and single top CMD yarns
US8251103B2 (en) 2009-11-04 2012-08-28 Weavexx Corporation Papermaker's forming fabric with engineered drainage channels
WO2014139852A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Voith Patent Gmbh Monofilament yarn for a paper machine clothing fabric
US9074319B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-07-07 Voith Patent Gmbh Monofilament yarn for a paper machine clothing fabric
CN105209681B (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-07-21 福伊特专利有限公司 Monofilament yarns for paper machine clothing fabric

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
FI844125A (en) application
FI844125A0 (en) 1984-10-19 application
FI844125L (en) 1985-09-27 grant
FI844125D0 (en) grant
JPS60215892A (en) 1985-10-29 application

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated contracting states:

Designated state(s): AT BE CH DE FR GB IT LI LU NL SE

17P Request for examination filed

Effective date: 19851008

17Q First examination report

Effective date: 19860929

18D Deemed to be withdrawn

Effective date: 19870209

RIN1 Inventor (correction)

Inventor name: FLEISCHER, THOMAS BERG

Inventor name: PALMER, WALTER MCKINNON