US3897363A - Blood control standard - Google Patents

Blood control standard Download PDF

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US3897363A
US3897363A US38741973A US3897363A US 3897363 A US3897363 A US 3897363A US 38741973 A US38741973 A US 38741973A US 3897363 A US3897363 A US 3897363A
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yeast
dextrose
per
blood
mg
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Allan L Louderback
Anthony J Fontana
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TECHNICON INSTRUMENTS Corp 511 BENEDICT AVENUE TARRYTOWN NEW YORK 10591-6097 A CORP OF DE
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Baxter International Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N33/00Investigating or analysing materials by specific methods not covered by the preceding groups
    • G01N33/48Biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Haemocytometers
    • G01N33/50Chemical analysis of biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Testing involving biospecific ligand binding methods; Immunological testing
    • G01N33/96Chemical analysis of biological material, e.g. blood, urine; Testing involving biospecific ligand binding methods; Immunological testing involving blood or serum control standard
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K35/00Medicinal preparations containing materials or reaction products thereof with undetermined constitution
    • A61K35/12Materials from mammals; Compositions comprising non-specified tissues or cells; Compositions comprising non-embryonic stem cells; Genetically modified cells
    • A61K35/14Blood; Artificial blood
    • A61K35/16Blood plasma; Blood serum
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12QMEASURING OR TESTING PROCESSES INVOLVING ENZYMES, NUCLEIC ACIDS OR MICROORGANISMS; COMPOSITIONS OR TEST PAPERS THEREFOR; PROCESSES OF PREPARING SUCH COMPOSITIONS; CONDITION-RESPONSIVE CONTROL IN MICROBIOLOGICAL OR ENZYMOLOGICAL PROCESSES
    • C12Q1/00Measuring or testing processes involving enzymes, nucleic acids or microorganisms; Compositions therefor; Processes of preparing such compositions
    • C12Q1/56Measuring or testing processes involving enzymes, nucleic acids or microorganisms; Compositions therefor; Processes of preparing such compositions involving blood clotting factors, e.g. involving thrombin, thromboplastin, fibrinogen
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S435/00Chemistry: molecular biology and microbiology
    • Y10S435/802Logarithmic growth phase
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S435/00Chemistry: molecular biology and microbiology
    • Y10S435/8215Microorganisms
    • Y10S435/911Microorganisms using fungi
    • Y10S435/94Saccharomyces
    • Y10S435/942Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T436/00Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing
    • Y10T436/10Composition for standardization, calibration, simulation, stabilization, preparation or preservation; processes of use in preparation for chemical testing
    • Y10T436/104998Glucose, ketone, nitrate standard or control
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T436/00Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing
    • Y10T436/10Composition for standardization, calibration, simulation, stabilization, preparation or preservation; processes of use in preparation for chemical testing
    • Y10T436/106664Blood serum or blood plasma standard or control
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T436/00Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing
    • Y10T436/10Composition for standardization, calibration, simulation, stabilization, preparation or preservation; processes of use in preparation for chemical testing
    • Y10T436/107497Preparation composition [e.g., lysing or precipitation, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T436/00Chemistry: analytical and immunological testing
    • Y10T436/10Composition for standardization, calibration, simulation, stabilization, preparation or preservation; processes of use in preparation for chemical testing
    • Y10T436/108331Preservative, buffer, anticoagulant or diluent

Abstract

A blood control standard is prepared from anticoagulant stored blood plasma containing elevated levels of dextrose by aerobic fermentation with yeast in the late log phase or in the stationery phase of the yeast growth to selectively destroy dextrose without adversely affecting the protein constituents of said blood plasma.

Description

Unite States atent I19] Louderback et a1.

[ 1 July 29, 1975 I BLOOD CONTROL STANDARD [75] Inventors: Allan L. Louderback, Temple City;

Anthony J. Fontana, Glendora, both of Calif.

[73] Assignee: Baxter Laboratories, Inc., Morton Grove, Ill.

[22] Filed: Aug. 10, 1973 [21] App]. No.: 387,419

[52] US. Cl 252/408; 23/230 B; 195/11; 195/37; 424/101 [51] Int. CL... C09k 3/00; G0ln 31/00; GOln 33/00 [58] Field of Search 252/408; 23/230 B; 424/101; 195/11, 37

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,788,628 1/1931 De Fine Olivarius 195/11 2,651,592 9/1953 Baker 195/11 X 2,744,017 5/1956 Baldwin 195/11 X 3,092,465 6/1963 Adams, Jr. et a1. 252/408 X 3,466,249 9/1969 Anderson 252/408 3,629,142 12/1971 Marbach 252/408 3,682,835 8/1972 Louder-back 252/408 3,717,549 2/1973 Roberts 195/37 3,751,381 8/1973 Megraw 252/408 3,753,925 8/1973 Louderback et al 252/408 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,287,083 l/1969 Germany 195/11 4543576 5/1970 Japan 195/11 OTHER PUBLICATIONS The Chemistry and Biology of Yeasts, edited by A. H. Cook, Academic Press 1nc., N.Y., 1958, pp. 252-275.

Primary Examiner-Benjamin R. Padgett Assistant ExaminerTeddy S. Gron Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Scott J. Meyer; Louis Altman [57] ABSTRACT 6 Claims, No Drawings BLOOD CONTROL STANDARD This invention relates to a blood control standard and method of preparation thereof.

Blood serum is a complex biological fluid containing numerous components of substantial physiological importance. In the normal or average healthy person the concentrations of these components fall within certain reasonably well-defined limits. When one or more of these components is determined upon analysis to fall outside of these acceptable limits, various diseases or pathological conditions of the body systems are indicated.

In recent years various automated procedures have been developed for conveniently analyzing multiple components of blood serum. Illustrative of the analytical equipment for these purposes are the Technicon Auto-Analyzer, the Warner Chillcott Robot Chemist, the Beckrnan Discrete Analyzer and the I-Iycel Mark X. These instruments are capable of rapidly and sequentially determining the concentrations of a host of blood serum components in a single sample, for example, up to a dozen or more values.

In the performance of the analytical tests made by the above and similar equipment on blood serum and other biological samples, it is necessary to use laboratory standard materials or so-called reference or control standards for purposes of calibration and control of the instrument. Accurate results in the use of these instruments, particularly in the case of multiautomated procedures, are dependent upon rigid and constant standardization of the biochemical determinations.

Illustrative of the control standards used in actual practice are the freeze-dried serum which is reconstituted with aqueous ammonium bicarbonate prior to use as described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,466,249, and the liquid blood serum control standard which does not require reconstitution prior to use as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,682,835.

A principal raw material used in making these and other such blood control standards is stored blood plasma obtained from blood donor centers and blood banks. Blood plasma is normally collected and stored in various anticoagulant materials such as, for example, sodium citrate, heparin and sodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate. Certain widely used anticoagulant materials contain, additionally, dextrose (D-glucose). ACD blood (containing citric acid, sodium citrate and dextrose) is a principal example of an anticoagulant stored blood containing elevated levels of dextrose. Another such anticoagulant stored blood is CPD blood (containing citrate, phosphate and dextrose).

Due to the extraneous additon of anticoagulant materials containing dextrose to the stored blood or blood plasma, the stored product will contain an elevated, or abnormally high, level of dextrose. Consequently, such stored blood plasma is not generally suitable for use as a raw material in the preparation of blood control standards except in the case of so-called abnormal control sera where high levels of dextrose are desired.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a blood control standard from anticoagulant stored plasma containing elevated levels of dextrose.

It is another object of this invention to provide a method for preparing a blood control standard having normal or reduced levels of dextrose from stored plasma containing elevated levels of dextrose without adversely affecting the normal protein constituents of said blood plasma.

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art after reading the disclosure hereof.

Briefly stated, the objects of the present invention are achieved by selective destruction of the dextrose in stored blood by aerobic fermentation with yeast in the negative acceleration phase or in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. It is important to use these growth phases in the practice of the present invention, otherwise the yeast feeds on the blood proteins to make more yeast cells and the protein content of the product is undesirably reduced.

Many microorganisms, including yeasts, are capable of dividing at a rapid rate, e.g., at a frequency of less than once per hour, if kept under favorable growth conditions. This leads to a multiplication of cells which is exponential or logarithmic. Ordinarily, following initial inoculation of a new medium with spores or with an old culture, a period of little or no growth occurs. This is referred to as the lag phase. Eventually, exponential multiplication begins. After a period of time, the multiplication slows down in what is termed a period of neg ative acceleration or the late log phase. Finally, the death of cells balances or exceeds the formation of new cells in what is termed the stationary phase. The stationary phase includes the so-called real stationary phase and the phase of decline in growth.

Thus, in the log phase, the cells are growing and dividing whereas in the stationary phase the cells exhibit little or no growth and division.

These various phases of yeast growth can be controlled or regulated by providing suitable conditions of nutrient, oxygen supply, pH, temperature and inoculant.

A further description of the kinetics of yeast growth and the foregoing growth phases are found in The Chemistry and Biology of Yeasts, edited by A. H. Cook, Academic Press Inc., New York, 1958, at pages 252 275, which is incorporated herein by reference.

It is also important in the practice of the present invention to use aerobic rather than anerobic fermentation. In the presence of air (aerobic fermentation) the yeast produces completely oxidized products, water and carbon dioxide, from dextrose, whereas the absence of air (anerobic fermentation) results in oxidized products (carbon dioxide) in part and.reduced products (alcohol) in part.

In a preferred method of the invention, defibrinated plasma or blood serum is incubated with the yeast for about 12 24 hours, preferably about 18 hours, at normal room temperature (ca. 2025 C).

Any available yeast can be used in accordance with this invention. Yeasts are widely distributed, wellknown microorganisms. Even as early as 1930, some 6,000 cultures of yeast were available from the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelculturen, Baarn, Holland. The commercially important yeasts which can be used in the practice of this invention are those such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyses cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus, Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, Saccharomyces fragilis, and the Torula yeasts, e.g., Torulopsis spherica, Torulopsis utilis (Candida utilis) and Candida pseudotropicalis.

Examples of suitable commercially available yeast products are Fleischmanns Active Dry Yeast marketed by Standard Brands Inc., and Red Star Active Dry Yeast, marketed by Universal Foods Corp. These yeast products are essentially compressed distillers yeasts. Preparation of these yeast products from grain alcohol product is well known and described in many patents, e.g., the early patent of H. Fleischmann, U.S. Pat. No. 102,387 (Apr. 26, 1870), which is a modification of the Vienna Process.

The amount of yeast used according to the present invention can vary somewhat. in general, from about 0.1 gram to about 10 grams of active dry yeast per liter of blood plasma is suitable and about one gram per liter is preferred.

Freshly stored ACD blood plasma may contain up to 500 mg. dextrose per 100 ml. and after 21 days of storage the dextrose level may still be as high as 300 mg. per 100 ml. In accordance with the present invention, this dextrose level is reduced to about 50 mg. per 100 ml., and preferably to about 40 mg. per 100 ml. This reduction is brought about without any substantial destruction of the normal protein content of the plasma.

Following the foregoing fermentation, the treated plasma is filtered or centrifuged to separate particulate residue and the resulting filtrate or supernatant is retained for use as the base blood control standard of this invention. Sufficient dextrose can then be added back to this base control standard to provide any desired predetermined dextrose level whereby various normal or abnormal blood control standards can be prepared. For example, the dextrose level can be increased to a range of from about 80 to about 400 mg. per 100 ml.

The blood control standard prepared as above can be further treated to reduce the inorganic ion level, particularly sodium, potassium and calcium, and/or to remove the lipoprotein components as described in US. Pat. No. 3,682,835. Thus, the above-prepared material can be admixed with a strong cation exchange resin such as Dowex-SO to substantially reduce said cation level, and the lipoprotein content can be removed by extraction with a fat-solvent such as a chlorinated hydrocarbon. The treated material is then conveniently reconstituted with water to about its original volume. The foregoing treatment can also be carried out prior to the selective destruction of the dextrose by the aerobic fermentation with yeast.

The following examples will further illustrate the invention although the invention is not limited to these specific examples.

EXAMPLE 1 Pooled human ACD stored blood plasma liters) was obtained from a blood donor center. Upon assay, the plasma was determined to contain 345 mg. (mg. per 100 ml.) of glucose and had a total protein content of 6.5 gram The blood plasma was defibrinated by reaction with 30,000 units of thrombin (Thrombin Topical, Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Michigan) and then removal of the clotted material. Upon assay, the defibrinated plasma was determined to contain 350 mg. of glucose.

To one liter of the defibrinated plasma was added 1 gram of Fleischmanns Active Dry Yeast. The mixture was stirred overnight (about 12 hours) on a magnetic mixer at room temperature (about C). The mixture was then filtered to remove the particulate matter and the filtrate was retained as the desired base blood control standard of the present invention. Upon assay, it was determined to contain 10 mg. of glucose.

The thus prepared base blood control standard was mixed with 30 grams of Dowex-SO ion exchange resin in three increments of 10 grams each whereby the Na ion level was reduced from its original level of 163 meq./liter to 97 meq./liter and the K ion level was reduced from its original level of 11 meq./liter to 4.8 meq./liter. The resin was removed after treatment with each 10 gram increment by filtration through glass wool. Upon assay, the final product was determined to have a total protein content of 6.3 gram EXAMPLE 2 Another liter of the defibrinated plasma prepared in Example 1, above, was mixed with 30 grams of Dowex-SO ion exchange resin in three increments of 10 grams each whereby the Na ion level was reduced to 94 meq./liter and the K* ion was reduced to 4.4 meq./liter. The resin was removed after treatment with each 10 gram increment by filtration through glass wool. Upon assay, the resin-treated plasma was determined to contain 310 mg. of glucose.

The resin-treated plasma was then mixed with 1 gram of Fleischmanns Active Dry Yeast and stirred overnight (about l2 hours) on a magnetic mixer at room temperature (about 20 C). The mixture was then filtered to remove the particulate matter and the filtrate was retained as the desired base blood control standard of the present invention. Upon assay, it was determined to contain 10 mg. of glucose and the total protein content was 6.4 gram Various other examples and modifications of the foregoing examples will be apparent to those skilled in the art after reading the foregoing specification and the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. All such further examples are included within the scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of making a blood control standard from anticoagulant stored, defibrinated blood plasma containing elevated levels of dextrose which comprises selectively destroying dextrose in said blood plasma by aerobic fermentation with agitation utilizing 0.1 to 10 grams of a yeast in the negative acceleration phase or in the stationary phase of the yeast growth per liter of said plasma and separating particulate residue from the fermentation product.

2. The method of claim 1 in which the yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

3. The method of claim 1 in which the blood plasma is incubated with the yeast for about 12 to about 24 hours at about 20 to about 25 C.

4. The method of claim 1 in which the dextrose in said blood plasma is reduced from an initial level of about 300 to 500 mg. per 100 ml. to a final level of about 0 to 50 mg. per 100 ml.

5. The method of claim 1 in which the yeast is Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, the blood plasma is incubated with said yeast for about 12 to about 24 hours at about 20 to about 25 C, and in which the dextrose in said blood plasma is reduced from an initial level of about 300 to 500 mg. per 100 ml. to a final level of about 0 to 50 mg. per 100 ml.

6 tion phase or in the stationary phase of the yeast growth to selectively destroy said dextrose and reduce its concentration to a level of about 0 to 50 mg. per ml,

and separated from particulate residue.

Claims (6)

1. THE METHOD OF MAKING A BLOOD CONTROL STANDARD FROM ANTICOAGULANT STORED, DEFIBRINATED BLOOD PLASMA CONTAINING ELEVATED LEVELS OF DEXTROSE WHICH COMPRISES SELECTIVELY DESTROYING DEXTROSE IN SAID BLOOD PLASMA BY AEROBIC FERMENTATION WITH AGITATION UTILIZING 0.1 TO 10 GRAMS OF A YEAST IN THE NEGATIVE ACCELERATION PHASE OR IN THE STATIONARY PHASE OF THE YEAST GROWTH PER LITER OF SAID PLASMA AND SEPARATING PARTICULATE RESIDUE FROM THE FERMENTATION PRODUCT.
2. The method of claim 1 in which the yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
3. The method of claim 1 in which the blood plasma is incubated with the yeast for about 12 to about 24 hours at about 20* to about 25* C.
4. The method of claim 1 in which the dextrose in said blood plasma is reduced from an initial level of about 300 to 500 mg. per 100 ml. to a final level of about 0 to 50 mg. per 100 ml.
5. The method of claim 1 in which the yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the blood plasma is incubated with said yeast for about 12 to about 24 hours at about 20* to about 25* C, and in which the dextrose in said blood plasma is reduced from an initial level of about 300 to 500 mg. per 100 ml. to a final level of about 0 to 50 mg. per 100 ml.
6. A liquid blood control standard comprising anticoagulant-stored blood plasma containing from about 300 to 500 mg. per 100 ml. of dextrose which is defibrinated, reacted with yeast by aerobic fermentation with agitation utilizing from 0.1 to 10 grams of said yeast per liter of said plasma in the negative acceleration phase or in the stationary phase of the yeast growth to selectively destroy said dextrose and reduce its concentration to a level of about 0 to 50 mg. per 100 ml, and seParated from particulate residue.
US3897363A 1973-08-10 1973-08-10 Blood control standard Expired - Lifetime US3897363A (en)

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Applications Claiming Priority (11)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3897363A US3897363A (en) 1973-08-10 1973-08-10 Blood control standard
CA 198888 CA1030448A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-05-03 Blood control standard
BE144425A BE815166A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-05-17 blood control standard
IL4486274A IL44862A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-05-20 A blood control standard and its preparation
JP6276774A JPS5040193A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-06-03
GB2486974A GB1440289A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-06-05 Blood control standard
AU6995874A AU6995874A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-06-10 Blood control standard
DE19742430622 DE2430622A1 (en) 1973-08-10 1974-06-26 Blood control standard and process for its manufacture
FR7422591A FR2240452A1 (en) 1973-08-10 1974-06-28
IT2586574A IT1017819B (en) 1973-08-10 1974-08-01 Standard for blood control
DK425274A DK425274A (en) 1973-08-10 1974-08-09

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JP (1) JPS5040193A (en)
BE (1) BE815166A (en)
CA (1) CA1030448A (en)
DE (1) DE2430622A1 (en)
DK (1) DK425274A (en)
FR (1) FR2240452A1 (en)
GB (1) GB1440289A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4056484A (en) * 1974-12-31 1977-11-01 Behringwerke Aktiengesellschaft Stable blood plasma, process for preparing it and its use as comparative plasma in coagulation tests
US6268481B1 (en) 1997-05-29 2001-07-31 Medical Analysis Systems, Inc. Covalently coupled troponin complexes

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1788628A (en) * 1925-12-22 1931-01-13 California Packing Corp Process of treating sugar solutions
US2651592A (en) * 1950-08-15 1953-09-08 Ben L Sarett Enzymatic process for producing gluconic acid
US2744017A (en) * 1950-08-15 1956-05-01 Ben L Sarett Removal of sugars by enzymatic process
US3092465A (en) * 1960-03-25 1963-06-04 Miles Lab Diagnostic test device for blood sugar
US3466249A (en) * 1967-02-13 1969-09-09 Baxter Laboratories Inc Blood serum reference standard for multi-automated analytical procedures
US3629142A (en) * 1969-12-08 1971-12-21 Edward P Marbach Reference standard blood serum for the calibration of automatic blood serum analyzing apparatus
US3682835A (en) * 1970-11-24 1972-08-08 Baxter Laboratories Inc Liquid blood serum control standard
US3717549A (en) * 1971-02-09 1973-02-20 Pfizer Fermentation process for the production of citric acid
US3751381A (en) * 1971-04-27 1973-08-07 Warner Lambert Co Dyed albumen-cohn fraction iii-lipid mixtures serum lipid assay standard
US3753925A (en) * 1972-03-24 1973-08-21 Baxter Laboratories Inc Cerebrospinal fluid control standard

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1788628A (en) * 1925-12-22 1931-01-13 California Packing Corp Process of treating sugar solutions
US2651592A (en) * 1950-08-15 1953-09-08 Ben L Sarett Enzymatic process for producing gluconic acid
US2744017A (en) * 1950-08-15 1956-05-01 Ben L Sarett Removal of sugars by enzymatic process
US3092465A (en) * 1960-03-25 1963-06-04 Miles Lab Diagnostic test device for blood sugar
US3466249A (en) * 1967-02-13 1969-09-09 Baxter Laboratories Inc Blood serum reference standard for multi-automated analytical procedures
US3629142A (en) * 1969-12-08 1971-12-21 Edward P Marbach Reference standard blood serum for the calibration of automatic blood serum analyzing apparatus
US3682835A (en) * 1970-11-24 1972-08-08 Baxter Laboratories Inc Liquid blood serum control standard
US3717549A (en) * 1971-02-09 1973-02-20 Pfizer Fermentation process for the production of citric acid
US3751381A (en) * 1971-04-27 1973-08-07 Warner Lambert Co Dyed albumen-cohn fraction iii-lipid mixtures serum lipid assay standard
US3753925A (en) * 1972-03-24 1973-08-21 Baxter Laboratories Inc Cerebrospinal fluid control standard

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4056484A (en) * 1974-12-31 1977-11-01 Behringwerke Aktiengesellschaft Stable blood plasma, process for preparing it and its use as comparative plasma in coagulation tests
US6268481B1 (en) 1997-05-29 2001-07-31 Medical Analysis Systems, Inc. Covalently coupled troponin complexes

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DE2430622A1 (en) 1975-02-27 application
FR2240452A1 (en) 1975-03-07 application
JPS5040193A (en) 1975-04-12 application
BE815166A (en) 1974-09-16 grant
GB1440289A (en) 1976-06-23 application
DK425274A (en) 1975-04-21 application
CA1030448A (en) 1978-05-02 grant
CA1030448A1 (en) grant
BE815166A1 (en) grant

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