WO2000064506A1 - Stent having antimicrobial agent - Google Patents

Stent having antimicrobial agent Download PDF

Info

Publication number
WO2000064506A1
WO2000064506A1 PCT/US2000/011092 US0011092W WO0064506A1 WO 2000064506 A1 WO2000064506 A1 WO 2000064506A1 US 0011092 W US0011092 W US 0011092W WO 0064506 A1 WO0064506 A1 WO 0064506A1
Authority
WO
WIPO (PCT)
Prior art keywords
stent
antimicrobial
metal
agent
medical
Prior art date
Application number
PCT/US2000/011092
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
WO2000064506A9 (en
Inventor
John E. Barry
Jeffrey A. Trogolo
Original Assignee
Agion Technologies, L.L.C.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US29854599A priority Critical
Priority to US09/298,545 priority
Application filed by Agion Technologies, L.L.C. filed Critical Agion Technologies, L.L.C.
Publication of WO2000064506A1 publication Critical patent/WO2000064506A1/en
Publication of WO2000064506A9 publication Critical patent/WO2000064506A9/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/02Inorganic materials
    • A61L31/022Metals or alloys
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/08Materials for coatings
    • A61L31/082Inorganic materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/08Materials for coatings
    • A61L31/082Inorganic materials
    • A61L31/088Other specific inorganic materials not covered by A61L31/084 or A61L31/086
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L31/00Materials for other surgical articles, e.g. stents, stent-grafts, shunts, surgical drapes, guide wires, materials for adhesion prevention, occluding devices, surgical gloves, tissue fixation devices
    • A61L31/12Composite materials, i.e. containing one material dispersed in a matrix of the same or different material
    • A61L31/125Composite materials, i.e. containing one material dispersed in a matrix of the same or different material having a macromolecular matrix
    • A61L31/128Composite materials, i.e. containing one material dispersed in a matrix of the same or different material having a macromolecular matrix containing other specific inorganic fillers not covered by A61L31/126 or A61L31/127

Abstract

A medical stent having an inorganic antimicrobial agent on a surface, the agent preferably being a zeolite. The stent can be of metal or a polymer and the agent being in a coating that is applied to one or both of the surfaces of the stent. The stent can be of a polymer resin incorporating the agent.

Description

STENT HAVING ANTIMICROBIAL AGENT

Field of the Invention

The invention relates to a medical stent having antimicrobial properties.

Background of the Invention

Stents are devices widely used in the medical field. For example, there are coronary and peripheral artery stents made of metal, such as stainless steel, NiTi or tungsten. Typical of these are of the type shown in U.S. patent 5,690,670. These stents also can be of metal coated with a polymer, such as polyurethane, or coated with a material such as silicone rubber. Typical of these are stents shown in U.S. Patent 5,71 3,949. Biliary, + esophageal, urinary and urethral stents often are of polymeric material. Stents of a polymer material are shown in U.S. Patents 5,71 3,949 and 5,607,467.

Most, if not all, of such stents are subject to contact with body fluids, such as blood, and with body tissue, such as arterial vessels. The materials contacting the stent are potential sources of contamination by bacteria. Also, the stent itself is a potential site for bacteria growth. Therefore, it would be desirable to provide the stent with antimicrobial properties. That is, it would be desirable that bacteria in the body fluids and tissue contacting the stent are killed. Providing the antimicrobial properties preferably should be done in a manner which does not increase build-up of solid materials deposited on the stent and, more preferably, should reduce such build-up. Also, providing the stent with antimicrobial properties should not adversely affect the stent deployment characteristics or its mechanical properties.

The general subject of attempting to provide antimicrobial action for medical type products to be used in the body has been considered. For example, U.S. Patent 5,906,466 describes an antimicrobial composition comprising antimicrobial silver compounds deposited on a physiologically inert oxide support material. In Japanese patent abstract No. 08041 61 1 an alloy exhibiting antimicrobial properties is disclosed.

Brief Description of the Invention

The present invention relates to a medical stent having antimicrobial properties. For a metal stent, in one embodiment a coating of a material with the antimicrobial agent is applied to the stent. For example, for the metal stent, the coating is of an adhesive type material, such as a hydrophilic polyurethane, which contains the antimicrobial agent. In another embodiment of a metal stent, the agent is applied to the metal stent as a powder coating. The coating can be applied to either both of the stent inner and outer surfaces.

For polymer stents, the agent can be blended into the polymeric resin that forms the stent. Thus, antimicrobial agent is present on both the stent inner and outer surfaces. Here also, a stent of resin material can have a coating containing the agent applied to one or both of its inner and outer surfaces.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the antimicrobial agent is of inorganic material, preferably a zeolite.

Objects of the Invention

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a medical stent having antimicrobial properties. Another object is to provide a medical stent one or both of whose inner and outer surfaces is coated with an inorganic antimicrobial agent.

A further object is a medical stent containing a zeolite as an antimicrobial agent.

Still an additional object is to provide a medical stent made of resin containing an inorganic antimicrobial agent.

Yet another object is to provide a medical stent having a coating containing an inorganic antimicrobial agent.

Brief Description of the Drawings Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon reference to the following specification and annexed drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a view of a typical medical stent of metal; and Figs. 2 and 3 respectively show a plan view of a blank of material for a stent and a stent made from the blank.

Detailed Description of the Invention

Fig .1 shows a metal stent of the type disclosed in U.S. Patent 5,690,670. This is illustrative of any type of metal stent with which the present invention can be utilized. The stent 1 60 of Fig. 1 is of the expandable type and is shown in a non-expanded state positioned on the distal end of a balloon expandable segment 1 62 of a guide wire 1 64. The stent 1 60 is fabricated from a suitable material such as stainless steel, NiTi, tungsten, Ti-Nb-Zr alloy or any other suitable material. The stent illustrated is designed so that it can be collapsed over a balloon segment of a balloon catheter.

The stent is positioned within a segment of a tubular body conduit 1 65, a blood vessel for example, to be propped open. Expansion of the balloon 1 62 expands the stent 1 60 radially outward up to the blood vessel wall 1 66 so that means for gripping soft tissue, such as barbs (not shown), on the outer surface of the stent 1 60, engage and grip blood vessel tissue to anchor the stent 1 60 in position. The balloon 1 62 is then collapsed and removed leaving the stent. In this way, the blood vessel is permanently propped open. As seen, the stent is in a position where it is contacted both by blood and body tissue. In accordance with the invention one or both of the stent inner and outer surfaces has a coating 200 of a material containing an antimicrobial agent, which is described in detail below. It is preferred that at least the outer surface be coated with the material containing the agent since this comes into contact with the body tissue. The process for coating and the material are described below.

The metal stent described in Fig. 1 for a blood vessel is only illustrative of the type of stent with which the subject invention can be employed. It is also applicable to urinary, gastrointestinal, and other stent applications. The stent can be of any shape, size and metal suitable for the application.

Figs. 2 and 3 show a stent of the type disclosed in U.S. Patent 5,71 3,949. As shown from Fig. 2, the stent starts as a flat piece of material 1 that has a top edge 2, a bottom edge 3 and ends 4 and 5. The piece 1 includes rows of slots 6, 7 which are offset from each other. The material of piece 1 is a resin, such a polyethylene, polyurethane, polytetrafluoethylene, silicone, block co-polymers of polyurethane and other suitable resins. These materials can be molded in a suitable die to produce the desired shape and slots 6, 7.

As seen in Fig. 2, the piece 1 is formed into a cylindrical stent with the edges 2, 3 attached together by any suitable means such as, for example, by surface fusing, ultrasonic welding or any other suitable technique. It should be noted that the material for piece 1 can be of metal. Here, the slots 6, 7 can be formed by laser etching or other suitable technique. For stents of a polymer material the agent can be incorporated directly into the resin used to make the stent. A coating containing the agent also can be applied to one or both of its surfaces.

Processes for making the different types of stents are described below.

Coated Stents - For a metal stent, the inorganic antimicrobial agent preferably is applied as a coating. A coating with the agent also can be applied to a stent of polymeric material, such as of Figs. 2 and 3. In either case, the coating must be adherent and flexible, the latter to accommodate flexing, bending and compression of the stent. Typical thickness for the coatings are from between about 1 - 1 5 microns, preferably, between about 1 - 1 0 microns and most preferably between about 1 - 5 microns.

Coatings of a polymer containing the agent are preferred for both the metal and polymeric stents. These can be bonded to the stent, that is, the coating is effectively adhesively bonded to the stent. The polymers for the coating can be of silicone rubber and hydrophilic polymers. A preferred coating can be of, for example, a hydrophilic polymer such as hydrophilic polyurethane or a hydrophilic polymer material having a lubricious property, such as shown in U.S. Patent 5,731 ,087. The antimicrobial agent preferably comprises zeolite ceramic particles mixed with the coating material. That is, the zeolite particles are blended in the desired amount into the coating material.

The agent particles comprise by weight of the coating between about 0.1 % - 1 00% , more preferably between about 0.1 % - 75% and most preferably between about 0.5%-50.0%. The size of the particles of the agent is preferably about 1 .0 micron in nominal diameter. The coating with the agent is applied by any suitable technique, such as spraying, painting or dipping the metal or resin stent into the coating material. This can be done either while the material piece forming the stent is flat or after it has its cylindrical shape. By using painting or spraying the coating with the agent can be applied to only one of the stent inner or outer surfaces. Heat and/or pressure is applied and roughening or etching of the surface is performed as needed depending upon the stent and coating materials.

Polymeric stent with coating:

resin for stent any suitable resin such as polyurethane, polyvinylchloride

coating Hydrophilic polyurethane, silicone rubber adhesives

agent 0.1 to 5.0 wt% Ag in zeolite

wt% 0.1 to 1 00.0, more preferably 0.5 to 75.0 and most preferably 1 .0 to 50.0 of agent in the coating

size of agent particles 1 .0 microns

2. Metal stent that is coated:

stent material NiTi, stainless steel, Ti-Nb-Zn, tungsten, tantalum

coating hydrophilic polyurethane, silicone rubber adhesives

agent 0.1 to 5.0 wt% in Ag in zeolite

wt% 0.1 to 1 00.0, more preferably 0.5 to 75.0 and most preferably 1 .0 to 50.0 of agent in the coating

size of agent particles 1 micron

Metal stent with resin coating containing antimicrobial agent:

stent material NiTi, stainless steel, TiNb-Zn, tungsten, tantalum

coating hydrophilic polyurethane, silicone rubber adhesives

agent 0.1 to 5.0 wt% Ag in zeolite wt% 0.1 to 20.0, more preferably 0.5 to 1 0.0 and most preferably 0.5 to 5.0 of agent in the coating

size of agent particles 1 .0 micron

Metal stents 2 and 3 above involve coating the metal with the polymer leaving the spaces 6, 7 of Figs. 2 and 3 between the metal struts free. In contrast, metal stent 3 above is a metal stent that is completely covered by a polymer containing the zeolite.

For a metal stent, a powder coating process also can be used to apply the coating containing the antimicrobial agent. A powder coating process usually comprises the basic steps of cleaning the metal, electrostatically spraying the powder onto the metal, and baking. One or both of the stent surfaces can be powder coated. Here, particles of the inorganic antimicrobial, such as the ceramic particles, can be incorporated into the powder, blended directly with the powder or applied in a second step to the surface of a powder coated part before the baking step. Incorporation of the inorganic antimicrobial agent into the powder to be sprayed can be accomplished in any suitable way. For example, it can be done by preparing a master batch concentrate of the resin particles containing the agent particles. That is, the zeolite ceramic particles are also made in a base resin, such as polyethylene, polyurethane, etc. These resin particles containing the zeolite ceramic, are then blended into the polymer or coating material, such as by kneading or rolling to form pellets having the agent in a desired concentration. This preferably is between 0.1 to 30% by weight, preferably 0.5 to 1 5%, and most preferably 1 to 1 0% of the pellets. The size of the resin containing zeolite particles in the pellets preferably is about 1 .0 micron. The pellets are then ground or melt atomized to produce a powder that is used directly in the spray powder coating process. Also, the mixture can be diluted with untreated powder normally used in the conventional powder coating process. An illustration of a metal stent that is powder coated follows. Metal stent that is powder coated:

stent material NiTi, stainless steel, Ti-Nb-Zn, tungsten, tantalum

powder silica

agent 0.1 to 5.0 wt% Ag in zeolite

wt% of zeolite in powder 0.1 to 1 00.0, more preferably 0.5 to

75.0 and most preferably 1 .0 to 50.0 of agent in the powder for coating

size of agent particles 1 .0 micron

An alternate method is to combine untreated polymer powder with a solution of an appropriate solvent, with or without a binder, and particles of the inorganic antimicrobial to coat the polymer powder particles with the inorganic antimicrobial agent particle. The solvent is then evaporated and the resulting powder composite is used in the conventional powder coating process ensuring that the inorganic antimicrobial is exposed at the surface. Here, the particle size of the ceramic resin particles of the agent also preferably is about 1 .0 micron nominal diameter.

Another method of producing an antimicrobial powder coating is to apply a polymer powder in the conventional manner to the stent surface or surfaces and then apply particles of the inorganic antimicrobial agent in a solvent or water. The stent is then dried and, as in the conventional powder coating process, the inorganic antimicrobial agent is incorporated onto the surface of the coating. Here, the size of the particles of the agent is preferably from about 0.8 to 2.0 microns nominal diameter.

In all of the above coating processes for both the metal and resin type stents, the inorganic antimicrobial agent is present on one or both of the stent surface to perform the intended function of killing bacteria.

Polymeric Stent With Agent - As explained with respect to Figs. 2 and 3, the stent can be of a polymeric material that is prepared from a suitable resin mixture containing the agent. Here, the agent is automatically available on both surfaces of the stent.

These resins with the agent can be prepared by first preparing a master batch concentrate of the antimicrobial agent. That is, particles of the ceramic zeolite in the resin base are blended with a polymeric resin, such as by kneading or molding. This master batch material is formed into pellets, which can be ground to any desired size. Methods for incorporating the antibiotic agent in the resin are described in U.S. Patents Nos. 4,938,955 and 4,906,464. Final formation of the stents from the resin incorporating the antimicrobial agent can be by compression molding or other conventional forming methods.

The pellets of the master batch material is then added to untreated resin that is to be used to make the stent. The composite of the master batch and untreated resin preferably results in a final concentration by weight of between 0.1 to 30%, preferably 0.5 to 1 5%, most preferably 1 to 1 0% of the agent zeolite particles. An example of a polymeric stent follows.

5. Polymeric stent:

resin polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber

agent Ag in zeolite (AJ 1 0N Shinagawa)

wt% 0.1 to 20.0, more preferably 0.5 to 10.0 and most preferably 0.5 to 5.0 of agent in the resin of the stent

size of agent particles 1 .0 micron

Where polyurethane is to be used as the resin material for the stent, the polyurethane is in liquid form. The zeolite particles, preferably in a base polyurethane resin form but also in the normal ceramic particle state, can be added to untreated polyurethane liquid to make a master batch concentrate, which is then added to untreated polyurethane to make the resin to be formed into the stent. Alternatively, the zeolite particles in resin form or as the ceramic particles can be added directly into untreated polyurethane. The liquid polyurethane with the particles of the agent are then molded to make the stent. The stent has the agent throughout its entire body and on both surfaces.

The antibiotic particles are preferably present in a concentration by weight in the resin used to make the stent of from 0.01 to 1 0.0wt%, more preferably from 0.01 to 8.0 wt%, and most preferably from 0.1 to 5.0 wt% . They are present on the surfaces of the stent contacted by the body fluid or body tissue.

A preferred embodiment of the resin with agent for making a polymeric stent has the following constituents:

plastic resin type polyurethane

material of agent silver zeolite (preferably

Shinagawa type AJ 1 0N)

wt. % of agent in composite 1 .0% of the stent

size of the agent particles 0.8 - 25.0 microns

While specific amounts of the antimicrobial agent are given for the various types of stents, it should be considered that in each case that there is an amount of the agent that is sufficient to produce an effective concentration. This means that there is a sufficient amount of the antimicrobial agent used alone, added to or combined with other materials such as to prevent or inhibit the growth of bacterial and/or fungal organisms or to kill such organisms in the particular stent application. The amount of the agent will vary based on the specific agent used and the material with which it is mixed or added to and upon known factors such as type and use of the stent. Environmental factors such as body temperature also should be taken into consideration. It is within the ability of one skilled in the art to relatively easily determine an effective amount of the antimicrobial agent to be used with each material.

As to the inorganic antimicrobial agent incorporated in the resin for the stent, into the liquid coating material or used in the coating powder, a number of metal ions, which are inorganic materials, have been shown to possess antibiotic activity, including silver, copper, zinc, mercury, tin, lead, bismuth, cadmium, chromium and thallium ions. These antibiotic metal ions are believed to exert their effects by disrupting respiration and electron transport systems upon absorption into bacterial or fungal cells. Antimicrobial metal ions (cations) of silver, gold, copper and zinc, in particular, are considered safe even for in vivo use. Antimicrobial silver cations are particularly useful for in vivo use due to the fact that they are not substantially absorbed into the body. That is, if such materials are used they should pose no hazard. In one embodiment of the invention, the inorganic antibiotic metal containing composition is an antibiotic metal salt. Such salts include silver acetate, silver benzoate, silver carbonate, silver ionate, silver iodide, silver lactate, silver laureate, silver nitrate, silver oxide, silver palpitate, silver protein, and silver sulfadiazine. Silver nitrate is preferred. These salts are particularly quick acting, as no release from ceramic particles is necessary to function antimicrobially.

Antibiotic ceramic particles useful with the present invention include zeolites, hydroxy apatite, zirconium phosphates or other ion-exchange ceramics. Zeolites are preferred, and are described in the preferred embodiments referred to below. Hydroxy apatite particles containing antimicrobial metals are described, e.g., in U.S. Patent No. 5,009,898. Zirconium phosphates containing antimicrobial metals are described, e.g., in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,296,238; 5,441 ,71 7; and 5,405,644.

Inorganic particles, such as the oxides of titanium, aluminum, zinc and copper, may be coated with a composition which confers antimicrobial properties, for example, by releasing antimicrobial metal ions such as silver ions, which are described, e.g., in U.S. Patent No. 5, 1 80,585. Inorganic soluble glass particles containing antimicrobial metal ions, such as silver, are described, e.g., in U.S. Patent Nos. 5,766,61 1 and 5,290,544. Antibiotic zeolites are preferred. These have been prepared by replacing all or part of the ion-exchangeable ions in zeolite with ammonium ions and antibiotic metal ions, as described in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,938,958 and 4,91 1 ,898. Such zeolites have been incorporated in antibiotic resins (as shown in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,938,955 and 4,906,464) and polymer articles (U.S. Patent No. 4,775,585) . Polymers including the antibiotic zeolites have been used to make refrigerators, dish washers, rice cookers, plastic film, chopping boards, vacuum bottles, plastic pails, and garbage containers. Other materials in which antibiotic zeolites have been incorporated include flooring, wall paper, cloth, paint, napkins, plastic automobile parts, catheters, bicycles, pens, toys, sand, and concrete. Examples of such uses are described in US Patents 5,71 4,445; 5,697,203; 5,562,872; 5, 1 80,585; 5,71 4,430; and 5, 1 02,401 . These applications involve slow release of antibiotic silver from the zeolite particles.

Antibiotic zeolites are well-known and can be prepared for use in the present invention using known methods. These include the antibiotic zeolites disclosed, for example, in U.S. Patent Nos. 4,938,958 and 4,91 1 ,898.

Either natural zeolites or synthetic zeolites can be used to make the antibiotic zeolites used in the present invention. "Zeolite" is an aluminosilicate having a three dimensional skeletal structure that is represented by the formula: XM2/nO-AI2O3-YSiO2-ZH2O. M represents an ion-exchangeable ion, generally a monovalent or divalent metal ion, n represents the atomic valency of the (metal) ion, X and Y represent coefficients of metal oxide and silica respectively, and Z represents the number of waters of crystallization. Examples of such zeolites include A-type zeolites, X-type zeolites, Y-type zeolites, T-type zeolites, high-silica zeolites, sodalite, mordenite, analcite, clinoptilolite, chabazite and erionite. The present invention is not restricted to use of these specific zeolites.

The ion-exchange capacities of these zeolites are as follows: A-type zeolite = 7 meq/g; X-type zeolite = 6.4 meq/g; Y-type zeolite = 5 meq/g; T-type zeolite = 3.4 meq/g; sodalite = 1 1 .5 meq/g; mordenite = 2.6 meq/g; analcite = 5 meq/g; clinoptilolite = 2.6 meq/g; chabazite = 5 meq/g; and erionite = 3.8 meq/g. These ion-exchange capacities are sufficient for the zeolites to undergo ion-exchange with ammonium and antibiotic metal ions.

The specific surface area of preferred zeolite particles is preferably at least 1 50 m2/g (anhydrous zeolite as standard) and the

SiO2/AI2O3 mol ratio in the zeolite composition is preferably less than 1 4, more preferably less than 1 1 .

The antibiotic metal ions (cations) used in the antibiotic zeolites should be retained on the zeolite particles through an ion-exchange reaction. Antibiotic metal ions which are adsorbed or attached without an ion-exchange reaction exhibit a decreased bactericidal effect and their antibiotic effect is not long-lasting. Nevertheless, it is advantageous for imparting quick antimicrobial action to maintain a sufficient amount of surface adsorbed metal ion. In the ion-exchange process, the antibiotic metal ions tend to be converted into their oxides, hydroxides, basic salts etc. either in the micropores or on the surfaces of the zeolite and also tend to deposit there, particularly when the concentration of metal ions in the vicinity of the zeolite surface is high. Such deposition tends to adversely affect the bactericidal properties of ion-exchanged zeolite.

In an embodiment of the antibiotic zeolites, a relatively low degree of ion exchange is employed to obtain superior bactericidal properties. It is believed to be required that at least a portion of the zeolite particles retain metal ions having bactericidal properties at ion-exchangeable sites of the zeolite in an amount less than the ion-exchange saturation capacity of the zeolite. In one embodiment, the zeolite employed in the present invention retains antimicrobial metal ions in an amount up to 41 % of the theoretical ion-exchange capacity of the zeolite. Such ion-exchanged zeolite with a relatively low degree of ion-exchange may be prepared by performing ion-exchange using a metal ion solution having a low concentration as compared with solutions conventionally used for ion exchange.

The antibiotic metal ion is preferably present in the range of from about 0.1 to 20.0 wt. % of the zeolite. In one embodiment, the zeolite contains from 0.1 to 20.0 wt. % of silver ions and from 0.1 to 20.0 wt. % of copper or zinc ions. Although ammonium ion can be contained in the zeolite at a concentration of about 20.0 wt. % or less of the zeolite, it is desirable to limit the content of ammonium ions to from 0.5 to 1 5.0 wt.%, preferably 1 .5 to 5.0 wt. %. Weight% described herein is determined for materials dried at temperatures such as 1 1 0°C, 250°C or 550°C as this is the temperature employed for the preferred post-manufacturing drying process. A preferred antibiotic zeolite is type A zeolite containing either a combination of ion-exchanged silver, zinc, and ammonium or silver and ammonium. One such zeolite is manufactured by Shinagawa, Inc. under the product number AW-1 0N and consists of 0.6% by weight of silver ion- exchanged in Type A zeolite particles having a diameter of about 2.5/;. Another formulation, AJ-1 0N, consists of about 2% by weight silver ion- exchanged in Type A zeolite particles having a diameter of about 2.5μ. Another formulation, AW-80, contains 0.6% by weight of silver ion- exchanged in Type A zeolite particles having a diameter of about 1 .0μ. Another formulation, AJ-80N, consists of about 2% by weight silver ion- exchanged in Type A zeolite particles having a diameter of about 1 .0μ. These zeolites preferably contain about between 0.5 % and 2.5% by weight of ion- exchanged ammonium. Other formulations also are available.

The zeolites are often obtained in master batches of low density polyethylene, polypropylene, or polystyrene, containing about 20.0 wt. % of the zeolite. Thus, they can be easily mixed with the resins used as materials for forming the composite resin used to make the stent or in the liquid coating material.

The antibiotic properties of the antibiotic zeolite particles of the invention may be assayed while in aqueous formulations using conventional assay techniques, including for example determining the minimum growth inhibitory concentration (MIC) with respect to a variety of bacteria, eumycetes and yeast. In such a test, the bacteria listed below may be employed: such a test, the bacteria listed below may be employed:

Bacillus cereus varmycoides;

Escherichia coli; Pseudomonas aeruginosa;

Staphylococcus aureus;

Streptococcus faecalis;

Aspergillus niger;

Aureobasiduim pullulans; Chaetomium globosum;

Gliocladium virens;

Penicillum funiculosum;

Candida albicans; and

Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

The assay for determining MIC can be carried out by smearing a solution containing bacteria for inoculation onto a plate culture medium to which a test sample of the encapsulated antibiotic zeolite particles is added in a particular concentration, followed by incubation and culturing of the plate. The MIC is defined as a minimum concentration thereof required for inhibiting the growth of each bacteria.

Safety and biocompatibility tests were conducted on the antibiotic zeolites employed in the invention. ISO 1 0993-1 procedures were employed. The following results were obtained: Cytotoxicity: Non-Toxic

Acute Systemic Toxicity: IMon-Toxic

Oral Toxicity: Safer than table salt

Intracutaneous Toxicity: Passed

Skin Irritation Test: Non-Irritant

Chronic Toxicity: No Observable Effect

In-vitro Hemolysis: Non-Hemolytic

30-day Muscle Implant Test: Passed

60-day Muscle Implant Test: Passed

90-day Muscle Implant Test: Passed

Ames Mutagenicity Test: Passed Pyrogenicity: Non-Pyrogenic

Thus, the antibiotic zeolites are exceptionally suitable under relevant toxicity and biocompatibility standards for use in the stents.

Specific features of the invention are shown in one or more of the drawings for convenience only, as each feature may be combined with other features in accordance with the invention. Alternative embodiments will be recognized by those skilled in the art and are intended to be included within the scope of the claims. All patent applications, patents, patent publications, and literature references cited in this specification are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. In the case of inconsistencies, the present description, including definitions, is intended to control. Accordingly, the above description should be construed as illustrating and not limiting the scope of the invention. All such obvious changes and modifications are within the patented scope of the appended claims.

Claims

We Claim: 1 . A medical stent comprising a metal, said stent having at least one surface which is to be contacted by body tissue or body fluid wherein said surface is coated with a composition containing antimicrobial zeolite particles.
2. The medical stent of claim 1 , wherein said metal is selected from the group consisting of stainless steel, NiTi, tungsten, Ti-Nb-Zr alloy and tantalum.
3. The medical stent of claim 1 wherein said zeolite particles comprise from 0.5 to 75.0 wt. % of said composition.
4. The medical stent of claim 3 wherein said zeolite particles comprise from 0.1 to 20.0 wt. % of the resin stent.
5. The medical stent of claim 1 wherein said composition comprises a polymeric resin.
6. The medical stent of claim 5, wherein said polymeric resin is selected from the group consisting of hydrophilic polyurethane and silicone rubber adhesives.
7. The medical stent of claim 1 , wherein said composition is coated on each of the inner and outer surfaces of said stent.
8. The medical stent of claim 1 , wherein said antimicrobial zeolite particles comprise antimicrobial metal cations.
9. The medical stent of claim 7 wherein said antimicrobial metal ions are silver ions present in the form of a silver salt.
1 0. The medical stent of claim 1 wherein said zeolite particles are from 0.5 to 2.5 microns.
1 1 . A medical stent comprising a polymeric resin, and antimicrobial zeolite particles, said stent having at least one surface which is to be contacted by body tissue or body fluid.
1 2. The medical stent of claim 1 1 , wherein said zeolite particles are coated on at least one surface of said stent.
1 3. The medical stent of claim 1 1 , wherein said polymeric resin is selected from the group consisting of polyurethane and polyvinyl chloride.
14. A medical stent comprising a metal, said stent having at least one surface which is to be contacted by body tissue or body fluid wherein said surface is coated with a composition which comprises a coating containing an inorganic antimicrobial agent.
1 5. The stent of claim 1 4, wherein said antimicrobial agent contains silver cations as the active ingredient.
1 6. The sten of claim 14, wherein said antimicrobial agent comprises a ceramic carrier.
1 7. A medical stent comprising a polymeric resin, and an inorganic antimicrobial agent, said stent having at least one surface which is to be contacted by body tissue or body fluid.
1 8. The stent of claim 1 7, wherein said antimicrobial agent contains silver cations as the active ingredient.
1 9. The sten of claim 1 7, wherein said antimicrobial agent comprises a ceramic carrier.
PCT/US2000/011092 1999-04-23 2000-04-21 Stent having antimicrobial agent WO2000064506A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US29854599A true 1999-04-23 1999-04-23
US09/298,545 1999-04-23

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU49755/00A AU4975500A (en) 1999-04-23 2000-04-21 Stent having antimicrobial agent
EP20000931951 EP1175236A1 (en) 1999-04-23 2000-04-21 Stent having antimicrobial agent

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
WO2000064506A1 true WO2000064506A1 (en) 2000-11-02
WO2000064506A9 WO2000064506A9 (en) 2002-06-06

Family

ID=23150978

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2000/011092 WO2000064506A1 (en) 1999-04-23 2000-04-21 Stent having antimicrobial agent

Country Status (3)

Country Link
EP (1) EP1175236A1 (en)
AU (1) AU4975500A (en)
WO (1) WO2000064506A1 (en)

Cited By (71)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6451373B1 (en) 2000-08-04 2002-09-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method of forming a therapeutic coating onto a surface of an implantable prosthesis
US6503954B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2003-01-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible carrier containing actinomycin D and a method of forming the same
US6503556B2 (en) 2000-12-28 2003-01-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of forming a coating for a prosthesis
US6540776B2 (en) 2000-12-28 2003-04-01 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Sheath for a prosthesis and methods of forming the same
US6663880B1 (en) 2001-11-30 2003-12-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Permeabilizing reagents to increase drug delivery and a method of local delivery
US6712845B2 (en) 2001-04-24 2004-03-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for a stent and a method of forming the same
US6713119B2 (en) 1999-09-03 2004-03-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible coating for a prosthesis and a method of forming the same
US6749626B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-06-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Actinomycin D for the treatment of vascular disease
US6753071B1 (en) 2001-09-27 2004-06-22 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate-reducing membrane for release of an agent
US6759054B2 (en) 1999-09-03 2004-07-06 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene vinyl alcohol composition and coating
US6780424B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2004-08-24 Charles David Claude Controlled morphologies in polymer drug for release of drugs from polymer films
US6790228B2 (en) 1999-12-23 2004-09-14 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for implantable devices and a method of forming the same
US6818247B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-11-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene vinyl alcohol-dimethyl acetamide composition and a method of coating a stent
US6824559B2 (en) 2000-12-22 2004-11-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene-carboxyl copolymers as drug delivery matrices
WO2004103425A1 (en) * 2003-05-23 2004-12-02 Gambro Lundia Ab Biocompatible polymer
US6833153B1 (en) 2000-10-31 2004-12-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Hemocompatible coatings on hydrophobic porous polymers
US6896965B1 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-05-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices
US6908624B2 (en) 1999-12-23 2005-06-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for implantable devices and a method of forming the same
US7022372B1 (en) 2002-11-12 2006-04-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Compositions for coating implantable medical devices
US7022334B1 (en) 2002-03-20 2006-04-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Therapeutic composition and a method of coating implantable medical devices
EP1728522A1 (en) * 2005-05-31 2006-12-06 Axetis Ag Coated Stents
US7169404B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2007-01-30 Advanced Cardiovasular Systems, Inc. Biologically absorbable coatings for implantable devices and methods for fabricating the same
US7175874B1 (en) 2001-11-30 2007-02-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating implantable devices
US7175873B1 (en) 2001-06-27 2007-02-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices and methods for fabrication thereof
US7201935B1 (en) 2002-09-17 2007-04-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Plasma-generated coatings for medical devices and methods for fabricating thereof
US7211150B1 (en) 2002-12-09 2007-05-01 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating and drying multiple stents
US7232573B1 (en) 2002-09-26 2007-06-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings containing self-assembled monolayers
US7255891B1 (en) 2003-02-26 2007-08-14 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method for coating implantable medical devices
US7288609B1 (en) 2003-03-04 2007-10-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices based on poly (orthoesters)
US7294329B1 (en) 2002-07-18 2007-11-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Poly(vinyl acetal) coatings for implantable medical devices
US20080003256A1 (en) * 2004-07-05 2008-01-03 Johan Martens Biocompatible Coating of Medical Devices
US7354605B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2008-04-08 Aglon Technologies Inc. Antimicrobial medical device
US7363074B1 (en) 2002-08-20 2008-04-22 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings comprising self-assembled molecular structures and a method of delivering a drug using the same
WO2008070361A2 (en) * 2006-11-17 2008-06-12 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Stent coating including therapeutic biodegradable glass, and method of making
US7404979B1 (en) 2002-09-30 2008-07-29 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Spin coating apparatus and a method for coating implantable devices
WO2008124519A2 (en) 2007-04-05 2008-10-16 Boston Scientific Limited Stents with ceramic drug reservoir layer and methods of making and using the same
US7438722B1 (en) 2002-09-20 2008-10-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method for treatment of restenosis
US7504125B1 (en) 2001-04-27 2009-03-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. System and method for coating implantable devices
WO2007130786A3 (en) * 2006-05-05 2009-04-09 Richard Francis Medical device having coating with zeolite drug reservoirs
FR2922773A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-05-01 Leary Patrick O surgical prosthesis
US7585516B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2009-09-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US7622146B2 (en) 2002-07-18 2009-11-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices and methods for fabrication thereof
US7645504B1 (en) 2003-06-26 2010-01-12 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for implantable medical devices comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers
US7651695B2 (en) 2001-05-18 2010-01-26 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Medicated stents for the treatment of vascular disease
US20100119576A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2010-05-13 Biotronik Vi Patent Ag Use of one or more of the elements from the group yttrium, neodymium and zirconium, and pharmaceutical compositions which contain those elements
US7732535B2 (en) 2002-09-05 2010-06-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for controlled release of drugs from implantable medical devices
US7875285B1 (en) 2003-07-15 2011-01-25 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Medicated coatings for implantable medical devices having controlled rate of release
US8034361B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2011-10-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings incorporating nanoparticles
US8097268B2 (en) 2003-05-01 2012-01-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for implantable medical devices
US8105374B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2012-01-31 Axetis Ag Vascular stents
US8202530B2 (en) 2002-09-27 2012-06-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible coatings for stents
US8211489B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2012-07-03 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods for applying an application material to an implantable device
US8337937B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2012-12-25 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent spin coating method
US8361538B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2013-01-29 Abbott Laboratories Methods for applying an application material to an implantable device
US8715771B2 (en) 2003-02-26 2014-05-06 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Coated stent and method of making the same
US8722103B2 (en) * 2003-07-03 2014-05-13 University Court Of The University Of St. Andrews Zeolites for delivery of nitric oxide
US8821906B2 (en) 2003-05-23 2014-09-02 Gambro Lundia Ab Biocompatible polymer
US9028859B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2015-05-12 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Phase-separated block copolymer coatings for implantable medical devices
US9038260B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2015-05-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent with radiopaque markers
US9056155B1 (en) 2007-05-29 2015-06-16 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Coatings having an elastic primer layer
US9067000B2 (en) 2004-10-27 2015-06-30 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. End-capped poly(ester amide) copolymers
US9072820B2 (en) 2006-06-26 2015-07-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer composite stent with polymer particles
US9084671B2 (en) 2002-06-21 2015-07-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of forming a micronized peptide coated stent
US9763818B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-09-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of crimping stent on catheter delivery assembly
US9827119B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-11-28 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Polymer scaffolds having a low crossing profile
US9833342B2 (en) 2006-08-21 2017-12-05 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Tracheobronchial implantable medical device and methods of use
US9999527B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2018-06-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Scaffolds having radiopaque markers
US10070975B2 (en) 2006-01-04 2018-09-11 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US10076591B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2018-09-18 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Absorbable coating for implantable device
US10145811B2 (en) 2006-07-13 2018-12-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Radio frequency identification monitoring of stents
US10166131B2 (en) 2001-09-19 2019-01-01 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises Limited Process for loading a stent onto a stent delivery system

Families Citing this family (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10028851B2 (en) 1997-04-15 2018-07-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for controlling erosion of a substrate of an implantable medical device
US8741378B1 (en) 2001-06-27 2014-06-03 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of coating an implantable device
US6656216B1 (en) 2001-06-29 2003-12-02 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Composite stent with regioselective material
US20070032853A1 (en) 2002-03-27 2007-02-08 Hossainy Syed F 40-O-(2-hydroxy)ethyl-rapamycin coated stent
US7758880B2 (en) 2002-12-11 2010-07-20 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible polyacrylate compositions for medical applications
US7776926B1 (en) 2002-12-11 2010-08-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible coating for implantable medical devices
US7279174B2 (en) 2003-05-08 2007-10-09 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings comprising hydrophilic additives
US7323209B1 (en) 2003-05-15 2008-01-29 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating stents
US7261946B2 (en) 2003-11-14 2007-08-28 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Block copolymers of acrylates and methacrylates with fluoroalkenes
US9114198B2 (en) 2003-11-19 2015-08-25 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biologically beneficial coatings for implantable devices containing fluorinated polymers and methods for fabricating the same
USRE45744E1 (en) 2003-12-01 2015-10-13 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Temperature controlled crimping
US20050214339A1 (en) 2004-03-29 2005-09-29 Yiwen Tang Biologically degradable compositions for medical applications
US8293890B2 (en) 2004-04-30 2012-10-23 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Hyaluronic acid based copolymers
US9561309B2 (en) 2004-05-27 2017-02-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Antifouling heparin coatings
US7563780B1 (en) 2004-06-18 2009-07-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Heparin prodrugs and drug delivery stents formed therefrom
US7494665B1 (en) 2004-07-30 2009-02-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymers containing siloxane monomers
US9283099B2 (en) 2004-08-25 2016-03-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent-catheter assembly with a releasable connection for stent retention
US7604818B2 (en) 2004-12-22 2009-10-20 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymers of fluorinated monomers and hydrocarbon monomers
US9248034B2 (en) 2005-08-23 2016-02-02 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Controlled disintegrating implantable medical devices
US9561351B2 (en) 2006-05-31 2017-02-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Drug delivery spiral coil construct
US8333000B2 (en) 2006-06-19 2012-12-18 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods for improving stent retention on a balloon catheter
US9284409B2 (en) 2007-07-19 2016-03-15 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Endoprosthesis having a non-fouling surface
WO2009020520A1 (en) 2007-08-03 2009-02-12 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Coating for medical device having increased surface area
US8920491B2 (en) 2008-04-22 2014-12-30 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices having a coating of inorganic material
WO2009132176A2 (en) 2008-04-24 2009-10-29 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Medical devices having inorganic particle layers

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0301717A1 (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-02-01 Karo Maeda Medical tubes for placement into the body of a patient
EP0640661A2 (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-01 Shin-Etsu Chemical Co., Ltd. Antibacterial and antifungal silicone rubber compositions
JPH0780080A (en) * 1993-09-14 1995-03-28 Nissho Corp Antimicrobial connector
EP0781566A2 (en) * 1995-12-26 1997-07-02 Toyo Boseki Kabushiki Kaisha Organic solvent-soluble mucopolysaccharide, antibacterial antithrombogenic composition and medical material
WO1997031709A1 (en) * 1996-02-29 1997-09-04 The Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Antimicrobial compositions
US5690670A (en) * 1989-12-21 1997-11-25 Davidson; James A. Stents of enhanced biocompatibility and hemocompatibility
WO2000030697A1 (en) * 1998-11-23 2000-06-02 Healthshield Technologies Llc Antibiotic hydrophilic polymer coating

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0301717A1 (en) * 1987-07-09 1989-02-01 Karo Maeda Medical tubes for placement into the body of a patient
US5690670A (en) * 1989-12-21 1997-11-25 Davidson; James A. Stents of enhanced biocompatibility and hemocompatibility
EP0640661A2 (en) * 1993-08-27 1995-03-01 Shin-Etsu Chemical Co., Ltd. Antibacterial and antifungal silicone rubber compositions
JPH0780080A (en) * 1993-09-14 1995-03-28 Nissho Corp Antimicrobial connector
EP0781566A2 (en) * 1995-12-26 1997-07-02 Toyo Boseki Kabushiki Kaisha Organic solvent-soluble mucopolysaccharide, antibacterial antithrombogenic composition and medical material
WO1997031709A1 (en) * 1996-02-29 1997-09-04 The Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Antimicrobial compositions
WO2000030697A1 (en) * 1998-11-23 2000-06-02 Healthshield Technologies Llc Antibiotic hydrophilic polymer coating

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
DATABASE WPI Section Ch Week 199521, Derwent World Patents Index; Class A96, AN 1995-157928, XP002145640 *

Cited By (106)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6713119B2 (en) 1999-09-03 2004-03-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible coating for a prosthesis and a method of forming the same
US6759054B2 (en) 1999-09-03 2004-07-06 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene vinyl alcohol composition and coating
US6790228B2 (en) 1999-12-23 2004-09-14 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for implantable devices and a method of forming the same
US6908624B2 (en) 1999-12-23 2005-06-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for implantable devices and a method of forming the same
US6503954B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2003-01-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible carrier containing actinomycin D and a method of forming the same
US6818247B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-11-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene vinyl alcohol-dimethyl acetamide composition and a method of coating a stent
US6749626B1 (en) 2000-03-31 2004-06-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Actinomycin D for the treatment of vascular disease
US6733768B2 (en) 2000-08-04 2004-05-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Composition for coating an implantable prosthesis
US6451373B1 (en) 2000-08-04 2002-09-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method of forming a therapeutic coating onto a surface of an implantable prosthesis
US6833153B1 (en) 2000-10-31 2004-12-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Hemocompatible coatings on hydrophobic porous polymers
US6824559B2 (en) 2000-12-22 2004-11-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Ethylene-carboxyl copolymers as drug delivery matrices
US6540776B2 (en) 2000-12-28 2003-04-01 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Sheath for a prosthesis and methods of forming the same
US6503556B2 (en) 2000-12-28 2003-01-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of forming a coating for a prosthesis
US6780424B2 (en) 2001-03-30 2004-08-24 Charles David Claude Controlled morphologies in polymer drug for release of drugs from polymer films
US6712845B2 (en) 2001-04-24 2004-03-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for a stent and a method of forming the same
US8007858B2 (en) 2001-04-27 2011-08-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. System and method for coating implantable devices
US7504125B1 (en) 2001-04-27 2009-03-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. System and method for coating implantable devices
US7651695B2 (en) 2001-05-18 2010-01-26 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Medicated stents for the treatment of vascular disease
US7175873B1 (en) 2001-06-27 2007-02-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices and methods for fabrication thereof
US10166131B2 (en) 2001-09-19 2019-01-01 Abbott Laboratories Vascular Enterprises Limited Process for loading a stent onto a stent delivery system
US6753071B1 (en) 2001-09-27 2004-06-22 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate-reducing membrane for release of an agent
US8349350B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2013-01-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US8124119B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2012-02-28 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US7585516B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2009-09-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US8883186B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2014-11-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US9173982B2 (en) 2001-11-12 2015-11-03 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices
US7175874B1 (en) 2001-11-30 2007-02-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating implantable devices
US8192785B2 (en) 2001-11-30 2012-06-05 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating implantable devices
US7014861B2 (en) 2001-11-30 2006-03-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Permeabilizing reagents to increase drug delivery and a method of local delivery
US6663880B1 (en) 2001-11-30 2003-12-16 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Permeabilizing reagents to increase drug delivery and a method of local delivery
US7354605B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2008-04-08 Aglon Technologies Inc. Antimicrobial medical device
US7022334B1 (en) 2002-03-20 2006-04-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Therapeutic composition and a method of coating implantable medical devices
US9084671B2 (en) 2002-06-21 2015-07-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of forming a micronized peptide coated stent
US7622146B2 (en) 2002-07-18 2009-11-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices and methods for fabrication thereof
US7294329B1 (en) 2002-07-18 2007-11-13 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Poly(vinyl acetal) coatings for implantable medical devices
US8551446B2 (en) 2002-07-18 2013-10-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Poly(vinyl acetal) coatings for implantable medical devices
US7941212B2 (en) 2002-08-20 2011-05-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method of delivering a drug using a medical device with a coating comprising a self-assembled molecular structure
US7363074B1 (en) 2002-08-20 2008-04-22 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings comprising self-assembled molecular structures and a method of delivering a drug using the same
US7536221B2 (en) 2002-08-20 2009-05-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings comprising self-assembled molecular structures
US7945319B2 (en) 2002-08-20 2011-05-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods of delivering a drug using a medical device with a coating comprising a self-assembled molecular structure
US7732535B2 (en) 2002-09-05 2010-06-08 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coating for controlled release of drugs from implantable medical devices
US7201935B1 (en) 2002-09-17 2007-04-10 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Plasma-generated coatings for medical devices and methods for fabricating thereof
US7438722B1 (en) 2002-09-20 2008-10-21 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method for treatment of restenosis
US7413746B2 (en) 2002-09-26 2008-08-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings containing self-assembled monolayers
US7232573B1 (en) 2002-09-26 2007-06-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings containing self-assembled monolayers
US8202530B2 (en) 2002-09-27 2012-06-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biocompatible coatings for stents
US8337937B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2012-12-25 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent spin coating method
US8042486B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2011-10-25 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent spin coating apparatus
US7404979B1 (en) 2002-09-30 2008-07-29 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Spin coating apparatus and a method for coating implantable devices
US7604831B2 (en) 2002-09-30 2009-10-20 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent spin coating method
US8034361B2 (en) 2002-11-12 2011-10-11 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Stent coatings incorporating nanoparticles
US6896965B1 (en) 2002-11-12 2005-05-24 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Rate limiting barriers for implantable devices
US7022372B1 (en) 2002-11-12 2006-04-04 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Compositions for coating implantable medical devices
US20100119576A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2010-05-13 Biotronik Vi Patent Ag Use of one or more of the elements from the group yttrium, neodymium and zirconium, and pharmaceutical compositions which contain those elements
US7534464B2 (en) 2002-12-09 2009-05-19 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Apparatus and method for coating and drying multiple stents
US8109230B2 (en) 2002-12-09 2012-02-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating and drying multiple stents
US8534223B2 (en) 2002-12-09 2013-09-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. System for coating a stent
US7211150B1 (en) 2002-12-09 2007-05-01 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for coating and drying multiple stents
US7255891B1 (en) 2003-02-26 2007-08-14 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method for coating implantable medical devices
US8715771B2 (en) 2003-02-26 2014-05-06 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Coated stent and method of making the same
US8007855B2 (en) 2003-02-26 2011-08-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Method for coating implantable medical devices
US7588794B2 (en) 2003-03-04 2009-09-15 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices based on poly (orthoesters)
US7288609B1 (en) 2003-03-04 2007-10-30 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for drug delivery devices based on poly (orthoesters)
US8367091B2 (en) 2003-05-01 2013-02-05 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for implantable medical devices
US8097268B2 (en) 2003-05-01 2012-01-17 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for implantable medical devices
WO2004103425A1 (en) * 2003-05-23 2004-12-02 Gambro Lundia Ab Biocompatible polymer
AU2004241896B2 (en) * 2003-05-23 2008-11-06 Gambro Lundia Ab Biocompatible polymer
US8821906B2 (en) 2003-05-23 2014-09-02 Gambro Lundia Ab Biocompatible polymer
US7645504B1 (en) 2003-06-26 2010-01-12 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Coatings for implantable medical devices comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers
US8722103B2 (en) * 2003-07-03 2014-05-13 University Court Of The University Of St. Andrews Zeolites for delivery of nitric oxide
US9402862B2 (en) 2003-07-03 2016-08-02 University Court Of The University Of St Andrews Zeolites for delivery of nitric oxide
US7875285B1 (en) 2003-07-15 2011-01-25 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Medicated coatings for implantable medical devices having controlled rate of release
US7169404B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2007-01-30 Advanced Cardiovasular Systems, Inc. Biologically absorbable coatings for implantable devices and methods for fabricating the same
US8003123B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2011-08-23 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biologically absorbable coatings for implantable devices and methods for fabricating the same
US7378106B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2008-05-27 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Biologically absorbable coatings for implantable devices and methods for fabricating the same
US20080003256A1 (en) * 2004-07-05 2008-01-03 Johan Martens Biocompatible Coating of Medical Devices
US8512734B2 (en) * 2004-07-05 2013-08-20 Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, K.U.Leuven R&D Biocompatible coating of medical devices
US9067000B2 (en) 2004-10-27 2015-06-30 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. End-capped poly(ester amide) copolymers
US8105374B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2012-01-31 Axetis Ag Vascular stents
EP1728522A1 (en) * 2005-05-31 2006-12-06 Axetis Ag Coated Stents
US8911857B2 (en) 2005-05-31 2014-12-16 Axetis Ag Vascular stents
US10070975B2 (en) 2006-01-04 2018-09-11 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
WO2007130786A3 (en) * 2006-05-05 2009-04-09 Richard Francis Medical device having coating with zeolite drug reservoirs
US7691400B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2010-04-06 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Medical device having coating with zeolite drug reservoirs
US9694116B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2017-07-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stents with radiopaque markers
US9038260B2 (en) 2006-05-26 2015-05-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Stent with radiopaque markers
US9072820B2 (en) 2006-06-26 2015-07-07 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Polymer composite stent with polymer particles
US9028859B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2015-05-12 Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Phase-separated block copolymer coatings for implantable medical devices
US10145811B2 (en) 2006-07-13 2018-12-04 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Radio frequency identification monitoring of stents
US9833342B2 (en) 2006-08-21 2017-12-05 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Tracheobronchial implantable medical device and methods of use
WO2008070361A2 (en) * 2006-11-17 2008-06-12 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Stent coating including therapeutic biodegradable glass, and method of making
WO2008070361A3 (en) * 2006-11-17 2009-05-22 Joseph Lessar Stent coating including therapeutic biodegradable glass, and method of making
WO2008124519A3 (en) * 2007-04-05 2009-10-29 Boston Scientific Limited Stents with ceramic drug reservoir layer and methods of making and using the same
WO2008124519A2 (en) 2007-04-05 2008-10-16 Boston Scientific Limited Stents with ceramic drug reservoir layer and methods of making and using the same
US9056155B1 (en) 2007-05-29 2015-06-16 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Coatings having an elastic primer layer
FR2922773A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-05-01 Leary Patrick O surgical prosthesis
WO2009056542A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-05-07 Patrick O'leary Surgical prosthesis for plastic reconstruction
US8361538B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2013-01-29 Abbott Laboratories Methods for applying an application material to an implantable device
US8211489B2 (en) 2007-12-19 2012-07-03 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. Methods for applying an application material to an implantable device
US9770351B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-09-26 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Crush recoverable polymer scaffolds
US9827119B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-11-28 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Polymer scaffolds having a low crossing profile
US10123894B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2018-11-13 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of crimping stent on catheter delivery assembly
US9763818B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2017-09-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of crimping stent on catheter delivery assembly
US9867728B2 (en) 2010-01-30 2018-01-16 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Method of making a stent
US10076591B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2018-09-18 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Absorbable coating for implantable device
US9999527B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2018-06-19 Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Scaffolds having radiopaque markers

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU4975500A (en) 2000-11-10
EP1175236A1 (en) 2002-01-30
WO2000064506A9 (en) 2002-06-06

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6558686B1 (en) Method of coating medical devices with a combination of antiseptics and antiseptic coating therefor
ES2355298T3 (en) Antimicrobial coating material.
US4952419A (en) Method of making antimicrobial coated implants
US6921390B2 (en) Long-term indwelling medical devices containing slow-releasing antimicrobial agents and having a surfactant surface
AU773655B2 (en) Triclosan and silver compound containing medical devices
EP1742530B1 (en) Antimicrobial coating for inhibition of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation
CN101184512B (en) Antimicrobial substrates and uses thereof
EP0517890B1 (en) Biocompatible abrasion resistant coated substrates
KR950003697B1 (en) Antimicrobial dressing or drape material
US5510109A (en) Antibacterial and antifungal composition
Vasilev et al. Antibacterial surfaces for biomedical devices
EP0298726B1 (en) A coating material for medical care
US4933178A (en) Metal-based antimicrobial coating
US8771343B2 (en) Medical devices with selective titanium oxide coatings
CN1294995C (en) Polymer compositions containing colloids of silver salts
US3975350A (en) Hydrophilic or hydrogel carrier systems such as coatings, body implants and other articles
EP1781098B1 (en) Antimicrobial devices and compositions
EP0379271B1 (en) Anti-infective and lubricious medical articles and method for their preparation
US20040161473A1 (en) Beneficial materials for topical or internal use by a human or other animal
US4906237A (en) Method of forming an improved hydrophilic coating on a polymer surface
US5328954A (en) Encrusting and bacterial resistant coatings for medical applications
US7476698B2 (en) Antimicrobial adhesive and coating substance and method for the production thereof
CN100393370C (en) Lubricant compositions, their preparation and articles coated therewith
EP1237587B1 (en) Wire, tube or catheter with hydrophilic coating
US5437656A (en) Method and device for inhibiting H.I.V. hepatitis B and other viruses and germs when using a needle, scalpel and other sharp instrument in a medical environment

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): AE AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY CA CH CN CR CU CZ DE DK DM EE ES FI GB GD GE HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MD MG MK MN MW MX NO NZ PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TR TT TZ UA UG UZ VN YU ZA ZW

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: A1

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW SD SL SZ TZ UG ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

121 Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
DFPE Request for preliminary examination filed prior to expiration of 19th month from priority date (pct application filed before 20040101)
WWE Wipo information: entry into national phase

Ref document number: 2000931951

Country of ref document: EP

WWP Wipo information: published in national office

Ref document number: 2000931951

Country of ref document: EP

REG Reference to national code

Ref country code: DE

Ref legal event code: 8642

AL Designated countries for regional patents

Kind code of ref document: C2

Designated state(s): GH GM KE LS MW SD SL SZ TZ UG ZW AM AZ BY KG KZ MD RU TJ TM AT BE CH CY DE DK ES FI FR GB GR IE IT LU MC NL PT SE BF BJ CF CG CI CM GA GN GW ML MR NE SN TD TG

COP Corrected version of pamphlet

Free format text: PAGES 1/3-3/3, DRAWINGS, REPLACED BY NEW PAGES 1/1; DUE TO LATE TRANSMITTAL BY THE RECEIVING OFFICE

AK Designated states

Kind code of ref document: C2

Designated state(s): AE AL AM AT AU AZ BA BB BG BR BY CA CH CN CR CU CZ DE DK DM EE ES FI GB GD GE HR HU ID IL IN IS JP KE KG KP KR KZ LC LK LR LS LT LU LV MD MG MK MN MW MX NO NZ PL PT RO RU SD SE SG SI SK SL TJ TM TR TT TZ UA UG UZ VN YU ZA ZW

NENP Non-entry into the national phase in:

Ref country code: JP