US505521A - hamilton - Google Patents

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US505521A
US505521A US505521DA US505521A US 505521 A US505521 A US 505521A US 505521D A US505521D A US 505521DA US 505521 A US505521 A US 505521A
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feed
dog
stop
spacer
rack
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J19/00Character- or line-spacing mechanisms
    • B41J19/18Character-spacing or back-spacing mechanisms; Carriage return or release devices therefor
    • B41J19/34Escapement-feed character-spacing mechanisms
    • B41J19/58Differential or variable-spacing arrangements

Description

(No Model.) 5 Sheets-Sheet 1.`

J. A. HAMILTON. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

5 Sheets- Sheet $2.

(No Model.)

' J. A. HAMILTON.

TYPE WRITINGYMAGEINE.' No. 505,521'. 'Patented sept. 26, 189s.

n; s' ll.

INVENTOR; WITNESSES. 04%

By his Attorneys, j/f/zf. 4 mng,

( No Model.)

. iJ. A. HAMILTON.

TYPE 4WRITING MACHINE.

` s sheetssnaren a.

Patented Sept. 26, 1893.

WITNEssEs: 4! Q6 (No Model.) 5 Sheets-Sheet 4. J. A. HAMILTON. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

HHHHIIHUUHHHIHH 1 3. R. d m m S 1 N am 6.. W (n, 2. 5. m .B nv H I y d Y m 6 E m .Tu u n 4 nv Nn t uw.

D.. Y mm. n m m fm mm no.

. f S m I 5 F mw (No Model.) 5 sheets-'sheet 5.

J. A. HAMILTON. TYPE WRITING MACHINE.

No. 505,521. Patented Sept. 26, 1893.v

INVENTOR; VVITIUISSES.` l .g2 j

l By z's Affomeys, Cem-6.6mm@ ((9.,

" NITED STATES TPATENT OFFICE.

JOHN A, HAMILTON, OF NEI/V YORK, N. Y.

TYPE-WRITING MACHINE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 505,521, dated September 26, 1893. Application filed April 1, 1893. Serial No. 463,641. (No model.)

To a/ZZ whom it may concern,.-`

Be it known that I, JOHN A. HAMILTON, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in TypeWVriters, of which the following is a specification. f

Typewriters as ordinarily constructed have a uniform feed for all letters or characters, so that narrow letters, as i or l, aregiven` the same space as letters of average width, as a, b, n, p, &c., while letters which in type are of extra width, as W w, M m, are crowded into the space suitable for letters of average width. This results in apparently very uneven spacing of the letters, the narrow letters presenting an isolated appearance, particui larly when two or more narrow letters occur in sequence, while the letters of extra width appear greatly crowded. The disadvantage of this system has been recognized, and attempts have been made in the construction of certain machines to provide a variable feed exactly proportional to the varying widths of the letters.

The object of my invention is to provide a variable feed for typewriters which shall be applicable to the machines in current use, such as the Remiugtom Yost, Caligraph, National, Premier, dac.

My invention does not propose a variable spacing wherein the letters or types shall have the same relative widths as in type printing, and a feed which-shall be variable in exact proportion to such varying widths of letters, as this would involve a degree of nicety which I consider impracticable of realization in a typewriting machine for commercial use.

My invention proposes such a degree of variable spacing as shall correct the most perceptible defects of the uniform spacing now employed in commercial typewriting machines.

My invention also aims to provide such a construction of feed mechanism or escapement as shall be applicable to existing machines without any serious alteration thereof.

To these ends my invention provides a feed mechanism or escapement for the carriage adapted to impart or permit to the carriage a movement ortravel to an extent'of one, two or three spaces, these spaces being so propor- Yas I, i, j, l, f, r, t, of three spaces for letters of extra width, as M n1,W w, and of two spaces forthe letters or characters of average width. In carrying out this principle my invention provides a feed-rack having teeth of approximately twice the fineness of the feedracks heretofore used on typewriters, that is to say,in `which the space of two teeth correlspends to the width of feed required for letters of normal width, as b, e, n, &c.;` and a variable stop operatively connectedwith the type-keys or such of them as may be necessary so as to present different stop surfaces or steps for determining the extent of movement of the carriage in feeding, in order to cause the escapement to slip one tooth for narrow letters, two teeth for letters of average width, and three teeth for letters of extra width.

ln applying `my invention to any existing machine, I propose to avoid any alteration of the feed mechanism beyond a change of those parts by which the extent of the escape movement is limited or determined. For example in the Remington typewriter, where the feed is effected by the transverse movement of a dog in a rack attached to the carriage, the dog having a free tooth or pawl which on passing out of engagement with the rack dies forward a distance of one tooth until arrested by striking `a stop, I remove this stop and substitute for it a variable stop having three steps or faces corresponding to movements of one, two or three teeth respectively of the Vliner rack which I substitute for the ordinary feed-rack; and I connect this variable stop by any suitable operative connections to the respective keys, in order that the variable stop shall move to present one face or another' in the path Vof the free pawl according to whether the letter being printed requires one, two or three spaces. The detailsof this connection between the variable stop and the keys may be variously worked out, and I will IOO y machines.

in this specification as one example thereof, describe in detail the means for effecting such connection which I have devised as best` applicable to the Remington typewriter.

In applying my invention to other typewriting machines, I propose to effect similar substitutions for the corresponding parts of the feed mechanisms or escapements of such It will be understood therefore that my present invention is not limited in its application to any one particular construction or kind of typewriting machine, but is applicable to any machine in which the carriage tends to move forward and is restrained therefrom by feed mechanism in the nature of an escapement.

In my present application for patent I shall claim the generic features of my invention as applicable to numerous existing or possible constructions of typewriting machines of this character, and I shall also make specific claims to those features which Iha've devised for applyingmygeneric invention to the Rem.-

ington typewriter, and to other typewritingy machines of analogous character.

I will nowproceed to describe myinvention in its special application to a Remington typewriter, referring for that purpose to the accompanying drawings, Whereinf Figs/M06.

Figure l is a vertical mid-section cut transverselyof the travel of the carriage. Figrl* isa fragmentary section showing a part not` clearly visible in Fig. l. Fig. 2 is a rear elevation thereof partly in vertical-section in the plane of the line Q-Zin Fig.v l. Fig. 3 is a horizontal section taken generally on the line 3 3 Yin Fig. l, showing the key-levers in plan, those levers and; keys not affected by myinvention being omitted. Fig. et is a horizontal section on a larger scale cut in the plane of the line 4-4inFg. l. Fig. 5is a fragmentary sectional rear elevation on the same scale as Fig. 4. Fig. 6 is a sectional side-view of the parts shown .in Fig. 5, and on the same scale, the sectionbeing cut in nearly the same plane as in Fig. l. Figs. 7 and 8 are sectional views showing the same parts as in Fig. 6, but illustrating two different positions of the feed mechanism; the scale being the same as in Figs. 9, l0, Il and l2 are diagrammatic horizontal sections on a `larger scale showing the variable stop at rest. and in its l three different stop positions.

the key-levers and the type-levers, c c the type-levers, and cl CZ the types carried thereby, the types d being lower case letters, numerals, duc., and the types d being capitals, dac. The carriage C carrying the impression cylinder D and its accessories, has the usual rack frame C carrying the feed-rack E.

F is the feed-dog, having immovably fixed upon it a toothf, and pivotally or movably mounted upon it afree tooth or pawl G, which I shall hereinafter refer to as the spacer, since it is that part of the escapement which by its movement determines the space or distance through which the carriage shall travel at each feed. The dog F is an elbow-lever, its lower arm F terminating in a cross-arm F2 connected at its opposite ends by suspension rods c to the universal feed-bar I-I beneath the levers B B, so that whenever any lever is pressed down 4it depresses the bar H and throws the` dog F forward, moving the tooth of the spacer G out of the rack E, and sliding the fixed tooth f in-to engagement therewith. As the free tooth or spacer G passes outof the teeth of the rack, it flies forward the dista-nce of one tooth in the machine as ordinarily heretofore constructed, so that upony the release ofthe key-lever, as the dog F moves backward, the spacerG moves into engagementwith the next tooth of the rack',

and as theiixed tooth f passes out ofthe ters corresponding to the tWo typesd d', and

`that when the keys are struck ordinarilyit .is the type d f that will make the impression against` the paper on the cylinder D, these types d printing the lower case letters, numerals, and certain punctuation marks, While the types- CZ print the capitals and certain other punctuation marks. To cause these latter types toprint vit is necessary-to provide a shifting mechanism to'shiftthe carriage D backward by pressing down what is known as a capital key having a leverA similar to the levers B, and connecting through avlink b with anarmj` on ay rock-shaft .I which has upwardly projecting arms Jl carrying a bar J2 entering forks on the portion of the carriage which directly carries the cylinder D, in order to throw this portion -of the carriage backward upon` pressing downv the Acapital key, a spring being arranged tothrow itforward again upon releasing this key.

Havingnow described the ordinary Remington machine in so far as is necessary to a comprehension of my present invention, l will proceed to describe the latter.

The. first change which my invention requires is f the substitution for the ordinary feed-rack E of a rack having approximately twice as many teeth. In the ordinary ymachine the rack has ten teethto the inch, and by preference I substitute for it a rack `which for the same size of type has sixteen teethv to theinch, although it-may have twenty teeth, more or less. I thus space the'lette'rs of average width, such as a, 6,41, &c.,slightly farchine each key a is marked `with two characther apart than they are spaced in an ordinaryRemington machine, giving them a space of one-eighth of aninch instead of one-tenth.

My invention'involves no necessary change of the dog F or spacer G. The restoring spring S of the dog I place however by preference on the opposite side from that customarily occupied, as shown in Fig. 4. The adjustable stop which is usually applied for limiting the throw of the spacer when released is removed, and in its place I provide the variable stop L, which is one of the characteristic elements of my invention. In the construction shown this stop L is pivoted on the same axis as the dog F. As best shown in Figs. 5 and 6, the stop L is made with a double arm L perforated to slip over the spindle t' of the dog, being held against endwise displacement by a collar lc set to the spindle by a screw 0l and entering between the arms L. For adjusting the variable stop L toward and from the dog F, this collar 7i; is made preferably as a nut screwing upon threads cut on the spindle t', and set in any position by the screw i. A light spring s reinforced against the dog F is arranged to press against the variable stop L, tending to press it forward, so that normally a shoulder Z formed on the back of the stop L, is pressed against the rear surface of the dog F, as best shown in Fig. 9, and by reason of the tension of this spring the variable stop L tends to retain this position relatively to the dog, and consequently when the dog is thrown forward the stop L tends to move forward with it.4 The stop L is formed with three stop faces or steps, best shown in Figs. 9 to l2, and marked 1, 2 and 3 respectively. These steps are arranged so that in different positions of the dog,one or another of them will stand in the path of the free tooth or spacer G. For a feed of one space the step 1 stands opposite the spacer as shown in Fig. lO; for a feed of two spaces the step 2 stands opposite it as shown in Fig. 1l; and for a feed of three spaces the step 3 stands in the path of the spacer as shown in Fig. l2.

I will now describe how the variable stop is operated upon so as to bring its steps 1, 2 or 3 in the path of the spacer as may be required. The variable stop tends as already stated to remain in position against the dog, so that as the latter is moved forward the stop `tends to move forward with it, and if :its

movement be notobstructed it will move with it as shown in Fig. 10, so that the step 1 is kept in line with the spacer, and upon the freeing of the latter by its passage out of engagement with the rack, it will tiy forward the distance of one tooth of the rack. But for the great majority of letters which require a feed of two spaces, the variable stop is to be stopped in such position as to bring the step 2 in the path of the spacer as shown in Fig. 1l. To effect this result I provide an abutment or intercepter K, which stands normally in the path of the stop L and intercepts itin a key a called a half-space key.

the correct position, asshown in Fig. 11.

\ This abutment `may be variously constructed,

the construction shown consisting of a pivoted arm projecting from and fixed to alittle shaft m which is mounted in suitable bearings attached to the fixed frame. This abutment is shown in its normal position in Fig. 6, and is shown displaced bybeing tilted upward in Fig. 7. In its normal position it comes opposite the nose or front end of the stop L, so that it stands as an obstruction in the, path of the stop and arrests it almost immediately upon the moving forward. of the stop with the dog. Thus the stop by striking against this abutment is arrested in the position shown in Fig. ll, with its step 2 in the path of the spacer. But if before the stop L moves forward the abutment arm K is thrown `up as shown in Fig. 7, the forward movement of the stopwill not be interfered with, and

`itsstep 1 will remain. in the path of the spacer, as shown in Fig. 10. The abutment K is normally passed down into the path of the stop by the tension of a spring s hung from a projecting bracketmand actingagainst a stepped arm p projecting forwardly from the abutment K orshaft m. A stop arm m may be provided for arresting the abutment when restored to its normal position by the tension of this spring.

I will now describe how the abutmentK is operated to bring it into or out of the path of j the variable stop. j Inasmuch as the spring s keeps it pressed normally into the path of the stop where it is required to remain `during the printing of all letters of normal Width, as a, b, n, ttc., Which I shall hereinafter refer to as two-space letters, it is only for the printing of narrow letters such as I, i, j, dac., which I shall hereinafter refer to as ,onespace letters that the abutment requires to be displaced. For thus dispacing it7 I provide its shaft m with a forwardlyprojecting `arm q, shown in Figs. 4 and l, with which arm engages the slotted upper end of an upright rod or link Q, which extends downward `as shown in Fig. 2, and at its lower end is pivoted or jointed to a pivoted frame Q', which I shall call a treadle, and which is well `shown in Fig. 3. This treadle is made of a rod or wire bent to the shape shown in Figs.

` 1 and 3, and having its ends bent into eyes .loosely embracing a rod P extended across the base of the machine as shown. To keep the treadle from being displaced lendwise along this rod, the latter has half-round` grooves turned in it, as shown at r in Fig. 3, within which grooves the pivotal eyes are sunk. The treadle Q' extends transversely beneath the key-levers B B of such of the keys as are used in connection with letters or characters requiring a feed of one space. These levers are the lever 30 in Fig. 3, for printing I i, the lever 36 for printing and the lever 41 which is an extra lever carrying These levers 30, 36 and 41 have applied beneath IOO IIO

them downward projections or blocks q' which extend down into contact with the treadle Q'. It results that when either of these key levers is depressed, lthe 'treadle Q' will be pressed down, thereby pulling down the link `Q and the arm q, and consequently oscillating the shaft m against the tension of the lspring s', and throwing'up the abutment K, as shown in Fig. `7. Thus provision is made for the feed of the single space letters. The'weight of the treadle Q and rod Q `is upheld by a light spring s3 (Fig. 1) hung from vany suitable part of the machine, and engaging a hook or projection on the. rod Q so as to keep the treadle pressed fup into lirm-engagementwith the blocks q'.

For feeding the three space letters M m, W W, I provide the following described connections:-The variable stop L is formed with a lever-arm L2 vproject-ing rearwardly and terminating in vacross-bar L3 (Figs. 4 and 5) eX- tending for a suitable distance from sfide to side,and connected at its ends with headed pul-l-ro'dst if. These rods are preferably carried loosely through -holes in the ends of the cross-bar L3, with their heads projecting sutlcientlyfabove it so thatduring the extreme yforward movement of thevariable stop the crossbar La will barely come into contact `with these heads (Fig. 7). The rods t t extenddow-nward and are jointed respectively to the key-lever 6 for printing NV w, and the lever 29for printing M m. Whenever either of these key-levers is depressed'it pulls down its connected rod t until the headthereof abuts against the top of the cross-bar Lava-nd pulls the latter downward, and thereby pulls the variable stop L back- Ward,whilethe-dog F is moving forward until the stop is pulled so far back as to bring its step 3 into the path'of the spacer G, as shown in Figs. :8 and l2. Consequently the spacer upon disengaging itself from the rack, will i'iy forward a distance of three spaces. It is thus seen that in printing one-space letters the abutment arm is thrown up by the action of the key-lever upon the treadle Q', thereby permitting the variable stop to move fully forward with the dog. In printing twospace letters, the abutment arm is not disturbed, so thatit intercepts the variable stop and arrests it with its intermediate step in the path of the spacer. And in printing three-space letters the variable stop is drawn backward while the dog moves forward, so thatthe third step of thestop is brought into the path of the spacer.

That feature of the Remington machine wherein one key serves for printing either one or other of two types according to the position of the impression roller, taken in -connection with the fact that certain typelevers carry both one-space and two-space letters or characters, necessitates a further provision which I will now describe. Take for example the letter L which is a-two-space letter, the type of which is carried on the same lever with the letter l which is a onespace letter. Provision must be made for controlling the spacing according to the posi tion of the impression cylinder, Whether it be for 'the two-space type L or the one-space type l. This I accomplish by placing the variable stop under the control of the capital key or shifting mechanism for such keys as operate both one-space and two-spacetypes. To establish such control, I provide, first,a second treadle R', (which maybe identical in construction with the treadle Q', except that having to pass under more key-levers rit is made longer'as shown in Fig. 3), this treadle being. connected b y alink Rwith the stepped arm p of the-abutment K. This stepped arm is formed with an upper step or ledge fr' in engagement with which the upper end of a slot in the link R normally stands, as shown in Fig. 6, so that if the treadle R' be 'pressed down, the downward ymovement of the link R will cause theupper end of its slot to carry down the stepped arm with it, and thereby tilt up the abutment K to give a one-space feed. The link R is, however, movable to the position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 1,so that its `upper end swings olf beyond the-step r', so thatif while in this position the treadle is depressed, the downward movement of the link does not carry with it the stepped arm, and the abutment consequently remains undisturbed and causes a two-space feed to lbe given. This--displacement of the link R from its normal position to that shown in dotted lines, isfdeter-mined by the operation vof -the shifting -mechanism rand coincidently with the shifting of the impression cylinder D. This connection may be variously made, the arrangement shown bei-ng well adapted for the purpose. According'to the construction shown, motion is transmitted to the link R from the oscillating shaft .l through which the impressionk roller is shifted. An arm u is iixedly attached to this shaft, yand is connected by a rod u' to the link R, so that on pressing the capital key the shaft J, arm u, rod u' and link R are thrown from the positions shown in full lines to those shown in dotted lines in Fig. l. The key-levers B whichengage -with the treadle R' are those marked 14 for the letters R r, l5 for F f, 18 for T t, 27 for Jj, and 35 for L l (see Fig. 3). Each of these levers has a projection Rztixed to its under side projecting down into contact with the treadle R', so that upon the depression of any one of these levers the treadle is depressed, thereby pulling down the link R against the tension of a light spring s2, which has just sufficient tension to uphold the link and treadle, so that in printing a lower case letter, all of which are single space, the abutment K is thrown up, but in printing a capital letter, all of which are two-space, the displacement of the link R beyond the step r' prevents the disturbance of theabutment.

The purpose of the slots in the upper ends of the links Q and R is to permit the arms q p of the abutment shaft to move freely down- IOC Ward in the slot of either link when drawn lovln by motion imparted through the other The purpose of the half-space key a', is to effect a feed of the carriage corresponding to one tooth 0f the feed-rack, or just half the feed that is given by the ordinary spacesbar A used for spacing between words. rlhe halfspace key has two uses: First, for purpose of display it may be used to throw a narrow space between letters in order thereby to make a Word or heading more prominent without isolating the letters so widely apart as must necessarily be done with the existing constructions; second, this space key is useful 1n bringing the impression cylinder to any required position for impressing the types, as for example in making corrections or striking 1n omitted lettersorwords. For this purpose the space-bar A is used on existing machines, but on a machine to which my invention is applied, the required point may be the space of one tooth beyond that to which thisspacebar feeds the carriage by moving it two teeth at atime, and to supply this space of one tooth the operator has only to depress the half-space key.

i In so far as the generic claims of my invention are concerned, it will be understood that the application of my` invention to a Remington typewriter is only one example of its applicabilities. With modifications merely of specific mechanisms, and Without departing from its essential principle, my invention may be applied to numerous other constructions of typewriters. In the Remington machine the type base is stationary and the carriage 'carriesthe paper being printed upon, but typewriting machines have been proposed in which the paper remains stationary and the type base is carried by the carriage. With respect to the feeding mechanism, the essential parts of an escape-` ment feed are in substance, in combination with a feed-rack, a feed-dog moving transversely in and out of the teeth of the rack, and a spacer or free pawl, tooth or other part pressed forward by a spring at each movement, and serving to limit theextent of feed of the carriage. In some instances the feedrack is mounted on the carriage, and the dog is pivoted on a'stationary frame, as in the Remington machine,but this arrangement might be transposed. In the Remington the feed-rack is immovable transversely and the dogis movable, but this arrangement might be transposed, the dog being immovable transversely of the rack, `and the latter moving sidewise in and out of engagelnent with the dog. The spacer or escape part may be a free pawl or tooth as in the Remington machine, or a free rack as in the Caligraph machine. My invention is applicable to any of these various modifications of the feed mechanism employed on typewriters, the precise construction and arrangement of the parts of my improved variable feed being necessarily dependent upon the construction of the feed mechanism of the typewriter to which it is applied.

An obvious modification of my invention will consist in the subdivision of the letters of the alphabet into one, two, three and four-space letters, or two, three and four- Space, or three, four and five-space, the fineness of the teeth of the rack and the proportionate widths of the steps of theyariable stops being proportioned correspondingly.

I claim as my invention the following-defined novel features, substantially as hereinbefore specified, namely:

1. In a typewriter, the combination with the feed-mechanism comprising a relativelymovable feed-rack and dog, and a spacer, said rack having teeth of a tineness equal to a fraction of the feed for types of average width, of a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer, mounted to reciprocate with the feed mechanism and means for operating said stop consisting of a movable abutment standing normally in the path of said stop, to intercept it in position to give a normal feed, and a connection` between said abutment and the requisite keys for throwing said abutment out of the path of the stop to vary the movement of the spacer and givea feed of different length when any of the keys so connected is depressed.

In a typewriter, the combination with the feed-mechanism comprising a relativelymovable feed-rack and dog, and a spacer, said rack having teeth of a fineness equal to half the feed for types of average width, of a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer, mounted to reciprocate with the feed mechanism and means for operating said stop consisting of a movable abutment standing normally in the path of said stop, to intercept it in position to give a two-space feed, and a connection between said-abutment and the keys for one-space types for throwing said abutment out of the path of the stop to permit the latter to move farther and thereby limit the movement of the spacer to give a one-space feed.

3. In a typewriter, the combination with the feed-mechanism comprising a relativelymovable feed-rack and dog, and a spacer, said rack having teeth of a fineness equal to half the feed for types of average width,`of a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer, mounted to reciprocate with the' throw the latter out of the path of the stop on the depression of the treadle.

- 4.l In a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E, dog F, and spacer G, of variable stop L, movable abutment K, treadle Q' arranged to be depressed by certain keys, and rod Q connecting it to said abutment, to the effect set forth.

5. In a type-writer wherein the same typekeys print two different types under the control of a shifting mechanism the combination therewith of a variable letter-feed, comprising a feed-rack, dog and spacer, a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer over one or more teeth of the rack,

a stop-actuating mechanism connected to the keys for printing each two types which require different feeds, so that the depression of any of said keys operates said stop-actuating mechanism, said mechanism normally connected to the stop to actuate the latter to give anarrow feed, and a connection between said stop-actuating mechanism and the shifting-mechanism for disconnecting the former from the stop upon the operation of the shifting mechanism, so that the depression of any of said 'keys fails to act upon the stop, and the latter gives the wider feed, whereby the same key will cause a wide or narrow feed according to the type it is printing as determined by the shifting mechanism.

6. In a typewriter wherein the same typekeys print two different types under the control of a shifting mechanism, the combination therewith of a variable letter-feed, comprising a feed-rack, dog and spacer, a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer over one or more teeth of the rack,

a movable abutment normally in the path of said stop and acting to hold it to the position for giving a two-space feed, a stop controlling mechanism for displacing said abutment to enable the stop to give a one-space feed, connected to and normally operated by the keys for print-ing each two types which require different feeds, so that normally the depression of any of said keys displaces said abutment and'gives a one-space feed, and a connection between said stop-controlling mechanism and the shifting mechanism for throwing t-he former out of action upon the operation of .the lat-ter, so that while the shifting mechanism is'in use the depression of any of said keys fails to displace said abutmentand gives a two-space feed.

7. In a typewriter wherein the same typekeys print two different types under the control of a shifting mechanism, the combination therewith of a variable letter-feed, comprising a feed-rack, dog and spacer, a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer over one or more teeth of the rack, and mechanism for controlling the stop consisting of a movable abutment K, having an arm 4with active portion fr', a treadle R arranged to be depressed by the keys for printing each two types which require different feeds, a rod R connecting the treadle to said arm, normally engaging the portion r' thereof, so that the depression of the treadle displaces Ithe abutment, and a rod u for connecting said rod R with the shifting mechanism the typewriter, and rod u connecting said arm'u to said rod R for throwing the latter out of action.

9. In a typewriter, thc combination with feed-rack E, dog F, and spacer G, of variable stop L, movable abutment K, treadle Q arranged to be depressed by certain keys, treadle R arranged to be depressed vby cert-ain other keys, rods Q and R for connecting the respective treadles to the abutment, and rod u connecting said rod R to the shifting mechanism for throwing it out of action.

l0. In a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E, dog F, and spacer G,of variable stop L, movable abutment K, having arms q and p, treadles Q and R arranged to be depressed by certain different keys, rods Q and R connecting the respective treadles to said arms q and p, both of said rods having free or slotted engagement with said arms to enable either arm to move down independently of its rod under the pull of `the other rod,and rod u connecting rod R with the shifting mechanism for throwing it out of acti-on.

lLIn a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E, dog F and spacer G, of variable stop L, movable abutment K constructedas a pivoted arm pressed normally to place by a spring s', and mechanism in connection with certain keys for displacing said abutment when said' lkeys are depressed.

12. In a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E, dog F and spacer G, ofvariable stop L, movable abutment K having an arm q, a treadle Q arranged to be depressed by certain keys, a rod Q connectingitwith said arm, and a spring s3 for upholding the vsaid'treadle and rod.

13. In a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E, dog F and spacer G, of variable stop L,.movable abutment K having an arm p, a treadle R arranged to be depressed by certain keys, a rod R connecting it with said arm, a rod u connecting said rod R with the shifting mechanism, and a spring s2 for upholding said treadle and rods.

14. In a typewriter, the combination with feed-rack E having teeth of a fineness equal to a fraction of the feed for'types of average width, dog F and spacer G, of a variable stop L mounted to move with the dog, and movable relatively to the dog in the direction of the dogs movement, having a shoulder abut- IOO IIO

ting against the dog and a spring s for tending to keep it in place with s aid shoulder pressed against the dog, whereby the stop normally moves with the dog to cause a feed ot a certain width, and connections between said stop and the requisite type-keys for displacing the stop relatively to the dog, and against the tension of said spring, for causing a feed of a different width.

l5. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, pivoted dog F and spacer G, with a variable stop L pivoted on the same axis as the dog, and spring s acting against it andreacting on the dog.

16. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, pivoted dog F and spacer G, with a variable stop L mounted to move relatively to the dog in the direction of the movement of the dog, having shoulder Z abutting against the dog for limiting its movement relatively thereto, and spring s tending to press it forward to bring said shoulder against the dog vhereby the stop is normally carried with the 17. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, pivoted dog F and spacer G, with a variable stop L mounted to move with the dog, and movable independently in the direction of the dogs movement, and an adj usting device for determining its position .longitudinally of the rack to adjust it to stop the spacer in positions coinciding with the spaces between the rack teeth.

18. In atypewriter, the combination of feedrack F., pivoted dog F and spacer G, with a variable stop L mounted to move with the dog, and an adjusting device for determining its position relatively to the spacer consisting of a screw collar la engaging the stop to move it toward or from the spacer.

19. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, pivoted dog F formed with an axial shaft c', and spacer G, with a variable stop L pivoted on said shaft, and a collar 7c adjustable thereon and engaging the stop.

20. In a typewriter, the combination to form a variable letter feed, of a feed-rack, a dog and spacer working therein, a variable stop for determining the movement of the spacer overa greater or less number of teeth, mounted to move with the dog, and movable relatively to the dog in the direction of the dogs movement, a spring pressing against said stop and tending to cause it to move normally with the dog, and a connection between the keys for types of extra width, and said variable stop adapted upon the depression of either of said keys to draw back the stop during the forward movement of the dog to a position where it permits an increased movement to the spacer, thereby causing a wider feed.

2l. In a typewriter, the combination to form a variable letter feed, of a feed-rack, a dog and spacer working therein, a variable stop L mounted to,` move with the dog, having a spring s acting against it and reacting on the dog, and a shoulder abutting against the dog for limiting its movement relatively thereto, whereby normally the stop moves with the dog, and having a rearwardly projecting arm, and a connection between `said arm and a key lever for impressing a type of extra width, adapted on the depression of such key-lever to draw back the variable stop against the tension of its spring during the forward movement of the dog.

22. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, dog F, spacer G, variable stop L mounted to move with the dog, having a spring tending to press it forward with the dog, and formed with a rearward arm L2, and a rod t connecting this arm with the key-lever of a type of extra width, whereby on the depression of said lever it draws back the stop.

23. In a typewriter, the combination of feedrack E, dog F, spacer G, variable stop L mounted to move with the dog, having a spring tending to press it forward with the dog, and formed with a rearward arm L2, having a cross-bar L3, and two rods t t connecting the opposite ends of this cross-bar

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3232405A (en) * 1963-06-26 1966-02-01 Ibm Typewriter escapement mechanism with spacing means
US3270851A (en) * 1963-08-08 1966-09-06 Scm Corp Typewriter
US3385415A (en) * 1965-04-23 1968-05-28 Olympia Werke Ag Half spacing escapement mechanism for typewriters
US20070132274A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 Lam William Y Titanium-containing lubricating oil composition

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3232405A (en) * 1963-06-26 1966-02-01 Ibm Typewriter escapement mechanism with spacing means
US3270851A (en) * 1963-08-08 1966-09-06 Scm Corp Typewriter
US3385415A (en) * 1965-04-23 1968-05-28 Olympia Werke Ag Half spacing escapement mechanism for typewriters
US20070132274A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 Lam William Y Titanium-containing lubricating oil composition

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