US895596A - Hydrocarbon-burner. - Google Patents

Hydrocarbon-burner. Download PDF

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US895596A
US895596A US32915806A US1906329158A US895596A US 895596 A US895596 A US 895596A US 32915806 A US32915806 A US 32915806A US 1906329158 A US1906329158 A US 1906329158A US 895596 A US895596 A US 895596A
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tubes
burner
mixing chamber
vaporizing
chamber
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US32915806A
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George H Thayer Jr
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/36Details, e.g. burner cooling means, noise reduction means
    • F23D11/44Preheating devices; Vaporising devices
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23CMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR COMBUSTION USING FLUID FUEL OR SOLID FUEL SUSPENDED IN  A CARRIER GAS OR AIR 
    • F23C99/00Subject-matter not provided for in other groups of this subclass

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  • This invention relates to improvements in hydro-carbon burners, or apparatus in which oil and water are vaporized and their vapors intermixed and superheated for combustion; and the invention consists in certain features of construction whereby superior vaporization, intermixing of the gases, and su erheating of the mixture are attained toget er with such other novel features of construction and operation as I hereinafter set forth.
  • Figure 1 is a side view of the complete device with its incasing pan shown in longitudinal section;
  • Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the complete device, including the incasing pan shown in section in Fig. 1;
  • Fig. 3 is a top plan view bf the device as sectioned on the .line 33 of Fig. 4; and
  • Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view on the line 44 of Fig. 1.
  • Fig. 5 is a section of one of the drop forming devices.
  • Supply pipes 10 and 11 lead respectively from su p y tanks, not here shown, of, respectivef water and fuel oil, through drop forming devices 12 and 13, whereby the suply may be conveniently and exactly reguated, to the vaporizing tubes 14 and 15.
  • These vaporizing tubes 14 and 15 are of the greatest practicable length, the vaporizing tube 14 running the full length of the a paratus and being recurved and carried bac over about half such length, and the vaporizing tube 15 running the full length of the ap aratus and being recurved and carried back nearly the full length and then again recurved and carried forward about half such length, as best shown in Fig. 2.
  • the longer of these two tubes is employed for the fuel oil, and the other for the water.
  • the open-end portions of these two vaporizing tubes enter respectively opposite ends of the mixing chamber 16 and are extended far .enough within such chamber to pass each other and respectively approach the opposite end walls of the chamber. ment, the two different gases formed in the respective vaporizing tubes are impinged against the respectively op )osite ends of the interior of the mixing cham er, and rebounding from such opposite ends are mixed with superior thoroughness.
  • the vortex action is further increased and promoted by providing that the top and ends of the mixing chamber 16 shall be without any vent, and the mixture of gases shall be drawn off from the bottom of the chamber through the T shaped burner supply pipe 17, so that the heated. gases flowing into the mixing chamber shall have an opportunity to rise therein and be subjected to the mixing process for as long a time as possible before the mixture is drawn off and carried to the burners.
  • the respectively opposite ends of the burner-supply pipe 17 lead, preferably through T shaped connections 18, 18, to the middle portions of the two perforated burner tubes 19, 19, one of which is located beneath and runs the full length of each of the vaporizing tubes, these burner tubes and their perforations being so arranged that the gas mixture emitted through and burning from such perforations shall envelop the vaporizing tubes with its flame and so maintain the vaporization of the fuel and the superheating of its gases within the vaporizing tubes and the mixing chamber.
  • the introduction of the gas mixture into the middle part of each of the burner tubes effects a more perfect and even distribution pipe 17.
  • the functions of incasing the apparatus and protecting the flames from deflecting drafts and the effecting of the primary ignition of the burners, are provided for by the case-pan 21, Whose walls rise somewhat above the burner pipes 19, 19.
  • the bottom of this pan is provided with grooves 22, 22, running around the edges thereof under the burner tubes and across the middle under the burners of the T shaped burner supply These grooves are filled with asbestos wicking, shown therein in section, Figs. 1 and 4, and are designed to distribute under the burners the more volatile oil used for the primary heating of the vaporizing tubes and ignition of the burners.
  • This more volatile oil is supplied to the bottom of the case-pan, preferably at one end, through the ignition-oil supply pipe 23, the latter leading from a suitable receptacle and drop sight-valve, not here shown, and being provided with a shut-off valve 24.
  • the ignition oil supplied to the asbestos wicking in the grooves of the bottom of the case-pan may be ignited at any point, but preferably at the touch-hole 25 at the opposite end of the pan from the ignition oil supply pipe.
  • the grooves for this wicking are preferably cut deeper nearer the intake end, so that the generating or ignition oil may burn the longer at that end of the pan and there effect the more intense heating of the vaporizing tubes.
  • the supply of ignition oil, from the supply pipe 23, is, of course, shut off as soon as the proper initial vaporization of the gases and igniting of the burners has been effected. Thereafter the heat from the burners themselves maintains the vaporization and supply of fuel to the burner flames.
  • the apparatus described is intended to be placed bodily in the combustion chamber of stoves, ranges, furnaces and other heaters where the draft is liable to be so strong as to draw the flame away from the burner unless the latter is protected.
  • the case pan is adapted to afford this protection and has been found to be very useful.
  • the drop feed devices are of novel construction. As shown, they consist of hollow cones 30 having orifices at theirv apices so small that only a drop can pass at a time. These cones placed in inverted positions, in the top of feed chambers 31 which are of glass are adapted to render the drops plainly visible.
  • the valves 32 regulate the admission of the oil and water to the cones.
  • I claim 1 In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber and extending past each other and discharging the vapors of water and oil respectively in opposite directions away from each other, so they do not interfere, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
  • a hydro-carbon burner in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber, and directing the currents away from each other and against opposite end walls of the chamber, burner tubes located below said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
  • a hydro-carbon burner in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes having their ends recurved and entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber and directing the vapor in opposite directions, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes,
  • a hydro-carbon burner in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two sub stantially parallel vaporizing tubes having their ends recurved and entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber, and direct ing the currents of vapor away from each other, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between the bottom of said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
  • a hydro-carbon burner in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber and directing the currents of vapor away from each other, the tube for the oil being doubled twice upon itself to increase its length-and to enable it to direct its vapor oppositely to the delivery of the other vaporizing tube, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamher and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.

Description

No.- 895,596. PATENTED AUG. 11, 1908.
G. H. THAYER, JR.
HYDROGARBON BURNER.
APPLICATION FILED AUG. 4,1906.
Mrnqy I GEORGE H. THAYER, JR, OF PLYMOUTH, INDIANA.
HYDROCARBON-BURNER.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Aug. 11, 1908.
Application filed August 4, 1906. Serial No. 329,158.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, GEORGE H. TIIAYER, Jr. a citizen of the United States, residing in Plymouth, in the county of Marshall and State of Indiana, have invented a new and useful Im rovement in Hydrocarbon-Burners, of whlch the following is a specification.
This invention relates to improvements in hydro-carbon burners, or apparatus in which oil and water are vaporized and their vapors intermixed and superheated for combustion; and the invention consists in certain features of construction whereby superior vaporization, intermixing of the gases, and su erheating of the mixture are attained toget er with such other novel features of construction and operation as I hereinafter set forth.
In the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification, Figure 1 is a side view of the complete device with its incasing pan shown in longitudinal section; Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the complete device, including the incasing pan shown in section in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a top plan view bf the device as sectioned on the .line 33 of Fig. 4; and Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view on the line 44 of Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a section of one of the drop forming devices.
Like reference numerals indicate like parts inall of the figures.
Supply pipes 10 and 11 lead respectively from su p y tanks, not here shown, of, respectivef water and fuel oil, through drop forming devices 12 and 13, whereby the suply may be conveniently and exactly reguated, to the vaporizing tubes 14 and 15. These vaporizing tubes 14 and 15 are of the greatest practicable length, the vaporizing tube 14 running the full length of the a paratus and being recurved and carried bac over about half such length, and the vaporizing tube 15 running the full length of the ap aratus and being recurved and carried back nearly the full length and then again recurved and carried forward about half such length, as best shown in Fig. 2. Preferably the longer of these two tubes, affording the greater opportunity for perfect vaporization of its contents, is employed for the fuel oil, and the other for the water. The open-end portions of these two vaporizing tubes enter respectively opposite ends of the mixing chamber 16 and are extended far .enough within such chamber to pass each other and respectively approach the opposite end walls of the chamber. ment, the two different gases formed in the respective vaporizing tubes are impinged against the respectively op )osite ends of the interior of the mixing cham er, and rebounding from such opposite ends are mixed with superior thoroughness. The fact that they pass out of their respective vaporizin tubes at o posite ends of the mixing chamTer, of itself means that each is allowed an opportunity to materially spread out and expand before meeting the other, and also that a vortex or rotary motion, peculiarly effective in causing a mixture of the gases, is maintained in the chamber; and both of these effects are greatly increased and promoted by the fur- By virtue of this arrange- I ther feature of providing that the tube-ends ,7
shall pass each other within the chamber so that the two gases will be discharged against the respectively opposite chamber ends and rebound therefrom before the discharges from the two tubes meet each other. The vortex action is further increased and promoted by providing that the top and ends of the mixing chamber 16 shall be without any vent, and the mixture of gases shall be drawn off from the bottom of the chamber through the T shaped burner supply pipe 17, so that the heated. gases flowing into the mixing chamber shall have an opportunity to rise therein and be subjected to the mixing process for as long a time as possible before the mixture is drawn off and carried to the burners.
The respectively opposite ends of the burner-supply pipe 17 lead, preferably through T shaped connections 18, 18, to the middle portions of the two perforated burner tubes 19, 19, one of which is located beneath and runs the full length of each of the vaporizing tubes, these burner tubes and their perforations being so arranged that the gas mixture emitted through and burning from such perforations shall envelop the vaporizing tubes with its flame and so maintain the vaporization of the fuel and the superheating of its gases within the vaporizing tubes and the mixing chamber. The introduction of the gas mixture into the middle part of each of the burner tubes effects a more perfect and even distribution pipe 17.
to the burner perforations 20, 20, than would the introduction of the mixture at either end of such tubes.
The functions of incasing the apparatus and protecting the flames from deflecting drafts and the effecting of the primary ignition of the burners, are provided for by the case-pan 21, Whose walls rise somewhat above the burner pipes 19, 19. The bottom of this pan is provided with grooves 22, 22, running around the edges thereof under the burner tubes and across the middle under the burners of the T shaped burner supply These grooves are filled with asbestos wicking, shown therein in section, Figs. 1 and 4, and are designed to distribute under the burners the more volatile oil used for the primary heating of the vaporizing tubes and ignition of the burners. This more volatile oil is supplied to the bottom of the case-pan, preferably at one end, through the ignition-oil supply pipe 23, the latter leading from a suitable receptacle and drop sight-valve, not here shown, and being provided with a shut-off valve 24. The ignition oil supplied to the asbestos wicking in the grooves of the bottom of the case-pan may be ignited at any point, but preferably at the touch-hole 25 at the opposite end of the pan from the ignition oil supply pipe. The grooves for this wicking are preferably cut deeper nearer the intake end, so that the generating or ignition oil may burn the longer at that end of the pan and there effect the more intense heating of the vaporizing tubes. The supply of ignition oil, from the supply pipe 23, is, of course, shut off as soon as the proper initial vaporization of the gases and igniting of the burners has been effected. Thereafter the heat from the burners themselves maintains the vaporization and supply of fuel to the burner flames.
My invention is hereinabove set forth as embodied in a particular form of construction, but is not limited to the particular details thereof or to less than all the possible forms in which the invention as hereinafter claimed may be embodied and distinguished from prior hydro-carbon burners.
The apparatus described is intended to be placed bodily in the combustion chamber of stoves, ranges, furnaces and other heaters where the draft is liable to be so strong as to draw the flame away from the burner unless the latter is protected. The case pan is adapted to afford this protection and has been found to be very useful.
The drop feed devices are of novel construction. As shown, they consist of hollow cones 30 having orifices at theirv apices so small that only a drop can pass at a time. These cones placed in inverted positions, in the top of feed chambers 31 which are of glass are adapted to render the drops plainly visible. The valves 32 regulate the admission of the oil and water to the cones.
I claim 1. In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber and extending past each other and discharging the vapors of water and oil respectively in opposite directions away from each other, so they do not interfere, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
2. In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber, and directing the currents away from each other and against opposite end walls of the chamber, burner tubes located below said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
3. In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes having their ends recurved and entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber and directing the vapor in opposite directions, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamber and said burner tubes,
. substantially as specified.
4. In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two sub stantially parallel vaporizing tubes having their ends recurved and entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber, the open ends of said tubes being carried past each other within said chamber, and direct ing the currents of vapor away from each other, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between the bottom of said mixing chamber and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
5. In a hydro-carbon burner, in combination, a horizontal mixing chamber, two substantially parallel vaporizing tubes entering respectively opposite ends of said mixing chamber and directing the currents of vapor away from each other, the tube for the oil being doubled twice upon itself to increase its length-and to enable it to direct its vapor oppositely to the delivery of the other vaporizing tube, burner tubes located below and parallel with said vaporizing tubes, and a pipe connection between said mixing chamher and said burner tubes, substantially as specified.
6. In a hydro-carbon burner the combination of a case pan, burner tubes therein, a 5 mixing chamber between and above the burner tubes and having a pipe connection with the latter, and oi] and Water vaporizing tubes extending over and parallel with the burner tubes, entering opposite ends of the mixing chamber and extending past each 10 other within the mixing chamber, substantially as and for the urpose described.
GEORiE H. THAYER, JR. l/Vitnesses:
PEARL ABRAMs, H. M. MUNDAY.
US32915806A 1906-08-04 1906-08-04 Hydrocarbon-burner. Expired - Lifetime US895596A (en)

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