US3800416A - Method and apparatus for assembly of contacts in a printed circuit board - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for assembly of contacts in a printed circuit board Download PDF

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Publication number
US3800416A
US3800416A US3800416DA US3800416A US 3800416 A US3800416 A US 3800416A US 3800416D A US3800416D A US 3800416DA US 3800416 A US3800416 A US 3800416A
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Prior art keywords
contacts
board
apertures
vise
row
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E Shultz
R Katzaman
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AMP Inc
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AMP Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R43/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors
    • H01R43/20Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors for assembling or disassembling contact members with insulating base, case or sleeve
    • H01R43/205Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors for assembling or disassembling contact members with insulating base, case or sleeve with a panel or printed circuit board
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K13/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing or adjusting assemblages of electric components
    • H05K13/04Mounting of components, e.g. of leadless components
    • H05K13/0447Hand tools therefor
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K13/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing or adjusting assemblages of electric components
    • H05K13/04Mounting of components, e.g. of leadless components
    • H05K13/0478Simultaneously mounting of different components
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49002Electrical device making
    • Y10T29/49117Conductor or circuit manufacturing
    • Y10T29/49124On flat or curved insulated base, e.g., printed circuit, etc.
    • Y10T29/49147Assembling terminal to base
    • Y10T29/49149Assembling terminal to base by metal fusion bonding
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/5313Means to assemble electrical device
    • Y10T29/53174Means to fasten electrical component to wiring board, base, or substrate

Abstract

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for simultaneously assembling a plurality of elongated contacts within corresponding apertures provided in a printed circuit board. According to the assembly techniques of the present invention, an entire row of elongated contacts are initially manually inserted into corresponding rows of P.C. board apertures with the aid of a hand tool. In the present invention, the printed circuit board is mounted on a carriage of an insertion machine. The initially inserted row of contacts partially protrudes through the P.C. board and is received in the jaws of a vise. In the operation of the insertion machine, the vise jaws close and grip the row of protruding contacts. Sequentially, a limited and precisely adjusted relative motion is effected between the P.C. board carriage and the vise. Such operation causes a corresponding limited and precisely controlled relative displacement between the inserted row of contacts and the P.C. board, thus forcibly positioning and seating the enlarged, interference fit portions of the contacts within corresponding apertures of the P.C. board. In this manner, all contacts of the row are precisely positioned simultaneously in desired registration within the printed circuit board. Sequentially, the vise jaws are opened, allowing an operator of the machine to remove the contacts therefrom and reposition the P.C. board on the carriage for insertion of another row of contacts. With the board thus repositioned, the machine may be reset for a repeated cycle of operation. In a modification of the machine, a mechanism is provided which is actuated after opening of the jaws, thereby automatically removing the row of contacts from the jaws. The purpose of this operation is to provide a substantial clearance between the P.C. board and the jaws, allowing the operator to reposition the P.C. board on the carriage without interfering with the vise jaws. With the P.C. board repositioned (desirably for insertion of another row of contacts) the operator may then reset the machine for a repeated cycle of operation.

Description

United States Patent [1 1 Shultz, Jr. et al.

[4 1 Apr. 2, 1974 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLY OF CONTACTS IN A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD [75] Inventors: Edmund Franklin Shultz, Jr.;

Ronald Eugene Katzaman, both of l-lummelstown, Pa.

[73] Assignee: AMP Incorporated, Harrisburg, Pa.

[22] Filed: May 19, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 255,239

3,676,926 7/1972 Kendall....

Primary Examiner-Charles W. Lanham Assistant Examiner.loseph A. Walkowski Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Gerald K. Kita, Esq.

[57] ABSTRACT The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for simultaneously assembling a plurality of elongated contacts within corresponding apertures provided in a printed circuit board. According to the assembly techniques of the present invention, an entire row of elongated contacts are initially manually inserted into corresponding rows of P.C. board apertures with the aid of a hand tool. In the present invention, the printed circuit board is mounted on a carriage of an insertion machine. The initially inserted row of contacts partially protrudes through the P.C. board and is received in Q jaws of a vise. In the operation of the insertion machine, the vise jaws close and grip the row of protruding contacts. sequentially, a limited and precisely adjusted relative motion is effected between the P.C. board carriage and the vise. Such operation causes a corresponding limited and precisely controlled relative displacement between the inserted row of contacts and the P.C. board, thus forcibly positioning and seating the enlarged, interference fit portions of the contacts within corresponding apertures of the P.C. board. In this manner, all contacts of the row are precisely positioned simultaneously in desired registration within the printed circuit board. Sequentially, the vise jaws are opened, allowing an operator of the machine to remove the contacts therefrom and reposition the P.C. board on the carriage for insertion of another row of contacts. With the board thus repositioned, the machine may be reset for a repeated cycle of operation. In a modification of the machine, a mechanism is provided which is actuated after opening of the jaws, thereby automatically removing the row of contacts from the jaws. The purpose of this operation is to provide a substantial clearance between the P.C. board and the jaws, allowing the operator to reposition the P.C. board on the carriage without interfering with the vise jaws. With the P.C. board repositioned (desirably for insertion of another row of contacts) the operator may then reset the machine for a repeated cycle of operation.

6 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures aleooms PATENTEMPR 21974 SHEET 1 OF 8 PATENT) APR 2 I974 SHEET 2 BF 8 PATENTEDAPR 2 1914 sum 5 or 8 PAI N EmPa' 21914 3; 800 4 16 SHEET 7 [1F 8 PATENTEDAPR 2 mm 3.800.416

, sum 8 [IF 8 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ASSEMBLY OF CONTACTS IN A PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for simultaneously assembling a plurality of elongated contacts within corresponding apertures provided in a printed circuit board. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for simultaneously inserting and positioning elongated contacts in desired registration within corresponding apertures of a printed circuit board; the contacts includingenlarged medial portions designed for an interference fit within corresponding P.C. board apertures, requiring a relatively large insertion force to forcibly seat a plurality of the enlarged contacts simultaneously within the P.C. board apertures.

In the prior art, machine assembly of interference fit contacts in a P.C. board was accomplished only by inserting the contacts one at a time or sequentially in small groups, a process requiring a relatively long assembly time. In the operation of a typical prior art assembly machine, the contacts are supplied continuously on a common carrier strip. The machine severs one, or a small number of contacts, from the carrier strip and forcibly impels the contacts into corresponding apertures in a printed circuit board. Such an assembly technique is relatively time consuming due to the step-and-repeat system whereby only one or a few contacts could be inserted during one cycle of machine operation. As another disadvantage, the step-andrepeat technique required that the printed circuit board be repeatedly indexed in order to position selected apertures thereof suitably for receipt of machine-impelled contacts. If misalignment occurred during indexing, the impelled contacts would miss the P.C. board apertures, possibly causing damage to the contacts and the P.C. board, and requiring manual adjustment and resetting of the machine by an operator, which added further to the required assembly time.

According to the assembly techniques of the present invention, an entire row of elongated contacts are initially manually inserted into corresponding rows of P.C. board apertures with the aid of a hand tool. Such a procedure eliminates the possibility of misalignment during initial insertion of the contacts, which heretofore required resetting of an exemplary prior art insertion machine. Insertion of an entire row of contacts simultaneously substantially eliminates the step-andrepeat indexing of the prior art machine required for inserting the equivalent number of contacts in a row.

In the present invention, the printed circuit board is mounted on a carriage of an insertion machine. The initially inserted row of contacts partially protrudes through the P.C. board and is received in the jaws of a vise. In the operation of the insertion machine, the vise jaws close and grip the row of protruding contacts. Sequentially, a limited and precisely adjusted relative motion is effected between the PG. board carriage and the vise. Such operation causes a corresponding limited and precisely controlled relative displacement between the inserted row of contacts and the P.C. board, thus forcibly positioning and seating the enlarged, interference fit portions of the contacts within corresponding apertures of the P.C. board. In this manner, all contacts of the row are precisely positioned simultaneously in desired registration within the printed circuit board. This over-comes a disadvantage of the prior art insertion machine, wherein the step-and-repeat operation did not always assure equal registration of all contacts of an entire row. sequentially, the vise jaws are opened, allowing an operator of the machine to remove the contacts therefrom and reposition the P.C. board on the carriage for insertion of another row of contacts. With the board thus repositioned, the machine may be reset for a repeated cycle of operation.

In a modification of the machine, a mechanism is provided which is actuated after opening of the jaws, thereby automatically removing the row of contacts from the jaws. More specifically, the mechanism causes an additional displacement of the P.C. board carriage, which removes both the P.C. board and the inserted row of contacts from the vicinity of the vise jaws. The purpose of this operation is to provide a substantial clearance between the P.C. board and the jaws, allowing the operator to reposition the P.C. board on the carriage without interfering with the vise jaws. With the P.C. board repositioned (desirably for insertion of another row of contacts) the operator may then reset the machine for a repeated cycle of operation.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for inserting a row of elongated contacts within corresponding apertures provided in a P.C. board, whereby each of the contacts is forcibly seated with an interference fit within a corresponding P.C. board aperture.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for simultaneously inserting and precisely positioning a plurality of elongated electrical contacts in desired registration within corresponding apertures of a printed circuit board.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for simultaneously inserting and precisely positioning enlarged medial portions of a plurality of contacts in desired registration within corresponding apertures of a printed circuit board, with the enlarged medial portions being seated with an interference fit within the corresponding apertures of the P.C. board.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus especially suited for simultaneously inserting and positioning a plurality of elongated contacts in desired registration within corresponding apertures of a printed circuit board, whereby a relatively large insertion force is required to forcibly seat the contacts simultaneously within the P.C. board apertures.

Other objects and many attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon perusal of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary exploded perspective of a printed circuit board, a row of elongated electrical contacts depending from a common carrier strip and a manually operated insertion tool for gripping and aligning the contacts for insertion into corresponding apertures provided in the P.C. board;

FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 are enlarged elevations in section illustrating in sequence the operation of a hand tool illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective of a preferred embodiment of a machine for simultaneously assembling a plurality of elongated contacts within corresponding apertures provided in a printed circuit board;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of the preferred embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5, with parts partially broken away to illustrate the details thereof;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective of a vise of the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 5, with parts illustrated in exploded configuration to illustrate the details thereof;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective of the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 7, with the component parts in assembled configuration;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation in section illustrating the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 8 incorporated into the preferred embodiment of the machine illustrated in FIG. 5, together with a printed circuit board and two rows of contacts in initial registration within corresponding apertures provided in the printed circuit board;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation in section illustrating selected component parts of the preferred embodiment of the machine illustrated in FIG.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation with parts partially broken away to illustrate component parts of the preferred embodiment of the machine illustrated in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 12 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation in section further illustrating the component parts of a preferred embodiment of the vise illustrated in FIG. 9.

With more particular reference to the drawings, there is shown generally at I a portion of an exemplary printed circuit board, a first row of apertures 2 and an adjacent row of apertures 4. In accordance with established practice, each of the holes 2 and 4 are lined with a conductive material such as copper or solder coated copper. Exemplary conducting printed circuit paths 2' and 4' are electrically connected to the linings of the corresponding apertures 2 and 4. Electrically conducting elongated contacts are received in the apertures 2 and 4 and are soldered in place to make electrical connecting with corresponding circuit paths 2' m4. A plurality of exemplary contacts is illustrated generally at 6. The contacts are arranged in a continuous row and depend from a continuous carrier strip 8. The contacts are on center spacings corresponding to the center spacings of either the row of apertures 2 or the row of apertures 4.

The present invention relates to the assembly of exemplary contacts 6 within a corresponding row of apertures. To begin the assembly operation, the carrier strip 8 is severed to separate a number of contacts 6 from the remainder of the carrier strip and provide a row of contacts of a number corresponding to the number of apertures 2. It is most advantageous to insert all of the selected contacts 6 simultaneously into the corresponding row of apertures 2. Ordinarily it is difficult to retain the selected contacts in desired rigid alignment during insertion into the row of apertures, thus making simultaneous insertion of the contacts a difficult operation. Thus to facilitate insertion of the contacts a simple hand tool according to the present invention is illustrated generally at 10. With reference to FIGS. 1-4, the tool includes a pair of opposed elongated rectangular jaws l2 and 14 mounted for pivotal displacement toward and away from each other. More particularly, the tool is provided with a jamb type hinge 16 having a pivot 18 pivotally connecting together a pair of hinge leaves 20 and 22. One elongated margin 24 of the jaw 12 is connected by threaded fasteners 26 to the hinge leaf 20 which extends entirely along the elongated dimension of the margin 24. In similar fashion, the jaw 14 has an elongated margin 28 connected by suitable threaded fasteners to the hinge leaf 22 which extends entirely along the elongated dimension of the margin 28. The jaws are thus mounted to the hinge for pivotal action about the axis of the hinge pin 18. Immediately adjacent to the hinge 16 and disposed between the jaws l2 and 14 is an elongated bearing block 30 extending along the entire longitudinal dimension of the jaw 14. The bearing block 30 is secured by threaded fasteners, one of which is shown at 32 to the jaw 14 and includes an undercut relieved notch portion 34 extending entirely along the length of the bearing block 30 and defining an undercut planar bearing surface 36 also extending along the entire longitudinal dimension of the jaw 14. The jaw 14 is further provided with a plurality of serrations or teeth 38 along the jaw edge margin 40 which is arcuately curved to extend the teeth 38 toward the opposed jaw 12. The opposed jaw 12 is provided with an edge margin 42 which is arcuately curved generally toward the opposed jaw 14. The serrations 38 are of sawtooth configuration having alternate protruding and recessed portions. The recessed portions are on center spacings corresponding to the center spacings of the row of apertures 2 provided in the P.C. board 1.

Operation of the tool is explained by reference to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. The jaws 12 and 14 are first manually pivoted to diverging positions as shown in FIG. 2. The selected row of contacts 6 is then manually placed between the jaws. As shown in FIG. 3, the carrier strip 8 is disposed generally in the undercut relieved portion 34 of the bearing block 30 and in abutment against the bearing surface 36. The contacts 6 will then register in adjacent recessed portions of the serrations 38. The jaws are then manually pivoted toward each other so as to engage on opposed sides of the contacts 6 and clamp the contacts therebetween. Still with reference to FIG. 3, it is observed that the jaw edge margin 40 is offset from and overlies the jaw edge margin 42. This advantageously protrudes the serrations 38 externally of the jaw edge margin 42 so that an operator is enabled to visually observe the correct placement of the contacts 6 within corresponding adjacent recessed portions of the serrations 38. Additionally, the offset configuration of the jaw margins 40 and 42 permits offset clamping action an opposed sides of the contacts 6 tending to force the contacts into the recessed portions of the serrations 38. With the bearing surface 36 fabricated so it is parallel to the jaw margins 40 and 42, proper alignment of the carrier strip and the contacts 6 for registration within adjacent serrations is assured. As shown in FIG. 4, the selected contacts 6 are maintained rigidly in desired alignment in the tool jaws and protrude partially therefrom for simultaneous introduction into a corresponding row of apertures 2 of the P.C. board 1. The tool thus facilitates simultaneous introduction of the contacts 6 into the exemplary row of apertures 2.

To complete the assembly of the contacts in the P.C. board, reference will be made to FIGS. 5-12 in order to describe generally an assembly machine according to the present invention for inserting and precisely positioning the contacts 6 in desired registration within the apertures of the P.C. board 1. As shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the machine is generally shown at 44 and includes a table 46 on which is mounted a rectangular,

open box enclosure defined by sidewalls 48. A carriage is mounted on the enclosure 48 and includes a pair of bearing blocks 52 pivotally mounted on an elongated shaft 54. The carriage 50 includes a pair of outboard mounted rods 56 and another pair of rods 58 on opposed sides of the enclosure 48. Bridging between the bars 56 and 58 are a pair of elongated rails 60 and 62. The rail 60 is mounted on bearing blocks 64 which are freely slidably received over the rods 56 and 58, respectively, allowing for reciprocating adjustment of the rails 60 on the rods. The rail 62 is mounted on each of its ends to blocks 66 and 68. The block 66 is fixedly secured to the ends of the rods 56. As shown in FIG. 11, one rod 58 is provided thereover with a worm drive configuration 70 and is of reduced diameter with respect to the first rod 58. The worm drive 70 is freely received through both the bearing block 68 and the rail 62 for connection through a gear train 72 to a manually driven hand wheel 74 rotatably mounted to the bearing block 68.

The rail 62 initially overlies and is freely received in registration against a support table 76 fixedly secured to the enclosure 48. Upon the aforementioned pivotal motion of the carriage 50 about the shaft 54, the rails 60 and 62 and the sliding bars 56 and 58 will be pivotally elevated with respect to the table support 76. The mechanisms by which the carriage is pivotally elevated or displaced is illustrated partially in FIGS. 5 and 6. More particularly, the rails 56 are freely slidably received through a bearing block 78. In similar fashion, as shown in FIG. 11, the unthreaded slide bars 58 is received in a similar bearing block 78'. However, the worm drive 70 is threadably received through the bearing block 78. As more particularly shown in FIG. 5, the lifting mechanism partially shown at 80 is associated with the bearing block 78. A similar lifting mechanism is associated with the bearing block 78'. Details of the lifting mechanisms will be explained in detail hereinafter by reference to FIG. 11.

With reference yet to FIGS. 5 and 6, disposed between the rails 60 and 62 is a vise shown generally at 82. The vise is fabricated with a pair of opposed jaws shown generally at 84 and 86. The jaw 84 is fixedly secured to the table support 76. The jaw 86 is mounted for forcible reciprocation by an enlarged plate 88 serving as a ram. The ram 88 slidably reciprocates on a pair of laterally opposed rails 90. For example, as shown in FIG. 6, a tongue and groove sliding joint is fabricated for slidably supporting the ram 88 on the side rails 90. The side rails 90 are part 00f the enclosure sidewalls 48. Yet with reference to FIG. 6, a portion of the ram periphery is defined by two tapered sidewalls 92. A resilient coil return spring 94 is suitably secured at one end by a suitable fastener 96 to the enclosure sidewalls 48, and secured at the other end by a suitable fastener 98 to a corresponding tapered sidewall 92 of the ram 88. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 10, the tapered sidewalls 92 of the ram converge toward an enlarged cylindrical piston rod which engages the tapered end of the ram 88. The piston rod is part of a conventional force multiplying hydraulic cylinder I02 fixedly mounted in the back panel wall 97 bridging between the enclosure sidewalls 48. The ram 98 is forcibly reciprocated by hydraulic fluid supplied to the hydraulic cylinder through an inlet manifold illustrated partially at 104.

In practice, the printed circuit board 1 is placed by an operator on the rails 60 and 62. As shown in FIGS.

l0 and 11, the rails 60 and 62 horizontally support opposed margins of the PC. board 1. For example, the RC. board may be removably secured to the rails in any suitable manner by threaded fasteners, C-clamps or any other suitable clamping apparatus well known in the prior art. With the rail 60 being freely slidably adjustable over the rods 56 and 58, the rails 60 and 62 may be initially spaced apart to accommodate a wide variety of PC. board sizes. In addition, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the PC. board supported on the rails 60 and 62 will also be supported on the vise jaws 84 and 86.

To summarize generally the operation of the machine 44, either a single row of contacts 6 or two rows of contacts 6 are introduced into the apertures 2 or 4 of the PC. board using the hand tool as described. Although the accompanying drawings illustrate two rows of contacts being simultaneously inserted within the corresponding rows of apertures 2 and 4, it is to be understood that the machine is well adapted for inserting only a single row of contacts in either of the rows 2 or 4. The rails 60 and 62 are indexed by the hand wheel 74 to slidably advance the bars 56 through the bearing block 78 and 52 while, as shown in FIG. 11, the worm drive 70 is threadably advanced through the bearing block 78 which threadably receives the worm drive 70. Since the rails 60 and 62 are mounted on the bars 56 and 58, the rails will advance with the bars 56 and 58 to precisely position the rows of apertures 2 or 4 in desired position over the jaws 84 and 86. The row or rows of contacts will then protrude from the PC. board and be received internally of the vise. Hydraulic fluid will be supplied through the inlet hose 104 by a suitable electric pump (not shown) of any type well known in the prior art. The fluid will actuate the hydraulic cylinder I02 forcing the ram 88 to slidably displace and close the vise jaws 84 and 86 into positive gripping engagement on the row or rows of contacts introduced into the PC. board 1. As will be explained hereinafter, a mechanism is then actuated to impart a precisely controlled and limited pivotal displacement of the carriage 50 about the shaft 54. This causes a corresponding precisely controlled and limited displacement between the PC. board and the row or rows of contacts gripped and maintained stationary by the vise jaws 84 and 86, thereby inserting and precisely positioning the contacts 6 in desired registration within corresponding apertures of the P.C. board 1.

The assembly machine is well suited for inserting and positioning any type of electrical contacts arranged in rows. It is particularly suited for inserting a row or rows of contacts of the type illustrated in the figures wherein each of the contacts includes an enlarged medial portion 99 which is designed for interference fit within a corresponding aperture 2 or 4. Advantageously, the contact medial portion 99 may include a band of solder thereover as of the type described in US. patent application Ser. No. 193,366, filed Oct. 28, 1971, wherein the solder band makes the interference fit with a corresponding aperture 2 or 4. The solder bands are then reflowed to retain the contacts in place by virtue of solder joints in accordance with the teachings of that application which are positively incorporated by reference herein. Alternatively, not shown, the contact may be of the type which does not initially carry a band of solder but which is first inserted with an interference fit within a corresponding aperture 2 or 4, and then solder is supplied subsequently by a separate operation to establish a solder joint within the aperture. When all of the contacts are soldered in place, the carrier strips of each row may be removed, leaving the contacts in desired alignment and secured in the board. The assembly machine 44 according to the present invention is thereby suitable for simultaneous insertion of a plurality of contacts requiring a relatively high insertion force due to the desired interference fit within the apertures. The machine is also well suited for simultaneous precise positioning of contacts within the circuit board by imparting a precisely controlled and limited displacement between the P.C. board and inserted contacts in order to precisely position any desired medial portion of the contacts within the board.

Details of the vise and the manner in which it is mounted in the machine will be described with reference to FIGS. 7 and 8. The visejaws 84 and 86 are illustrated in exploded configuration in FIG. 7. The jaws are of identical elongated rectangular plate configuration and are in opposing relationship. Each of the jaw plates is provided with a relatively thick portion 106 extending horizontally along a peripheral edge margin. The relatively thick portion is machined to provide a generally laterally extending channel 108 extending longitudinally through the relatively thick portion 106. The bottom wall 110 of the channel is of the same thickness as a relatively thinner remainder 107 of the plate. The relatively thick portion 106 defines the channel sidewalls and is machined with a series of spaced slots 112 extending laterally through the sidewalls of the channel 108. Each of the slots 112 partially receives therein a vertically elongated rectangular bar 114 mounted against the bottom wall 110 of the channel portion and the face 107 of each jaw 84 or 86. Disposed between each of the bars 114 is a first spacer plate 116 of T- shaped configuration with the opposed arms 118 of the T-configuration bridging between the jaws for registration within a groove 120 in the relatively thin portion 107 of each jaw 84 or 86. In similar fashion, disposed between each of the bars 114 is a second spacer plate 122 of inverted T-shaped configuration, with the opposed arms 124 of the T-configuration in registration respectively within a corresponding channel 108 of a jaw 84 or 86. As shown in FIGS. 7 and 9, each arm 124 of the spacer 122 is captivated vertically between the sidewalls of the channel 108. The stem 126 of the inverted T-shaped spacer plate 122 is disposed between the relatively thick portions 106 of the jaws when the jaws are assembled in adjacent opposed relationship, in a manner to be explained hereinafter.

with reference to FIGS. 7 and 8, the jaw 86 has associated therewith a plurality of stacked pressure plates 128 each having therethrough a central aperture 130. Each of the plates 128 is further provided with a pair of spaced protruding bearing surfaces 132 adapted for engagement against the external face 134 of the jaw 86. A plurality of spacer washers 136 are interposed between adjacent pressure plates 128, and a cylindrical connecting rod 140 is received through the apertures 130 of the stacked pressure plates 128 and through the washers 136. As shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, channel shaped end blocks 142 are provided on each end of the stacked pressure plates 128 and washers 136, with the rod 140 being received in a central aperture 144 provided in the channel portion 146 of each end block 142. As a result, a sub-assembly 147 of pressure plates is created from the stacked plates 128, the interposed washers 136 and the channel end blocks 142.

A similar sub-assembly 147 of pressure plates 128 is fabricated for attachment to the jaw 84. Such a subassembly is shown more particularly in FIG. 7, assembled to the back of the jaw 84. As shown in the figure, an elongated link bar 148 is received in the channel portion 146 of each end block 142 of the sub-assembly. One end of the link 148 is apertured at 150 to receive an end of the connecting rod 140 therein. The jaw 84 includes a lateral notch portion 152 slidably receiving a medial portion of the link bar 148 therein. On either side of the notch portion 152 is a pair of dowels 154 projecting generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the link bar 148. The dowels receive thereover respective resilient coil springs 156.

In the assembly of the vise as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the bars 114 and the spacer plates 122 and 116 are assembled against the surface 107 of the jaw 84 as heretofore described. Then the jaw 86 is assembled over the bars 114 and the spacer plates 116 and 122, placing the jaws 84 and 86 in adjacent opposed relationship as shown in FIG. 8. The link bar 148 will be received slidably through a lateral notch portion 152 provided in the jaw 86, which notch portion is similar to the notch portion 152 of the jaw 84. On either side of the notch portion 152 is provided a reduced diameter aperture 154' which receives an end of a corresponding dowel 154. To complete the assembly ofjaws as shown in FIG. 8, the sub-assembly 147 is assembled over the jaw 86. In so doing, each link bar 148 is partially received in the channel portion 146 of the corresponding end block 142. The connecting rod 140 of the sub-assembly is received in a slot 158 of the link 148. As shown in FIG. 8, the rod 140 will slidably traverse in the slot 158 allowing the jaws 84 and 86 to be displaced slidably along the link 148 toward each other against the action of the coil springs 156. Such displacement will compress the coil springs 156 storing therein spring energy utilized to slidably displace the jaws away from each other along the longitudinal axis of the link bars 148. Even with the jaws displaced toward each other, the bars 114 thereof remain freely slidably vertically between the jaws for a purpose to be described. 6

With reference to FIG. 8 taken in conjunction with FIGS. 9 and 10, mounting of the vise 82 in the assembly machine 44 will be described in detail. As shown in the figures, each of the pressure plates 128 includes a lateral, projecting flange portion 160 serving as a hangar flange for positioning and retaining the vise 82 between the table 176 and the ram 88. More particularly, the pressure plates 128 assembled to the jaw 84 are received against a planar end 161 of the table 176, with the hangar flanges 160 of the pressure plates 128 overlying the table 76 and vertically supporting the pressure plates 128. Advantageously, each of the plates 128 includes a vertical planar bearing surface 162 against which the end 161 of the table 176 impinges. In similar fashion, the pressure plates 128 associated with the jaw 86 are vertically supported by the corresponding hangar flanges 160 to the vertically planar end 164 of the ram 88, each of the pressure plates 128 being provided with planar bearing surfaces 162 against which the planar end 164 impinges. Thus, with the jaw 84 being supported on the stationary table 76 and the jaw 86 being supported on the ram 88, reciprocation of the ram will slidably displace the jaws toward each other against the action of the coil springs 156 as described.

With reference to FIGS. 9 and 12, receipt of the contacts within the jaws will be explained in detail. With the P. C. board properly indexed by operation of the hand wheel 74 and the worm gear 70, the rows of apertures 2 and 4 will be located in desired position above the vise 82 such that the row or rows of contacts 6 protruding from the row of apertures 2 and 4 will be received between the vise jaws 84 and 86. More particularly, each contact will be received in a clearance space defined between a corresponding stem portion 126 of the inverted T-shaped spacer plate 122 and a respective jaw 2 or 4. Each contact will bottom against an arm 124 of the inverted T-shaped plate 122. Since all of the arms 124 of the plates 122 are in horizontal alignment and captivated against vertical movement by the jaws as described, all of the contacts 6 will engage the arms and be desirably horizontally aligned with respect to one another. In addition the bars 114 desirably maintain a selected spacing between contacts. Upon forcible closure of the jaws by reciprocation of the ram 88 as described, each contact 6 will be pinched between a corresponding jaw and one of the stem portions 126 of the inverted T-shaped spacer plates 122. Each contact will thus be positively gripped and retained stationary on desired center spacings and in horizontal alignment with one another by the vise jaws 84 and 86. The carrier strip will align and space the contacts also.

To describe more in detail the operation of the vise 82, reference is again made to FIGS. 9 and 10.

The rectangular bars 114 of the vise 82 vertically depend from the jaws 84 and 86. Each of the bars 114 is I provided with a lateral notch portion 166 partially re- I ceived over an end wall 168 ofa channel bar 170 which horizontally bridges across and receives all of the rectangular bars 114 therein. The channel 170 is secured by fasteners 172 to a relatively massive horizontal bar 174 suitably horizontally grooved at 176 to receive therein the other end wall 178 of the channel. The massive bar 174 also is provided with a projecting horizontal portion 180 which overlies and clamps the depending portion of the rectangular bars 114 against the channel wall 168, thereby captivating the notched end portions of all the rectangular bars 114. As shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the relatively massive bar 174 is slidably captivated for vertical displacement within a vertical groove 182 provided in a pair of spaced corner posts 184 supporting the table 76.

As shown in FIGS. 5 and 10, each of the corner posts 184 supports a bearing block 186, which in turn rotatably supports a horizontal shaft 188. The shaft 188 is keyed at 189 to each of a pair of relatively massive lever arms 190. Each of the lever arms 190 is provided with a connecting rod 192 pivotally mounted at one end at 194 to the lever arm 190 at a location generally offset from the shaft 188. Each connecting rod 192 is additionally pivotally connected at the other end at 196 to the relatively massive horizontal bar 174, thereby connecting the relatively massive horizontal bar 174 to both of the lever arms 190. Each of the lever arms 190 is connected at one end by a common pin 198 to a lug 200 provided on the end of a vertically reciprocating piston rod 202 which forms a part of a force multiplying cylinder 204. With reference to FIG. 10, the cylinder 204 is of any type well known in the prior art and is suspended vertically by a pin connection 206 to each of a pair of vertically elongated hangar plates 208, one of which is shown in FIG. 10. Each hangar plate 208 is provided with a yoke configuration at one end 210 which is secured by fasteners 212 to an elongated suspension bar 214 horizontally bridging across and connected to the opposed enclosure sidewalls 48. The bar 214 includes an internally threaded bore 216 which receives a complementary threaded shaft 218 therein, the shaft being threadably adjusted with a protruding end 220 serving as a stop against which the lug 200 impinges, whereby vertical travel of the lug 200 is limited. Yet with reference to FIG. 10, the lug 200 also is provided thereon with a limit switch generally shown at 222 having a lever action closure 224. As shown with reference to FIGS. 10 and 11, upon the supply of air pressure to the cylinder 204 by a suitable electric pump (not shown), which may be of any type well known in the prior art, the piston 202 and the lug 200 will be forced by the force applying cylinder vertically upward toward the protruding stop 220. The lever 224 will engage the stop 220 and be deflected thereby to activate the limit switch 222 which returns an electrical signal to the electric pump, according to a technique well known in the prior art, which signal shuts off the pump and extinguishes the supply of air to the cylinder 204. The lug and piston will no longer be forcibly actuated for vertical travel. However, residual air pressure in the cylinder 204 may continue to urge the piston for additional vertical travel, thus necessitating a correct positioning of the stop 220 in order to produce a precisely controlled and limited vertical travel of the lug 200 simultaneous with activation of the limit switch 222. Such controlled and limited vertical travel of the lug is transmitted by counter-clockwise pivoting of the lever arm 190 about the shaft 188, through the connecting rods 192 and the horizontal bar 174, to all of the vertically depending bars 114 of the vise 82. As shown with reference to FIGS. 10 and 12, all of the rectangular bars 114 of the jaws 82 impinge against the bottom of the PC. board 1, horizontally supporting and lifting the portions of the PC. board which are between each of the contacts 6.

Such supporting and lifting action serves to support the PC. board and prevent warpage thereof at the location of the contacts 6 when the PC. board is pivotally displaced upon the pivotal displacement of the carriage 50. Thus the carriage 50 is primarily relied upon for displacing the RC. board with respect to the contacts 6. Lifting of the rectangular bars 114 of the vise by the lifting mechanisms occurs simultaneously with pivotal displacement of the carriage in order to support the PC. board and prevent warpage thereof at the location of the contacts 6. To further describe the operation of the lifting mechanism 80, reference will be made to FIGS. 10 and 11. As shown in FIG. 11, each lifting mechanism 80 includes a connecting rod 226 connected by a suitable threaded fastener 228 to the rotatable shaft 188 which also supports the relatively massive lever arms 190. The lifting mechanism further includes another connecting link 230 in the form of a force multiplying air cylinder 230 which is pivotally connected at one end at 232 to the connecting link 226. At its other end, the air cylinder 230 is pivotally connected at 234 to a corresponding bearing block 78 or 78'. Although only one mechanism 80 is described, the other is of identical construction. In operation, the

described counterclockwise pivotal action of the relatively massive lever arms 190 will cause a corresponding rotation of the shaft 188. As shown in FIG. 1 1, such rotation of the shaft 188 will cause a corresponding counterclockwise and simultaneous pivotal displacement of the links 226, which displacement is transferred into relatively vertical movement of the cylinders 230 and the corresponding bearing blocks 78 and 78'. Such vertical movement will accordingly create pivotal displacement of the carriage 50 about the shaft 54. During the lifting operation, the air cylinders 230 will act as rigid links to insure that pivotal displacement of the carriage is created solely upon the counterclockwise pivotal motion of the links 226. It is observed in FIGS. 11 and 12 that the pivotal action of the links 226 occurs simultaneously with the pivotal action of the relatively massive lever arms 190, thereby causing the pivotal displacement of the carriage 50 simultaneously with the lifting and supporting action of the rectangular bars 114 of the vise. Thus, the positively limited and precisely controlled displacement of the lug 200 by stopping it against the adjustably positioned threaded stop 220 precisely controls and selectively limits the amount of displacement of both the carriage 50 and of the rectangular bars 114 of the vise. As a result of threadably adjusting the stop 220, a precisely controlled and selectively limited relative displacement between the P.C. board and the contacts may be effected in order to insert and precisely position any selected medial portion of each of the contacts 6 within the corresponding apertures 2 or 4 of the P.C. board. The described lifting mechanisms 80 are capable of applying considerable insertion force, which force may be required to positively insert and seat a plurality of contacts of various selected types is desired positions within the P.C. board.

Advantageously, the limit switch 222 may be utilized to shut off both the hydraulic pump supplying the hydraulic cylinder 102 and the air supply to the cylinder 204. Upon shut off, the hydraulic pressure will bleed from the force multiplying cylinders 102 and 204, causing the ram 88 to retract by the action of the coil springs 94, and further causing the return pivotal displacement of the carriage 50 to its initial position, as shown in FIG. on the support table 76. However, before the carriage 59 has the opportunity to return fully to its position as shown in FIG. 10, an operator of the machine may desired to retain it in its lifted position in order to lift the inserted contacts from the vise jaws and index the P.C. board I to a new position by operation of the hand wheel 74 and worm drive 70. Accordingly, as shown in FIG. 11, although return pivotal motion of the link 226 and the lever arms 190 occurs, the cylinder links 230 may be of the type for passive expansion so that an operator may lift and thus pivotally displace the carriage 50 in order to expand the cylinders and lift the inserted row or rows of contacts 6 from the now open jaws of the vise, allowing indexing of the P.C. board to a new location on the carriage 50. As a modification, the expansible links 230 may be in the form of positively actuated air cylinders each having an internal piston which is forcibly reciprocated by air pressure to sequentially lift the carriage 50 after shut-off of the hydraulic motors that supplied the force multiplying cylinders 102 and 204. If positive pneumatic pressure is utilized to expand the expansible cylinders 230, the cylinders must be compressed by an operator by pushing down the carriage 50. In the alternative, an electrical reset signal may be initiated by an operator of the machine in order to cause return pivotal displacement of the carriage 50 in preparation for recycling the machine to insert an additional row or rows of contacts in the P.C. board as described. For example, the reset signal may be in the form of a foot treadle switch or any other conventional switch.

It should be understood that design of any desired electrical circuit within the abilities of one having ordinary skill in the art may be developed to produce the required sequential actuations of, first the pump supplying the hydraulic cylinder 102 which reciprocates the ram 88 and closes the jaws of the vise, second the pump supplying the hydraulic cylinder 204 which produces reciprocation of the lug 200 in order to produce a precisely controlled and limited displacement of the P.C. board carriage 50 and the bars 114 of the vise, next the shut-off switch 222 which shuts off the hydraulic pumps to allow opening of the jaws and return displacement of the carriage 50, and then the actuation of the pneumatic cylinders 230 for lifting the inserted contacts from the opened jaws of the vise in order to allow indexing of the P.C. board carriage 50.

What has been described and shown in detail is a preferred embodiment together with modifications of the method and apparatus according to the present invention. Other modifications and embodiments are intended to be covered by the spirit and scope of the appended claims, wherein:

What is claimed is:

l. A method of inserting contacts in a P.C. board provided with apertures, comprising the steps of:

providing a plurality of contacts in serial fashion along a carrier strip,

gripping and aligning each of said contacts in desired serial fashion with a comb-like tool,

introducing simultaneously all of said contacts in corresponding apertures of said P.C. board using said tool,

gripping said contacts as they protrude from the apertures beneath the P.C. board, seating said contacts within the apertures of said P.C. board as they remain gripped beneath the P.C. board, securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said P.C. board, and removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.

2. The method as recited in claim 1, further including the steps of: locating said P.C. board in alignment with a vise, receiving said contacts in said vise upon introduction of said contacts in said apertures of said P.C. board, gripping said contacts with said vise, causing relative displacement between said contacts and said P.C. board to seat said contacts in said P.C. board prior to the step of securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said P.C. board.

3. The method as recited in claim 2, and further including the step of: removing said P.C. board and said contacts from said vise subsequent to the step of causing relative displacement between said contacts and said P.C. board, and wherein the step of securing said contacts fixedly in said corresponding apertures further includes the step of: soldering said contacts in said apertures.

4. The method as recited in claim 3, wherein the step of soldering said contacts in said apertures further includes the steps of:

providing a band of solder encircling and adhered to each of said contacts while said contacts are provided in serial fashion along the carrier strip, and further including the steps of: positioning said bands of solder adhered to said contacts within corresponding apertures, and

reflowing the bands of solder to form solder joints substantially within the apertures to thereby secure the contacts fixedly in place within the apertures of said P.C. board prior to the step of removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.

5. A method of inserting contacts in a P.C. board pro vided with apertures, comprising the steps of:

providing a plurality of contacts in serial fashion along a carrier strip,

gripping and aligning each of said contacts in a desired serial fashion within a comb-type tool, locating said PC. board in alignment with a vise, introducing simultaneously all of said contacts in corresponding apertures of said P.C. board using said tool, receiving said contacts in said vise upon introduction of said contacts in said apertures of said PC. board,

gripping said contacts with said vise,

displacing said PC. board and maintaining said vise in a fixed position while said contacts remain gripped by said vise to cause relative displacement between said contacts and said PC. board and to seat said contacts in said P.C. board,

securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said PC. board, and removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.

6. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the step of securing said contact fixedly in said corresponding apertures further includes the steps of:

providing bands of solder encircling and adhered to said contacts,

positioning said bands of solder adhered to said contacts within corresponding apertures provided in said PC. board,

reflowing said bands of solder to form solder joints substantially within corresponding apertures to thereby secure the contacts fixedly in place within the apertures of said printed circuit board prior to the step of removing said carrier strip from the secured contacts, and

further including the step of:

removing said PC. board and said contacts from said vise subsequent to the step of causing relative displacement between said contact and said PC. board and prior to the step of reflowing the bands of solder to form solder joints.

Claims (6)

1. A method of inserting contacts in a P.C. board provided with apertures, comprising the steps of: providing a plurality of contacts in serial fashion along a carrier strip, gripping and aligning each of said contacts in desired serial fashion with a comb-like tool, introducing simultaneously all of said contacts in corresponding apertures of said P.C. board using said tool, gripping said contacts as they protrude from the apertures beneath the P.C. board, seating said contacts within the apertures of said P.C. board as they remain gripped beneath the P.C. board, securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said P.C. board, and removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.
2. The method as recited in claim 1, further including the steps of: locating said P.C. board in alignment with a vise, receiving said contacts in said vise upon introduction of said contacts in said apertures of said P.C. board, gripping said contacts with said vise, causing relative displacement between said contacts and said P.C. board to seat said contacts in said P.C. board prior to the step of securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said P.C. board.
3. The method as recited in claim 2, and further including the step of: removing said P.C. board and said contacts from said vise subsequent to the step of causing relative displacement between said contacts and said P.C. board, and wherein the step of securing said contacts fixedly in said corresponding apertures further includes the step of: soldering said contacts in said apertures.
4. The method as recited in claim 3, wherein the step of soldering said contacts in said apertures further includes the steps of: providing a band of solder encircling and adhered to each of said contacts while said contacts are provided in serial fashion along the carrier strip, and further including the steps of: positioning said bands of solder adhered to said contacts within corresponding apertures, and reflowing the bands of solder to form solder joints substantially within the apertures to thereby secure the contacts fixedly in place within the apertures of said P.C. board prior to the step of removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.
5. A method of inserting contacts in a P.C. board provided with apertures, comprising the steps of: providing a plurality of contacts in serial fashion along a carrier strip, gripping and aligning each of said contacts in a desired serial fashion within a comb-type tool, locating said P.C. board in alignment with a vise, introducing simultaneously all of said contacts in corresponding apertures of said P.C. board using said tool, receiving said contacts in said vise upon introduction of said contacts in said apertures of said P.C. board, gripping said contacts with said vise, displacing said P.C. board and maintaining said vise in a fixed position while said contacts remain gripped by said vise to cause relative displacement between said contacts and said P.C. board and to seat said contacts in said P.C. board, securing said contacts fixedly in place in said corresponding apertures of said P.C. board, and removing said carrier strip from said secured contacts.
6. The method as recited in claim 5, wherein the step of securing said contact fixedly in said corresponding apertures further includes the steps of: providing bands of solder encircling and adhered to said contacts, positioning said bands of solder adhered to said contacts within corresponding apertures provided in said P.C. board, reflowing said bands of solder to form solder joints substantially within corresponding apertures to thereby secure the contacts fixedly in place within the apertures of said printed circuit board prior to the step of removing said carrier strip from the secured contacts, and further including the step of: removing said P.C. board and said contacts from said vise subsequent to the step of causing relative displacement between said contact and said P.C. board and prior to the step of reflowing the bands of solder to form solder joints.
US3800416A 1972-05-19 1972-05-19 Method and apparatus for assembly of contacts in a printed circuit board Expired - Lifetime US3800416A (en)

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US (1) US3800416A (en)
JP (1) JPS4941856A (en)
BE (1) BE799693A (en)
CA (1) CA969676A (en)
DE (1) DE2323668A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2185872A1 (en)
GB (1) GB1377911A (en)
NL (1) NL7306805A (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3946477A (en) * 1974-03-28 1976-03-30 Amp Incorporated Apparatus for aligning and inserting pins into holes of a substrate
US4089104A (en) * 1977-05-03 1978-05-16 Litton Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for preassembling a printed circuit board connector
FR2390071A1 (en) * 1977-05-03 1978-12-01 Litton Systems Inc
US4327484A (en) * 1977-09-29 1982-05-04 Fuji Mfg. Co., Ltd. Apparatus for inserting electronic components to a printed circuit board
US4378632A (en) * 1980-12-23 1983-04-05 Elfab Corporation Method of and apparatus for pull-fitting contacts
US4380118A (en) * 1981-08-13 1983-04-19 Amp Incorporated Terminal insertion tool
US4398628A (en) * 1980-09-30 1983-08-16 Western Electric Company, Inc. Methods of inserting pins into an apparatus and a pin supporting shuttle used therefor
US4418475A (en) * 1979-11-19 1983-12-06 Elfab Corporation Method of manufacturing a printed circuit card edge connector having a pull through bellows contact a lay-over insulator
US4515354A (en) * 1982-09-13 1985-05-07 At&T Technologies, Inc. Fixture for assembling pins into a shuttle
US4753601A (en) * 1983-10-14 1988-06-28 Amp Incorporated Circuit board thickness compensator
US4769905A (en) * 1987-05-15 1988-09-13 Amp Incorporated Apparatus and method for loading semiconductor chip carriers into sockets

Families Citing this family (4)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA1031138A (en) * 1974-03-28 1978-05-16 Amp Incorporated Terminal insertion apparatus
JPS5678085A (en) * 1980-12-01 1981-06-26 Yamaichi Electric Mfg Method of implanting male contactor for connector
JPS6022479B2 (en) * 1980-12-01 1985-06-01 Yamaichi Electric Mfg
DE102014107998B3 (en) * 2014-06-06 2015-09-10 Neuschäfer Elektronik GmbH Mounting aid for high pin PCB connector

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US3545606A (en) * 1968-06-11 1970-12-08 Benny Morris Bennett Flexible tape terminal assembly
US3676926A (en) * 1970-05-20 1972-07-18 Elfab Corp Method for manufacturing connector terminals

Patent Citations (2)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3545606A (en) * 1968-06-11 1970-12-08 Benny Morris Bennett Flexible tape terminal assembly
US3676926A (en) * 1970-05-20 1972-07-18 Elfab Corp Method for manufacturing connector terminals

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3946477A (en) * 1974-03-28 1976-03-30 Amp Incorporated Apparatus for aligning and inserting pins into holes of a substrate
US4089104A (en) * 1977-05-03 1978-05-16 Litton Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for preassembling a printed circuit board connector
FR2390071A1 (en) * 1977-05-03 1978-12-01 Litton Systems Inc
US4327484A (en) * 1977-09-29 1982-05-04 Fuji Mfg. Co., Ltd. Apparatus for inserting electronic components to a printed circuit board
US4418475A (en) * 1979-11-19 1983-12-06 Elfab Corporation Method of manufacturing a printed circuit card edge connector having a pull through bellows contact a lay-over insulator
US4398628A (en) * 1980-09-30 1983-08-16 Western Electric Company, Inc. Methods of inserting pins into an apparatus and a pin supporting shuttle used therefor
US4378632A (en) * 1980-12-23 1983-04-05 Elfab Corporation Method of and apparatus for pull-fitting contacts
US4380118A (en) * 1981-08-13 1983-04-19 Amp Incorporated Terminal insertion tool
US4515354A (en) * 1982-09-13 1985-05-07 At&T Technologies, Inc. Fixture for assembling pins into a shuttle
US4753601A (en) * 1983-10-14 1988-06-28 Amp Incorporated Circuit board thickness compensator
US4769905A (en) * 1987-05-15 1988-09-13 Amp Incorporated Apparatus and method for loading semiconductor chip carriers into sockets

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
NL7306805A (en) 1973-11-21 application
CA969676A1 (en) grant
BE799693A (en) 1973-11-19 grant
BE799693A1 (en) grant
DE2323668A1 (en) 1973-12-06 application
JPS4941856A (en) 1974-04-19 application
CA969676A (en) 1975-06-17 grant
FR2185872A1 (en) 1974-01-04 application
GB1377911A (en) 1974-12-18 application

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