US772117A - Process of constructing containing vessels. - Google Patents

Process of constructing containing vessels. Download PDF

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Publication number
US772117A
US772117A US15443103A US1903154431A US772117A US 772117 A US772117 A US 772117A US 15443103 A US15443103 A US 15443103A US 1903154431 A US1903154431 A US 1903154431A US 772117 A US772117 A US 772117A
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Prior art keywords
cage
vessel
core
cement
wires
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US15443103A
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Edward Jarvis Winslow
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/28Adapting the inner sole or the side of the upper of the shoe to the sole of the foot
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C33/00Moulds or cores; Details thereof or accessories therefor
    • B29C33/38Moulds or cores; Details thereof or accessories therefor characterised by the material or the manufacturing process
    • B29C33/3842Manufacturing moulds, e.g. shaping the mould surface by machining
    • B29C33/3857Manufacturing moulds, e.g. shaping the mould surface by machining by making impressions of one or more parts of models, e.g. shaped articles and including possible subsequent assembly of the parts
    • B29C2033/3871Manufacturing moulds, e.g. shaping the mould surface by machining by making impressions of one or more parts of models, e.g. shaped articles and including possible subsequent assembly of the parts the models being organic material, e.g. living or dead bodies or parts thereof
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S425/00Plastic article or earthenware shaping or treating: apparatus
    • Y10S425/122Reinforcing and aggregate

Definitions

  • the said bottom a, body portion a, top (0 and neck A consist of a metallic cage or frame 0, corresponding in form with the vessel, and a body of cement or plaster B, in which the said cage or frame is embedded and which forms with said cage the Walls of the vessel.
  • Said body of cement is preferably made of practically uniform thickness throughout the walls of the vessel.
  • Said cage in the instance shown is embedded in the cement wall somewhat nearer the exterior than to the interior surface. This, however, is not essential.
  • the application of the cement to the tubular body of the cage is begun at the lower edge thereof, so as to form an upward continuation of the cement layer resting on the platform D, it being of course understood that the plastic ma terial is applied from the outside of the metallic cage and is pressed through the open spaces thereof and against the core, the exterior surface of the core conforming to the desired interior shape of the finished vessel.
  • the cement to the tubular body portion of the cage is held by suitable means at a uniform distance from the surface of the core.
  • the means used for this purpose may conveniently consist of wedges cl" (Z lnterposed between the circumferential wires G of the cage and the outer Said blocks d will also be prefer.

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  • Health & Medical Sciences (AREA)
  • Epidemiology (AREA)
  • General Health & Medical Sciences (AREA)
  • Public Health (AREA)
  • Rod-Shaped Construction Members (AREA)

Description

772.117. I .rPATBNTED 0CT.\11, 1904 r E. J,, W1NsL0w.
PROCESS OF UONSTRUGITI'NG CONTAINING VESSELS. APPLICATION FILED APR. 27, 1903. .NO MODEL. 3 SHEETS-SEEM 1.
y 6 I I I I d H I! I I I II u H H I H Q I I a J PI- E M r- O I I /p 1 III I I v ..I I I II I II II II L IIII I I I I IIIIII I I I III W I III I III I H IIIII. n
r I I 7KWg wav No. 772,117. PATENTED"00T. 11, 1904.
' I I E. J. wms ow. PROCESS OF OONSTRUOTING CONTAINING VESSELS.
APPLICATION FILED APR. 27. 1903.
no menu. a sums-SHEET 2;
ffi lneaaear v lids/aw? Zda/ardJar 13771238021/ M fimrfi M014,
No. 772.117. PATE-NTED OCT. 11, 1904.
' E. J. WINSLO'W.
PROCESS OF GOINS-TRUOTING CONTAINING VESSELS.
. APPLICATION FILED APR. 2'7. 190's. no MODEL.
i I z twrne ga UNITED STATES Patented October '11, 1904'.
PATENT OFFICE.
PROCESS OF CONSTRUCTING CONTAINING VESSELS- SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 772,117, dated October 11, 1904.
Application filed April 2'7, 1903. Serial No. 154,4:31. (N0 model.)
To all whom, it may concern:
Be itknown that I, EDWARD J ARVIS WVINs- Low, of the city of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Processes This invention relates to a process of constructing containing vessels and is directed more particularly to that class of containing vessels made of cement or plastic material.
The article consists of any suitably-shaped vessel (the design varying according to the use to which the vessel is to be put) made of plastic materialsuch, for example, as cement in which is embedded a metallic cage having a similar design, the plastic material and the metallic cage forming one solid integral structure or monolith. Where the shape or design of the finished article requires arms, necks, elongated members, or the like, it is sometimes convenient to construct them separately and then unite them to the body of the vessel by cement or the like; but usually, and particularly when employing the apparatus set forth in an application, Serial No. 156,574, filed simultaneously herewith, this will not be necessary, and the entire structure may be made integral and in one continuous operation.
The process of making such vessel embraces the steps of forming a metallic cage of the desired configuration or design over an interior removable core, applying the plastic material to the cage, and after the material is set in removing the core.
All of these and other features of the invention will be fully understood by reference to the accompanying drawings and will be more specifically set forth in the claims appended to this specification.
In said drawings, Figure l is a sectional view of a containing vessel embodying my invention, together with a sectional interior form or core used in its construction. Fig. 2
is a perspective view of the same, illustrating the process of construction thereof. Figs. 3, 4, and 5 are views in vertical section illustrating several steps in the process of constructing the lower part of the vessel. View in perspective of the lower portion of the metal frame or cage, showing the means of joining the bottom to the tubular body thereof.
Referring to the said illustrations, Figs. 1 and 2, A indicates as a whole one style of containing vessel embodying my invention. It is a jar designed for use in railway-yards to be sunk into the ground and be a receptacle of battery-cells for operating switch-signaling devices. Manifestly, however, the vessel may be used for a variety of purposes and be of any other desired shape or configuration required by such use. This vessel consists of a cylindrical body portion a, bottom a, and top a and has located upon the top a a tapered rectangular open neck A, through which neck access may be had to the interior of the vessel A. The said bottom a, body portion a, top (0 and neck A consist of a metallic cage or frame 0, corresponding in form with the vessel, and a body of cement or plaster B, in which the said cage or frame is embedded and which forms with said cage the Walls of the vessel. Said body of cement is preferably made of practically uniform thickness throughout the walls of the vessel. Said cage in the instance shown is embedded in the cement wall somewhat nearer the exterior than to the interior surface. This, however, is not essential. In the case of a vessel to be buried in the ground and adapted to contain batterycells or for like uses the greatest strains to which the wall of the vessel is subjected will come upon the exterior thereof, and in that case it will usually be preferable that the cage should be nearer the interior than the exterior surface of the cement wall. In case, however, the vessel is to be-so used as to be subject to interior pressure it will commonly be preferable to have the cage nearest the outer surface of the wall.
The metallic cage C consists, as herein shown, of longitudinal and transverse wires 0 c, which cross each other and are joined at their intersections to form an open-mesh fabric or wire-netting offamiliar construction.-
Fig. 6 is a I usually purchase such wire fabric in the open market in rolls and cut off a strip or section of such length that when rolled and its edges interlocked a tubular or cylindric wire member 01' body, as C, will be formed. Such tubular or cylindric member constitutes the cylindric wall or body of the cage C, the longitudinal wires 0 running vertically and the transverse wires 0 running circumferentially or horizontally of the said cylindric wall, as shown.
I prefer to employ a wire fabric in which the longitudinal and transverse wires are joined at their intersections by electric welding, although a fabric in which said wires are interwoven and joined by soldering or dipping may be employed.
The bottom C of the metallic cage C is formed of a piece of a similar wire fabric cut to a shape corresponding with the tubular body of the cage and having the ends 0 of its wires upturned to form a sort of flange and joined to the wires of the said body portion C by being interlocked or intertwisted with the wires of the latter. As a preferred construction the ends 0 referred to are carried over the lowermost transverse wire 0 of the body portion C and so far as possible twisted about the vertical wires 0 above said transverse wire. It will be understood that while the wires 0 c are secured together at their several intersections by electric welding, soldering, or dipping the wire ends 0 need only be secured to said wires 0 0 merely by wrapping or twisting, although there will be no objection to said welding or soldering of the wire ends 0 of the wires 0 0 except the expense thereof. The top of the metallic cage C is similarly made of a piece of wire fabric cut to conform to the shape of the tubular body of the cage and having its wire ends 0* turned downwardly and secured to the wires 0 0 in the same manner as before described in connection with the bottom 0 When the wire frame of the neck A is made of rectangular form, as in the instance shown, two opposite sides of the neck will preferably be formed by cutting two parallel slits in the top C and making a central transverse cut between said slits to form two flaps C* G", which are bent upwardly or outwardly from the plane of the top. Separate end pieces (1 C will then be shaped to fit at their bottom and side edges to the side edges of the opental plane with the top wall a of the vessel and constitutes an inward extension thereof. I/Vhen the said flange Z2 is thus located, the wire fabric at the intersection of the neck with the top C of the cage will preferably be extended into said flange. For this purpose the opening in the top C is made smaller than the lower part of the neck, and the wires which run from the top upwardly through the flaps C are bent outwardly over the top and then upwardly, so as to form folds 0 while the upright wires 0 of the inserted pieces C are attached at their lower ends to the wires of the top at points outside of the opening in the top, the same being herein shown as attached to wires 0 which are parallel with and exterior to the wires which form the margins of said opening.
The vessel illustrated and described has great strength and durability, the metallic cage forming a strong and rigid frame, to which the cement or plastic material is firmly joined.
Having now described the construction of the containing vessel, I will proceed to describe the process by which it is made.
I first apply the fabric which is to constitute the tubular body C of the cage around an interior removable core E, attaching the fabric temporarily to the core, but making the tubular body sufficiently larger than the core to leave a space between them for the plaster or cement which is to form the inner part of the vessel-wall. I then attach the metal-fabric bottom C to the tubular body by joining the wire ends 0 of said bottom to the wires 0 c of the tubular body, as above described. I then apply to a suitable hori- Zontal table or platform D a layer of plaster or cement thick enough and of proper size to form the bottom wall of the vessel. I then suspend the core E, with the tubular body U of the cage and the attached bottom C thereon, over the said layer of cement, as seen in Fig. 3. The said tubular body of the cage is then loosened from the core, so as to permit said body and the bottom C to drop and rest upon the layer of cement. The said bottom of the cage is then pressed downwardly into the cement until properly embedded therein, this being done while the cement is still so soft as to permit the wires to easily sink or be forced into the mass or layer. to insure that the wire-fabric bottom C shall be suitably located in the cement layer, I place in the cement layer beneath the margins of the bottom a number of spacingblocks (Z, as seen in Fig. 3. Said spacingblocks rest on the platformand are adapted to support the edges of the bottom and all parts thereof at desired distance from or above the said platform. Such spacingblocks are preferably made of cement, so that they will themselves form part of the bottom wall when the latter hardens. The said spac- In order ing-blocks will of course be .of such thickness as to correspond with the thickness of the cement exterior to the wire cage in the finished article. After the bottom (J of the cage has been thus embedded in the cement layer resting on the platform, as shown in Fig. 4:, the core D is lowered until its lower edge reaches a point just above the top of the cement layer and supports it in this position. To insure that the lower edge of the core shall be supported at the proper distance above the bottom C of the cage, I place other spacing-blocks, d, in the cement layer around the upper surface of the bottom member O and inside of the lower edge of the cage C, locating said blocks so as to come beneath the lower edge of the core E. Said spacingblocks d are placed in the cement layer when the core is still in its elevated position, as seen in Fig. 4C. These spacing-blocks are made of such thickness as to come slightly above the level of the top of the cement layer when they rest upon the bottom member C so that'when the core is lowered and rests upon such spacing-blocks the latter will support the edge of the core slightly above the level of the top surface of the cement layer- It will of course be understood that the purpose of the spacingblocks d is to prevent the sinking of the lower edge of the'core into the unhardened layer of cement which is to form the bottom wall of the vessel.
ably made of cement,so that they will form part of the bottom wall of the finished vessel. The core E after being so lowered is correctly located upon the spacing-blocks (Z and centered within the tubular body C of the cage, as seen in Fig. 5. The top C of the cage is then placed in position and secured at its margin to the tubular body 0, other spacingblocks 6Z being placed between the top of the core and the said top C so that the latter will be held at a distance above the top of the core equal to the thickness of the cement to be applied inside of the said top The parts will then be in condition for the application to the cage of the plaster or cement which is to form the sidewall, top, and neck of the vessel. The application of the cement to the tubular body of the cage is begun at the lower edge thereof, so as to form an upward continuation of the cement layer resting on the platform D, it being of course understood that the plastic ma terial is applied from the outside of the metallic cage and is pressed through the open spaces thereof and against the core, the exterior surface of the core conforming to the desired interior shape of the finished vessel. During the application of the cement to the tubular body portion of the cage the latter is held by suitable means at a uniform distance from the surface of the core. The means used for this purpose may conveniently consist of wedges cl" (Z lnterposed between the circumferential wires G of the cage and the outer Said blocks d will also be prefer.
surface of the core. Convenientlya set 'of such wedges will. be applied to one of the circumferential wires 0 near the bottom of the vessel before the application of the plaster begins, and when the plaster has been applied nearly to the level of the set of wedges so located the wedges are removed and inserted behind another one of the circumferential wires at a higher elevation and the application of the plaster continued until the wedges are again reached. The same operation may be repeated until the side wall of the vessel is completed. The top wall will then be finished,
spacing-blocks d in this instance serving to support the top of the cage while the plaster is being applied. These blocks may be removed through the meshes of the cage as the work progresses; but if the blocks are made of cement they may remain in place and will form part of the finished top wall. From the above it follows that the mass or body of cement forming the bottom, sides, and top will be in a single piece or integral and that the finished vessel will be monolithic.
To facilitate the removal of the core E, it
will be made in sections detachably bolted or secured together, the parts of the core being removed singly through the opening in the head or neck.
I claim as my invention 1. The process of constructing a vessel having a restricted opening in its top, the same consisting in first surrounding by the lower part of a metallic cage, a sectional or collapsible core, the exterior of which is of the desired interior shape of the vessel then suspending the core together with the lower part of the cage over a layer of plastic material, applied to a horizontal surface or platform then lowering the lower part of the cage, until the bottom wall thereof is embedded in said layer of plastic material, then attaching to the said lower part of the cage the top wall thereof over the said core, then applying to the sides and top of the core a layer of plastic material, to form a continuation of the layer on said platform and of sufficient thickness to coverthe cage, then allowing the plastic material to set or harden and finally'removing the core through the restricted opening; the
bottom, sides and top of the vessel being monolithic.
2. The process of constructing a vessel having a restricted opening in its top, the same consisting in surrounding by a metallic cage a sectional or collapsible core the exterior of which is of the desired interior shape'of the vessel, embedding the bottom of the cage in a layer of the plasti'c material applied to a, horizontal supporting surface or platform, applying to the top and sides of the core a layer of plastic material of suificient thickness to cover the cage, then permitting the plastic material to set or harden and finally removing the core through the restricted opening; the
bottom, sides and top of the vessel being monolithic and being formed in one continuous operation before the plastic material has set or hardened.
3. The process of constructing a vessel having a restricted opening in its top, the same consisting in first forming the lower part of a metallic cage, then embedding the bottom wall of the cage in a layer of plastic material applied to a horizontal surface or platform, then locating within the said lower part of the metallic cage a sectional or collapsible core, the exterior of which is of the desired interior size and shape of the vessel, then applying and securing a top wall to said cage over the core, then applying to the sides and top of the core, a layer of plastic material of suf- EDWARD JARVIS WINSLOW.
Witnesses:
TAYLOR E. BROWN, 0. CLARENCE POOLE.
US15443103A 1903-04-27 1903-04-27 Process of constructing containing vessels. Expired - Lifetime US772117A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2477930A (en) * 1945-06-21 1949-08-02 Harold L Hiebert Method of molding reinforced concrete storage structures
US2554755A (en) * 1946-01-09 1951-05-29 Roger G Sechaud Method for binding cylindrical concrete work and apparatus for executing this method
US2579183A (en) * 1943-06-29 1951-12-18 Freysainet Eugene Method for tensioning reinforcements
US2597084A (en) * 1948-01-13 1952-05-20 Huddleston Julian Method of molding prestressed concrete structures
US2683914A (en) * 1948-08-11 1954-07-20 Tangerois Ets Method of making reinforced concrete tanks
US2685128A (en) * 1949-11-17 1954-08-03 Tournon Giovanni Stretching reinforcements of concrete structures
US3278086A (en) * 1962-11-29 1966-10-11 Rhone Poulenc Sa Containers for compressed fluids, and valve for such containers
US6401409B1 (en) * 1998-05-27 2002-06-11 Michael C. Martin Underground storm shelter

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2579183A (en) * 1943-06-29 1951-12-18 Freysainet Eugene Method for tensioning reinforcements
US2477930A (en) * 1945-06-21 1949-08-02 Harold L Hiebert Method of molding reinforced concrete storage structures
US2554755A (en) * 1946-01-09 1951-05-29 Roger G Sechaud Method for binding cylindrical concrete work and apparatus for executing this method
US2597084A (en) * 1948-01-13 1952-05-20 Huddleston Julian Method of molding prestressed concrete structures
US2683914A (en) * 1948-08-11 1954-07-20 Tangerois Ets Method of making reinforced concrete tanks
US2685128A (en) * 1949-11-17 1954-08-03 Tournon Giovanni Stretching reinforcements of concrete structures
US3278086A (en) * 1962-11-29 1966-10-11 Rhone Poulenc Sa Containers for compressed fluids, and valve for such containers
US6401409B1 (en) * 1998-05-27 2002-06-11 Michael C. Martin Underground storm shelter

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