US3657520A - Heating cable with cold outlets - Google Patents

Heating cable with cold outlets Download PDF

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US3657520A
US3657520A US3657520DA US3657520A US 3657520 A US3657520 A US 3657520A US 3657520D A US3657520D A US 3657520DA US 3657520 A US3657520 A US 3657520A
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Prior art keywords
heating
wires
cable
sheath
braid
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Michel A Ragault
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MICHEL A RAGAULT
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MICHEL A RAGAULT
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • H05B3/40Heating elements having the shape of rods or tubes
    • H05B3/54Heating elements having the shape of rods or tubes flexible
    • H05B3/56Heating cables

Abstract

A heating cable with cold outlets, intended mainly for use as immersion heaters and like heating elements, having heating resistance wire of relatively great length having its end brazed to non-heating conductors of greater diameter, the heating wire being covered with a glass fiber braid having a thickness such that the element has a constant cross-sectional dimension, this element being subsequently slipped into a sheath of plastic insulating material, and that said elements are assembled end to end in order to produce a cable of indefinite length subsequently covered with a metal braid and eventually, by extrusion, with a sheath of insulating plastic material.

Description

United States Patent Ragault [451 Apr. 18, 1972 54] HEATING CABLE WITH COLD 3,538,482 11/1970 Dugger ..219/549 OUTLETS FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [72] lnvenm" :22;Efigflgig 4,420,828 8/1966 Japan ..338/214 [22] Filed: Aug. 20, 1970 Primary Examiner-Velodymyr Y. Mayewsky pp No 65 398 Att0rneyRobert E. Burns and Emmanuel J. Lobato [57] ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl ..219/553, 219/528, 2313952419; A heating cable with cold outlets, intended mainly for use as 51 I Cl 1 Hosb 3/10 immersion heaters and like heating elements, having heating d 552 553 resistance wire of relatively great length having its end brazed 1 0 can 628, 3:;8/66 to non-heating conductors of greater diameter, the heating wire being covered with a glass fiber braid having a thickness 56] References Cited such that the element has a constant cross-sectional dimen- UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,529,914 11/1950 Challener ..338/214 7/1957 Schrotter et a1. ....338/214 3,284,751 11/1966 Barker et a1, ..338/66 3,348,186 10/1967 Rosen ..338/214 sion, this element being subsequently slipped into a sheath of plastic insulating material, and that said elements are assembled end to end in order to produce a cable of indefinite length subsequently covered with a metal braid and eventually, by extrusion, with a sheath of insulating plastic material.

7 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPR 18 I972 A wm a imam H HEATING CABLE WITH COLD OUTLETS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to heating cables having cold outlets of the type intended more particularly for immersion heaters or like heating devices.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART It is known to use heating resistances operating by Joule effect in immersion heaters, within a closed tube of glass, quartz, porcelain, etc.; however, these resistances are attended by many inconveniences making their use rather delicate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The cable according to the present inventionis characterized in that it consists on the one hand of a conductor having a cross-sectional area calculated according to the desired heating effect and on the other hand of conductors having a greater diameter under these conditions it is an easy matter to wind this wire on a suitable support allowing only the nonheating portions to project beyond the liquid level for obtaining an immersion heater or like element capable of heating any desired bath and characterized by the following advantageous features:

I. The cable is perfectly break-proof, whether during the handling or during actual service;

2. The shape and dimensions of the support are completely optional; as a result, less floor space is required in service and the disposition is more rational in the baths, in comparison with conventional or prior art immersion heaters;

3. The electrical supply connections may be remote from the bath and/or the working site;

4. The copper ends are connected to the 220-Volt mains and the metal screen or sheath is connected to the ground terminal; thus, any dangerous current leak is definitely eliminated; another function of the screen means is that it will greater cross-sectional area producing no heating at all, the 20 distribute the heat by dissipating the Same from a point having ends of these conductors being brazed in order to provide a continuous cable structure.

To avoid any difference in diameter between the heating conductor and the non-heating conductors, one or several layers of heat resisting fibers adapted to be braided are disposed around the heating conductor, for example glass fiber braids, to eliminate any difference in diameter between the conductors.

By way of example, the heating cable may comprise a stainless steel resistor-forming section having a diameter of 1 millimeter and brazed at its ends to a copper wire having a diameter of at least 2 mm, the successive cold and hot sections being silver-brazed. A polytetrafluorethylene braid is slipped on this assembly of heating wires and cold wires. Thus, a cable comprising for example a 15.5-meter long heating conductor and two cold conductors, one 0.85-m long and the other 1.65-m long, is obtained.

Heating resistors are brazed to the free ends of this cable, and so forth, until a relatively long cable comprising in succession relatively long heating resistors separated by relatively short cold conductors of unequal lengths, is obtained.

On the cable thus obtained a metal braid is formed by using, for instance l-mm copper wire, and the resulting braid is covered by extrusion with a fluorethylene-propylene.

To obtain immersion heaters, it is only necessary to cut this cable in order to obtain elements or sections comprising about meters of heating resistance with a 0.85-m long cold conductor fonning an outlet at one end and a 1.65-m long cold conductor forming an outlet at the opposite end.

In the example described hereinabove, the resistance is slightly in excess of 3 'Kw under a 220-Volt current, the polytetrafluorethylene charge being for example 300 watts/sq.dm watts/sq.in.) and the fluorethylenepropylene charge 180 watts/sq.dm. (12 watts/sq.in).

According to a modified form of embodiment the abovedescribed steps concerning the preparation of a constant-section cable are firstly adhered to, then these elements are brazed end to end to constitutea cable of indefinite length, and this cable is covered with a glass fiber braid. Then this braid is coated with silicone rubber, or alternatively the surface of the previously heated wire is coated directly with a fluidized polyfluorethylene powder bonded to the hot wires by passing the assembly through an oven, possibly with a step consisting in mechanically crushing and welding the grains to one another. A metal braid is subsequently applied on this insulating sheath and the operation is completed as in the preceding example.

In the above mentioned example, by cutting the cold copper sections across the joints between the sheath sections, which are determined for example by measuring the known lengths of the hot and cold portions, identical electric resistances are obtained which approximate 2.8 Kw under 220 volts, with end plastic sheath for example of sections the length of which corresponds to the conductors of a tendency to overheating to adjacent points; thus, no overheating can take place not only at the points of contact with said support but also at possible crossings and superpositions of heating sections;

5. A universal chemical resistance is achieved, due to the properties of the extruded plastic material constituting the outermost coating; thus, the same therrnoprobe may be used in succession in different media, in contrast to the sheaths of conventional immersion heaters of which the resistance is frequently specific of only one medium;

6. In electrolytic baths the fact that the immersion heater is completely insulated will avoid the known shunt current effect frequently constituting a cause of damage or interference with immersion heaters having conductive sheaths;

7. Also due to the particular properties of the plastic materials constituting the outermost coatings or sheats, and to a lower emission of heat per heating surface unit, possible solid deposits such as those tending to develop in bright nickel-plating baths on the heating devices associated with these baths, will not be formed with the same facility with the device of this invention, and if they develop nevertheless they can be removed very easily by a simply brushing step, in contrast with the hardly removable incrustation observed in conventional installations.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The heating cable according to this invention will now be described more in detail with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the attached drawing illustrating diagrammatically by way of example axial sections of component elements of this cable.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The heating resistance 1 of a diameter of, say, a resistivity of 70 microhms per sq.cm (450 microhms per sq.in.), is brazed at its ends 2 and 3 to cold conductors 4, 5 consisting of non-heating copper wires having a diameter of, say, 2 mm.

Braided on the heating wire 1 is a l-mm thick sheath 6 of insulating material for giving to this cable section the same diameter as the non-heating wires 4 and 5 thereof.

An insulating sheath 7, for example a plastic sheath made of Teflon and having a thickness of 0.2 to 0.5 mm, is slipped on the assembly thus formed, i.e. comprising a heating conductor and two cold conductors. The element thus obtained is extended on either side in order to comprise successive elements including heating conductors each of a length of, say, 15.5 meters, with cold conductors 4, 5 having a length, for each element, of 0.80 m on one side and 1.60 m on the other side. Then a metal braid 8 for example of 0.1 mm copper wire is braided on this continuous cable, and a plastic sheath 9 for example of Teflon is formed by extrusion on this braid.

To obtain immersion heater elements, it is only necessary to cut this infinite cable along the lines X-X in order to produce 1 mm, having elements comprising each a heating conductor 1 and two cold conductors 4 and 5, having a length of 0.80 m on one side and 1.60 m on the other side, for instance. The cold conductors form outlet terminals for the heating element.

In the modified form of embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawing the procedure employed is initially the same as in the case of FIG. 1, that is, similar elements are assembly which comprise each a heating conductor 1 brazed at its ends to cold conductors 4, 5 of unequal length, these elements being assembled end-to-end to produce a cable of indefinite length. Then this cable is covered by braiding thereon a glass fiber braid 6 in order to form a constant diameter cable. This braid 6 is then covered with a layer consisting for example of silicone rubber or plastic material such as polytetrafluorethylene, which may be in the form of a fluidized powder remelt on the hot cable.

Braided on this layer 10 is a metal sheath 8 and the latter is covered in turn with a sheath 9 of insulating material, as in the preceding example.

What I claim is:

1. Heating cable with cold outlets, intended mainly for use as electric immersion heaters and like heating elements, comprising alternately a succession of heating resistance wires of relatively great length and of non-heating conductive wires of greater cross-sectional dimension than said resistance wires, the ends of the heating wires being soldered to the ends of the conductive wires, a glass fiber braid formed on and around each of said heating wires and having a thickness such that the cross-sectional dimension of the heating wires with said glass fiber braids is the same as that of said conductive wires, an insulating sheath and a metal braid of uniform diameter surrounding the assembly of the heating wires and conductive wires and a sheath of insulating plastic material extruded over the assembly.

2. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein said heating resistance wires consist of stainless-steel resistor having a diameter of 0.8 mm, and said conductive wires consist of copper wire having a diameter of 1.6 mm.

3. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein the plastic sheath covering the assembly of heating wires and conductive wires consists of polytetrafluoroethylene.

4. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein said metal braid is made from 0. 1 mm copper wire.

5. A section of heating cable for an electric immersion heater as set forth in claim 1, wherein each of said heating resistance wires is 15.5 meters long and two adjoining said conductive wires consist of copper wire having a length of 0.85 meter on one side and 1.65 meters on the other side of said resistance wire.

6. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein the assembly comprising said braid covered resistance wire and said conductive wires have braided thereon another layer of fiber glass surrounded by said insulating sheath and metal braid.

7. Cable as set forth in claim 6, wherein said glass fiber braid covering the heating and cold conductors is coated in the hot state with a fluidized powder of plastic material of the polytetrafluorethylene type bonded thereon by the application of heat, said layer being subsequently covered with said metal braid and with said insulating external sheath.

Claims (7)

1. Heating cable with cold outlets, intended mainly for use as electric immersion heaters and like heating elements, comprising alternately a succession of heating resistance wires of relatively great length and of non-heating conductive wires of greater cross-sectional dimension than said resistance wires, the ends of the heating wires being soldered to the ends of the conductive wires, a glass fiber braid formed on and around each of said heating wires and having a thickness such that the crosssectional dimension of the heating wires with said glass fiber braids is the same as that of said conductive wires, an insulating sheath and a metal braid of uniform diameter surrounding the assembly of the heating wires and conductive wires and a sheath of insulating plastic material extruded over the assembly.
2. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein said heating resistance wires consist of stainless-steel resistor having a diameter of 0.8 mm, and said conductive wires consist of copper wire having a diameter of 1.6 mm.
3. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein the plastic sheath covering the assembly of heating wires and conductive wires consists of polytetrafluoroethylene.
4. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein said metal braid is made from 0.1 mm copper wire.
5. A section of heating cable for an electric immersion heater as set forth in claim 1, wherein each of said heating resistance wires is 15.5 meters long and two adjoining said conductive wires consist of copper wire having a length of 0.85 meter on one siDe and 1.65 meters on the other side of said resistance wire.
6. Heating cable as set forth in claim 1, wherein the assembly comprising said braid covered resistance wire and said conductive wires have braided thereon another layer of fiber glass surrounded by said insulating sheath and metal braid.
7. Cable as set forth in claim 6, wherein said glass fiber braid covering the heating and cold conductors is coated in the hot state with a fluidized powder of plastic material of the polytetrafluorethylene type bonded thereon by the application of heat, said layer being subsequently covered with said metal braid and with said insulating external sheath.
US3657520A 1970-08-20 1970-08-20 Heating cable with cold outlets Expired - Lifetime US3657520A (en)

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4103276A (en) * 1976-07-14 1978-07-25 Nordson Corporation Resistor core cable
US4158764A (en) * 1975-06-24 1979-06-19 Yane Frank J Device for heating liquid in a container
US4242573A (en) * 1979-01-24 1980-12-30 Raychem Corporation Water immersible heater
US4390776A (en) * 1982-03-01 1983-06-28 Yane Daryl J Immersion heater
US4461347A (en) * 1981-01-27 1984-07-24 Interlab, Inc. Heat exchange assembly for ultra-pure water
US4551619A (en) * 1985-01-22 1985-11-05 Lefebvre Fredrick L Cable structure for immersion heaters or the like
US4617456A (en) * 1984-09-18 1986-10-14 Process Technology, Inc. Long life corrosion proof electroplating immersion heater
US4626665A (en) * 1985-06-24 1986-12-02 Shell Oil Company Metal oversheathed electrical resistance heater
US6002117A (en) * 1998-03-10 1999-12-14 Pak; Il Young Electric heating cord with non-heating core-conducting element and reduced EMF emissions
US6300597B1 (en) * 1997-01-21 2001-10-09 Myoung Jun Lee Electromagnetic field shielding electric heating pad
WO2005055666A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-16 E.G.O. Elektro-Gerätebau GmbH Coaxial heating element for a heating device and associated heating device
US20090014437A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2009-01-15 Nv Bekaert Sa Glass-coated metallic filament cables for use in electrical heatable textiles
WO2010025750A2 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-11 Al Bernstein Electric heating cell conductor having energy carrier cells and low-co2 applications
US20100089586A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2010-04-15 John Andrew Stanecki Movable heaters for treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US20110124228A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-05-26 John Matthew Coles Compacted coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US20110132661A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-06-09 Patrick Silas Harmason Parallelogram coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US20110308814A1 (en) * 2006-04-21 2011-12-22 James Louis Menotti Joint used for coupling long heaters
US8355623B2 (en) 2004-04-23 2013-01-15 Shell Oil Company Temperature limited heaters with high power factors
US8448707B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2013-05-28 Shell Oil Company Non-conducting heater casings
US8485256B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2013-07-16 Shell Oil Company Variable thickness insulated conductors
US8536497B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2013-09-17 Shell Oil Company Methods for forming long subsurface heaters
US8586866B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2013-11-19 Shell Oil Company Hydroformed splice for insulated conductors
CN103428912A (en) * 2012-05-17 2013-12-04 河南科信电缆有限公司 Woven cover carbon fiber cable
US8791396B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2014-07-29 Shell Oil Company Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations
US8857051B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2014-10-14 Shell Oil Company System and method for coupling lead-in conductor to insulated conductor
US8939207B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2015-01-27 Shell Oil Company Insulated conductor heaters with semiconductor layers
US8943686B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2015-02-03 Shell Oil Company Compaction of electrical insulation for joining insulated conductors
US9048653B2 (en) 2011-04-08 2015-06-02 Shell Oil Company Systems for joining insulated conductors
US9080409B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-07-14 Shell Oil Company Integral splice for insulated conductors
US9080917B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-07-14 Shell Oil Company System and methods for using dielectric properties of an insulated conductor in a subsurface formation to assess properties of the insulated conductor
US9226341B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-12-29 Shell Oil Company Forming insulated conductors using a final reduction step after heat treating

Citations (5)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2529914A (en) * 1950-06-22 1950-11-14 Denison Mattress Factory Electrical heating element
US2800560A (en) * 1956-04-30 1957-07-23 Riverside Mfg And Electrical S Water-proof electrical connection and method of making the same
US3284751A (en) * 1963-10-11 1966-11-08 Eltra Corp Resistor ignition lead
US3348186A (en) * 1964-11-16 1967-10-17 Nordson Corp High resistance cable
US3538482A (en) * 1968-11-05 1970-11-03 Ristance Corp Heating wire

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2529914A (en) * 1950-06-22 1950-11-14 Denison Mattress Factory Electrical heating element
US2800560A (en) * 1956-04-30 1957-07-23 Riverside Mfg And Electrical S Water-proof electrical connection and method of making the same
US3284751A (en) * 1963-10-11 1966-11-08 Eltra Corp Resistor ignition lead
US3348186A (en) * 1964-11-16 1967-10-17 Nordson Corp High resistance cable
US3538482A (en) * 1968-11-05 1970-11-03 Ristance Corp Heating wire

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4158764A (en) * 1975-06-24 1979-06-19 Yane Frank J Device for heating liquid in a container
US4103276A (en) * 1976-07-14 1978-07-25 Nordson Corporation Resistor core cable
US4242573A (en) * 1979-01-24 1980-12-30 Raychem Corporation Water immersible heater
US4461347A (en) * 1981-01-27 1984-07-24 Interlab, Inc. Heat exchange assembly for ultra-pure water
US4390776A (en) * 1982-03-01 1983-06-28 Yane Daryl J Immersion heater
US4617456A (en) * 1984-09-18 1986-10-14 Process Technology, Inc. Long life corrosion proof electroplating immersion heater
US4551619A (en) * 1985-01-22 1985-11-05 Lefebvre Fredrick L Cable structure for immersion heaters or the like
US4626665A (en) * 1985-06-24 1986-12-02 Shell Oil Company Metal oversheathed electrical resistance heater
US6300597B1 (en) * 1997-01-21 2001-10-09 Myoung Jun Lee Electromagnetic field shielding electric heating pad
US6002117A (en) * 1998-03-10 1999-12-14 Pak; Il Young Electric heating cord with non-heating core-conducting element and reduced EMF emissions
WO2005055666A1 (en) * 2003-12-01 2005-06-16 E.G.O. Elektro-Gerätebau GmbH Coaxial heating element for a heating device and associated heating device
US8355623B2 (en) 2004-04-23 2013-01-15 Shell Oil Company Temperature limited heaters with high power factors
US20090014437A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2009-01-15 Nv Bekaert Sa Glass-coated metallic filament cables for use in electrical heatable textiles
US20110308814A1 (en) * 2006-04-21 2011-12-22 James Louis Menotti Joint used for coupling long heaters
US8381806B2 (en) * 2006-04-21 2013-02-26 Shell Oil Company Joint used for coupling long heaters
US8791396B2 (en) 2007-04-20 2014-07-29 Shell Oil Company Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations
US8536497B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2013-09-17 Shell Oil Company Methods for forming long subsurface heaters
WO2010025750A3 (en) * 2008-09-04 2011-12-01 Al Bernstein Electric heating cell conductor having energy carrier cells and low-co2 applications
WO2010025750A2 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-11 Al Bernstein Electric heating cell conductor having energy carrier cells and low-co2 applications
US9022118B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2015-05-05 Shell Oil Company Double insulated heaters for treating subsurface formations
US8256512B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2012-09-04 Shell Oil Company Movable heaters for treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8353347B2 (en) 2008-10-13 2013-01-15 Shell Oil Company Deployment of insulated conductors for treating subsurface formations
US20100224368A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2010-09-09 Stanley Leroy Mason Deployment of insulated conductors for treating subsurface formations
US20100089586A1 (en) * 2008-10-13 2010-04-15 John Andrew Stanecki Movable heaters for treating subsurface hydrocarbon containing formations
US8448707B2 (en) 2009-04-10 2013-05-28 Shell Oil Company Non-conducting heater casings
US8485847B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2013-07-16 Shell Oil Company Press-fit coupling joint for joining insulated conductors
US20110132661A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-06-09 Patrick Silas Harmason Parallelogram coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US8816203B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2014-08-26 Shell Oil Company Compacted coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US20110124228A1 (en) * 2009-10-09 2011-05-26 John Matthew Coles Compacted coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US9466896B2 (en) 2009-10-09 2016-10-11 Shell Oil Company Parallelogram coupling joint for coupling insulated conductors
US8967259B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2015-03-03 Shell Oil Company Helical winding of insulated conductor heaters for installation
US8859942B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2014-10-14 Shell Oil Company Insulating blocks and methods for installation in insulated conductor heaters
US8502120B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2013-08-06 Shell Oil Company Insulating blocks and methods for installation in insulated conductor heaters
US8485256B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2013-07-16 Shell Oil Company Variable thickness insulated conductors
US8939207B2 (en) 2010-04-09 2015-01-27 Shell Oil Company Insulated conductor heaters with semiconductor layers
US8857051B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2014-10-14 Shell Oil Company System and method for coupling lead-in conductor to insulated conductor
US8732946B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2014-05-27 Shell Oil Company Mechanical compaction of insulator for insulated conductor splices
US8943686B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2015-02-03 Shell Oil Company Compaction of electrical insulation for joining insulated conductors
US8586867B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2013-11-19 Shell Oil Company End termination for three-phase insulated conductors
US8586866B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2013-11-19 Shell Oil Company Hydroformed splice for insulated conductors
US9337550B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2016-05-10 Shell Oil Company End termination for three-phase insulated conductors
US9755415B2 (en) 2010-10-08 2017-09-05 Shell Oil Company End termination for three-phase insulated conductors
US9048653B2 (en) 2011-04-08 2015-06-02 Shell Oil Company Systems for joining insulated conductors
US9080917B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-07-14 Shell Oil Company System and methods for using dielectric properties of an insulated conductor in a subsurface formation to assess properties of the insulated conductor
US9226341B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-12-29 Shell Oil Company Forming insulated conductors using a final reduction step after heat treating
US9080409B2 (en) 2011-10-07 2015-07-14 Shell Oil Company Integral splice for insulated conductors
CN103428912A (en) * 2012-05-17 2013-12-04 河南科信电缆有限公司 Woven cover carbon fiber cable

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