US600792A - Vapor - Google Patents

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US600792A
US600792A US600792DA US600792A US 600792 A US600792 A US 600792A US 600792D A US600792D A US 600792DA US 600792 A US600792 A US 600792A
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tube
lamp
vaporizing
reflector
burner
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D91/00Burners specially adapted for specific applications, not otherwise provided for
    • F23D91/02Burners specially adapted for specific applications, not otherwise provided for for use in particular heating operations

Description

(No Model.)
A. KITSON. VAPOR BURNING APPARATUS.
No. 600,792. Patented Mar. 15,1898.
I Q v A IIIIIIISWTEE ARTHUR KITsoN, or PHILADELPHI PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR To THE KITSON HYDROOARBON HEATING AND INOANDESCENT LIGHTING con PANY, OF WEST VIRGINIA.
vAPomBu RNlNG APPARATUS.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent'No. 600,792, dated March 15, 1898.
Application filed November 1, 18 97.'
To all whom it may concern.-
Be it known thatI, ARTHUR KITSON, a subject of the Queen of Great Britain, residing at Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia I and State of Pennsylvania, have invented a certain new and useful Vapor-Burning Apparatus, of which the following is a specification.
My invention relates to vapor-burners, and is more specifically designed to produce a selfcontained vapor-burning lamp or table-lamp having certain features of construction in so far as the vapor producing and burning apparatus are concerned, which are applicable to hanging and other forms of vapor-lamp, however. p
The preferred form of myapparatus is illustrated in the accompanying sheet of drawings, in which- Figure is a side elevation and partial section of the lamp, broken away in parts. Fig. 2 is a detail cross-section of my improved form of reflector with vaporizing-tube mounted therein. Fig. 3 is a detail view of the alcohol-cup and skeleton extensions for supporting the globe.
Throughout the drawings like referencefigures refer to like parts.
1 represents the standard or base, which rests upon the table and on which the lamp is supported.
2 is the main bodyor reservoir of the lamp, which may be made of any convenient or artistic form.
3 is the connection controlled by a valve or plug through which the reservoir or body of the lamp may be charged with oil.
4 is a second connection through which the portion of the lamp-body abovethe level of the oil 2 may be charged with compressed air by a foot pump or connection with any other supply of compressed air.
5 is a valve or plug for opening and closing said connection.
6 is a small safety-valve mounted on said compressed-air connection inside of the valve.
7 is the ordinary form of burner, similar to that illustrated in my pending application, Serial No. 648,353, filed August 16, 1897.
Serial No. 657,027. (Nd model.)
8 is an incandescent mantle which is pref- 5o .erably used in combination with said burner,
being sustained-by any suitable support 8.
19 is a skeleton or perforated extension or .flange on the alcohol-cup 20, which surrounds the burner, which cup may contain a body of 5 5 globe, inasmuch as other forms. of sur- 6o rounding envelop may be employed. This globe 18 is of glass or other translucent material.
9 is a supply-tube which extends from nearly the bottom of the interior of the res- 6 5 ervoir or body of the lamp 2 up through the standard supporting the burner and along the side of theglobe 18 to one end of the vaporizingtube 10. This vaporizing-tube, with its needle-valve 13, is similar in construction to that illustrated in my above-mentioned pending application, and is adjustably mounted in the reflector 11, being held in place by the set-screw 12. 9 is a valve in said supply-tube 9 for shutting off the supply of oil when the lamp is not in operation, and 28 is a strainer or filter therein.
14 is a curved mixing-tube connected to and supported from the base of the burner 7 and extending up to the upper portion of the lamp, where it terminates opposite the nozzle of the vaporizing-tube 10. The upper end of this vaporizing-tube is not attached to the upper portion of the lamp, but is preferably supported by a sliding joint with the extremity of the vaporizing-tube by means of the spider 15, whose central boss slides freely on said vaporizing-tube. r
. 16 represents a muflier or a small metal col lar for breaking up the current of air drawn into the mixing-tube by the jet of vapor from the vaporizing-tube and so preventing the dis agreeable hissing sound which is common in this form of vapor-lamp when not provided with some apparatus of this nature.
17 represents a small drip-cock placed at the lower portion of the hollow base of the burner for the purpose of drawing off any small amount of oil which may be discharged from the mixing-tube by unskilled manipulation of the apparatus,
21 represents a central opening in the reflector 11 for the passage of the hot gases generated in the lamp.
22 22 represent two of several shade-supports attached also to the upper side of the reflector, and 23 is any convenient form of shade mounted on said supports and over-- hanging the upper portion of the apparatus. 24 is a chimney mounted on said reflector and over the central opening therein. Said reflector 11 is preferably provided with a lining of porcelain or similar material 25, (shown in Fig. 2,) which will protect it from the destructive action of the hot gases. The reflector may rest upon the upper end of the globe 18 by gravity, but I prefer to rigidly hold the parts together by means of two or more rods 26, which extend from the base of the burner up along theoutside of the globe and through the reflector, each terminating in a thumb screw 27. By removing the thumb-screw the lamp may be quickly and easily taken apart.
The general mode of operation of my apparatus is as follows: Oil being charged into the lamp body or reservoir 2 up to the line 2, or thereabout, compressed air is admitted through the connection 4 at the necessary degree of pressure after the oil connection 3 has been closed. Any excess pressure which may tend to burst any of the connections or interfere with the proper operation of thelainp is prevented by the safety-valve 6. The globe 18 rests upon the skeleton extension'19 of the alcohol-cup, and the reflector 11 is mounted on the upper end of said globe, its outer circumference fitting closely down over the same. The chimney 24 being in place, a small quantity of alcohol is poured on the asbestos in the alcohol-cup and lighted. The flame heats the mantle 8 to incandescence and the vaporizing-tube to the necessary temperature to vaporize the oil. Oil is then admitted by opening the cock 9 and the needle-valve 13. The pressure of the compressed air in the lamp-reservoir forcing the oil up through the supply-tube 9, the vapor of oil issuing from the nozzle of the vaporizing-tube entrains the necessary quantity of air into the mixing-tube 14, and the latter delivers the combustible mixture to the burner 7, where it becomes ignited, and thus the action of the lamp becomes self-supporting.
The advantages of my construction reside in its being portable and in the special arrangement of the surrounding globe 18, surrounding the incandescent mantle and open to the air at the bottom, whereby a strong current of intensely-heated gases and air is thrown up against the reflector 11 and thereby focused on the vaporizing-tube 10. So great is the heat to which the vaporizing-tube is thus subjected that I find that the oil is not only vaporized, but changed to a fixed gas which does not condense when cool. This adds I to the brilliancy of the light produced'and prevents the collection of oil in the burner and The mixing-tube 14, beingv varying degrees of heat to which it is sub-- j ected when thelamp is lighted ornot lighted, and the sliding joint which its upper end forms with the vaporizing-tube permits said expansion and contraction, while at the same time it affords a support to the upper end of said vaporizing-tube. The chimney 24, being mounted over the vaporizing-tube and keeping the hot gases confined for a certain distance after they have left the vaporizing-tube, prevents any possible access of cold air to said vaporizing-tube and thereby steadies the action of the vaporizing apparatus as well as increasing the efficiency of the same.
It is evident that various changes could be made in the various details of my apparatus without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention so long as the relative arrangement of the parts shown in the drawings and the principle of operation described in the specification are maintained.
The broad feature of the combination of a vapor-burner, an incandescent mantle therefor, and a vaporizing-tube with proper connections to the burner and located within the heating-zone of the burner-flame I do not claim herein, as the same is shown, described, and claimed in my pending application, Serial No. 663,495, filed December 27, 1897.
Having therefore described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to protect by Letters Patent, is
1. In a vapor-burning lamp the combination of the burner and connections, the incandescent mantle therefoigthe translucent globe surrounding said incandescent mantle, the p across the opening in said reflector, substantially as described.
3. In a vapor-burning lamp, the combina tion of the burner and connections, the incandescent mantle, the globe surrounding said mantle, and open to the air at the bottom, the reflector which has a central opening for the passage of hot gases, the outer circumference of which reflector fits over the top of said globe, and the vaporizingtube extending across the opening in said reflector, together With the chimney mounted on said reflector over said opening, substantially as described.
4. In a vapor-burning lamp, the combination of the burner and connections, the incandescent mantle,the globe surrounding said mantle, and open to the air at the bottom, the reflector which has a central opening for the passage of hot gases the outer circumference of which reflector fits over the top of said globe, and the vaporizing-tube extending across the opening in said reflector, together a with the chimney mounted on saidreflector over said opening, the shade supports attached to said reflector and shade supported thereon, substantially as described.
In a vapor-burning lamp, the combination of the burner and its connections, the
globe of translucent material surrounding said burner, the chimney mounted above said globe, and the vaporizing-tube located between said globe and the chimney, substantially as described;
In testimony whereof I have hereuntoaf fixed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.
, a ARTHUR KITsoN.
Witnesses:
A. PARKER SMITH,
LILIAN FOSTER.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040189741A1 (en) * 2003-03-25 2004-09-30 Toshiba Tec Kabushika Kaisha Ink Jet recording apparatus having maintenane means for cleaning an ink jet recording head

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040189741A1 (en) * 2003-03-25 2004-09-30 Toshiba Tec Kabushika Kaisha Ink Jet recording apparatus having maintenane means for cleaning an ink jet recording head

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