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US3661151A - Surgical shoe - Google Patents

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Publication number
US3661151A
US3661151A US3661151DA US3661151A US 3661151 A US3661151 A US 3661151A US 3661151D A US3661151D A US 3661151DA US 3661151 A US3661151 A US 3661151A
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Prior art keywords
shoe
foot
midsole
upper
sole
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Expired - Lifetime
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Errol A Schoenbrun
Murray M Lichtenstein
Bernard Podos
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PSL IND Inc
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PSL IND Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements

Abstract

A shoe converted to aid post-operative rehabilitation of the foot and to serve as a splint or cast for foot fractures is provided with rigid plywood midsole to restrict undesirable foot movement during ambulation. The shoe upper is modified by eliminating the conventional toe box and tongue so that the shoe can be readily adjusted to compensate for swelling of the foot constriction loosening lacing placed through eyelets in the upper. Elimination of the toe box and tongue a also decreases post-operative constriction of the foot within the shoe contributing to undesirable swelling. In all other respects the shoe remains unmodified, to allow both feet to be the same height for the walking surface when a normal shoe is worn on the other foot, for cosmetic purposes, and to permit ambulation with maximum comfort and convenience.

Description

United States Patent Schoenbrun et al.

[54] SURGICAL SHOE [72] Inventors: Errol A. Schoenbrun; Murray M. Lichtenstein; Bernard Podos, all of El Paso, Tex.

[73] Assignee: PSL Industries, Inc., El Paso, Tex.

[22] Filed: Feb. 6, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 9,199

[52] US. Cl. ..l28/87 R, 128/835, 36/25 R [51] Int. Cl. ..A6lf 5/04 [58] Field ofSearch ..128/87,83.5,82,581,80, 128/83; 36/30, 33, 28, 2.5

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,566,487 3/1971 Beightol ..36/2.5 R

2,545,910 3/1951 Aprile ..128/581 X 2,424,159 7/1947 Goetz..... "128/581 X 2,724,912 11/1955 Silombra... 36/30 X 3,198,192 8/1965 OBrien ..128/83 5 3,044,463 7/1962 Cool ..128/83.5 X

2,736,971 3/1956 Elsey ..128/581 X reeaeiwwa wwn May 9,1972

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Nov. 1951, p. 8.

Primary IiraminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant E\-aniincr-J. Yasko Almrne \'Brufsky, Staas, Breiner & Halsey [57] ABSTRACT A shoe converted to aid post-operative rehabilitation of the foot and to serve as a splint or cast for foot fractures is provided with rigid plywood midsole to restrict undesirable foot movement during ambulation. The shoe upper is modified by eliminating the conventional toe box and tongue so that the shoe can be readily adjusted to compensate for swelling of the foot constriction loosening lacing placed through eyelets in the upper. Elimination of the toe box and tongue a also decreases postoperative constriction of the foot within the shoe contributing to undesirable swelling. In all other respects the shoe remains unmodified, to allow both feet to be the same height for the walking surface when a normal shoe is worn on the other foot, for cosmetic purposes, and to permit ambulation with maximum comfort and convenience.

7 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures SURGICAL SHOE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an orthopedic device, and more particularly, a modified shoe useful for post-operative foot rehabilitation and for permitting ambulation during healing of foot fractures and injuries.

2. Prior Art A common surgical appliance is one which holds a limb in a relatively fixed and immobile position while healing proceeds. The most common of such appliances is the plaster-of-paris cast for post-operative immobilization and for treatment of fractures and related injuries.

Surgical splints in combination with bandages or plaster-ofparis casts are also employed to hold a limb in fixed position to allow healing of fractures and injuries. These usually feature a relatively straight rigid member which may be bandaged to a limb or incorporated in the cast. An advanced exampleof such an appliance is illustrated in US. Pat. No. 3,198,192, issued to H. T. O'Brien where a piece of plywood is adhered to a patients foot by a bandage or cast. A rubber heel affixed to the rigid plywood splint elevates the foot from the ground and provides a walking surface.

While the above device satisfies the need to restrain a limb and particularly a foot during healing, it is no more than a surgical splint which does not satisfactorily meet the need for an inexpensive, mass-produced, foot rehabilitation device which the patient can have easily mounted on and removed from his foot without extensive medical assistance.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention a shoe, rather than a splint, is used to immobilize the foot during post-operative periods and for healing of fractures and other foot injuries. The shoe is modified by building a plywood midsole into the sole to rigidify it. The upper of the shoe is substantially like any other laced shoe, except for the elimination of the conventional tongue and toe box. The resulting construction enables easy insertion of an injured or post-operative foot into the shoe and in combination with the rigidified sole provides restraint of movement of the foot in the shoe, when the shoe is laced.

Restraint in the shoe achieves the desired orthopedic purposes ofa cast or splint while allowing a patient otherwise normal movement, such as walking, without substantial impediment. In addition, constriction by a shoe has the added advantage of reducing post-operative swelling, but if the same does occur, the shoe can be readily adjusted to compensate for swelling ofthe foot, by undoing and retying the laces.

Other advantages and aims of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the surgical rehabilitation shoe comprising the invention; and

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the shoe shown in FIG. 1 taken substantially along the plane indicated by line 22 of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawing in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements throughout the two views, a rehabilitation shoe constructed in accordance with the present invention is generally designated by the numeral 10.

Shoe includes shoe upper 11 cemented to a fiat composite sole shown generally as 13. Composite sole 13 includes a flat, rigid, plywood midsole 15 to which the lower edge 16 of upper 11 is cemented. After securement of edge 16 to rigid sole 15, a rubber, ripple sole 17 is secured by cement to the underside of the front half of midsole 15. A cushion crepe wedge heel 43 is cemented between the remaining half of plywood, midsole l5 and ripple sole 17. The composite sole 13 is completed by an elongated piece of foam rubber cushion 41 having a fabric covering 39. The foam 41 and covering 39 are laminated to a piece of cardboard 40, and the laminated assembly is then cemented to the upper surface of plywood midsole 15.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, foam cushion 41 extends the entire length of the upper surface of midsole 15. The front portion of the fabric covered foam cushion 41 is covered by a leather toe piece 37 secured to the upper surface of the midsole 15 and stitched to foam cushion 41. A leather heelpad 38 is cemented on foam cushion 41 adjacent the heel portion of the shoe.

Upper 11 can be reinforced by a backstay 19 and heel counter 21 stitched and partially cemented to the upper. The shoe upper 11 is substantially the same as in any laced shoe construction except that an integral toe box and tongue for covering the toes and foot midportion have been eliminated.

A leather tongue 25 is stitched along one of its edges 27 to adjacent, spaced portions 26 of upper 11 located adjacent the midportion of the foot. The edges of the tongues 25 facing each other are left unattached to allow lacing to be placed in metal eyelets 31 along their length. The eyelets 31 are spaced the length of the tongues 25 and are arranged in corresponding number on both tongues 25.

The resulting sole construction, provides elevation of a foot to the same degree as an ordinary shoe. A normal shoe may be worn on the uninjured foot and the rehabilitation shoe on the injured foot with the result that both feet are spaced the same distance from the ground, providing a minimum impediment to walking.

Theupper ll restrains the foot by enclosing it at the midpoint and drawing the heel of the foot into the heel counter 21 by means of lacing the tongues 25. The bottom of the foot rests firmly against the foam cushion 41 on top of the rigid plywood midsole 15. Selective tension may be applied uniformly across the foot by adjusting the tightness of the lacings to compensate for any swelling of the foot due to the injury or surgery, and to minimize any tendency for additional swelling.

The shoe serves as a splint to hold a foot immobile when the foot is urged into the conforming upper 11 and downwardly against the rigid midsole 15. Upper 11 alleviates the necessity of a cast or bandage that would normally hold the foot against the splint or plywood midsole 15, while healing. Further, confinement of the foot not only permits healing, but limits movement of the flesh to prevent tearing of sutures and to hold an incision in place when the shoe is used post-operatively. Additionally, there is forward, lateral and rear protection against bumping of an injured foot by the rigid sole 13.

What we claim as our invention is:

l. A surgical shoe construction designed to receive a castless foot to promote post-operative rehabilitation of the foot comprising:

a composite sole, said composite including rigid midsole means for immobilizing the foot of the wearer by restricting undesirable foot movement during ambulation,

cushion means on the upper surface of said midsole means, and ground engaging sole means secured to the lower surface said midsole means;

heel means comprising an insert positioned between the midsole means and the ground engaging sole means for elevating said midsole means;

a flexible shoe upper secured to said composite sole adapted to substantially envelop the foot of the wearer to minimize swelling of the foot;

said upper having an open toe portion and a midportion having spaced edges; and

4. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said shoe upper is secured to the lower surface of said midsole.

5. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein ground engaging sole portion is a rippled rubber sole.

6. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cushion on said midsole is formed from foam.

7. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said rigid midsole is formed from plywood.

Claims (7)

1. A surgical shoe construction designed to receive a cast-less foot to promote post-operative rehabilitation of the foot comprising: a composite sole, said composite including rigid midsole means for immobilizing the foot of the wearer by restricting undesirable foot movement during ambulation, cushion means on the upper surface of said midsole means, and ground engaging sole means secured to the lower surface of said midsole means; heel means comprising an insert positioned between the midsole means and the ground engaging sole means for elevating said midsole means; a flexible shoe upper secured to said composite sole adapted to substantially envelop the foot of the wearer to minimize swelling of the foot; said upper having an open toe portion and a midportion having spaced edges; and said midportion including a pair of spaced tongues overlaying the flexible upper of the shoe for securing said shoe to said foot, said tongues carrying means for bringing the midportion edges together with the selective tension to compensate for various swelling conditions of the foot.
2. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said spaced tongues include lace receiving eyelets.
3. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said insert provision between the midsole means and ground engaging sole portion comprises a wedge.
4. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said shoe upper is secured to the lower surface of said midsole.
5. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein ground engaging sole portion is a rippled rubber sole.
6. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said cushion on said midsole is formed from foam.
7. A surgical shoe in accordance with claim 1 wherein said rigid midsole is formed from plywood.
US3661151A 1970-02-06 1970-02-06 Surgical shoe Expired - Lifetime US3661151A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3814088A (en) * 1972-01-12 1974-06-04 E Raymond Orthopedic boot
US3847147A (en) * 1973-04-25 1974-11-12 R Turner Foot support
US4177583A (en) * 1978-04-13 1979-12-11 Chapman Andrew W Orthopedic shoe with forefoot protective guard
US4677767A (en) * 1984-08-13 1987-07-07 Darby H Darrell Shock absorbing surgical shoe
US4727660A (en) * 1985-06-10 1988-03-01 Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler Sport Shoe for rehabilitation purposes
US4821432A (en) * 1988-03-25 1989-04-18 Reiber M Andrew Walking adapter for postsurgical shoes
US5014448A (en) * 1989-10-24 1991-05-14 Perrone M A Post-surgical slipper
US20030226286A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-11 David Pochatko Rigid and flexible shoe
US20080141565A1 (en) * 2006-12-18 2008-06-19 Rini David A Detachable post-operative protective device for the toes and forefoot
US9248042B2 (en) 2012-09-12 2016-02-02 Yessenia Lopez Dorsal foot splint
US9492305B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-11-15 Ortho Systems Orthopedic walking boot with heel cushion
US9510965B2 (en) 2014-07-01 2016-12-06 Ortho Systems Adjustable walking apparatus

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2424159A (en) * 1945-05-22 1947-07-15 Alice E Goetz Weighted shoe
US2545910A (en) * 1948-12-02 1951-03-20 Aprile George Weighted footwear
US2724912A (en) * 1953-03-03 1955-11-29 Silombra Armando Laminar soled sandal with heel pocket
US2736971A (en) * 1954-09-20 1956-03-06 Carroll M Elsey Corrective shoe
US3044463A (en) * 1959-05-25 1962-07-17 Delbert A Cool Cast shoe
US3198192A (en) * 1963-03-07 1965-08-03 Helen T O'brien Slipper cast
US3566487A (en) * 1969-11-12 1971-03-02 Leroy E Beightol Cast shoe

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2424159A (en) * 1945-05-22 1947-07-15 Alice E Goetz Weighted shoe
US2545910A (en) * 1948-12-02 1951-03-20 Aprile George Weighted footwear
US2724912A (en) * 1953-03-03 1955-11-29 Silombra Armando Laminar soled sandal with heel pocket
US2736971A (en) * 1954-09-20 1956-03-06 Carroll M Elsey Corrective shoe
US3044463A (en) * 1959-05-25 1962-07-17 Delbert A Cool Cast shoe
US3198192A (en) * 1963-03-07 1965-08-03 Helen T O'brien Slipper cast
US3566487A (en) * 1969-11-12 1971-03-02 Leroy E Beightol Cast shoe

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
A Walking Plaster Appliance by Wright, The Lancet, Nov. 11, 1950, p. 519. Advertisement in Jour. Bone & Joint Surg., Nov. 1951, p. 8. *

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3814088A (en) * 1972-01-12 1974-06-04 E Raymond Orthopedic boot
US3847147A (en) * 1973-04-25 1974-11-12 R Turner Foot support
US4177583A (en) * 1978-04-13 1979-12-11 Chapman Andrew W Orthopedic shoe with forefoot protective guard
US4677767A (en) * 1984-08-13 1987-07-07 Darby H Darrell Shock absorbing surgical shoe
US4727660A (en) * 1985-06-10 1988-03-01 Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler Sport Shoe for rehabilitation purposes
WO1987006108A1 (en) * 1986-04-11 1987-10-22 Darby H Darrel Shock absorbing surgical shoe
US4821432A (en) * 1988-03-25 1989-04-18 Reiber M Andrew Walking adapter for postsurgical shoes
US5014448A (en) * 1989-10-24 1991-05-14 Perrone M A Post-surgical slipper
US20030226286A1 (en) * 2002-06-07 2003-12-11 David Pochatko Rigid and flexible shoe
US6796058B2 (en) 2002-06-07 2004-09-28 Rigiflex Llc Rigid and flexible shoe
US20080141565A1 (en) * 2006-12-18 2008-06-19 Rini David A Detachable post-operative protective device for the toes and forefoot
US8955237B2 (en) 2006-12-18 2015-02-17 David A. RINI Detachable post-operative protective device for the toes and forefoot
US9248042B2 (en) 2012-09-12 2016-02-02 Yessenia Lopez Dorsal foot splint
US9492305B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-11-15 Ortho Systems Orthopedic walking boot with heel cushion
US9510965B2 (en) 2014-07-01 2016-12-06 Ortho Systems Adjustable walking apparatus

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