US6943620B2 - Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same - Google Patents

Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US6943620B2
US6943620B2 US10791181 US79118104A US6943620B2 US 6943620 B2 US6943620 B2 US 6943620B2 US 10791181 US10791181 US 10791181 US 79118104 A US79118104 A US 79118104A US 6943620 B2 US6943620 B2 US 6943620B2
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
voltages
difference
sum
digital
noise
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
US10791181
Other versions
US20040228416A1 (en )
Inventor
Jack Andersen
John Laurence Melanson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cirrus Logic Inc
Original Assignee
Cirrus Logic Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H03BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY
    • H03FAMPLIFIERS
    • H03F3/00Amplifiers with only discharge tubes or only semiconductor devices as amplifying elements
    • H03F3/20Power amplifiers, e.g. Class B amplifiers, Class C amplifiers
    • H03F3/21Power amplifiers, e.g. Class B amplifiers, Class C amplifiers with semiconductor devices only
    • H03F3/217Class D power amplifiers; Switching amplifiers
    • H03F3/2175Class D power amplifiers; Switching amplifiers using analogue-digital or digital-analogue conversion
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H03BASIC ELECTRONIC CIRCUITRY
    • H03FAMPLIFIERS
    • H03F2200/00Indexing scheme relating to amplifiers
    • H03F2200/331Sigma delta modulation being used in an amplifying circuit

Abstract

A delta-sigma modulator for driving an output stage is disclosed. The delta-sigma modulator operates between first and second voltages and includes a loop filter, a quantizer, and a feedback loop coupling an output of the quantizer and an input of the loop filter. The feedback loop includes compensation circuitry for compensating for variations in the first and second voltages in response to a measured average of the first and second voltages and a measured difference between the first and second voltages. Measuring circuitry measures the average and the difference of the first and second voltages.

Description

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 10/329,852, by Andersen, et al. entitled “Delta-Sigma Amplifiers with Output Stage Supply Voltage Variation Compensation and Method And Digital Amplifier Systems Using the Same”, filed Dec. 26, 2002 now U.S. Pat. No. 6,741,123, allowed on Dec. 9, 2003, which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention relates in general to digital amplifiers, and in particular, to delta-sigma amplifiers with supply voltage variation compensation and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Delta-sigma modulators (noise shapers) are particularly useful in digital to analog and analog to digital converters (DACs and ADCs). Using oversampling, a delta-sigma modulator spreads quantization noise power across the oversampling frequency band, which is typically much greater than the input signal bandwidth. Additionally, a delta sigma modulator performs noise shaping by acting as a lowpass filter to the input signal and a highpass filter to the noise; most of the quantization noise power is thereby shifted out of the signal band.

In addition to data conversion applications, delta-sigma noise shapers are increasingly utilized in the design of digital amplifiers. In one particular technique, a digital delta-sigma noise shaper provides a noise shaped (quantized) digital data stream to a pulse width (duty cycle) modulator PWM, which in turn drives a linear amplifier output stage and associated load. This technique is generally described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,784,017 entitled “Analogue and Digital Convertors Using Pulse Edge Modulators with Non-linearity Error Correction” granted Jul. 21, 1998 and U.S. Pat. No. 5,548,286 entitled “Analogue and Digital Convertor Using Pulse Edge Modulators with Non-linearity Error Correction” granted Aug. 20, 1996, both to Craven, U.S. Pat. No. 5,815,102 entitled “Delta Sigma PWM DAC to Reduce Switching” granted Sep. 29, 1998 to the present inventor (incorporated herein by reference), U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/163,235 to the present inventor (incorporated herein by reference), and International Patent Application No. PCT/DK97/00133 by Risbo.

One difficulty in implementing these digital amplifiers is minimizing noise and distortion due to power supply noise and variations. This problem is correctly identified in U.S. Pat. No. 5,559,467 to Smedly (“the '467 patent”). Specifically, the '467 patent recognizes the need to account for the time-varying value of the power supply voltage during modulation; however, the solution proposed in the '467 patent introduces its own distortion into the system.

Hence, improved circuits and methods are required for minimizing noise and distortion in digital amplifiers in light of power supply noise and time variations.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The principles of the present invention allow for the measurement of the sum and difference between the supply voltages supplying an amplifier output stage. The measured sum and difference are then utilized by a noise shaper driving the input to the output stage to compensate for variations in the supply voltages. When applied to ADC circuits and systems, these principles advantageously provide an output signal which is less sensitive to power supply noise and variations.

According to one particular embodiment, a delta-sigma modulator is disclosed for driving an output stage operating between first and second voltages including a loop filter, a quantizer, and a feedback loop coupling an output of the quantizer and an input of the loop filter. The feedback loop includes compensation circuitry for compensating for variations in the first and second voltages in response to a measured average of the first and second voltages and a measured difference between the first and second voltages. Measuring circuitry measures the average and the difference of the first and second voltages.

Advantageously, the principles of the present invention allow for amplifier supply voltage variations to be corrected in the noise shaper stage without introducing other noise and distortion into the amplifier output signal. These principles are particularly useful in digital amplifiers, such as digital audio amplifiers, and are applicable to a number of different amplifier output stages including half-bridge and full-bridge configurations. The output stages may be directly driven by the output of the noise shaper or through an intermediate stage such as a PWM converter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present invention, and the advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary audio amplifier embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2A is a block diagram illustrating the exemplary noise shaper of FIG. 1 in further detail;

FIG. 2B graphically illustrates operation of the f1 and f2 voltage compensation blocks of the exemplary noise shaper of FIG. 2A;

FIG. 3A illustrates representative gain and offset compensation circuitry suitable for compensating for supply voltage variations according to one embodiment of the principles of the present invention; and

FIG. 3B illustrates representative gain and offset compensation circuitry suitable for compensating for supply voltage variations according to a second embodiment of the inventive principles.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The principles of the present invention and their advantages are best understood by referring to the illustrated embodiment depicted in FIGS. 1-3 of the drawings, in which like numbers designate like parts.

FIG. 1 is block diagram of an exemplary audio amplifier 100 embodying the principles of the present invention. Audio amplifier is described in further detail in coassigned U.S. Pat. No. 6,344,811, issued Feb. 5, 2002 to Melanson for “Power Supply Compensation For Noise Shaped Digital Amplifiers,” incorporated herein by reference.

Audio amplifier 100 includes a delta-sigma modulator (noise shaper) 101, which shifts noise in the audio baseband of the input signal DIGITAL IN to higher frequencies using oversampling and quantization. Delta-sigma modulator 101 preferrably utilizes non-linear feedback for addressing variable moments in the following pulse width (duty cycle) modulated signal discussed below. Examples of delta-sigma modulators with such non-linear feedback are described in coassigned U. S. Pat. No. 6,150,969 to Melanson, entitled Correction of Nonlinear Output Distortion In a Delta Sigma DAC, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,815,102 to Melanson, entitled Delta Sigma PWM DAC to Reduce Switching, both of which are also incorporated herein by reference. A general discussion of delta-sigma modulator topologies is found in publications such as Norsworthy et al., Delta-Sigma Data Converters, Theory, Design and Simulation, IEEE Press, 1996.

A pulse-width modulator (PWM) stage 102 converts each quantized sample from delta-sigma modulator (noise shaper) 101 into a pulse width (duty-cycle) modulated pattern of logical ones and logic zeros of corresponding percentages of a total number of time slots in the pattern. The PWM stream output from pulse width modulator stage 102 in turn controls a pair of complementary switches 104 and 105, such as power transistors, which in the illustrated embodiment form a half-bridge between voltage supply rails 109 and 110. In particular, switch 104 drives the unfiltered analog output VOUT to voltage V+ during logic high slots of each PWM pattern, and switch 105 drives the output VOUT to V− during the logic low slots of the pattern. In alternate embodiments, a full-bridge output or capacitor-coupled output may be used in which the output operates from a single voltage supply or rail. In additional alternate embodiments, in which a single-bit noise shaper 101 is utilized, the output stream from delta-sigma modulator 101 may directly control switches 104 and 105.

The unfiltered analog audio signal VOUT generated by switches 104 and 105 is passed through an L-C filter including an inductor 106 and capacitor 107 which removes the high frequency (out-of-band) energy components. The ultimate filtered audio output signal AUDIO OUT drives a load 108, such as an audio speaker or headset.

Switches 104 and 105 generate the unfiltered audio signal VOUT by driving the output VOUT from corresponding voltage rails 109 and 110 at respective nominal supply voltages V+ and V−. Generally, voltage rails 109 and 110 are sourced from unregulated power-supplies (not shown) and consequently the voltages V+ and V− typically vary with time.

ADCs 111 and 112 respectively monitor voltage rails 109 and 110 and provide corresponding scaled digital representations V1 and V2 of the voltages V+ and V− to delta-sigma modulator 102. Delta-sigma modulator 102 utilizes the outputs of ADCs 111 and 112 to correct for variations and noise in voltages V+ and V−, as described below. High frequency energy on voltage rails 109 and 110 is coupled to ground through capacitors 113 and 114.

For purposes of discussion, an audio application is described as an operation performed on digital audio from a source (e.g., Digital In signal 115) such as a compact disk (CD) or digital versatile disk (DVD) player; however, the concepts described herein are utilized in a wide range of amplifier and data conversion applications, including digital motor controls and Class D power supplies.

FIG. 2A is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary embodiment of delta-sigma modulator 102 in further detail. The digital audio input signal, DIGITAL IN signal 115, is summed with negative feedback from the delta-sigma loop by input summer 201 and the resulting sum passed through a conventional digital loop filter 202. The output from loop filter 202 drives a feed-forward compensation block f1 (203), which receives digital supply rail voltage variation compensation data V1 and V2 from ADCs 111 and 112 of FIG. 1 and in turn provides a compensated input to digital quantizer 204. The delta-sigma feedback loop between the output of quantizer 204 and the inverting input of input summer 201 similarly includes a compensation block f2 (205) receiving digital supply rail voltage variation compensation data V1 and V2 from ADCs 111 and 112.

Each quantized sample QOUT from quantizer 204 represents a corresponding PWM pattern of N number of total time slots with an active (logic high) pulse width of W number of time slots, in which N is an integer greater than two (2) and W is an integer from 0 to N. Hence, for a given quantized sample from quantizer 204, the resulting PWM pattern from PWM stage 103 of FIG. 1 generates an output voltage VOUT through switches 113 and 114 at the voltage V+ for W/N number of time slots and at the voltage of V− for (N−W)/N time slots such that:
V OUT=(V+)*W/N+(V−)*(N−W)/N=((V+)−(V−))*W/N+(V−)   (1)

If the numerical values of the digital input samples of DIGITAL IN signal 115 are scaled in units of volts, then the numerical values V1 and V2 of voltages V+ and V− generated by ADCs 111 and 112 are automatically, properly scaled with respects to the numerical values of DIGITAL IN signal 115. In general, however, this automatic and proper scaling does not necessarily occur. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, a signed numerical input for DIGITAL IN signal 115 with a range from −1 to 1 results in output PWM pattern with an active pulse duty cycle ranging from 0% to 100%. In other words, a signed numerical input at DIGITAL IN signal 115 of −1 maps to 0% duty cycle (i.e. W=0), a signed numerical input of +1 maps to 100% duty cycle (i.e. W=N), and numerical input of 0 maps to 50% duty cycle (i.e. W=N/2). Therefore ADCs 111 and 112 convert the analog voltages V+ and V− and corresponding scaled output voltages V1 and V2 consistent with the scaling of DIGITAL IN signal 115. In the illustrated embodiment, the resulting pulse width of the active high slots for each PWM pattern output from PWM stage 103 in response to each quantized sample from delta-sigma modulator 102 is therefore:
W=N*(1+Q OUT)/2.   (2)

Feedback compensation block f2 205 of FIG. 2A provides feedback to modulator input summer 201. Specifically, block f2 calculates the actual average voltage observed at the output VOUT, given scaled digital power supply voltages V1 and V2 and input DIGITAL IN:
f 2 out=(V 1V 2)*W/N+V 2=Q Out*(V 1V 2)/2+(V 1+V 2)/2,   (3)
in which QOut is again the quantized (truncated) digital output from quantizer 204.

Feedforward compensation block f1 generates the inverse of feedback compensation block f2. In other words, for a given sample output QOUT from delta-sigma modulator 102 corresponding to an output voltage x at the output VOUT:

f 1 Out=(x−(V 1+V 2)/2)*2/(V 1V 2).   (4)

FIG. 2B graphically illustrates operation of f1 and f2 blocks 203 and 205 for the illustrated embodiment in which Va=(V1+V2)/2 and Vd=(V1−V2)/2. FIG. 2B and Equations (3) and (4) demonstrate that the scaled supply voltage difference noise Vd=(V1−V2)/2 couples to the input DIGITAL IN signal 115 through input summer 201 as a gain error applied to the quantizer output QOut. Consequently, variations in difference noise Vd modulate or scale the input signal, DIGITAL IN signal 115, in a signal-dependent a manner analogous to distortion. This “distortion” occurs over a wide signal band as variations in difference noise Vd modulate the wideband quantization noise in QOut which folds back into the baseband. Offset in the measurement of difference noise Vd is critical since an offset will lead to reduced noise rejection in VOUT, although gain error is less critical since a gain error in Vd only results in a gain error on the output signal VOUT.

On the other hand, the average voltage noise Va=(v1+v2)/2 couples to the output VOUT, even without any signal present at the input DIGITAL IN signal 115, thereby directly adding to the noise floor in VOUT. In the case of the average noise Va, offset measurement is not critical, since offset in average noise Va only results in an offset at the output VOUT; however, gain error in the measurement of noise Va is critical, since gain error in Va will result in reduced noise rejection.

The principles of the present invention provide for the scaled supply difference noise Vd and the scaled average noise Va to be measured and filtered in separate ADCs 111 and 112. Advantageously, less lowpass filtering is required by the average noise Va, which implies less latency and better rejection in a wider frequency range. Gain correction is then applied to average noise Va and offset correction is applied to difference noise Vd.

FIG. 3A illustrates gain and offset compensation circuitry 300 according to one embodiment of the principles of the present invention. In compensation circuitry 300, the difference between the scaled digital outputs V1 and V2 from ADCs 111 and 112 is taken by digital subtractor 301 and their sum taken by digital summer 302. The respective outputs of subtractor 301 and summer 302 are then divided by a constant two (2) in respective digital dividers 303 a and 303 b to obtain the digital values for difference noise Vd and average noise Va without gain or offset correction.

With respect to difference noise Vd, offset compensation (trimming) is provided in the digital path by a scaling factor OFFSET COMPENSATION which is summed with the uncorrected noise Vd in a digital summer 304 to generate Vdtrimmed. The value Vdtrimmed is then provided to the Va and Vd inputs to compensation blocks f1 and f2 of FIGS. 2A and 2B. The gain of the average noise Va is trimmed for gain error compensation digitally by multiplying the uncorrected average noise value Va with a gain compensation factor GAIN COMPENSATION in a digital multiplier 305. The value Vdtrimmed is similarly provided to compensation blocks f1 and f2. Preferred techniques for determining the values of OFFSET COMPENSATION and GAIN COMPENSATION are discussed below.

Gain and offset compensation circuitry 306 according to a second embodiment of the inventive principles is shown in FIG. 3B. In this case, the voltage difference between analog voltage rails V+ and V− is taken by an analog subtractor 307 and the sum by an analog summer 308. The outputs from subtractor 307 and summer 308 are then divided by a constant of two (2) by respective dividers 309a and 309b and then filtered and converted by ADCs 111 and 112 to produce the uncompensated scaled digital values of Vd and Va. Offset and gain compensation factors OFFSET COMPENSATION and GAIN COMPENSATION are then applied by summer 304 and multiplier 305, as described above.

The value of the gain compensation scaling factor GAIN COMPENSATION is determined after production of audio amplifier 100 since the value depends on the matching of associated external circuitry such as external power supplies and filter elements. According to one embodiment of the inventive principles, the amplifier output voltage VOUT of FIG. 1 is measured for a given input DIGITAL_IN signal 115. Specifically, since the power supply rejection is best with the correct scaling factor GAIN COMPENSATION, the factor GAIN COMPENSATION is set by measuring the noise on the output signal AUDIO OUT (e.g. the difference from the expected output spectrum) and adjusting the gain scaling factor GAIN COMPENSATION until this noise is minimized. If a zero-value of DIGITAL IN signal 115 (silence) is utilized, then Vd is proportional to whatever noise is present on the output. In sum, by setting GAIN COMPENSATION, the AC noise at VOUT is trimmed.

The value of the offset correction factor OFFSET COMPENSATION is also set after production of amplifier 100 since its value also depends on the matching of associated external circuitry. In one embodiment, the output voltage at output signal AUDIO OUT of amplifier 100 is measured and the noise on the output (difference from the expected output spectrum) observed. The value of OFFSET COMPENSATION is adjusted to trim the offset until this difference is minimized. In this case, the input to DIGITAL IN is a pure sine wave such that the output noise in AUDIO OUT is simply whatever noise is present on the output at frequencies other than the frequency of the input sine wave.

The noise present on the output AUDIO OUT depends on the noise present on the power supplies. The trimming is therefore improved by increasing the noise on the power supply rails V+ and V− for instance by controlling a power supply regulator, disabling a power supply pumping circuit, or any other way of adding a signal to the power supply rails. Additionally, adjusting the gain and offsets in the difference noise Vd and average noise Va as described above may be part of product test at assembly, part of a user initiated calibration sequence, executed at startup of amplifier 100, or during amplifier operation. Furthermore, for a full-bridged output, the average noise is coupled to both speaker terminals and thus cancels automatically, and therefore for the difference power supply noise Vd only needs to be measured and corrected.

Although the invention has been described with reference to a specific embodiments, these descriptions are not meant to be construed in a limiting sense. Various modifications of the disclosed embodiments, as well as alternative embodiments of the invention, will become apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reference to the description of the invention. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and the specific embodiment disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention. It should also be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

It is therefore contemplated that the claims will cover any such modifications or embodiments that fall within the true scope of the invention.

Claims (16)

1. A method of power supply voltage compensation in an amplifier having a noise shaper including a loop filter and a quantizer and an output stage operating between first and second voltages, comprising:
measuring an analog difference of first and second voltages;
measuring an analog sum of the first and second voltages;
converting the analog difference to a digital difference; and
converting the analog sum to a digital sum;
providing the digital sum and difference of the first and second voltages to the noise shaper for compensating for variations in the first and second voltages.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
subtracting a measured average value of the first and second voltages from an output of the noise shaper loop filter;
dividing the result of the subtraction by the measured difference; and
providing the result of the division to an input of the quantizer.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
multiplying an output of the quantizer by the measured difference;
adding a result of the multiplication to the measured average; and
feeding-back a result of the addition to an input of the noise shaper.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising adding an offset compensation factor to the difference.
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising trimming the offset compensation factor comprising:
applying a selected value to an input of the amplifier;
measuring noise at an output of the amplifier; and
trimming the offset compensation factor to minimize the measured noise.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein applying a selected value to the input of the amplifier comprises applying a zero-value.
7. The method of claim 1, further comprising multiplying the measured sum by a gain compensation factor.
8. The method of claim 7, further comprising trimming the gain compensation factor comprising:
applying a selected signal to an input of the amplifier;
measuring noise at an output of the amplifier; and
trimming the gain compensation factor to minimize the measured noise.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein applying a selected signal to the input of the amplifier comprises applying a sine wave.
10. The method of claim 1, further comprising adding a selected amount of noise to a selected one of the first and second voltages prior to measuring the sum and difference.
11. A method of power supply voltage compensation in an amplifier having a noise shaper including a loop filter and a quantizer and an output stage operating between first and second voltages, comprising:
measuring a difference of first and second voltages;
measuring a sum of the first and second voltages; and
providing the measured sum and difference of the first and second voltages to the noise shaper for compensating for variations in the first and second voltages, comprising:
subtracting an average value of the first and second voltages from an output of the noise shaper loop filter;
dividing the result of the subtraction by the measured difference; and
providing the result of the division to an input of the quantizer.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein measuring the sum and difference of the first and second voltages comprise:
converting the first and second voltages to first and second digital voltages;
taking the difference of the first and second digital voltages; and
taking the sum of the first and second digital voltages.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein measuring the sum and difference of the first and second voltages comprise:
taking the analog difference between the first and second voltages;
taking the analog sum of the first and second voltages;
converting the analog difference to a digital difference; and
converting the analog sum to a digital sum.
14. A method of power supply voltage compensation in an amplifier having a noise shaper including a loop filter and a quantizer and an output stage operating between first and second voltages, comprising:
measuring a difference of first and second voltages;
measuring a sum of the first and second voltages; and
providing the measured sum and difference of the first and second voltages to the noise shaper for compensating for variations in the first and second voltages, comprising:
multiplying an output of the quantizer by the measured difference;
adding a result of the multiplication to an average of the first and second voltages; and
feeding-back a result of the addition to an input of the noise shaper.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein measuring the sum and difference of the first and second voltages comprise:
converting the first and second voltages to first and second digital voltages;
taking the difference of the first and second digital voltages; and
taking the sum of the first and second digital voltages.
16. The method of claim 14, wherein measuring the sum and difference of the first and second voltages comprise:
taking the analog difference between the first and second voltages;
taking the analog sum of the first and second voltages;
converting the analog difference to a digital difference; and
converting the analog sum to a digital sum.
US10791181 2002-12-26 2004-03-02 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same Active US6943620B2 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10329852 US6741123B1 (en) 2002-12-26 2002-12-26 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensation and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same
US10791181 US6943620B2 (en) 2002-12-26 2004-03-02 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10791181 US6943620B2 (en) 2002-12-26 2004-03-02 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10329852 Continuation US6741123B1 (en) 2002-12-26 2002-12-26 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensation and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20040228416A1 true US20040228416A1 (en) 2004-11-18
US6943620B2 true US6943620B2 (en) 2005-09-13

Family

ID=32312330

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10329852 Active US6741123B1 (en) 2002-12-26 2002-12-26 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensation and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same
US10791181 Active US6943620B2 (en) 2002-12-26 2004-03-02 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensations and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10329852 Active US6741123B1 (en) 2002-12-26 2002-12-26 Delta-sigma amplifiers with output stage supply voltage variation compensation and methods and digital amplifier systems using the same

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (2) US6741123B1 (en)
EP (1) EP1579570B1 (en)
JP (1) JP4157098B2 (en)
DE (2) DE60306685D1 (en)
DK (1) DK1579570T3 (en)
WO (1) WO2004062089A3 (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040171397A1 (en) * 2003-01-10 2004-09-02 Stmicroelectronics N.V. Power amplification device, in particular for a cellular mobile telephone
US20060114057A1 (en) * 2004-12-01 2006-06-01 Creative Technology Ltd. Power multiplier system and method
US20060197590A1 (en) * 2005-01-17 2006-09-07 Wen-Chi Wang Power amplifier and method for error correcting of output signals thereof
US20070030189A1 (en) * 2004-03-25 2007-02-08 Optichron, Inc. Reduced complexity nonlinear filters for analog-to-digital converter linearization
US20070120596A1 (en) * 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 Pulsus Technologies Method and apparatus for outputting audio signal
US20070146940A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2007-06-28 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Switch mode power supply with output voltage equalizer
US20080042746A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-02-21 Mucahit Kozak Sigma-delta based class d audio or servo amplifier with load noise shaping
US20080042745A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-02-21 Mucahit Kozak Sigma-delta based class d audio power amplifier with high power efficiency
US20140347128A1 (en) * 2011-11-17 2014-11-27 St-Ericsson Sa Digital Class-D Amplifier and Digital Signal Processing Method
US9918172B1 (en) 2016-08-19 2018-03-13 Semiconductor Components Industries, Llc Active output driver supply compensation for noise reduction

Families Citing this family (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7142597B2 (en) * 2002-09-26 2006-11-28 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. Full bridge integral noise shaping for quantization of pulse width modulation signals
DE10308946B4 (en) * 2003-02-28 2006-02-16 Infineon Technologies Ag line driver
WO2005036734A1 (en) * 2003-10-10 2005-04-21 Tc Electronic A/S Power supply compensation
GB2408858B (en) * 2003-12-05 2006-11-29 Wolfson Ltd Word length reduction circuit
US7170434B2 (en) * 2004-01-16 2007-01-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Look-ahead delta sigma modulator with quantization using natural and pattern loop filter responses
DE602005015176D1 (en) * 2004-10-28 2009-08-13 Camco Prod & Vertriebs Gmbh A switched power amplifiers and methods for amplifying a digital signal
KR101001115B1 (en) * 2005-06-27 2010-12-14 퀄컴 인코포레이티드 Methods and apparatus for implementing and using amplifiers for performing various amplification related operations
US7289050B1 (en) * 2005-06-27 2007-10-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Amplification method and apparatus
US7262658B2 (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-08-28 Texas Instruments Incorporated Class-D amplifier system
US7425910B1 (en) 2006-02-27 2008-09-16 Marvell International Ltd. Transmitter digital-to-analog converter with noise shaping
US20080000431A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Stephen Longo Dog leash assembly
US8362838B2 (en) * 2007-01-19 2013-01-29 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Multi-stage amplifier with multiple sets of fixed and variable voltage rails
US8018171B1 (en) 2007-03-12 2011-09-13 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Multi-function duty cycle modifier
US7667408B2 (en) * 2007-03-12 2010-02-23 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Lighting system with lighting dimmer output mapping
US8076920B1 (en) 2007-03-12 2011-12-13 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switching power converter and control system
US7852017B1 (en) 2007-03-12 2010-12-14 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Ballast for light emitting diode light sources
US7696913B2 (en) * 2007-05-02 2010-04-13 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Signal processing system using delta-sigma modulation having an internal stabilizer path with direct output-to-integrator connection
US7554473B2 (en) * 2007-05-02 2009-06-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Control system using a nonlinear delta-sigma modulator with nonlinear process modeling
US8102127B2 (en) 2007-06-24 2012-01-24 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Hybrid gas discharge lamp-LED lighting system
KR100949880B1 (en) * 2007-10-31 2010-03-26 주식회사 하이닉스반도체 Semicoductor device and Method of fabricating the same
US7804697B2 (en) * 2007-12-11 2010-09-28 Cirrus Logic, Inc. History-independent noise-immune modulated transformer-coupled gate control signaling method and apparatus
US8008898B2 (en) * 2008-01-30 2011-08-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switching regulator with boosted auxiliary winding supply
US8022683B2 (en) * 2008-01-30 2011-09-20 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Powering a power supply integrated circuit with sense current
US7755525B2 (en) * 2008-01-30 2010-07-13 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Delta sigma modulator with unavailable output values
US8222872B1 (en) 2008-09-30 2012-07-17 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switching power converter with selectable mode auxiliary power supply
US8576589B2 (en) * 2008-01-30 2013-11-05 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switch state controller with a sense current generated operating voltage
US7759881B1 (en) 2008-03-31 2010-07-20 Cirrus Logic, Inc. LED lighting system with a multiple mode current control dimming strategy
US8008902B2 (en) * 2008-06-25 2011-08-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Hysteretic buck converter having dynamic thresholds
US8847719B2 (en) * 2008-07-25 2014-09-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Transformer with split primary winding
US8344707B2 (en) * 2008-07-25 2013-01-01 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Current sensing in a switching power converter
US8212491B2 (en) * 2008-07-25 2012-07-03 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switching power converter control with triac-based leading edge dimmer compatibility
US8487546B2 (en) * 2008-08-29 2013-07-16 Cirrus Logic, Inc. LED lighting system with accurate current control
US8179110B2 (en) * 2008-09-30 2012-05-15 Cirrus Logic Inc. Adjustable constant current source with continuous conduction mode (“CCM”) and discontinuous conduction mode (“DCM”) operation
US8288954B2 (en) * 2008-12-07 2012-10-16 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Primary-side based control of secondary-side current for a transformer
US8299722B2 (en) 2008-12-12 2012-10-30 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Time division light output sensing and brightness adjustment for different spectra of light emitting diodes
US8362707B2 (en) * 2008-12-12 2013-01-29 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Light emitting diode based lighting system with time division ambient light feedback response
US7994863B2 (en) * 2008-12-31 2011-08-09 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Electronic system having common mode voltage range enhancement
US8482223B2 (en) 2009-04-30 2013-07-09 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Calibration of lamps
US8198874B2 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-06-12 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switching power converter with current sensing transformer auxiliary power supply
US8248145B2 (en) * 2009-06-30 2012-08-21 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Cascode configured switching using at least one low breakdown voltage internal, integrated circuit switch to control at least one high breakdown voltage external switch
US8212493B2 (en) 2009-06-30 2012-07-03 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Low energy transfer mode for auxiliary power supply operation in a cascaded switching power converter
US8963535B1 (en) 2009-06-30 2015-02-24 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Switch controlled current sensing using a hall effect sensor
US9155174B2 (en) 2009-09-30 2015-10-06 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Phase control dimming compatible lighting systems
US8654483B2 (en) * 2009-11-09 2014-02-18 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Power system having voltage-based monitoring for over current protection
DE102012104488A1 (en) * 2012-05-24 2013-11-28 Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften München Switched amplifiers for variable supply voltage
US9240754B2 (en) 2013-12-30 2016-01-19 Qualcomm Technologies International, Ltd. Frequency fine tuning
US9391563B2 (en) 2013-12-30 2016-07-12 Qualcomm Technologies International, Ltd. Current controlled transconducting inverting amplifiers
US9442141B2 (en) * 2014-01-08 2016-09-13 Qualcomm Technologies International, Ltd. Analogue-to-digital converter
US10020818B1 (en) 2016-03-25 2018-07-10 MY Tech, LLC Systems and methods for fast delta sigma modulation using parallel path feedback loops
EP3316480A1 (en) 2016-10-31 2018-05-02 Oticon A/s A hearing device comprising an amplifier system for minimizing variation in an acoustical signal caused by variation in gain of an amplifier

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5304902A (en) * 1990-06-05 1994-04-19 Victor Company Of Japan, Ltd. Apparatus for driving a brushless DC motor
US5548286A (en) 1991-02-22 1996-08-20 B&W Loudspeakers Ltd. Analogue and digital convertors using pulse edge modulators with non-linearity error correction
US5559467A (en) 1995-01-27 1996-09-24 The Regents Of The University Of California Digital, pulse width modulation audio power amplifier with noise and ripple shaping
WO1997037443A1 (en) 1996-04-01 1997-10-09 Motorola Inc. Two-way communication system for performing dynamic channel control
US5754943A (en) * 1995-06-21 1998-05-19 Nec Corporation Cable loss equalization system used in wireless communication equipment
US5815102A (en) 1996-06-12 1998-09-29 Audiologic, Incorporated Delta sigma pwm dac to reduce switching
US6150969A (en) 1996-06-12 2000-11-21 Audiologic, Incorporated Correction of nonlinear output distortion in a Delta Sigma DAC
US6344811B1 (en) * 1999-03-16 2002-02-05 Audio Logic, Inc. Power supply compensation for noise shaped, digital amplifiers
US6414614B1 (en) * 1999-02-23 2002-07-02 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Power output stage compensation for digital output amplifiers

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB9623175D0 (en) * 1996-11-06 1997-01-08 Harman Int Ind Improvements in or relating to amplifiers

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5304902A (en) * 1990-06-05 1994-04-19 Victor Company Of Japan, Ltd. Apparatus for driving a brushless DC motor
US5548286A (en) 1991-02-22 1996-08-20 B&W Loudspeakers Ltd. Analogue and digital convertors using pulse edge modulators with non-linearity error correction
US5784017A (en) 1991-02-22 1998-07-21 B & W Loudspeakers Ltd. Analogue and digital convertors using pulse edge modulators with non-linearity error correction
US5559467A (en) 1995-01-27 1996-09-24 The Regents Of The University Of California Digital, pulse width modulation audio power amplifier with noise and ripple shaping
US5754943A (en) * 1995-06-21 1998-05-19 Nec Corporation Cable loss equalization system used in wireless communication equipment
WO1997037443A1 (en) 1996-04-01 1997-10-09 Motorola Inc. Two-way communication system for performing dynamic channel control
US5815102A (en) 1996-06-12 1998-09-29 Audiologic, Incorporated Delta sigma pwm dac to reduce switching
US6150969A (en) 1996-06-12 2000-11-21 Audiologic, Incorporated Correction of nonlinear output distortion in a Delta Sigma DAC
US6414614B1 (en) * 1999-02-23 2002-07-02 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Power output stage compensation for digital output amplifiers
US6344811B1 (en) * 1999-03-16 2002-02-05 Audio Logic, Inc. Power supply compensation for noise shaped, digital amplifiers

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040171397A1 (en) * 2003-01-10 2004-09-02 Stmicroelectronics N.V. Power amplification device, in particular for a cellular mobile telephone
US7177605B2 (en) * 2003-01-10 2007-02-13 Stmicroelectronics N.V. Power amplification device, in particular for a cellular mobile telephone
US20070146940A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2007-06-28 Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V. Switch mode power supply with output voltage equalizer
US7362082B2 (en) * 2004-03-12 2008-04-22 Bobinados De Transformadores S.L. Switch mode power supply with output voltage equalizer
US20070030189A1 (en) * 2004-03-25 2007-02-08 Optichron, Inc. Reduced complexity nonlinear filters for analog-to-digital converter linearization
US7394413B2 (en) * 2004-03-25 2008-07-01 Optichron, Inc. Reduced complexity nonlinear filters for analog-to-digital converter linearization
US7116168B2 (en) * 2004-12-01 2006-10-03 Creative Technology Ltd Power multiplier system and method
US20060114057A1 (en) * 2004-12-01 2006-06-01 Creative Technology Ltd. Power multiplier system and method
US20060197590A1 (en) * 2005-01-17 2006-09-07 Wen-Chi Wang Power amplifier and method for error correcting of output signals thereof
US7327188B2 (en) * 2005-01-17 2008-02-05 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. Power amplifier and method for error correcting of output signals thereof
US7298204B2 (en) * 2005-11-30 2007-11-20 Pulsus Technologies Method and apparatus for outputting audio signal
US20070120596A1 (en) * 2005-11-30 2007-05-31 Pulsus Technologies Method and apparatus for outputting audio signal
US20080042746A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-02-21 Mucahit Kozak Sigma-delta based class d audio or servo amplifier with load noise shaping
US20080042745A1 (en) * 2006-08-16 2008-02-21 Mucahit Kozak Sigma-delta based class d audio power amplifier with high power efficiency
US7605653B2 (en) 2006-08-16 2009-10-20 Intrinsix Corporation Sigma-delta based class D audio power amplifier with high power efficiency
US7612608B2 (en) 2006-08-16 2009-11-03 Intrinsix Corporation Sigma-delta based Class D audio or servo amplifier with load noise shaping
US20140347128A1 (en) * 2011-11-17 2014-11-27 St-Ericsson Sa Digital Class-D Amplifier and Digital Signal Processing Method
US9438182B2 (en) * 2011-11-17 2016-09-06 St-Ericsson Sa Digital class-D amplifier and digital signal processing method
US9918172B1 (en) 2016-08-19 2018-03-13 Semiconductor Components Industries, Llc Active output driver supply compensation for noise reduction

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP1579570A4 (en) 2006-01-11 application
US6741123B1 (en) 2004-05-25 grant
DE60306685T2 (en) 2007-06-28 grant
JP4157098B2 (en) 2008-09-24 grant
US20040228416A1 (en) 2004-11-18 application
EP1579570A2 (en) 2005-09-28 application
WO2004062089A2 (en) 2004-07-22 application
JP2006512851A (en) 2006-04-13 application
DK1579570T3 (en) 2006-10-30 grant
DE60306685D1 (en) 2006-08-17 grant
EP1579570B1 (en) 2006-07-05 grant
WO2004062089A3 (en) 2004-09-23 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Van Veldhoven A triple-mode continuous-time/spl Sigma//spl Delta/modulator with switched-capacitor feedback DAC for a GSM-EDGE/CDMA2000/UMTS receiver
US5039989A (en) Delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter with chopper stabilization at the sampling frequency
US7554473B2 (en) Control system using a nonlinear delta-sigma modulator with nonlinear process modeling
US5672998A (en) Class D amplifier and method
US6175272B1 (en) Pulse—width modulation system
US6693571B2 (en) Modulation of a digital input signal using a digital signal modulator and signal splitting
US6593807B2 (en) Digital amplifier with improved performance
US6518838B1 (en) Circuit for compensating noise and errors from an output state of a digital amplifier
US20040141558A1 (en) Signal processing system with baseband noise modulation and noise fold back reduction
US6956514B1 (en) Delta-sigma modulators with improved noise performance
US7907010B2 (en) Digital amplifier
US5920273A (en) Digital-to-analog converter
US6861968B2 (en) Signal processing system with baseband noise modulation and noise filtering
US6922100B2 (en) Method and apparatus for switching amplification having variable sample point and variable order correction
US6924700B2 (en) Class D amplifier
US4939516A (en) Chopper stabilized delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter
US20040021594A1 (en) Noise shapers with shared and independent filters and multiple quantizers and data converters and methods using the same
US20050012649A1 (en) Sigma-delta modulator with reduced switching rate for use in class-D amplification
US6795004B2 (en) Delta-sigma modulation apparatus and signal amplification apparatus
Naus et al. A CMOS stereo 16-bit D/A converter for digital audio
US20070018865A1 (en) Third order sigma-delta modulator
US6707337B2 (en) Self-operating PWM amplifier
US7129875B1 (en) Tracking reference system for analog-to-digital converter systems
US20020163458A1 (en) Signal amplifying method, signal amplifier and devices related therewith
US7167046B2 (en) Class-D amplifier

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: CIRRUS LOGIC, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ANDERSEN, JACK;MELANSON, JOHN LAURENCE;REEL/FRAME:015041/0945;SIGNING DATES FROM 20021219 TO 20021220

CC Certificate of correction
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 8

FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 12