US769112A - Hydrocarbon-burner. - Google Patents

Hydrocarbon-burner. Download PDF

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US769112A
US769112A US10455102A US1902104551A US769112A US 769112 A US769112 A US 769112A US 10455102 A US10455102 A US 10455102A US 1902104551 A US1902104551 A US 1902104551A US 769112 A US769112 A US 769112A
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cup
oil
cover
burner
air
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US10455102A
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Allan C Rush
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RUSH NATIONAL OIL BURNER Co
RUSH NAT OIL BURNER Co
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RUSH NAT OIL BURNER Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel

Definitions

  • An object of this invention is to provide a:
  • hydrocarbon-burner which will burn a low grade of kerosene or petroleum distillates with great variation of ame, so that with the same .burner a great range of heat may be secured, the burner being capable of being turned down ⁇ very low and then at pleasure increased to its ⁇ full capacity or to any intermediatel heat desired.
  • An object invention is to provide an Voil-burnerof the description referred to which may bereadily cleaned from soot and other '.deposits. f I propose to use this invention for heating cook-stoves, ranges, fireplaces, and heaters of all kinds and for steam generation and for any use or uses to which the same may be adapted.
  • Figure I is a perspective view of the burner. A portion of the cover is broken away to expose interior construction.
  • Eig. II is a plan of the cups omitting the cover.
  • Fig. III is a section of theburner on line III III of Fig.
  • Fig. IV is a sectional elevation in which Be it known that I, ALLAN C. RUSH, ahydrhe cups and air-pipe are sectioned on line III III of Eig. II and the coveris in a different position to more clearly show its supportinglegs.
  • Fig. V vis a perspective view of the cover detached.
  • 1 designates acup or bowl; 2, means for supplying ⁇ oil to said cup; 3, a hollow stem forming a pipe extending up through the cup and terminating above the rim 4 thereof.
  • a cover above the cup havingacavity, preferably a concavity 6, in its under side, into which the pipe formed by the hollow stern 3 extends, the same opening into said cavity i above the plane of the rim of the cup.
  • ll designates legs extending down from the under side of the cover 5, inside the iiange 7 around the edge of the cavity 6, and surrounding the open-ended pipe or stem 3 to support the cover 5 above the cup l.
  • These legs are desirably beveled at their lower ends, as shown at 12, so that in case of vany deposit-in the bottom of the cup 1 ⁇ the cover may be replaced without cleaning the cup, said legs being brought to the Hoor of the cup by partially rotating the cover back and forth to scrape said deposit out'of the way of said legs, thus to maintain a determined width of the outlet 8 when the legs are seated.
  • the burner will be supported by a grate (not shown) or any suitable means, leaving' the hollow stem 3 open at bottom and top for the free ingress of air therethrough.
  • the detached cover 5 will be placed in position,
  • the dome-shaped cover or heat-reiector 5 shown in the drawings becomes highly heated and concentrates the inwardly-reflected rays of heat upon the vapors contained in the cavity of said dome and also reflects the heat down upon the surface of oil in the cup.
  • the cover will belifted off, thus giving access to the under side of the same and to the interior of the cup, whereupon by a brush or anysuitable appliance any deposits may be removed.
  • the reector or cover 5 and its legs are made of a refractory material, desirably metal, which is adapted to become highly heated from the iame of the burner and to conduct and radiate heat down into and on top of the oil, and when said cover becomes highly heated it and its legs act as a mixer to mix the air and vapors before they escape from beneath the cover.
  • a refractory material desirably metal
  • the means for supplying air to the cavity of the dome may be variously constructed and that the form shown in the drawings, wherein the air-pipe 3 extends above the rim of the cup and opens into the concavity, is preferred for the reason that the air is thus inducted up into the body of vapors in the dome and must How down again in order to pass out from above the cup. A more thorough mingling of the vapors and air is thus produced; but I do not propose to limit the invention to such a specific construction, for the reason that I believe myself to be the first who has ever provided a cup with means for supplying oil thereto and mounted a dome above the same and directed air up into the cavity of the dome. This burner is distinguished from other burners in that the air is supplied to the dome over the cup and the oil is supplied directly to the cup under the dome. A fur- IOO IIO
  • the cover which in its .preferred form is of refractory. material and has legs which conduct heat from the cover down into the oil and yet allow the vapors to pass up freely into the dome, and the combined air and vapor 'beyond the peri'pheries of therims of the cups or hemispheres.
  • a hydrocarbon -burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to thecup, a cover arranged over the cup and having a cavity in its under side and a laterally-extending flange which extends beyond the cavity of the cup, and means for directing air int-o said cavity; a passage being provided between the cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of air and vapor.
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to the cup, a cover arranged over the cup and having a cavity in its under side and a laterally-extending iiange which extends beyond the cav- ⁇ ity of thecup, and an air-pipe extending up through the bottom of said cup abovethebottom thereof and adapted to direct air toward the top of said cavity; an open space being provided, between the cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of the mingled air and vapor.
  • a hyd rocarbon-burner comprising a cup
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to the cup,
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising a cup, a coverhaving a concavity, inl its under side and a laterally-extending flange which extends beyond the cavity of the cup, legs at the inner edge of said flange extending into said cup, and a pipe extending up throughsaid cup and opening into the cavity above the-rim of the cup,van open space being provided between the flange and the rim of the cup for the escape of commingled air and vapor.
  • a hydrocarbon burner comprising a member consisting in a hollow stem, an oilcup surrounding said hollow stem, a drip-cup ⁇ surrounding said hollow stem and arranged below said first-named cup, acover over said first-named cup, and means for supplying oil to said firstnamed cup, aspace being provided between said cup and the cover for the escape of mingled air and vapors.
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising a hollow stem, an oil-cup surrounding said stem and terminating in a rim below the top thereof, a drip-cup below said oil-cup, means for supplying oil to said first-named cup, and a cover which covers the cavity of said firstnamed cup and is furnished with a cavity in 4 which said hollow stem terminates, an open space being provided between the cover and the rim of the upper cup.
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising a hollow stem, a cup surrounding said stem and terminating below 'the upper end thereof and furnished at the bottom with a downwardlyprojecting bead', a cup below said'first-named cup, means for supplying oil to the upper cup, and a cover which covers the cavity of said upper cup, an open space being provided between said cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of mingled air and vapor.
  • a hydrocarbon burner comprising a hollow stem, a cup surrounding said stem and terminating below the upper end thereof and furnished at the bottom with a downwardly-A projecting bead, a cup below said first-named cup, means for supplying oil to the upper'cup, and a cover covering the cavity of said upper cup furnished with a cavity in which said hollow stem terminates, an open space being provided between the cover and the rim of the upper cup.
  • a hydrocarbon -burner comprising acup having a downwardly-tapering chamber IOO IIO
  • a hydrocarbon-burner comprising a cup having a downwardly-tapering chamber andan upwardly-tapering open-ended pipe TSC.”
  • A'hydrocarbon-burner having a cup; means for supplying oil to the cup and a cover forming a dome-shaped refractory oil-heater arranged above the cup with an open space between it and the rim of the cup; and a hollow pipe extending up through the -cup and having its upper end open to discharge air into the concavity of the dome.
  • a hydrocarbon-burner having a cup; means for supplying oil to the cup; and a cover forming a domesshaped refractory oilheater arranged above the cup with an open space between it and the rim of the cup and a hollow pipe extending up through the cup and terminating in the dome to discharge air into the concavity of the dome.
  • a liquid-fuel burner comprising two cups one of which is inverted above the other and having their outer rims oppositely disposed and separated to form a vapor-outlet therebetween; an oil-supply pipe connected to and opening into said lower cup; an airsupply pipe commencing below said lower cup, extending centrally therethrough and terminating above the top of said lower cup.
  • a liquid-fuel burner comprising a retort-chamber composed of two hollow hemispheres oppositely disposed and having their edges spaced apart by lugs extending from one, to and resting upon the other to form a vapor-channel therebetween; an oil-supply pipe adapted to discharge oil into the lower of said hemispheres; an air-supply pipe conimencing below and extending centrally through and terminating above the top of said lower hemisphere and within said upper heinisphere.
  • a liquid-fuel burner comprising two cups one ot' which is inverted above the other andhaving their edges disposed opposite each other and spaced apart by lugs extending from one to and resting upon the other to form a vapor-channel therebetween; an air-4 supply pipe commencing below the lower cup and extending centrally therethrough and terminating within said upper cup; an oil-supply pipe adapted to supply oil into said lower cup; a starting-pan surrounding said air-supply pipe below said lower cup.

Description

No. 769,112. L PATENTED AUG.30-,1904.
A.G.RUSH. i HYDROCARBONBURNER.
APPLICATION FILED APB". 24, 1902.
N0 MODEL.
Mfwf jtMm/Jv 1 www UNITED STATES Patented August 3o, 19o4.
PATENT OEEICE.
ALLAN C. RUSH, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO RUSH NATIONAL OIL BURNER COMPANY,
TERRITORY.
A CORPORATION OF ARIZONA HYDROCARB'QN-BURNER.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 769,112, dated August 30, 1904,
Application filed April 24, 1902.
T0 all whom it muy concern,.-
zen of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented a new and useful Hydrocarbon-Burner, of which the followingv is a specification.
An object of this invention is to provide a:
hydrocarbon-burner which will burn a low grade of kerosene or petroleum distillates with great variation of ame, so that with the same .burner a great range of heat may be secured, the burner being capable of being turned down `very low and then at pleasure increased to its `full capacity or to any intermediatel heat desired.
An object invention is to provide an Voil-burnerof the description referred to which may bereadily cleaned from soot and other '.deposits. f I propose to use this invention for heating cook-stoves, ranges, fireplaces, and heaters of all kinds and for steam generation and for any use or uses to which the same may be adapted.
An important purpose of this invention is 'to accomplish the foregoing objects by extremely cheap and hsimple means, and this I do by two castings comprising a cup having an-oil-inlet and a centrally-arranged vertical pipe which extends above the rim of the cup, and a cover having a concaved dome above the open top end of the pipe, and aiiange below thelevel of the said open top of the pipe and extending over and beyond the cavity of the cup. l
The accompanying drawings illustrate a hydrocarbon-burner" embodying my invention in the best form in which I at present contemplate applying the same.
Figure I is a perspective view of the burner. A portion of the cover is broken away to expose interior construction. Eig. II is a plan of the cups omitting the cover. Fig. III is a section of theburner on line III III of Fig.
Serial No. 104,551. (No model.)
` f II. Fig. IV is a sectional elevation in which Be it known that I, ALLAN C. RUSH, a citithe cups and air-pipe are sectioned on line III III of Eig. II and the coveris in a different position to more clearly show its supportinglegs. Fig. V vis a perspective view of the cover detached.
1 designates acup or bowl; 2, means for supplying `oil to said cup; 3, a hollow stem forming a pipe extending up through the cup and terminating above the rim 4 thereof.
5 is a cover above the cup, havingacavity, preferably a concavity 6, in its under side, into which the pipe formed by the hollow stern 3 extends, the same opening into said cavity i above the plane of the rim of the cup.
7 is a iiange on said cover around said cavity and projecting beyond the sides of the cup, an open spaceS being provided between the cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of commingled air and vapor.
9 designates a second cup below the lirstmentioned upper cup l to receive oil which may drip from Vsaid first cup in starting the burner into operation.
l() .designates an annular r bead extending down from the bottom of the cup 1 to cause any oil which may flow from the top of the cup and down the sides thereof to drip through the air below the cup V1 into the cup 9.
lldesignates legs extending down from the under side of the cover 5, inside the iiange 7 around the edge of the cavity 6, and surrounding the open-ended pipe or stem 3 to support the cover 5 above the cup l. x These legs are desirably beveled at their lower ends, as shown at 12, so that in case of vany deposit-in the bottom of the cup 1` the cover may be replaced without cleaning the cup, said legs being brought to the Hoor of the cup by partially rotating the cover back and forth to scrape said deposit out'of the way of said legs, thus to maintain a determined width of the outlet 8 when the legs are seated.
' In practical use the burner will be supported by a grate (not shown) or any suitable means, leaving' the hollow stem 3 open at bottom and top for the free ingress of air therethrough. The detached cover 5 will be placed in position,
as shown in Figs. I, III, and IV, and oil will be turned on through the pipe 2 and may be allowed to lill the cup l and, in a measure, iiow over the rim thereof and will drip from the bead 10 to the lower pan, thus diffusing the oil with the atmospheric air, and the same will then be lighted, thereupon heating the extending iange 7 of the cover and also, in a measure, heating the upper cup. rIhe cover 5 acts as a refiector and reects the heat down upon the surface of the oil contained in the upper cup l. The oil in the cup l soon reaches the boiling-point, and vapor rises from the heating and distilling of the oil and enters the cavity 6 of the cover or reflector 5, where it becomes more highly heated, and then escapes downward and outward, and cold air rushes vinto the cavity through the pipe or hollow stem 3 and becomes heated, forcing the vapor and het air back down toward the surface of the oil in the upper cup or bowl l. rIhe concaved form'of the cavity shown facilitates this action. The vapors which rise from the surface of the oil are thus mixed with the hot air and vapor thus forced down, and the commingled product of hot air and vapor passes out through the open space 8 between the cover and the rim L of the upper cup, where it ignites, further heating the reflector.
I have found a desirable result to be reached by the use of four separate legs l1 for the cover and have observed that said legs apparently arrest for a time the downward fiow of the vapor and hot air and gas, and there results a commotion of these elements and a thorough mixing of the same, and when said elements are forced out by the draft of cold air from the air-pipe 3 in the chamber and become ignited at the rim of the flange 7 there results a good flame with practically no noise from explosion of gases or otherwise.
The dome-shaped cover or heat-reiector 5 shown in the drawings becomes highly heated and concentrates the inwardly-reflected rays of heat upon the vapors contained in the cavity of said dome and also reflects the heat down upon the surface of oil in the cup.
, In practical operation as soon as the iiame is well started the operator will regulate the oil-supply, so that the oil will not flow over the rim of the upper cup, and as soon as the oil in the lower cup is consumed the liame is then supplied wholly from the vapors which rise from the surface of the oil in the upper cup and said oil is heated only from above, so that there is no danger of boiling over, and as the supply of oil is decreased to lessen the fire the surface of the oil in the cup lowers to a greater distance from the cover and less heat is therefore applied to said oil and is therefore less effective in vaporizing the oil, and the iiame becomes reduced in correspondence with the amount of oil supplied, and when a greater supply of oil is allowed to flow into the cup, thus raising the surface of the oil in the cup, said oil is brought closer to the reflector, and thereby is subjected to greater heat, and the evaporatirm of the oil is colisequently greater and the iame liereer, so that the burner automatically adapts itself to the appropriate vaporization of the oil in accordance with the amount supplied, althougha considerable quantity of the oil is all the time subjected to the heat of the burner. The cavity of the cup desirably decreases downward in cross-sectional arca, as shown, to heighten this effect.
It is understood that the supply ef oil to the burner will be controlled in the usual way by a needle-valve. (Not shown.)
By means of the automatic regulation above referred to a burner of large size can be effectively used for a small fiame, so that the burner is adapted to a great range of heating. It is possible with this construction to turn the iame down, so as to merely keep a cookstove or other heater merely warm, and at pleasure more oil can be turned on and the heat increased to any degree required within the limits of the burner.
To clean the burner, the cover will belifted off, thus giving access to the under side of the same and to the interior of the cup, whereupon by a brush or anysuitable appliance any deposits may be removed.
The reector or cover 5 and its legs are made of a refractory material, desirably metal, which is adapted to become highly heated from the iame of the burner and to conduct and radiate heat down into and on top of the oil, and when said cover becomes highly heated it and its legs act as a mixer to mix the air and vapors before they escape from beneath the cover. I have noted the best results when the space between the cover and the cup is quite narrow-say somewhat less than one-fourth of an inch-and the rim should project, say, one-half inch beyond the sides of the cup.
It is to be understood that the means for supplying air to the cavity of the dome may be variously constructed and that the form shown in the drawings, wherein the air-pipe 3 extends above the rim of the cup and opens into the concavity, is preferred for the reason that the air is thus inducted up into the body of vapors in the dome and must How down again in order to pass out from above the cup. A more thorough mingling of the vapors and air is thus produced; but I do not propose to limit the invention to such a specific construction, for the reason that I believe myself to be the first who has ever provided a cup with means for supplying oil thereto and mounted a dome above the same and directed air up into the cavity of the dome. This burner is distinguished from other burners in that the air is supplied to the dome over the cup and the oil is supplied directly to the cup under the dome. A fur- IOO IIO
ther distinction is also to be observed regardingthe cover, which in its .preferred form is of refractory. material and has legs which conduct heat from the cover down into the oil and yet allow the vapors to pass up freely into the dome, and the combined air and vapor 'beyond the peri'pheries of therims of the cups or hemispheres.
What I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, isi l. A hydrocarbon -burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to thecup, a cover arranged over the cup and having a cavity in its under side and a laterally-extending flange which extends beyond the cavity of the cup, and means for directing air int-o said cavity; a passage being provided between the cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of air and vapor.
2. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to the cup, a cover arranged over the cup and having a cavity in its under side and a laterally-extending iiange which extends beyond the cav-` ity of thecup, and an air-pipe extending up through the bottom of said cup abovethebottom thereof and adapted to direct air toward the top of said cavity; an open space being provided, between the cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of the mingled air and vapor.
3. A hyd rocarbon-burner comprising a cup,
means for supplying oil to the cup, a cover arranged over the cup and having a cavity in mingled air and vapor.
4. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising an open cup, means for supplying oil to the cup,
tend down into the cup; and an air-pipe opening into said cavity between said legs. an open space being between the cover and the cup for the escape of air and vapor.
6. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising a cup, a coverhaving a concavity, inl its under side and a laterally-extending flange which extends beyond the cavity of the cup, legs at the inner edge of said flange extending into said cup, and a pipe extending up throughsaid cup and opening into the cavity above the-rim of the cup,van open space being provided between the flange and the rim of the cup for the escape of commingled air and vapor.
7 A hydrocarbon burner comprising a member consisting in a hollow stem, an oilcup surrounding said hollow stem, a drip-cup `surrounding said hollow stem and arranged below said first-named cup, acover over said first-named cup, and means for supplying oil to said firstnamed cup, aspace being provided between said cup and the cover for the escape of mingled air and vapors.
8. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising a hollow stem, an oil-cup surrounding said stem and terminating in a rim below the top thereof, a drip-cup below said oil-cup, means for supplying oil to said first-named cup, and a cover which covers the cavity of said firstnamed cup and is furnished with a cavity in 4 which said hollow stem terminates, an open space being provided between the cover and the rim of the upper cup.
9. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising a hollow stem, a cup surrounding said stem and terminating below 'the upper end thereof and furnished at the bottom with a downwardlyprojecting bead', a cup below said'first-named cup, means for supplying oil to the upper cup, and a cover which covers the cavity of said upper cup, an open space being provided between said cover and the rim of the cup for the escape of mingled air and vapor. f
. 10. A hydrocarbon burner comprising a hollow stem, a cup surrounding said stem and terminating below the upper end thereof and furnished at the bottom with a downwardly-A projecting bead, a cup below said first-named cup, means for supplying oil to the upper'cup, and a cover covering the cavity of said upper cup furnished with a cavity in which said hollow stem terminates, an open space being provided between the cover and the rim of the upper cup.
l1. A hydrocarbon -burner comprising acup having a downwardly-tapering chamber IOO IIO
and an upwardly-tapering open-ended pipe ranged with a space between it and the rim of the cup.
12. A hydrocarbon-burner comprising a cup having a downwardly-tapering chamber andan upwardly-tapering open-ended pipe TSC."
which opens upwardly at the top; means for supplying oil to the cup; and a cover forming a anged refractory oil-heater above the cup arranged with a space between it and the rim of the cup.
13. A'hydrocarbon-burner having a cup; means for supplying oil to the cup and a cover forming a dome-shaped refractory oil-heater arranged above the cup with an open space between it and the rim of the cup; anda hollow pipe extending up through the -cup and having its upper end open to discharge air into the concavity of the dome.
'14. A hydrocarbon-burner having a cup; means for supplying oil to the cup; and a cover forming a domesshaped refractory oilheater arranged above the cup with an open space between it and the rim of the cup and a hollow pipe extending up through the cup and terminating in the dome to discharge air into the concavity of the dome.
15. A liquid-fuel burner comprising two cups one of which is inverted above the other and having their outer rims oppositely disposed and separated to form a vapor-outlet therebetween; an oil-supply pipe connected to and opening into said lower cup; an airsupply pipe commencing below said lower cup, extending centrally therethrough and terminating above the top of said lower cup.
16. A liquid-fuel burner comprising a retort-chamber composed of two hollow hemispheres oppositely disposed and having their edges spaced apart by lugs extending from one, to and resting upon the other to form a vapor-channel therebetween; an oil-supply pipe adapted to discharge oil into the lower of said hemispheres; an air-supply pipe conimencing below and extending centrally through and terminating above the top of said lower hemisphere and within said upper heinisphere.
17. A liquid-fuel burner comprising two cups one ot' which is inverted above the other andhaving their edges disposed opposite each other and spaced apart by lugs extending from one to and resting upon the other to form a vapor-channel therebetween; an air-4 supply pipe commencing below the lower cup and extending centrally therethrough and terminating within said upper cup; an oil-supply pipe adapted to supply oil into said lower cup; a starting-pan surrounding said air-supply pipe below said lower cup.
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses, at Los Angeles, California, this 18th day of April, 1902.
ALLAN C. RUSH.
Witnesses:
J AMES R. TowNsmND, A. M. HOLLY.
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