US3546355A - Automatic tone generating system for an electronic organ - Google Patents

Automatic tone generating system for an electronic organ Download PDF

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US3546355A
US3546355A US3546355DA US3546355A US 3546355 A US3546355 A US 3546355A US 3546355D A US3546355D A US 3546355DA US 3546355 A US3546355 A US 3546355A
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tone
organ
rhythm
gate
output
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Fred B Maynard
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Motorola Solutions Inc
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Motorola Solutions Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10HELECTROPHONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10H1/00Details of electrophonic musical instruments
    • G10H1/36Accompaniment arrangements
    • G10H1/38Chord
    • G10H1/383Chord detection and/or recognition, e.g. for correction, or automatic bass generation

Description

United States Patent References Cited [72] Inventor FredB.Maynlrd X XX U .33 mmmmm K MM M 8 8 Sim mm Tm m N u u E m m T m m A u P B. m m m m m M om sflmmmm Duaaao CCPCS D6679 N66666 uwwwww Ill/l 24623 I I 27280 20968 $3.33 27583 64553 9. .3 23333 .B 0 .m m rm k r r A UWJP x .m I82 9m. 3 8 k m an. n hwmm n P71 MF 0. de mm d .w WCWS Ha AFPA 1.111.. 253 2247 ([lll a corporation of Illinois Primary Examiner-Herman Karl Saalbach Assistant Examiner-T. Vezeau Attorney-Mueller, Aichele and Rauner ABSTRACT: An electrical system for automatically controlling the play of organ music and referred to hereinafter as the auto-bass". The system includes tone select means for providing a control potential indicative of a selected organ tone and means for gating an organ bass tone signal through a cascaded digital type gate arrangement in response to the control potential and in response to a rhythm beat signal.
4 2 4 R m m m 0 fl 4 h m mm o E G6 1 m m m Y n S m m C m m m m m T m m A m m R Ae m Gh- H m GRF m Oiw m m m TN" m m m C D m m h n m. m m u m Mum L m m a c u AAl U I F M U H m U U U U T U n w w P N M m D M m s m P 2 l T ,6 m u a a n u R E Tm T 9 A 9 1 R I mm m on w Ll mm mm M C v S on a m 50R a m a /n D III. 1 i|||s|||||| u n uu u n i ii... i, m u. h a u. H I [ll llll l Illll u a u u -l 3 m ||||T| ||i.i Iii '13 u F||l|l||| l I T v 3 3 7\ lllll ll SPECIFICATION This invention relates generally to electronic organs and more particularly to an electronic system which may be automatically controlled to play bass tones, chords and percussion notes in preselected rhythms.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Prior art electronic organs have not been equipped with electrical systems which may be energized by the organist to automatically generate bass tones and chords in preselected rhythms. In these prior art organs, the desired bass tone may be produced only by the organist striking individual keys on the organ keyboard.
In spite of the absence of electronic systems for automatically controlling the play of bass tones and chords, there has been a long felt need by organ manufacturers of the highest performance instruments for a variety of electrical systems which will make the electronic organ simple to play and attractive to an unskilled beginner. The beginner or novice organist outnumbers the very proficient organist by probably 100 to I, thus making the auto-bass" of the present invention of utmost utility to both theorgan manufacturer and the novice organist.
' SUMMARY .OF rue INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved electronic organ system which is attractive to the beginner and which enablesthe beginner to easily play tones and chords that would otherwise be difficult for him to play.
Another object of this invention is to provide a system for automatically controlling'the play of bass tones and chords from an organ tone generator which are generated subsequent to an initial or downbeat chord, played by the organist.
A further object of this invention is to provide electronic organ circuitry which may be fabricated economically using integrated circuits.
The present invention features tone gate which is connected to both an organ tone select means and to an organ'tone generator. The tonegate responds to a predetermined input electrical potential to pass a selected organ tone.
. Another feature of the present invention is the provision of a rhythm signal gate connected to the output of the tone gate. The rhythm signal gate is responsive to rhythm beat signals applied thereto to gate organ tones to the output of the rhythm signal gate in a predetermined rhythm sequence.
These and other objects and features of this invention will become more fully apparent in the following description of the accompanying drawings. 1 DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS H6. 1 is a block diagram of the automatic bass tone generating system according to this invention; and
FIG. 2 is a more detailed illustration of the invention shown partially in block and partially in schematic diagram. FIG. 2 includes means for generating chords, bass notes and percussion sounds in selected rhythm sequence.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Briefly described, the invention is directed to a system for electronically gating a bass tone in a preselected rhythm sequence and in response to the keying of a tone select means. The tone select means is connected to the input of a tone control signal gate and provides thereat a control potential which causes a tone control signal gate. An organ tone gate is connected to the output of the tone control signal gate and is further connected to receive a bass tone signal from an organ tone generator. Organ bass tones from the tone generator are gated through the organtone gate in response to a tone control signal applied thereto. A rhythm signal gate is connected to the output of the organ tone gate and is further connected to receive rhythm beat signals from a rhythm beat generator. These rhythm beat signals gate the organ bass tones through the rhythm signal gate in a predetermined rhythm sequence. The output of the rhythm signal gate is then amplified by conventional audio amplifier circuitry in the organ.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referring to the drawings in more detail, the block diagram in FIG. I will be described. Some of the functional blocks in FIG. I are also included in the more specific block and schematic diagram in FIG. 2. However, FIG. 2 includes circuitry for producing percussion and chord output signals in addition to the bass tones described with reference to FIG. 1.
In FIG. I a tone select means 14 such as a set of conventional key switches is connected to a tone control signal gate 16. The tone select means 14 is shown as having a single output connection, but may in fact have a plurality of outputs corresponding to a plurality of musical notes.
Upon receiving a control potential at the input of the tone control signal gate 16 (which is a NOR type gate), gate 16 produces a tone control signal which is applied to the tone gate 18. The function of the tone control signal gate 16 is to detect which chord is played. The gate 16 in the example shown responds only when a C major chord is played, i.e when G,C, and E notes are played together on the organ keyboard. For every other chord, there will be a similar system (not shown) within the gating means" circuitry and consist ing of gates similar to 16, 18, and 20. A fully comprehensive auto-bass system might have as many as 48 such gating means systems for major, minor augmented and diminished chords.
In response to a tone control signal, the organ tone gate 18 passes organ bass tones from the organ tone generator 10 to the input of the rhythm signal gate 20. A bass tone is always present at the output of the organ tone gate 18 as long as both bass tone and control signal inputs to the tone gate 18 are present. The organ tone gate 18 is an AND type digital gate.
A rhythm signal gate 20 is also an AND type digital gate and produces a bass rhythm tone output signal in response to both rhythm beat signals from the rhythm beat generator 12 and the organ tone at the output of the organ tone gate 18. The above-described auto-bass system according to the present invention provides a gated bass tone at the output of the rhythm signal gate 20, and this bass tone is gated in a sequence controlled by the rhythm beat signals at the output of the rhythm beat generator 12.
Referring now to FIG. 2, the tone select means 14 includes a plurality of key switches 32, 34, and 36, which may be closed to ground lines 60, 62, and 64 respectively. Switches 32, 34, and 36, and switches 42, 44, and 46 are controlled by the same G, C and E keys on the organ keyboard, respectively, as will be explained in more detail hereinafter. When all three key switches 32,34, and 36 are activated (closed), all of the bias from the -l 5 volt supply 33 and applied to bus 35 is shorted to ground, grounding lines 60, 62, and 64 thereby producing a -15 volt output control signal at the output line 66 of the tone control signal gate 16. This control signal on line 66 is applied to inputs 68 and 70 of the-organ tone gate 18. Additional inputs 72 and 74 connect the organ tone generator 10 to the organ tone gate 18, and lines 72 and 74 may carry, for example, C and G bass notes which are gated through the organ tone gate 18 whenever there is the -l 5 volt potential applied to inputs and 70, respectively.
The organ tone gate 18 is an AND type of digital gate and passes the C and G bass tones to output leads 76 and 78, respectively, during the presence of -l 5 volt potential applied to inputs 68 and of the organ tone gate 18. Thus, the C and G buss notes are ANDedthrough the organ tone gate 18 and are applied to two inputs of the rhythm signal gate 20, as shown. The rhythm signal gate 20 is further connected via lines 80 and 82 tov output terminals 91 and 95 of the rhythm 75 heat generator 12. The rhythm beat generator 12 has eight output terminals 91 through 98, respectively, and generates a sequence of eight beats on terminals 91 through 98, respectively. An initial or downbeat signal on output terminal 91 is applied via lead 82 to one input of rhythm signal gate 20 and the fifth or afterbeat signal is applied via line 80 to another input of the rhythm signal gate 20.
The rhythm beat generator 12 generates electrical pulses on terminals 91 through 98 at a steady rate of between 44 to 240 beats per minute, and this rate may be controlled by the tempo control knob 99 on the rhythm beat generator chassis. The rhythm beat generator 12 is equipped with connections (not shown) which will bypass beats 7 and 8 which are normally present at output terminals 97 and 98, leaving beats 1 through 6 to repeat at a steady rate. The 8-beat condition where outputs 97 and 98 are not bypassed is the condition for 4/4 time. In 4/4 time, beat 1 is the down or beginning beat in the musical measure and beat is the second or middle beat. Beats 3 and 7 are afterbeats and beats 2, 4, 6, and 8 are off-time or syncopated beats.
The six-beat condition mentioned above with outputs 97 and 98 bypassed provides a 3/4 or waltz time, in which case beat l is again the down or first beat in the measure and beats 3 and 5 are the afterbeats. ln 3/4 time beats 2, 4, and 6 are the off-time or syncopated beats.
With the rhythm beat generator 12 operating at a selected tempo, and C and G output tones on leads 76 and 78, respectively, arc gated through the rhythm signal gate on beats l and 5 respectively, and this tone passage continues as long as all key switches 30, 32, and 34 are closed. The rhythm beat signal on line 82 is ANDed with the C tone on line 78 to gate the C tone to output lead 86 on the downbeat, and the rhythm beat signal on line 80 is ANDed with the G tone on line 76 to gate the G tone to output lead 84 on the fifth or middlebeat. Thus, the sequence of bass notes on lines 84 and 86 will be C-G-C- GC, etc. As will be seen below, the complete note sequence will be C-chord-G-chord-C-chord, etc.
The output terminals 93 and 97 at which rhythm beat notes 3 and 7 appear are connected via line 103 to a bus 49 in the chord select means 17. Each time the third and seventh beat appear on line 103, bus 49 is driven negative. Thus, since the key switches 32, 34, and 36, and key switches 42, 44, and 46, respectively, are all controlled by and mechanically connected to the same respective G, C, and E keys on an organ keyboard, then the G, C, and E inputs which are connected via lines 52, 54, and 56 to the chord keyer 28 are grounded simultaneously with the grounding oflines 60, 62, and 64 from the tone select means 14 each time beats 3 and 7 drive line 103 negative leading to bus 49.
The chord keyer 28 includes a plurality of AND gates, and the single output connection 101 from the organ tone generator is representative of a plurality of inputs applying separate organ tones to the chord keyer 28. These tones are ANDed with the potentials on lines 52, 54, and 56 as well as other additional outputs (not shown) from the chord select means 17 as there are additional chords to be played. Thus, a selected output chord passes from the organ tone generator 10 and through the chord keyer 28 to the output line 105 in the third and seventh beat sequence controlled by the abovedescribed connections to the rhythm beat generator 12. Therefore, the overall musical effect is a C-chord-G art, and for this reason, a detailed schematic interconnection between the selector switch 24 andrhythm beat generator 12 has been omitted. The tempo control knob 99 of the rhythm beat generator 12 may be changed to a foot or knee operated tempo control. Such control of the rhythm beat generator 12 allows the organ player to retard or accelerate the tempo at his own will rather than mechanically follow thegenerator 12.
The output 109 of the rhythm selector switch 24 is connected to the input of various percussionsound generators illustrated as functional block 26. Block 26 is composed of several ringing circuits and noise circuits; which are well known in the art. The percussion sound generators 26 generate sounds such as drums, congas, cymbals, and other percussion sounds which are routed to the output audio amplifiers (not shown).
The organ tone generator 10 of the present invention includes one octave of 13 bass notes from a bass section and one octave of 12 treble notes from a treble section. The organ tone generator 10 will normally generate many more notes than these, but the other notes are utilized with the organ proper and not with the auto-bass portion described herein.
lclaim:
1. An electrical system for automatically controlling the play of organ music including, in combination,
a. tone select means for providing a control potential indicative ofa selected organ chord which is to be played;
b. gating means connected to said tone select means and responsive to said control potential;
c. organ tone generating means for providing a plurality of organ tones at the output thereof; and
d. said gating means connected to receive an organ tone signal from the output of said organ tone generating means and responsive to both said control potential and to an applied rhythm signal for passing a selected organ tone to the output of said gating means in a selected rhythm.
2. The system defined in claim 1 wherein said gating means includes a tone control signal gate connected to said tone select means and responsive to a potential at the output of said tone select means for producing a tone control signal indicative ofa preselected organ tone.
3. The system defined in claim 2 wherein said gating means further includes a tone gate connected to the output of said tone control signal gate for receiving therefrom a tone control signal, said tone gate further connected to receive selected organ tones from said organ tone generating means and operative to pass one or more organ tones therethrough in response to a tone control signal from said tone control signal gate.
4. The system defined in claim 3 wherein said gating means further includes a rhythm gate connected to the output of said tone gate and responsive to said rhythm signal for passing therethrough an organ tone in said selected rhythm.
5. A system for automatically controlling the play of organ music including, in combination:
a. an organ tone generator;
b. a rhythm beat generator;
c. tone select means for providing an a control potential indicative of an organ tone to be automatically played in a predetermined rhythm sequence; and
d. gating means connected to said tone select means, to said chord-Cdescribed. However, it is obvious that any sequence of bassrgan tone generator and to said rhythm beat generator,
notes and chords may be automatically played by merely adding more keys in the tone and chord select means 14 and 17, respectively. Such additional keys could then be connected to additional tone control signal gates and drive same as previously described. Also, tone rhythm sequences may be varied merely by changing lead connections between leads 80, 82, and 103, and rhythm beat terminals 91-98.
A rhythm selector switch 24 is connected to the output 107 of the rhythm beat generator 12 and is operative to select various heat rhythms from the rhythm beat generator 12. The
said gating means responsive to said control potential and to a rhythm signal from said rhythm beat generator for passing a selected organ tone therethrough. 6. The system defined in claim 5 wherein said gating means includes a tone control signal gate connected to the output of said tone select means and adapted to receive a plurality of control potentials from said tone select means representative of a musical note.
7. The system defined in claim 6 wherein said gating means further includes an organ tone gate connected to the output of said tone control signal gate, said organ tone gate further confunction of the rhythm selector switch 24 is well known in the nected to said organ tone generator and receiving therefrom a selected organ tone, said organ'tone gate passing one or more organ tones to the output thereof upon receiving a control signal from said tone control signal gate. 8. The system defined in claim 7 wherein said gating means further includes a rhythm signal gate connected to the outputs of said organ tone gate and said rhythm beat generator, respectively, said rhythmsignal gate responsive to a rhythm beat signal from said. rhythm beat generator for passing therethrough in a selected rhythm sequence a selected organ tone which is present at the output of said organ tone gate.
9. The system defined in claim 8 which further includes:
a. chord select means coupled to said tone select means and operative to generate control potentials simultaneously with control potentials generated by said tone select select means for gating said chord select means in a preselected rhythm with respect to rhythm signals applied to said rhythm signal gate; and
c. chord keyer means connected between said chord select means and said organ tone generator for providing chord output notes in a sequence determined by rhythm gating signals applied to said chord select means.
10. The system defined in claim 9 which further includes:
a. a rhythm selector switch connected to another output of said rhythm beat generator and responsive to selected rhythm signals to provide rhythm control signals for percussion generators;
b. percussion sound generating means connected to said rhythm selector switch and responsive to said rhythm control signals to produce'a percussion sound output in a preselected musical sequence with respect to the bass and chord output tones.
Disclaimer 3,546,35S.-Fred B. Maynard, Phoenix, Ariz. AUTOMATIC TONE GENER- ATING SYSTEM FOR AN ELECTRONIC ORGAN. Patent dated Dec. 8, 1970. Disclaimer filed Feb. 2, 1981, by the assignee, Motorola, Inc.
Hereby enters this disclaimer to claim 5 of said patent.
[Official Gazette April 20. 1982.]
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Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3624263A (en) * 1970-02-16 1971-11-30 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Electronic musical instrument with automatic bass performance circuitry
US3629480A (en) * 1970-04-10 1971-12-21 Baldwin Co D H Rhythmic accompaniment system employing randomness in rhythm generation
US3649736A (en) * 1969-09-01 1972-03-14 Eminent Nv Electronic rhythm apparatus for a musical instrument
US3681508A (en) * 1969-09-30 1972-08-01 Bohm R Electronic organ
US3688009A (en) * 1970-11-13 1972-08-29 Seeburg Corp Musical device for automatically producing tone patterns
US3706837A (en) * 1971-06-17 1972-12-19 Wurlitzer Co Automatic rhythmic chording unit
US3707594A (en) * 1970-03-10 1972-12-26 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm sound producing device adapted for use with keyboard musical instruments
US3708602A (en) * 1969-10-29 1973-01-02 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg An electronic organ with automatic chord and bass systems
US3708604A (en) * 1971-11-15 1973-01-02 Jasper Electronics Mfg Corp Electronic organ with rhythmic accompaniment and bass
US3715442A (en) * 1970-12-15 1973-02-06 A Freeman Chord tone generator control system
US3740449A (en) * 1971-06-24 1973-06-19 Conn C Ltd Electric organ with chord playing and rhythm systems
US3760088A (en) * 1971-04-27 1973-09-18 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm playing apparatus
US3763305A (en) * 1971-03-22 1973-10-02 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm playing apparatus
US3764721A (en) * 1971-09-30 1973-10-09 Motorola Inc Electronic musical instrument
US3789718A (en) * 1971-12-30 1974-02-05 Baldwin Co D H Voltage controlled chord organ
US3795755A (en) * 1971-06-24 1974-03-05 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic accompaniment device of an electronic musical instrument
US3813472A (en) * 1971-08-20 1974-05-28 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Electronic musical instrument with rhythm selection pulse generator
US3825667A (en) * 1973-02-15 1974-07-23 Hammond Corp Alternate high-low and root-fifth selection system for electrical musical instruments
JPS4998218A (en) * 1973-01-23 1974-09-17
US3839592A (en) * 1973-04-30 1974-10-01 A Freeman Plural mode automatic bass system with pedal sustain
US3845684A (en) * 1973-11-14 1974-11-05 E Herr Electronic automatic reset switch circuit and electronic keyboard musical instrument incorporating it
US3872765A (en) * 1972-12-28 1975-03-25 Pioneer Electronic Corp Chord selection apparatus for an electronic musical instrument
US3878751A (en) * 1970-11-30 1975-04-22 Opsonar Organ Corp Endless record audio signal generator and means for playing record
US3889568A (en) * 1974-01-31 1975-06-17 Pioneer Electric Corp Automatic chord performance apparatus for a chord organ
US3918341A (en) * 1974-03-25 1975-11-11 Baldwin Co D H Automatic chord and rhythm system for electronic organ
US3943813A (en) * 1973-10-15 1976-03-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Company, Ltd. Automatic music playing system
US3954038A (en) * 1973-11-23 1976-05-04 Warwick Electronics Inc. Electrical musical instrument with automatic sequential tone generation
US3981218A (en) * 1974-06-14 1976-09-21 Norlin Music, Inc. Preset system for electronic musical instrument
US3990339A (en) * 1974-10-23 1976-11-09 Kimball International, Inc. Electric organ and method of operation
USRE29144E (en) * 1974-03-25 1977-03-01 D. H. Baldwin Company Automatic chord and rhythm system for electronic organ
US4018122A (en) * 1973-02-21 1977-04-19 B.V. "Eminent" Fabriek Van Electronische Orgels Electronic musical instrument with automatic bass accompaniment
US4019417A (en) * 1974-06-24 1977-04-26 Warwick Electronics Inc. Electrical musical instrument with chord generation
US4020728A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-05-03 Kimball International, Inc. Electronic organ with automatic keying of pedal notes
US4120225A (en) * 1977-01-17 1978-10-17 Kimball International, Inc. Method and apparatus for automatically producing in an electronic organ rhythmic accompaniment manual note patterns
US4137809A (en) * 1970-12-30 1979-02-06 D. H. Baldwin Company Arpeggio system for electronic organs
US4182211A (en) * 1977-09-21 1980-01-08 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Information transmission system
US4186636A (en) * 1975-10-21 1980-02-05 Thomas International Corporation Digital chord generation for electronic musical instruments
US4379422A (en) * 1977-08-15 1983-04-12 Baldwin Piano & Organ Company Polyphonic electronic music system

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3649736A (en) * 1969-09-01 1972-03-14 Eminent Nv Electronic rhythm apparatus for a musical instrument
US3681508A (en) * 1969-09-30 1972-08-01 Bohm R Electronic organ
US3708602A (en) * 1969-10-29 1973-01-02 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg An electronic organ with automatic chord and bass systems
US3624263A (en) * 1970-02-16 1971-11-30 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Electronic musical instrument with automatic bass performance circuitry
US3707594A (en) * 1970-03-10 1972-12-26 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm sound producing device adapted for use with keyboard musical instruments
US3629480A (en) * 1970-04-10 1971-12-21 Baldwin Co D H Rhythmic accompaniment system employing randomness in rhythm generation
US3688009A (en) * 1970-11-13 1972-08-29 Seeburg Corp Musical device for automatically producing tone patterns
US3878751A (en) * 1970-11-30 1975-04-22 Opsonar Organ Corp Endless record audio signal generator and means for playing record
US3715442A (en) * 1970-12-15 1973-02-06 A Freeman Chord tone generator control system
US4137809A (en) * 1970-12-30 1979-02-06 D. H. Baldwin Company Arpeggio system for electronic organs
US3763305A (en) * 1971-03-22 1973-10-02 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm playing apparatus
US3760088A (en) * 1971-04-27 1973-09-18 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic rhythm playing apparatus
US3706837A (en) * 1971-06-17 1972-12-19 Wurlitzer Co Automatic rhythmic chording unit
US3795755A (en) * 1971-06-24 1974-03-05 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Automatic accompaniment device of an electronic musical instrument
US3740449A (en) * 1971-06-24 1973-06-19 Conn C Ltd Electric organ with chord playing and rhythm systems
US3813472A (en) * 1971-08-20 1974-05-28 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Electronic musical instrument with rhythm selection pulse generator
US3764721A (en) * 1971-09-30 1973-10-09 Motorola Inc Electronic musical instrument
US3708604A (en) * 1971-11-15 1973-01-02 Jasper Electronics Mfg Corp Electronic organ with rhythmic accompaniment and bass
US3789718A (en) * 1971-12-30 1974-02-05 Baldwin Co D H Voltage controlled chord organ
US3872765A (en) * 1972-12-28 1975-03-25 Pioneer Electronic Corp Chord selection apparatus for an electronic musical instrument
JPS4998218A (en) * 1973-01-23 1974-09-17
JPS532686B2 (en) * 1973-01-23 1978-01-31
US3825667A (en) * 1973-02-15 1974-07-23 Hammond Corp Alternate high-low and root-fifth selection system for electrical musical instruments
US4018122A (en) * 1973-02-21 1977-04-19 B.V. "Eminent" Fabriek Van Electronische Orgels Electronic musical instrument with automatic bass accompaniment
US3839592A (en) * 1973-04-30 1974-10-01 A Freeman Plural mode automatic bass system with pedal sustain
US3943813A (en) * 1973-10-15 1976-03-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Company, Ltd. Automatic music playing system
US3845684A (en) * 1973-11-14 1974-11-05 E Herr Electronic automatic reset switch circuit and electronic keyboard musical instrument incorporating it
US3954038A (en) * 1973-11-23 1976-05-04 Warwick Electronics Inc. Electrical musical instrument with automatic sequential tone generation
US3889568A (en) * 1974-01-31 1975-06-17 Pioneer Electric Corp Automatic chord performance apparatus for a chord organ
USRE29144E (en) * 1974-03-25 1977-03-01 D. H. Baldwin Company Automatic chord and rhythm system for electronic organ
US3918341A (en) * 1974-03-25 1975-11-11 Baldwin Co D H Automatic chord and rhythm system for electronic organ
US3981218A (en) * 1974-06-14 1976-09-21 Norlin Music, Inc. Preset system for electronic musical instrument
US4019417A (en) * 1974-06-24 1977-04-26 Warwick Electronics Inc. Electrical musical instrument with chord generation
US4059039A (en) * 1974-06-24 1977-11-22 Warwick Electronics Inc. Electrical musical instrument with chord generation
US3990339A (en) * 1974-10-23 1976-11-09 Kimball International, Inc. Electric organ and method of operation
US4186636A (en) * 1975-10-21 1980-02-05 Thomas International Corporation Digital chord generation for electronic musical instruments
US4020728A (en) * 1975-10-24 1977-05-03 Kimball International, Inc. Electronic organ with automatic keying of pedal notes
US4120225A (en) * 1977-01-17 1978-10-17 Kimball International, Inc. Method and apparatus for automatically producing in an electronic organ rhythmic accompaniment manual note patterns
US4379422A (en) * 1977-08-15 1983-04-12 Baldwin Piano & Organ Company Polyphonic electronic music system
US4182211A (en) * 1977-09-21 1980-01-08 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Information transmission system

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