US3660241A - Container for organ perfusion or the like - Google Patents

Container for organ perfusion or the like Download PDF

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Publication number
US3660241A
US3660241A US3660241DA US3660241A US 3660241 A US3660241 A US 3660241A US 3660241D A US3660241D A US 3660241DA US 3660241 A US3660241 A US 3660241A
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Prior art keywords
container
conduit
bag
conduits
kidney
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Expired - Lifetime
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Paul Joseph Michielsen
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Baxter International Inc
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Baxter International Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01NPRESERVATION OF BODIES OF HUMANS OR ANIMALS OR PLANTS OR PARTS THEREOF; BIOCIDES, e.g. AS DISINFECTANTS, AS PESTICIDES, AS HERBICIDES; PEST REPELLANTS OR ATTRACTANTS; PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS
    • A01N1/00Preservation of bodies of humans or animals, or parts thereof
    • A01N1/02Preservation of living parts
    • A01N1/0205Chemical aspects
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01NPRESERVATION OF BODIES OF HUMANS OR ANIMALS OR PLANTS OR PARTS THEREOF; BIOCIDES, e.g. AS DISINFECTANTS, AS PESTICIDES, AS HERBICIDES; PEST REPELLANTS OR ATTRACTANTS; PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS
    • A01N1/00Preservation of bodies of humans or animals, or parts thereof
    • A01N1/02Preservation of living parts

Abstract

A container having at least one access port defined therein; and a flexible conduit passing through the access port in sealing relation, in which the conduit is slideable relative to the port without disruption of the seal.

Description

Uhlmann ..222/l 80 A United States Patent women 'Michielsen 1 May 2, W72

[ 4] CONTAINER FOR ORGAN PERFUSION THER PUBLICATIONS OR THE LIKE Eiseman et al., A Disposable Liver Perfusion Chamber, [72] Inventor: Paul Joseph Michlelsen, Herent, Belgium surgery 1 l 186 [73] Assignee: Baxter Laboratories Inc., Morton Grove, pn'mmy Louis Menace Assistant Examiner-Roger B. Andewelt [22] Filed: Jan. 12, 1970 Attorney-Walter C. Kehm and W. Garrettson Ellis [21] Appl. No.: 2,231 [57] ABSTRACT v 521 u.s.c|... ..19s/127 128/DIG. 3 222/522 A having least access Port defined therein; [51] Int. Cl. "(12k 9/00 and a flexible conduit Passing through the access P in Seal [58] Field of Searc ..l/l27; l28/DIG. 3; 23/2585; ing relation, in which the conduit is slideable relative to the 1; 222/21 1 478 522 523 port without disruption ofthe seal.

[ 56] References Cited 6 Olalms, 6 Drawing Figures UNITED STATES PATENTS PATYNTEUMM 2 1972 SHEET 2 BF 2 TT'HULHHHTHII INVENTOR zyzz 1 mg 224 BY 5%) ATTORNEY CONTAINER FOR ORGAN PERFUSION OR THE LIKE BACKGROUND or "ms INvsNnoN removed from a donor and maintained in viable condition by artificial means. This is done to maintain the organ until the recipient is selected and preparedto receive it. At the present time, organs of potential donors have sometimes been unavailable to recipients in desperate need of them, because the donor, who is often a victim of a fatal accident or illness, is

located at a region remote from the recipient. In this case, emergency measures, such as maintaining the vital functions of a clinically dead donor by elaborate artificial means, must be performed while transporting the donor and the required life maintenance equipment to the location of the recipient. This is frequently impossible to do.

The technique of organ perfusion is intended to simplify the problem of storing and transporting living organs by providing a generally portable artificial environment in which the organ can survive until the time of implantation.

The organ, once severed from a donor, is generally cannulated to connect it to a source of circulatory fluid which carries oxygen and optional nutrients. The cannulation process generally takes substantial manual dexterity, and it is desirable to I perform the operation in a relatively large space unhindered by the walls of an organ perfusion container. However, the cannulated organ must then be placed in the container, and it is undesirableto have extraneous loops of cannula tubing coiling around the organ within the container.

DESCRIPTION OFITHE INVENTION In accordance with this invention, a container is provided having at leastone access port defined therein which is spaced from a mount opening in the container. Flexible conduit tubing passes through the access port, the conduit tubing having a cross-sectional shape generally conforming to the shape of the accessport, and being of at least equal transverse dimension to the port to provide a pressure seal between the container and conduit at the port. Thus, the conduit tubing is slideable relative to the port without disruption of the seal to permit leakage and interior contamination. Typically, the conduit tubing is long enough to be able to pass through both the access port and the mouth of the container in one sliding position of the conduit. Thus an organ such as a heart, liver, lung, or kidney can be cannulated outside of the container, and then placed within the container, drawing excess tubing through the port out of the container.

The container of this invention can be rigid and self supporting, or it canbe a flexible, collapsible bag, or any other configuration as desired. Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a flexible, collapsible bag made in accordance with this invention, showing a cannulated organ connected to some of the conduits of the bag.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the same bag as in FIG. 1, showing how the organ is placed within the bagand the conduits drawn through the access ports out of the bag.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1, showing details of the structure of the access port.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of another modification of a rigid, self-supporting container of this invention. 7

. FIG. 6 is a view of the closed container of FIG. 5.

Referring IO;FIGS. 1 through 4, flexible bag 10 is shown being used as-an' organ perfusion container for a human kidney .12. Bag 10 comprises a pair of flexible, transparent plastic sheets 14, 16 sealed together at the edges by seal line 18 and rivets 19, or by any other conventional means, to define a bag.

In FIG. 1, sheet 14 is partly broken away to show sheet 16 behind it. A portion 20 of the edges are left unsealed to define a mouth opening in the bag.

Conduits 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 are sealingly slideable, each in a separate semi-rigid plastic sleeve 32. The sleeves 32 are sealingly mounted between plastic sheets 14 and 16 to provide access ports into the bag 10. Conduits 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 are made of a flexible material such as silicone rubber, and have a cross-sectional shape generally confonning to the shape of the sleeves or access ports 32, which are typically cylindrical. The above mentioned conduits are typically of slightly larger size than the ports 32 to provide a pressure seal between the bag and conduits at the port. Thus conduits 22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 are sealingly slideable within sleeves 32 when pulled on one end or the other so that the length of each conduit within the bag is adjustable.

In the embodiment shown, conduit 24 is cannulated to the renal artery of kidney 12 to provide blood or other perfusate to the kidney during perfusion. Conduit 28 is attached to the renal vein of kidney 12 to receive the same fluid upon circulation through the kidney and to carry it away from the kidney to conventional organ perfusion equipment, which provides the necessary functions of pumping the fluid and oxygenating it. Conduit 30 is cannulated to the ureter of kidney 12 to receive and carry away waste products formed therein. Conduits 22 and 26 are not used in this instance and carry caps 23 and 27. These conduits are made available to permit use of the bag with other organs or in the case of bifurcations of the renal artery and vein.

After cannulation of the kidney with the aforementioned conduits, the kidney 12 is placed within bag 10 and the mouth opening is sealed by folding over and clamping or any other manner as desired. Simultaneously therewith, the cannulated conduits are pulled by their outer ends to cause each of them to slide through their associated sleeve 32 to reduce the length of each conduit residing within bag 10 so as not to crowd the kidney or to cause twisting of the cannulation sites at which each conduit is connected to the kidney.

Conduits 34, 36, and 38 serve as inlet and outlet conduits for providing wash or perfusion solution to bathe the inside of the bag and the outside of the organ. If desired, one can bathe the kidney in an oxygenated, nutrient-containing isotonic solution through conduits 34 and 36, which is withdrawn through conduit 38. Throughout the period of kidney storage in bag 10, blood or other perfusion solution is pumped to and from the kidney 12 through conduits 24 and 28.

If desired, only one sliding conduit is connected to the kidney at the renal artery, the renal vein and the ureter being allowed to spill into the bag. Perfusion solution is then withdrawn from the bag by a conventional conduit, e.g. conduit 38.

The entire bag 10 can be placed in an outer cooling bath to control the temperature of kidney 12 and the perfusion solution. By the use of this bag, great convenience is achieved in cannulating the kidney to connect it to the appropriate conduits prior to placing it into the bag. Then the kidney can be inserted in the bag and sealed in a relatively sterile environment to maintain it in a viable condition by perfusion of oxygenating solution which optionally contains nutrient.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6, a self supporting organ perfusion container made of acrylic plastic or the like is shown as including a cylindrical bowl 40 having an open top 41, four sliding conduits 42, 43, 44, and 45, each of which slides through an access port comprising a sleeve 46 to gain entrance to the container. As in the previous embodiment, conduits 42 to 45 have a cross-sectional shape conforming to the shape of each access port or sleeve 46, and are of equal or slightly greater cross-sectional size to ports 46 to provide a sliding pressure seal between the container 40 and the conduits. Thus the conduits are slideable relative to the access ports without disruption of the seal, thus preventing leakage out of the container. Conduits 42 to 45 are of such length that they can extend out of the top opening of bowl 40 for cannulation to an organ such as a liver 48 (the conduits connecting, for example, to one artery, two veins, and the bile duct). After cannulation is complete, the conduits are withdrawn into the container by sliding them through their respective sleeves 46, and the organ is simultaneously placed into the container. The mouth opening 41 of the bowl 40 can then be sealed or capped in any manner desired, such as by sealing top 50.

The bowl 40 can be drained from bottom drain 51 as desired. A conduit for flushing the outside of the organ can also be added, if desired.

The containers of this application are thus suited for the convenient cannulation and perfusion of a number of different organs, to maintain the organs in viable condition outside of a living body.

The previous disclosure is for illustrative purposes only and is not to be taken as limiting the scope of the invention of this application. It is to be understood that the arrangement and the numbers of conduits connected to the containers of this invention can be varied as desired in accordance with the objective to be obtained.

I claim:

1. A container having an outer casing with a plurality of access ports and a mouth opening defined therein, said mouth opening being spaced from said access ports, a flexible conduit passing through each said access port having a cross sectional shape generally conforming to the shape of said access port and being of at least equal transverse dimension to said port to provide a seal between said container and conduit at the port, whereby said conduit is slidable relative said port without disruption of said seal.

2. The container of claim 1 in which each said conduit is of such length as to be able to extend through both said port and said mouth opening at one sliding position of said conduit.

3. The container of claim 1 which said outer casing is made of flexible material.

4. The container of claim 1 which said casing is rigid and self-supporting.

5. The container of claim 1 comprising a pair of flexible, transparent plastic sheets sealed together at the edges to define a bag, said access ports being defined by tubular plastic sleeves mounted between said plastic sheets at edges thereof.

6. The container of claim 9 in which a portion of the edges of said plastic sheets are in unsealed relation to define said mouth opening.

Claims (5)

  1. 2. The container of claim 1 in which each said conduit is of such length as to be able to extend through both said port and said mouth opening at one sliding position of said conduit.
  2. 3. The container of claim 1 which said outer casing is made of flexible material.
  3. 4. The container of claim 1 which said casing is rigid and self-supporting.
  4. 5. The container of claim 1 comprising a pair of flexible, transparent plastic sheets sealed together at the edges to define a bag, said access ports being defined by tubular plastic sleeves mounted between said plastic sheets at edges thereof.
  5. 6. The container of claim 9 in which a portion of the edges of said plastic sheets are in unsealed relation to define said mouth opening.
US3660241D 1970-01-12 1970-01-12 Container for organ perfusion or the like Expired - Lifetime US3660241A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5110721A (en) * 1989-02-10 1992-05-05 The Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Method for hypothermic organ protection during organ retrieval
US5326706A (en) * 1989-07-17 1994-07-05 Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Homeostatic organ preservation system
US5338662A (en) * 1992-09-21 1994-08-16 Bio-Preserve Medical Corporation Organ perfusion device
US6673594B1 (en) 1998-09-29 2004-01-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040111104A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-06-10 Organ Recovery Systems Cannulas, cannula mount assemblies, and clamping methods using such cannulas and cannula mount assemblies
US20040224298A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2004-11-11 John Brassil Apparatus and method for determining effects of a substance of an organ
US20040224299A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US20040221719A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US20060063142A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2006-03-23 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20070184545A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2007-08-09 Plaats Arjan Van Der Portable preservation apparatus for a donor organ
US8323954B2 (en) 2000-08-25 2012-12-04 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8828034B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2014-09-09 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Cannula
US9022978B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2015-05-05 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Universal sealring cannula
US9642625B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-05-09 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Cannula for a donor organ with or without an aortic cuff or patch
US20170156311A1 (en) * 1997-09-23 2017-06-08 Department of the Veteran Affairs Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
USD796688S1 (en) * 2015-01-09 2017-09-05 Butler Concepts Limited Storage cassette
US9814230B2 (en) 2008-01-31 2017-11-14 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex vivo lung care
US9894894B2 (en) 2004-10-07 2018-02-20 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex-vivo organ care and for using lactate as an indication of donor organ status
USD814655S1 (en) * 2014-07-09 2018-04-03 Butler Concepts Limited Storage cassette
US10039276B2 (en) 2005-06-28 2018-08-07 Transmedics, Inc. Systems, methods, compositions and solutions for perfusing an organ
US10076112B2 (en) 2014-06-02 2018-09-18 Transmedic, Inc. Ex vivo organ care system
US10194655B2 (en) 2015-09-09 2019-02-05 Transmedics, Inc. Aortic cannula for ex vivo organ care system
WO2019095079A1 (en) * 2017-11-20 2019-05-23 Tevosol, Inc. Apparatus for perfusion of an excised organ
US10314303B2 (en) 2004-10-07 2019-06-11 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex-vivo organ care
US10327443B2 (en) 2007-03-20 2019-06-25 Transmedics, Inc. Systems for monitoring and applying electrical currents in an organ perfusion system

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3456850A (en) * 1967-04-27 1969-07-22 Ernest A Uhlmann Soap dispensing apparatus

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3456850A (en) * 1967-04-27 1969-07-22 Ernest A Uhlmann Soap dispensing apparatus

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Eiseman et al., A Disposable Liver Perfusion Chamber, 60 Surgery, No. 6, pp. 1183 1186 *

Cited By (57)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5110721A (en) * 1989-02-10 1992-05-05 The Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Method for hypothermic organ protection during organ retrieval
US5326706A (en) * 1989-07-17 1994-07-05 Research Foundation Of State University Of New York Homeostatic organ preservation system
US5338662A (en) * 1992-09-21 1994-08-16 Bio-Preserve Medical Corporation Organ perfusion device
US5494822A (en) * 1992-09-21 1996-02-27 Bio-Preserve Medical Corporation Organ perfusion device
US20170156311A1 (en) * 1997-09-23 2017-06-08 Department of the Veteran Affairs Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
US9756850B2 (en) * 1997-09-23 2017-09-12 The Department Of Veteran Affairs Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
US9756849B2 (en) 1997-09-23 2017-09-12 The Department Of Veteran Affairs Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
US9756851B2 (en) * 1997-09-23 2017-09-12 The Department Of Veteran Affairs Compositions, methods and devices for maintaining an organ
US8268612B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-09-18 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8445260B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-05-21 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20060063142A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2006-03-23 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8609400B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-12-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8431385B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-04-30 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8420381B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-04-16 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8349551B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-01-08 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method for controlling perfusion of an organ
US8318415B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-11-27 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of determining transport and/or storage parameters for maintaining viability of an organ
US7749693B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2010-07-06 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of determining that an organ is not suitable for transplantation and using it for testing substances
US20100221696A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2010-09-02 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040224298A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2004-11-11 John Brassil Apparatus and method for determining effects of a substance of an organ
US7824848B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2010-11-02 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US6673594B1 (en) 1998-09-29 2004-01-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110053256A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-03-03 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110059429A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-03-10 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110129908A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-06-02 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8268547B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-09-18 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of transporting and storing a kidney
US20110039253A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-02-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8962303B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2015-02-24 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8323954B2 (en) 2000-08-25 2012-12-04 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040111104A1 (en) * 2002-08-23 2004-06-10 Organ Recovery Systems Cannulas, cannula mount assemblies, and clamping methods using such cannulas and cannula mount assemblies
US8361091B2 (en) 2002-08-23 2013-01-29 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Cannulas, cannula mount assemblies, and clamping methods using such cannulas and cannula mount assemblies
US8389271B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2013-03-05 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US20100112542A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2010-05-06 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US20100151559A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2010-06-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US7998725B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2011-08-16 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for holding a plurality of tubes connectible to an organ or tissue container
US7691622B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2010-04-06 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US7678563B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2010-03-16 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US20040235142A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-25 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for holding a plurality of tubes connectible to an organ or tissue container
US20040221719A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US8097449B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2012-01-17 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US8128740B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2012-03-06 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US20040224299A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US20070184545A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2007-08-09 Plaats Arjan Van Der Portable preservation apparatus for a donor organ
US7811808B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2010-10-12 Organ Assist B.V. Portable preservation apparatus for a donor organ
US9894894B2 (en) 2004-10-07 2018-02-20 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex-vivo organ care and for using lactate as an indication of donor organ status
US10321676B2 (en) 2004-10-07 2019-06-18 Transmedics, Inc. System and methods for ex-vivo organ care and for using lactate as an indication of donor organ status
US10314303B2 (en) 2004-10-07 2019-06-11 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex-vivo organ care
US10039276B2 (en) 2005-06-28 2018-08-07 Transmedics, Inc. Systems, methods, compositions and solutions for perfusing an organ
US10327443B2 (en) 2007-03-20 2019-06-25 Transmedics, Inc. Systems for monitoring and applying electrical currents in an organ perfusion system
US9814230B2 (en) 2008-01-31 2017-11-14 Transmedics, Inc. Systems and methods for ex vivo lung care
US8828034B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2014-09-09 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Cannula
US9022978B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2015-05-05 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Universal sealring cannula
US9642625B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-05-09 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Cannula for a donor organ with or without an aortic cuff or patch
US10076112B2 (en) 2014-06-02 2018-09-18 Transmedic, Inc. Ex vivo organ care system
USD814655S1 (en) * 2014-07-09 2018-04-03 Butler Concepts Limited Storage cassette
USD796688S1 (en) * 2015-01-09 2017-09-05 Butler Concepts Limited Storage cassette
US10194655B2 (en) 2015-09-09 2019-02-05 Transmedics, Inc. Aortic cannula for ex vivo organ care system
WO2019095079A1 (en) * 2017-11-20 2019-05-23 Tevosol, Inc. Apparatus for perfusion of an excised organ

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BE767120A (en) 1971-10-01

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