US3563235A - Intrauterine contraceptive method - Google Patents

Intrauterine contraceptive method Download PDF

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US3563235A
US3563235A US3563235DA US3563235A US 3563235 A US3563235 A US 3563235A US 3563235D A US3563235D A US 3563235DA US 3563235 A US3563235 A US 3563235A
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copper
method
zinc
metal
intrauterine
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Jaime A Zipper
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GD Searle LLC
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GD Searle LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F6/00Contraceptive devices; Pessaries; Applicators therefor
    • A61F6/06Contraceptive devices; Pessaries; Applicators therefor for use by females
    • A61F6/14Contraceptive devices; Pessaries; Applicators therefor for use by females intra-uterine type

Abstract

A method of contraception is disclosed characterized by providing for the presence of elemental copper or zinc in the uterine cavity. This invention is preferably practiced by wrapping a small amount of wire or foil or by placing a sleeve around a conventional intrauterine device prior to implantation. In a modification of this method, two different metals are employed to provide improved effectiveness.

Description

United States Patent inventor Jaime A. Zipper Santiago, Chile Sept. 18, 1968 Feb. 16, 1971 By mesne assignments, to G. D. Searle & Co. Chicago, Ill.

Appl. No. Filed Patented Assignee INTRAUTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE METHOD 8 Claims, No Drawings References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner-Adele M. Eager Attorney-Curtis, Morris & Safford ABSTRACT: A method of contraception is disclosed characterized by providing for the presence of elemental copper or zinc in the uterine cavity. This invention is preferably practiced by wrapping a small amount of wire or foil or by placing a sleeve around a conventional intrauterine device prior to implantation. In a modification of this method, two different metals are employed to provide improved effectiveness.

INTRAUTERINE CONTRACEPTIVE METHOD This invention relates to an improved contraceptive method.

During recent past years, due to world population pressures, a vast amount of research has been undertaken directed to developing improved contraceptive methods. One such method which has gained wide favor because of its high effectiveness is to employ certain hormones known to modify the body endocrinology and suppress ovulation. These hormones, popularly administered as birth control pills, if used regularly, prove to be highly effective and reliable for controlling conception. Nevertheless, they are not without difficulties when used in large scale birth control programs in developed and in developing countries, not only because they are relatively expensive, but also because considerable reliance has to be placed upon the patient to take the pills in accordance-with the prescribed regimen.

In view of these disadvantages of conventional control pills, use of intrauterine contraceptive devices has achieved considerable popularity. Such devices may be inserted inexpensively in patients in large scale programs, and moreover, do not require reliance upon a patientss willingness or ability to follow a particular regimen of treatment. Despite these advantages of the intrauterine contraceptive devices which are already available and being manufactured commercially, it has been been found that they are not as effective as the socalled conventional birth control pills, provided the latter are used within the prescribed regimen. Accordingly, considerable effort has been directed toward improving the efficacy of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

In accordance with the present invention, it has been found that the presence of elemental copper of zinc in the uterine cavity is highly effective to prevent conception.

The elemental metal may be inserted or implanted in the uterine cavity by any convenient method. Normally, only a relatively small amount is required, for example, a small piece of copper or zinc wire in the order of l to 2 centimeters in length and a fraction of a millimeter in diameter is effective. The effectiveness of a given quantity of metal appears to be related to the exposed surface area. In general it is believed that an exposed metallic surface of at least about 20 square millimeters is sufficient. Larger amounts may be used so long as the size of the insert is not unacceptable.

' to 65 percent copper; copper-silver alloys containing up to 90 percent silver; and copper-tin containing alloys such as certain admiralty metals and bronzes (which may also contain other alloying elements such as zinc, phosphorus, aluminum, manganese, etc.

A modification of the present invention which has been found to improve effectiveness of the copper or zinc is to provide for the presence of a second dissimilar metal. The second metallic element appears to have a synergistic effect on the copper or zinc since bimetallic couples are even more effective as contraceptives. Any combination of a variety of pharmaceutically acceptable metals or alloys thereof may be used; for example, silver, stainless steel, gold, platinum, tin, brass, bronze, and the like. it will be obvious, moreover, that the combination of copper and zinc themselves can be used as a twometal system for improving the efficacy of the present invention.

The present invention may be further understood by reference to the following examples:

EXAMPLE 1 Comparative tests were performed on a group of patients to ascertain the relative effectiveness under clinical conditions of the presence of'a small amount of copper in the form of wire carried on an intrauterine device. A T-shaped plastic intrauterine device was placed in 250 members of the group as a control. In the control group no exogenous copper, zinc or other free elemental metal was present on the intrauterine device. In the balance of the group the same intrauterine 1 device was used modified by winding; a piece of copper wire, 3

centimeters in length and millimeters in diameter, around V RESULTS OF IMPLANTATION OF INTRAUTERINE DEVICES PER 100 USERS Small quantities of foreign material in the uterine cavity,

however, would not ordinarily have the desired longevity of action because they would be quickly expelled or sloughed off either through muscular uterine contractions or during the period of regular menstrual flow. Preferably, therefore, the elemental metal in implanted wit within the uterine cavity by means of a carrier, for which purpose any of the conventional intrauterine contraceptive devices are eminently suitable. A

wide variety of such devices are known, i.e., single or multiple loops, spirals, crosses, and various sinuous shapes. The metal may be deposited onto the carrier in the following manners: (a) it could be in the form of wire which would be wound around a portion of the carrier; (b) the metal could be in the form of foil and could be wrapped around the carrier; (c) the metal could be in the form of tubing and could he slipped onto a portion of the carrier as a sleeve and swaged in place by pressure; (d) the metal could be applied to the carrier by means of a plating process; (e) metal filings, powder, etc. may be intimately blended with the resinous material from which the intrauterine device is made.

The contraceptive properties of metallic copper were determined in experimental animals in the following manner:

served as the site of the intrauterine device.

Under general anesthesia an abdominal incision was made and a l.5 cm. length of wire consisting of four strands of wire each of which was 0.15 mm. in diameter was inserted in the lower portion of the cavity of the right uterine horn close to the cervical os. The wire was fastened in place by a silk suture through the myometrium in order to avoid expulsion. The left horn remained intact.

After a week of rest the rabbits were mated. Ten days after mating, the occurence of pregnancy was determined by obf serving the implantation sites through an abdominal incision.

There were no implantations in the right uterine horn which contained the copper wire. There were, however, an average Adult virgirial rabbits were used. lln each instance, thele ft uterine horn served as the control and the right uterine horn of 4.1 implantations per rabbit in the left uterine horn which had remained intact. This example illustrates clearly and definitely that copper serves as a potent antifertility agent when it lies in the endometrial cavity.

EXAMPLE 3 The contraceptive properties of metallic zinc were determined in experimental animals in the following manner:

Adult virginal rabbits were used. In each instance, the left uterine horn served as the control and the right uterine horn served as the site of the intrauterine device.

Under general anesthesia an abdominal incision was made and a 1.5 cm. length of zinc wire of 0.5 mm. diameter was inserted in the lower portion of the cavity of the right uterine horn close to the cervical s. The wire was fastened in place by a silk suture through the myometrium in order to avoid expulsion. The left horn remained intact.

After a week of rest the rabbits were mated. Ten days after mating, the occurence of pregnancy was determined by observing the implantation sites through an abdominal incision. There were no implantations in the right uterine hornwhich contained the zinc wire. There were, however, an average of 3.5 implantations per rabbit in the left uterine horn which had remained intact. This example illustrates clearly and definitely that zinc serves as a potent antifertility agent when it lies in the endometrial cavity.

EXAMPLE 4 In order to illustrate the contraceptive properties of copper are related to the amount of surface are of the copper which is exposed within the uterine cavity, the following experiment was performed.

Adult virginal rabbits were divided into two groups. Under general anesthesia and by the same surgical technique described in Examples 2 and 3, a single 1.5 cm. length of copper wire 0.20 mm. in diameter was affixed within the right uterine horn of the animals in Group A, The same procedure was followed in Group B except that four 1.5 cm. segments of copper wire 0.20 mm. in diameter were wound together and were affixed within the right uterine horn. The left uterine horns of all animals in both Groups A and B were kept intact and served as controls.

After a week of rest the rabbits were mated. Ten days after mating, the occurence of pregnancy was determined by observing the implantation sites through an abdominal incision. There were no implantations in the right horns of the animals in Group B. There was no evidence of reduced implantation in the right or in the left horn of the animals in Group A. This example clearly illustrates that the contraceptive properties of copper are determined to some degree by the surface area of copper which is exposed within the uterine cavity.

EXAMPLE 5 The effectiveness of a twometal system was studied by implantation of copper and silver couples in the rabbit uterus. The study was performed as follows:

Adult virginal rabbits were divided in four groups. Under general anesthesia the following foreign bodies were inserted in the lower portion of the cavity of the right uterine horn close to the cervical 05. These were fastened in place by a silk suture through the myometrium in order to avoid expulsion. In all four groups the left uterine horn was kept intact and thus served as the control. The foreign body affixed within the right uterine horn in the four groups was as follows:

Group A-a single copper wire 0,20 mm. diameter and 1.5

cm. long; Group B-a single copper wire 0.20 mm. diameter and 1.5 cm. long wound around a silver wire 0.35 mm. diameter and 1.5 cm. long;

Group C-a silver wire 0.35 mm. diameter and 1.5 cm. long; Group D-four copper wires 0.20 mm. diameter and 1.5 cm.

long.

After a week of rest the rabbits were mated. Ten days after mating, the occurence of pregnancy was determined by observing the implantation sites through an abdominal incision. In group A it was found that the presence of a single copper wire 0.20 mm. in diameter and 1.5 cm. long did not produce a marked effect on implantation rates in either the right uterine horn where the wire was implanted or in the contralateral horn. On the other hand, the presence of the two metals, i.e., Group B, with the same quantity of copper as in Group A, showed a remarkable decrease in the number of implantations in the right uterine horn where the two wires were placed. lmplantations were normal in the contralateral horn. The silver wire used in Group C did not produce an effect on implantation rates. When the amount of copper was increased in Group D, no implantations were observed in the right uterine horn where the wires were placed. Implantations were normal in the contralateral horn. This example clearly illustrates that when two metals are mechanically combined and inserted in the uterine cavity, the contraceptive properties are greater than then when one or the other metal is used alone.

I claim:

1. A method of contraception which comprises placing a contraceptively effective amount of an elemental metal selected from the group consisting of copper and zinc in the uterine cavity.

2. A method as in claim 1 wherein a said elemental metal is attached to an intrauterine device effective to retain said metal in the uterine cavity over a prolonged period of time.

3. A method as in claim 1 wherein said metal in is in the form of a pharmaceutically acceptable alloy.

4. A method as in claim 1 wherein two dissimilar pharmaceutically acceptable metals are placed in the uterine cavity in contact with each other, at least one of said metals being selected from the group consisting of copper and zinc.

5. A method as in claim 4 wherein said dissimilar metals are silver and copper.

6. A method as in claim 1 wherein said elemental metal has an exposed surface area of at least about 20 square millimeters.

7. An intrauterine contraceptive device adaptable to insertion in the uterine cavity and capable of being retained therein for prolonged periods of time, said device including a contraceptively effective amount of an elemental metal selected from the group consisting of copper and zinc.

8. An intrauterine contraceptive device as in claim 7 wherein said elemental metal has an exposed surface area of at least about 20 square millimeters.

Claims (7)

  1. 2. A method as in claim 1 wherein a said elemental metal is attached to an intrauterine device effective to retain said metal in the uterine cavity over a prolonged period of time.
  2. 3. A method as in claim 1 wherein said metal in is in the form of a pharmaceutically acceptable alloy.
  3. 4. A method as in claim 1 wherein two dissimilar pharmaceutically acceptable metals are placed in the uterine cavity in contact with each other, at least one of said metals being selected from the group consisting of copper and zinc.
  4. 5. A method as in claim 4 wherein said dissimilar metals are silver and copper.
  5. 6. A method as in claim 1 wherein said elemental metal has an exposed surface area of at least about 20 square millimeters.
  6. 7. An intrauterine contraceptive device adaptable to insertion in the uterine cavity and capable of being retained therein for prolonged periods of time, said device including a contraceptively effective amount of an elemental metal selected from the group consisting of copper and zinc.
  7. 8. An intrauterine contraceptive device as in claim 7 wherein said elemental metal has an exposed surface area of at least about 20 square millimeters.
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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3620212A (en) * 1970-06-15 1971-11-16 Robert D Fannon Jr Intrauterine contraceptive device
US3683905A (en) * 1970-03-16 1972-08-15 Marc E Chaft Intra-uterine contraceptive devices
US3834378A (en) * 1970-11-12 1974-09-10 Robins Co Inc A H Intrauterine device
US3877461A (en) * 1971-06-21 1975-04-15 Investors In Ventures Inc Device for controlling body fluids
DE2361206A1 (en) * 1973-12-06 1975-06-19 Schering Ag Intra-uterine device contg. active medicaments - and mfd. from plastic materials
US3973560A (en) * 1973-07-27 1976-08-10 A. H. Robins Company, Incorporated Intrauterine device of C or omega form
US4018220A (en) * 1974-07-19 1977-04-19 Lionel C. R. Emmett Method of insertion for intrauterine device of C or omega form with tubular inserter
US4111196A (en) * 1973-07-27 1978-09-05 Lionel C. R. Emmett Intrauterine contraceptive device of c or omega form with tubular inserter and method of placement
FR2479685A1 (en) * 1980-04-02 1981-10-09 Outokumpu Oy copper wire to a birth control device, intrauterine and its method of manufacture
US4353363A (en) * 1978-11-23 1982-10-12 Angel Sopena Quesada Intrauterine spermicide
EP0152193A1 (en) * 1984-01-23 1985-08-21 Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd Streamlined t-shaped intrauterine device and method of preventing conception
WO1985004798A1 (en) * 1984-04-19 1985-11-07 University Of Queensland Contraceptive methods and delivery systems therefore
WO1990002478A1 (en) * 1988-09-14 1990-03-22 Francesco Pianetti Bimetallic spiral intrauterine device
US5224493A (en) * 1991-01-30 1993-07-06 Cadco Corporation Contraceptive intracervical device and novel nonsystemic agents for the prevention of conception and disease
WO1997016142A2 (en) * 1995-11-01 1997-05-09 Bernd Hamann Intrauterine contracteptive pessary
US20040127918A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-07-01 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US20040211429A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-10-28 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
EP1902693A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-26 Melinda-Kinga Karpati Intrauterine contraceptive device
US20090277463A1 (en) * 1999-08-23 2009-11-12 Conceptus, Inc., A California Corporation Deployment Actuation System for Intrafallopian Contraception
WO2011030345A1 (en) * 2009-09-09 2011-03-17 Vhb Pharmaceuticals Pvt. Ltd. A threadless intrauterine contraceptive implant and a method for manufacture
US20130019374A1 (en) * 2011-01-04 2013-01-24 Schwartz Alan N Gel-based seals and fixation devices and associated systems and methods
US9907691B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2018-03-06 Hologic, Inc. Intrauterine contraceptive devices

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US454573A (en) * 1891-06-23 Electrical pessary
US662716A (en) * 1900-07-31 1900-11-27 John G L Gaedeke Intra-uterine battery.
US709675A (en) * 1901-10-04 1902-09-23 Albert Heimann Pessary.
US982996A (en) * 1910-04-19 1911-01-31 J B Eldridge Wire spring-stem pessary.
US1896071A (en) * 1931-04-24 1933-02-07 George A Clark Pessary

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US454573A (en) * 1891-06-23 Electrical pessary
US662716A (en) * 1900-07-31 1900-11-27 John G L Gaedeke Intra-uterine battery.
US709675A (en) * 1901-10-04 1902-09-23 Albert Heimann Pessary.
US982996A (en) * 1910-04-19 1911-01-31 J B Eldridge Wire spring-stem pessary.
US1896071A (en) * 1931-04-24 1933-02-07 George A Clark Pessary

Cited By (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3683905A (en) * 1970-03-16 1972-08-15 Marc E Chaft Intra-uterine contraceptive devices
US3620212A (en) * 1970-06-15 1971-11-16 Robert D Fannon Jr Intrauterine contraceptive device
US3834378A (en) * 1970-11-12 1974-09-10 Robins Co Inc A H Intrauterine device
US3877461A (en) * 1971-06-21 1975-04-15 Investors In Ventures Inc Device for controlling body fluids
US3973560A (en) * 1973-07-27 1976-08-10 A. H. Robins Company, Incorporated Intrauterine device of C or omega form
US4111196A (en) * 1973-07-27 1978-09-05 Lionel C. R. Emmett Intrauterine contraceptive device of c or omega form with tubular inserter and method of placement
DE2361206A1 (en) * 1973-12-06 1975-06-19 Schering Ag Intra-uterine device contg. active medicaments - and mfd. from plastic materials
US4018220A (en) * 1974-07-19 1977-04-19 Lionel C. R. Emmett Method of insertion for intrauterine device of C or omega form with tubular inserter
US4353363A (en) * 1978-11-23 1982-10-12 Angel Sopena Quesada Intrauterine spermicide
FR2479685A1 (en) * 1980-04-02 1981-10-09 Outokumpu Oy copper wire to a birth control device, intrauterine and its method of manufacture
EP0152193A1 (en) * 1984-01-23 1985-08-21 Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd Streamlined t-shaped intrauterine device and method of preventing conception
JPS60215355A (en) * 1984-01-23 1985-10-28 Ooso Pharm Kanada Ltd Streamline t-shaped intrauterine apparatus
JPH0675584B2 (en) 1984-01-23 1994-09-28 オーソ・フアーマシユーチカル・(カナダ)・リミテツド T-shaped intrauterine contraceptive device
WO1985004798A1 (en) * 1984-04-19 1985-11-07 University Of Queensland Contraceptive methods and delivery systems therefore
US4959216A (en) * 1984-04-19 1990-09-25 University Of Queensland Contraceptive methods and delivery systems thereof
WO1990002478A1 (en) * 1988-09-14 1990-03-22 Francesco Pianetti Bimetallic spiral intrauterine device
US5433217A (en) * 1988-09-14 1995-07-18 Pianetti; Francesco Bimetallic spiral intrauterine device
US5224493A (en) * 1991-01-30 1993-07-06 Cadco Corporation Contraceptive intracervical device and novel nonsystemic agents for the prevention of conception and disease
US8066007B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2011-11-29 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US7921848B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2011-04-12 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US20040127918A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-07-01 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US20040211429A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-10-28 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US20070044808A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2007-03-01 Conceptus, Inc., A California Corporation Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US20070144528A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2007-06-28 Julian Nikolchev Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and their delivery
US8733361B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2014-05-27 Bayer Essure Inc. Occlusion devices and methods
US8327852B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2012-12-11 Conceptus, Inc. Occlusion devices and methods
US8171936B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2012-05-08 Conceptus, Inc. Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
US8356599B2 (en) 1995-06-07 2013-01-22 Conceptus, Inc. Occlusion devices and methods
US20110030696A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2011-02-10 Nikolchev Julian N Contraceptive transcervical fallopian tube occlusion devices and methods
WO1997016142A2 (en) * 1995-11-01 1997-05-09 Bernd Hamann Intrauterine contracteptive pessary
WO1997016142A3 (en) * 1995-11-01 1997-07-31 Bernd Hamann Intrauterine contracteptive pessary
US8733360B2 (en) 1997-09-24 2014-05-27 Bayer Essure Inc. Occlusion devices and methods
US8613282B2 (en) 1997-09-24 2013-12-24 Conceptus, Inc. Occlusion devices and methods
US9597224B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2017-03-21 Bayer Healthcare Llc Deployment actuation system
US8079364B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2011-12-20 Conceptus, Inc. Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US8381733B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2013-02-26 Conceptus, Inc. Deployment actuation system
US7934504B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2011-05-03 Conceptus, Inc. Deployment actuation system for intrafallopian contraception
US8584679B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2013-11-19 Conceptus, Inc. Deployment actuation system
US8695604B2 (en) 1999-08-23 2014-04-15 Bayer Essure Inc. Deployment actuation system
US20090277463A1 (en) * 1999-08-23 2009-11-12 Conceptus, Inc., A California Corporation Deployment Actuation System for Intrafallopian Contraception
CN101534757B (en) 2006-09-20 2011-06-15 梅琳达·金嘉·卡尔帕蒂 Intrauterine contraceptive device
EP1902693A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-26 Melinda-Kinga Karpati Intrauterine contraceptive device
JP2010504296A (en) * 2006-09-20 2010-02-12 メリンダ−キンガ・カルパティ Intrauterine contraceptive device
US8118028B2 (en) * 2006-09-20 2012-02-21 Melinda-Kinga Karpati Intrauterine contraceptive device
US20090311306A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2009-12-17 Melinda-Kinga Karpati Intrauterine contraceptive device
WO2008034619A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-27 Melinda-Kinga Karpati Intrauterine contraceptive device
WO2011030345A1 (en) * 2009-09-09 2011-03-17 Vhb Pharmaceuticals Pvt. Ltd. A threadless intrauterine contraceptive implant and a method for manufacture
US20130019374A1 (en) * 2011-01-04 2013-01-24 Schwartz Alan N Gel-based seals and fixation devices and associated systems and methods
WO2012147064A1 (en) * 2011-04-28 2012-11-01 Mazzanti Alberto Intra -uterine device
US9907691B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2018-03-06 Hologic, Inc. Intrauterine contraceptive devices

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