WO2001039290A2 - Method and apparatus for producing lithium based cathodes - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for producing lithium based cathodes

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Publication number
WO2001039290A2
WO2001039290A2 PCT/US2000/031889 US0031889W WO2001039290A2 WO 2001039290 A2 WO2001039290 A2 WO 2001039290A2 US 0031889 W US0031889 W US 0031889W WO 2001039290 A2 WO2001039290 A2 WO 2001039290A2
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WO
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Prior art keywords
method
lithium
solution
gas
heating
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Application number
PCT/US2000/031889
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French (fr)
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WO2001039290A3 (en )
Inventor
Lonnie G. Johnson
Ahmet Erbil
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Johnson Research & Development Company, Inc.
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01GCOMPOUNDS CONTAINING METALS NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C01D OR C01F
    • C01G51/00Compounds of cobalt
    • C01G51/40Cobaltates
    • C01G51/42Cobaltates containing alkali metals, e.g. LiCoO2
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01GCOMPOUNDS CONTAINING METALS NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C01D OR C01F
    • C01G49/00Compounds of iron
    • C01G49/0018Mixed oxides or hydroxides, e.g. ferrites
    • C01G49/0027Mixed oxides or hydroxides, e.g. ferrites containing one alkali metal
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01GCOMPOUNDS CONTAINING METALS NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES C01D OR C01F
    • C01G53/00Compounds of nickel
    • C01G53/40Nickelates
    • C01G53/42Nickelates containing alkali metals, e.g. LiNiO2
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/02Electrodes composed of or comprising active material
    • H01M4/04Processes of manufacture in general
    • H01M4/0402Methods of deposition of the material
    • H01M4/0421Methods of deposition of the material involving vapour deposition
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/02Electrodes composed of or comprising active material
    • H01M4/04Processes of manufacture in general
    • H01M4/0402Methods of deposition of the material
    • H01M4/0421Methods of deposition of the material involving vapour deposition
    • H01M4/0423Physical vapour deposition
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/02Electrodes composed of or comprising active material
    • H01M4/13Electrodes for accumulators with non-aqueous electrolyte, e.g. for lithium-accumulators; Processes of manufacture thereof
    • H01M4/131Electrodes based on mixed oxides or hydroxides, or on mixtures of oxides or hydroxides, e.g. LiCoOx
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/02Electrodes composed of or comprising active material
    • H01M4/36Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids
    • H01M4/48Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids of inorganic oxides or hydroxides
    • H01M4/485Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids of inorganic oxides or hydroxides of mixed oxides or hydroxides for inserting or intercalating light metals, e.g. LiTi2O4 or LiTi2OxFy
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M4/00Electrodes
    • H01M4/02Electrodes composed of or comprising active material
    • H01M4/36Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids
    • H01M4/48Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids of inorganic oxides or hydroxides
    • H01M4/52Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids of inorganic oxides or hydroxides of nickel, cobalt or iron
    • H01M4/525Selection of substances as active materials, active masses, active liquids of inorganic oxides or hydroxides of nickel, cobalt or iron of mixed oxides or hydroxides containing iron, cobalt or nickel for inserting or intercalating light metals, e.g. LiNiO2, LiCoO2 or LiCoOxFy
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2002/00Crystal-structural characteristics
    • C01P2002/08Intercalated structures, i.e. with atoms or molecules intercalated in their structure
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2002/00Crystal-structural characteristics
    • C01P2002/70Crystal-structural characteristics defined by measured X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction data
    • C01P2002/72Crystal-structural characteristics defined by measured X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction data by d-values or two theta-values, e.g. as X-ray diagram
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2002/00Crystal-structural characteristics
    • C01P2002/70Crystal-structural characteristics defined by measured X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction data
    • C01P2002/77Crystal-structural characteristics defined by measured X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction data by unit-cell parameters, atom positions or structure diagrams
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2004/00Particle morphology
    • C01P2004/01Particle morphology depicted by an image
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C01INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C01PINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF SOLID INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    • C01P2006/00Physical properties of inorganic compounds
    • C01P2006/40Electric properties

Abstract

A method of producing a layer of lithiated material is provided wherein a mixture of Li(acac) and Co (acac)3 is dissolved in solution (50). The solution is deposited upon a substrate (56) by atomizing t he solution (52), passing the atomized solution into a heated gas stream (51) so as to vaporize the solution, and directing the vaporized solution (55) onto a substrate (56).

Description

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING LITHIUM BASED CATHODES

TECHNICAL FIELD This invention relates generally to thin film batteries, and more particularly to the production of lithium cathodes of thin film, rechargeable lithium ion batteries .

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Conventional, canister type batteries today include toxic materials such as cadmium, mercury, lead and acid electrolytes. These chemicals are presently facing governmental regulations or bans as manufacturing materials, thus limiting their use as battery components. Another problem associated with these battery materials is that the amount of energy stored and delivered by these batteries is directly related to the size and weight of the active components used therein. Large batteries, such as those found in automobiles, produce large amounts of current but have very low energy densities (Watts hours per liter) and specific energies (Watt hours per gram) . As such, they require lengthy recharge times which render them impractical for many uses.

To address the need for higher energy densities and specific energies, the battery industry has been moving towards lithium based batteries. The major focus of the battery industry has been on liquid and polymer electrolyte systems. However, these systems have inherent safety problems because of the volatile nature of the electrolyte solvents. Furthermore, these types of batteries have a relatively high ratio of inert material components, such as the current collector, separator, and substrate, relative to the active energy storage materials used for the anode and cathode. In addition, their relatively high internal impedance results in low rate capability (watts/kilogram) which renders them impractical for many applications.

Thin film lithium batteries have been produced which have a stacked configuration of films commencing with an inert ceramic substrate upon which a cathode current collector and cathode are mounted. A solid state electrolyte is deposited upon the cathode, an anode in turn deposited upon the electrolyte, and an anode current collector mounted upon the anode. Typically, a protective coating is applied over the entire cell. Lithium batteries of this type are describe in detail in U.S. Patent Nos . 5,569,520 and 5,597,660, the disclosures of which are specifically incorporated herein. However, the lithiated cathode material of these batteries have a (003) alignment of the lithium cells, as shown in Fig. 1, which creates a high internal cell resistance resulting in large capacity losses .

Thin film batteries have also been produced by forming active cathode materials through chemical vapor deposition techniques. In the past, chemical vapor deposition cathodes have been manufactured in extremely low pressure environments, within a range of 1-100 torr . The requirements of this extremely low pressure environment greatly increases the cost of production and greatly reduces the feasibility of producing commercially viable products as a result of the difficulty in controlling such. Furthermore, this type of chemical vapor deposition is typically carried out by heating a precursor solution to cause evaporation of the solution to a gas phase so that it may be carried off to a deposition location through a stream of non-reactive gas, such as argon. The heating of the precursor for an extended time period can cause the solution to decompose and therefor become unworkable. Furthermore, the high temperature and low pressure of the system requires extensive heating of the transport lines conveying the solution to prevent the evaporated solution from condensing between the heating location and the deposition location, thus further increasing the cost and the complications involved in production.

Recently, it has been discovered that the annealing of lithiated cathode materials on a substrate under proper conditions results in batteries having significantly enhanced performances, for the annealing causes the lithiated material to crystalize. This crystallized material has a hexagonal layered structure in which alternating planes containing Li and Co ions are separated by close packed oxygen layers. It has been discovered that LiCo02 films deposited onto an alumina substrate by magnetron sputtering and crystallized by annealing at 700°C exhibit a high degree of preferred orientation or texturing with the layers of the oxygen, cobalt and lithium oriented generally normal to the substrate, as illustrated by the

(101) plane shown in Fig. 2. This orientation is preferred as it provides for high lithium ion diffusion through the cathode since the lithium planes are aligned parallel to the direction of current flow. It is believed that the preferred orientation is formed because the extreme heating during annealing creates a large volume strain energy oriented generally parallel to the underlying rigid substrate surface. As the crystals form they naturally grow in the direction of the least energy strain, as such the annealing process and its resulting volume strain energy promotes crystal growth in a direction generally normal to the underlying substrate surface, which also is the preferred orientation for ion diffusion through the crystal .

In the past, with an annealing temperature below 600°C the lithium material has no significant change in the microstructure , and thus the lithium orientation remains amorphous, as taught in Characterization of Thin-Film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries With Lithium Cobalt Oxide Cathodes, in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, Vol. 143, No 10, by B.Wang, J.B. Bates, F.X. Hart, B.C. Sales, R.A. Zuhr and J.D. Robertson. This amorphous state restricts lithium ion diffusion through the layers of oxygen and cobalt, and therefore creates a high internal cell resistance resulting in large capacity losses .

Hence, in order to anneal the lithiated cathode material to the most efficient orientation it was believed that the cathode had to be bonded to a rigid substrate and heated to nearly 700°C for an extended period of time.

Another problem associated with the chemical vapor deposition of lithium based cathodes has been associated with the solvents which are used in combination with the precursor materials, such as lithium, cobalt, magnesium, nickel or iron based materials. Typically, such solvents where extremely volatile and created a risk of fire and explosions at high temperatures. It thus is seen that a need remains for a method of producing a cathode for use in high performance rechargeable, thin film lithium battery without the need for an extremely low pressure system, without annealing the cathode, and without the use of volatile solvents. Accordingly, it is to the provision of such that the present invention is primarily directed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In a preferred form of the invention, a method of producing a layer of LiCo02 comprises the steps of providing a lithium based solution, atomizing the lithium based solution to form a mist, heating a stream of gas, entraining the atomized lithium based solution into the heated gas stream so as to heat the lithium based solution mist to a vapor state, and depositing the vapor upon a substrate . BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Fig. 1 is an illustration of a lithium intercalation compound oriented along the (003) plane.

Fig. 2 is an illustration of a lithium intercalation compound oriented along the preferred (101) plane.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a thin film lithium battery illustrating principles of the invention in a preferred embodiment .

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the thin film lithium battery of Fig. 3 taken along plane 4-4.

Fig. 5 is a schematic diagram of the apparatus utilized to deposit the cathode of the thin film lithium battery of Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the first region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment.

Fig. 7 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the second region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment. Fig. 8 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the third region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment . Fig. 9 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the first region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment after being annealed. Fig. 10 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the second region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment after being annealed.

Fig. 11 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the third region of the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment after being annealed.

Fig. 12 is a graph of an x-ray diffraction pattern of a cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment .

Fig. 13 is a graph of an x-ray diffraction pattern of a cathode layer deposited in accordance with the method of the preferred embodiment after being annealed.

Fig. 14 is a schematic diagram of the apparatus utilized to deposit the cathode of the thin film lithium battery of Fig. 3.

Fig. 15 is a cross-section of the nozzle of the apparatus shown in Fig. 14. Fig. 16 is a photocopy of a photograph showing the cathode layer deposited in accordance with the alternative embodiment .

Fig. 17 is a schematic diagram of an apparatus utilized to deposit cathodes in another preferred embodiment .

DETAILED DESCRIPTION With reference next to the drawings, there is shown a rechargeable, thin film lithium battery cell 10 produced in accordance with a method embodying principles of the invention in a preferred form. The battery cell 10 has an aluminum cathode current collector 11 sandwiched between two cathodes 12. The cathodes 12 are made of a lithium intercalation compound, or lithium metal oxide, such as LiCo02, LiMg02, LiNi02 or LiFe02. Each cathode 12 has a solid state electrolyte 13 formed thereon. The electrolyte 13 is preferably made of lithium phosphorus oxynitride, LixPOyNz. In turn, each electrolyte 13 has an anode 14 deposited thereon. The anode 14 is preferably made of silicon-tin oxynitride, SiTON, when used in lithium ion batteries, or other suitable materials such as lithium metal, zinc nitride or tin nitride. Finally, an anode current collector 16, preferably made of copper or nickel, contacts both anodes 14 to substantially encase the cathode collector 11, cathode 12, electrolyte 13 and anode 14.

The inventive method will utilize a vapor deposition apparatus shown in Fig. 5. The apparatus includes a holding tank 20 coupled to an ultrasonic generator 21. The holding tank 20 has an air inlet 22 coupled to an air pump 23 and an outlet conduit 24 extending to an injection tube 25 having a nozzle 27 at one end. The injection tube 25 is coupled to a heating element 28. The nozzle 27 is directed towards a heater block 29 positioned adjacent the nozzle 27.

The battery cell 10 is preferably manufactured in the following manner. A mixture of Li (TMHD) , commonly referred to as lithium (2 , 2 , 6 , 6-tetramethyl-3 , 5-heptadionate or Li(C11H1902) and commonly referred to as cobalt (III) acety lacetonate Co(C5H702)3 or Co(acac)3 is dissolved in an organic solvent, such as a mixture of diglyme, toluene and HTMHD, to produce a solution which is held within holding tank 20. The ultrasonic generator 21, or any other type of conventional atomizer, creates a stream of solution mist, having a liquid droplet size distribution of between 5 to 20 micrometers with a preferred droplet size of approximately 5 micrometers . The mist droplets are carried through the outlet conduit 24 to the injection tube 25 due to the force of the pressurized air from air pump 23 introduced into the holding tank through air inlet 22, the air inlet airstream is pressurized to between 1-2 p.s.i.

The injection tube 25 is heated to approximately 200°C so that the mist droplets passing therethrough are vaporized. This vapor is then directed onto a substrate positioned approximately 1.5 to 2 inches from the end of nozzle. The substrate is heated by the underlying heating block 29 to approximately 400°C. As the vapor approaches and contacts the heated substrate the Li (TMHD) and Co(acac)3 reacts with the 02 within the ambient air resulting in the formation of a layer of LiCo02 on the substrate surface and the production of volatile organic gases which are vented away. It has been discovered that the resulting layer LiCo02 forms as crystals having a preferred orientation along the (101) plane, as shown in Fig. 2. The substrate may then be inverted m order to deposit a layer upon its opposite side.

The following example is given for illustrative purposes only and is not meant to be a limitation on the subject invention.

A solution was prepared by mixing 0.25 grams parts Li

(TMHD) and 0.5 grams of Co (acac)3 in an organic solvent comprising a mixture of diglyme, toluene and HTMHD having a volume of 53 ml. The mixture contained 40 ml of diglyme, 10 ml toluene and 3 ml of HTMHD. This solution provides a critical advantage as it is capable of being handled in air without any adverse effects. The misted solution was passed through a 1/4 inch ID outlet conduit 24 at a rate of 2 liters per minute and through an approximately 2 inch long injection tube heated to 200°C in order to achieve complete vaporization of the mist. The resulting vapor was directed onto a Si02 substrate positioned approximately 1.5 inches from the nozzle 27.

The resulting layer of LiCo02 appeared to have three concentric, distinct regions: a central first region Rl having a dark green, shiny appearance, a second region R2 surrounding the first region Rl having a dark green appearance, and a third region R3 surrounding the second region R2 having a light green appearance. It is believed that this non-uniformity is due to the injection scheme utilized in the experiment.

Referring next to Figs. 6-8, there are shown SEM photographs of the first, second and third regions, respectively. Figs. 6 and 8 show that the first and third regions of the layer to be extremely smooth with very uniform grain sizes of approximately lOOnm. This smoothness and grain size provides an exceptional cathode structure not previously achieved with conventional vapor deposition methods. The layer exhibited no evidence of cracking or peeling.

As shown in Fig. 12, an x-ray diffraction pattern of all three regions shows a high degree of texturing in the (101) plane. It should be noted that the peaks associated with the LiCo02 phase are sharp which indicates that this phase has good crystallinity . This also shows a broad peak at approximately 22° which is assumed to be associated with the amorphous Si02 substrate. The sample layer of LiCo02 was then annealed at 650°C for a period of 30 minutes. A comparison of the pre- annealed sample to the post -annealed sample showed little differences. Figs. 9-11 show the first, second and third regions, respectively, of the post-annealed sample. It should be noted that the crystalline structure within the

(101) plane remained very similar as shown by the comparison of Fig. 12 with Fig. 13. As such, the annealing process did not provide significant benefits to the cathode layer . Of particular importance is that fact that after the annealing process a crack appeared in the sample, as shown on the extreme right side of Fig. 9. This type of cracking of the cathode material is a problem applicant is attempting to avoid as this will cause a degradation of the cathode which may result in the ineffectiveness of the battery.

Hence, it should be understood that the present invention results in the formation of a LiCo02 layer with the proper (101) plane crystalline growth. Moreover, this process achieves this result without the need of annealing the LiCo02 layer to achieve the proper (101) plane crystalline growth. Lastly, this was achieved utilizing chemical vapor deposition in ambient conditions. Once the cathode layer is complete the remaining portions of the battery, such as the electrolyte 13, anode 14, anode collector 16 may be applied. The electrolyte and anode may be applied through any conventional means, such as by sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, spray pyrolysis, laser ablation, ion beam evaporation or the like .

It should be understood that the length of the injection tube 25, flow rate through the injection tube and heating of the injection tube are all variables that must be adjusted in order to achieve the proper vaporization of the mist droplets passing through the injection tube, i.e. the heat input must be matched to the boiling point of the solvent. The injection tube may be heated by any convention means, such as with microwave radiation, heat lamps, resistive coils, etc. Also, any conventional device may be utilized to mist or atomize the solution. The inventive method also includes the method of spraying the solution into a mist form that is then passed through a heated zone so as to vaporize the mist prior to reaching the substrate, as illustrated in Fig. 5 by heating elements 28.

It should also be understood that different lithium and cobalt compounds or chelates compounds may be utilized in the inventive method preferably those which can be volatilized below 300°C. However, it is believed that the recited compounds provide the critical advantage of the capability of being handled in air.

Lastly, it should be understood that preferably only the first region Rl is utilized as the cathode of a battery. It is believed that through a proper arrangement of multiple nozzles the first region Rl may be optimized in size while the second and third regions R2 and R3 minimized or altogether eliminated.

Referring next to Figs. 14, 15 and 16, there is described a second method of producing a lithium layer in another preferred form of the invention. The inventive method utilizes a chemical vapor deposition apparatus 40 shown in Fig. 14. The apparatus 40 includes a copper heating chamber 42 having a heating element 43 therein, preferably made of nichrome or other suitable resistance heating wire such a platinum, and a temperature probe 44 for monitoring the temperature within the heating chamber 42. The heating element 43 is coupled to a variable transformer 46 which controls the power to the resistive heating element 43 and thereby the heat within the heating chamber. The heating chamber 42 is in fluid communication with a pressure tank 47 through a conduit 48. The pressure tank 47 contains a supply of compressed inert gas such as nitrogen or argon. The heating chamber 42 is also in fluid communication with a supply of precursor solution contained within a non-reactive storage container 50, such as that made of polyethylene, via a conduit 51. The storage container 50 contains an ultrasonic generator 52 which atomizes the solution as previously described. The storage container 50 is also in fluid communication with the supply of compressed inert gas within pressure tank 47 through a conduit 55. Conduits 48 and 53 have metering valves 54 which control the flow of gas through the respective conduits. A nozzle 55 is coupled to the heating chamber 42 so as to direct the flow of the precursor entrained heated gas stream onto an adjacent substrate 56. The nozzle is preferably made of ceramic having an approximately 1mm opening therethrough. As best shown in Fig. 15, the nozzle 55 is coupled to conduit 51 and has an interior passage shaped to create a venturi effect which aids in drawing the precursor from the conduit and causing a uniform mixing of the precursor with the heated gas stream. The substrate may also include a temperature probe for monitoring the temperature of the substrate during deposition. The battery cell is preferably manufactured with the just described apparatus 40 in the following manner. The metering valve 54 coupled to conduit 48 is opened to allow the flow of inert gas from within the pressure tank 47 into the heating chamber 42 wherein the heating element 43 raises the temperature of the gas stream passing through the heating chamber to approximately 600 degrees Celsius. Similarly, the metering valve 54 of conduit 53 is opened to cause the pressurized inert gas to flow through conduit 53 into the storage container 50. A mixture of lithium acetylacetonate and cobalt (iii) acetylacetonate dissolved in an aqueous solvent to produce a solution, held within the storage container 50, is atomized by the actuation of the ultrasonic generator 52, which again may be any other type of conventional atomizer which causes a portion of the solution to atomize into a mist. The precursor mist droplets produced by the ultrasonic generator 52 are delivered into the pre-heated inert gas stream at rates ranging from 5 to 50 ml/hr. The precursor mist droplets are carried though conduit 51 to the heating chamber nozzle 55 due to the force of the pressurized inert gas entering the storage container 50.

Upon entering the heating chamber 42 downstream of the heating element 43, the precursor droplets are flash vaporized wherein the vapor is entrained into the heated gas stream. The precursor droplets are additionally reacted from contact with the heated gas stream. This serves to chemically activate the precursor and allows for subsequent deposition onto a substrate. This stream is then directed by nozzle 55 onto a substrate, positioned approximately 0.28 inch from the nozzle 55, wherein the vaporized precursor arrives at the substrate 56 and decomposes into a mixed oxide. The substrate 56 is heated to approximately 350 degrees Celsius. In this case, the mixed oxide is lithium cobalt oxide and the deposition rate of the lithium cobalt oxide is believed to be approximately 0.5 microns/hr .

With reference next to Fig. 15, there is shown a photocopy of a photograph of the resulting lithium cobalt oxide layer produced in the previously described manner upon an alumina ceramic substrate. The layer was produced utilizing a solution comprised of 150 ml of de-ionized water, 0.09 grams of lithium (acac) and 0.3 grams of cobalt

(acac)3. The inert gas was released from pressure tank 47 at 30 psi and the substrate 56 was heated to approximately 350 degrees Celsius. As illustrated in Fig. 15, the resulting layer contains triangular/pyramidal crystals, a generally preferred formation of crystal growth which lessens the need of annealing the layer. With reference next to Fig. 17, there is shown an apparatus similar to that shown in Fig. 14 except that the pressure tank 47 is not in fluid communication with the storage container 50. Here, the precursor is drawn through the conduit 51 through the force of the venturi alone. It should be understood that similar apparatuses may be devised which do not utilize a venturi nozzle or may utilize spray nozzles which deliver droplets into the heating chamber downstream of heating element 43.

It should be understood that the term aqueous solvent, as used herein, is intended in include solvents which are largely water based and therefore may also include other additional materials such as organic solvents. It should also be understood that the just described method may be accomplished without the external heating of the substrate. It thus is seen that a high rate capability battery cathode is now provided which is manufacture without an extremely low pressure environment and without a non- reactive gas environment, yet still includes a good crystal alignment without the need of post annealing. It should of course be understood that many modifications may be made to the specific preferred embodiment described herein without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

Claims

1. A method of producing a lithium intercalation material cathode layer of a thin film battery comprising the steps of :
(a) providing a lithium based solution;
(b) atomizing the lithium based solution to form a mist;
(c) heating a stream of gas ;
(d) entraining the atomized lithium based solution into the pre-heated gas stream so as to heat the lithium based solution mist to a vapor state; and
(e) depositing the vapor upon a substrate.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the steam of gas is heated to a temperature to cause chemical activation of the lithium based solution.
3. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of (f) heating the substrate.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein the vapor is deposited through a nozzle.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein said lithium based solution is a lithium compound and cobalt compound dissolved within an aqueous solvent .
6. The method of claim 5 wherein said lithium compound is Li (acac) .
7. The method of claim 5 wherein said cobalt compound is Co (acac)3
8. The method of claim 1 wherein the mist has a droplet size distribution of between 5 and 20 micrometers.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein the gas stream is comprised of an inert gas .
10. The method of claim 9 wherein the inert gas stream includes hydrogen.
11. The method of claim 9 wherein the inert gas stream includes argon.
12. A method of producing a layer of lithium metal oxide comprising the steps of:
(a) providing a solution having a mixture of Li (acac) and Co (acac)3 dissolved in an aqueous solvent;
(b) processing the solution to form a mist;
(c) entraining the mist into a pre-heated stream of gas sufficient to cause the vaporization of the mist; and
(d) depositing the vapor upon a substrate.
13. The method of claim 12 further comprising the step of (e) heating the substrate.
14. The method of claim 13 wherein the mist has a droplet size distribution of between 5 and 20 micrometers.
15. The method of claim 12 wherein the gas stream is comprised of an inert gas.
16. The method of claim 15 wherein the inert gas is hydrogen .
17. The method of claim 15 wherein the inert gas is argon.
18. A method of producing a layer of lithium metal oxide comprising the steps of :
(a) providing a solution having a mixture of a lithium based compound and a cobalt based compound dissolved in a solvent;
(b) processing the solution to form a mist;
(c) entraining the mist into a heated stream of gas sufficient to cause the vaporization of the mist; and
(d) depositing the vapor upon a substrate.
19. The method of claim 18 wherein said solvent is an aqueous solvent .
20. The method of claim 18 wherein the gas stream is comprised of an inert gas.
21. The method of claim 20 wherein the inert gas is hydrogen .
22. The method of claim 20 wherein the inert gas is argon .
23. The method of claim 20 wherein the inert gas is argon.
24. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus comprising, means for generating a stream of gas; heating means for heating the stream of gas produced by the generating means; holding means for holding a supply of precursor solution; precursor delivery means for delivering the precursor solution from said holding means into the stream of gas downstream of said heating means, said precursor delivery means including atomizing means for atomizing the precursor solution into a mist; and directing means for directing the stream of gas containing the heated precursor solution onto a substrate.
25. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein said precursor delivery means includes a supply of pressurized gas in fluid communication with said holding means.
26. The apparatus of claim 24 wherein said means for generating a stream of gas includes a supply of pressurized inert gas .
27. A method of producing a lithium intercalation material cathode layer of a thin film battery comprising the steps of :
(a) providing a lithium based solution;
(b) atomizing the lithium based solution to form a mist ;
(c) heating the lithium based solution mist to a vapor state; and
(d) depositing the vapor upon a substrate.
28. The method of claim 27 further comprising the step of (e) heating the substrate.
29. The method of claim 27 wherein the vapor is deposited through a nozzle.
30. The method of claim 29 wherein the mist is vaporized prior to passing through the nozzle.
31. The method of claim 29 wherein the mist is vaporized after passing through the nozzle.
32. The method of claim 27 wherein said lithium based solution is a lithium compound and cobalt compound dissolved within an organic solvent .
33. The method of claim 32 wherein said lithium compound is Li (TMHD) .
34. The method of claim 32 wherein said cobalt compound is Co (acac)3.
35. The method of claim 32 wherein the organic solvent includes diglyme.
36. The method of claim 32 wherein the organic solvent includes toluene.
37. The method of claim 32 wherein the organic solvent includes HTMHD.
38. The method of claim 32 wherein the organic solvent is a mixture of diglyme, toluene and HTMHD.
39. The method of claim 27 wherein the mist has a droplet size distribution of between 5 and 20 micrometers.
40 A method of producing a layer of lithium metal oxide comprising the steps of:
(a) providing a solution having a mixture of Li (TMHD) and Co (acac)3 dissolved in an organic solvent; (b) processing the solution to form a mist;
(c) heating the solution mist to a vapor state; and
(d) depositing the vapor upon a substrate.
41 The method of claim 40 further comprising the step of (e) heating the substrate.
42. The method of claim 40 wherein the vapor is deposited through a nozzle.
43. The method of claim 40 wherein the mist is vaporized prior to passing through the nozzle.
44. The method of claim 40 wherein the mist is vaporized after passing through the nozzle.
45. The method of claim 40 wherein the organic solvent includes diglyme.
46. The method of claim 40 wherein the organic solvent includes toluene.
47. The method of claim 40 wherein the organic solvent includes HTMHD.
48. The method of claim 40 wherein the organic solvent is a mixture of diglyme, toluene and HTMHD.
49. The method of claim 40 wherein the mist has a droplet size distribution of between 5 and 20 micrometers
PCT/US2000/031889 1999-11-23 2000-11-20 Method and apparatus for producing lithium based cathodes WO2001039290A3 (en)

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US09511275 US6511516B1 (en) 2000-02-23 2000-02-23 Method and apparatus for producing lithium based cathodes

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US8354294B2 (en) * 2006-01-24 2013-01-15 De Rochemont L Pierre Liquid chemical deposition apparatus and process and products therefrom
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US20100323118A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-12-23 Mohanty Pravansu S Direct thermal spray synthesis of li ion battery components

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US5976489A (en) * 1996-04-10 1999-11-02 Valence Technology, Inc. Method for preparing lithium manganese oxide compounds

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