US3452498A - Building construction - Google Patents

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US3452498A
US3452498A US3452498DA US3452498A US 3452498 A US3452498 A US 3452498A US 3452498D A US3452498D A US 3452498DA US 3452498 A US3452498 A US 3452498A
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wall
plate
fig
sill
top
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Lewis R Kinsey
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LEWIS R KINSEY
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LEWIS R KINSEY
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/0007Base structures; Cellars
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/02Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units
    • E04B5/10Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units with metal beams or girders, e.g. with steel lattice girders
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B7/00Roofs; Roof construction with regard to insulation
    • E04B7/20Roofs consisting of self-supporting slabs, e.g. able to be loaded
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/38Connections for building structures in general
    • E04B1/61Connections for building structures in general of slab-shaped building elements with each other
    • E04B1/6108Connections for building structures in general of slab-shaped building elements with each other the frontal surfaces of the slabs connected together
    • E04B1/612Connections for building structures in general of slab-shaped building elements with each other the frontal surfaces of the slabs connected together by means between frontal surfaces
    • E04B1/6179Connections for building structures in general of slab-shaped building elements with each other the frontal surfaces of the slabs connected together by means between frontal surfaces with protrusions and recesses on each frontal surface
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • E04B2001/2481Details of wall panels
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • E04B2001/2484Details of floor panels or slabs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • E04B2001/249Structures with a sloping roof
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/35Extraordinary methods of construction, e.g. lift-slab, jack-block
    • E04B2001/3583Extraordinary methods of construction, e.g. lift-slab, jack-block using permanent tensioning means, e.g. cables or rods, to assemble or rigidify structures (not pre- or poststressing concrete), e.g. by tying them around the structure

Description

July 1, 1969 L. R. KINSEY BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Sheet 1 of 5 Filed Sept. 14, 1967 INVENTOR. law/$6 hu e) ATmRA/EY L. R. KINSEY July 1, 1969 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Sheet 6 of5 Filed Sept. 14, 1967 5 4 3 Z 4 q a) E- a M, 2. 4 7i 1 1/ 4 4 3 Z 5 WM a e 3/ U l. h 5 6 9 a a a a 1 3 2 7 3 4 flw Y 0 5 N9 WW W! e W E A) T ORA/1" Y L. R. K NSEY July 1 1969 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ,NVENTOR.

fm v a TIU NH j L. R. KINSEY BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Shet Filed Sept. 14, 1967 lshil m m 1 5 a 2 3 w(& w i A U a/w 1% 3 2 3 w m 2L 1 f i 3 w 4 p ii a a 5 2 4 4 Juiy 1, 1969 L, KlNSEY I 3,452,498

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Sept. 14, 1967 Sheet 5 of 5 INVENTOR. [aw/5' 2 (7/1/5157 b-wdgm ATZURJVEY United States Patent O US. Cl. 52-262 1 Claim ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An all metallic building or home planned and designed to be constructed from metal extrusions so as to provide a structure of 100% metal completely fire-proof, termiteproof, and free from dry rot.

CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS There are no cross-references to related applications.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The field of this invention lies in the construction of buildings and homes, and is particularly directed to procedures and construction of such edifices from metallic extrusions.

The extrusion building process is so completely unique and different from standard building practices that an entirely new method of construction has been developed and the old methods and ideas discarded. Looking further into the process it soon becomes apparent that both the economical aspects and the speed of assembly are greatly enhanced.

It is estimated that in building an average home labor comprises approximately 75% of the total cost. The extruded home can be constructed from the foundation up in a relatively short time with unskilled labor and a minimum number of tools.

The entire home is 100% aluminum and consequently fire-proof, termite-proof, and completely free from dry rot. Any variety of colors can be obtained directly from the factory where color can be embedded into the aluminum during or after extrusion. The extruded members, being box-like in form with open ends, can be filled with an insulation material prior to assembly giving a completely insulated building.

The extrusion method of building can be compared to building with blocks or a grown-ups Erector set, with the possibility of constructing any kind of building from a single room cabin to a multiple dwelling housing project. Industrial and commercial buildings, farm and storage buildings, and even army barracks are feasible and, because of features like lightness, simplicity of construction, and great durabiilty, the possibilities in the foreign market are limitless as well as anywhere in the United States.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One of the objects of this invention is to provide a permanent all metal structure for a building.

Another object is to provide a building structure that is easy to assemble or disassemble and move.

A further object is to provide a building which may be constructed with a minimum of tools required and can be easily erected by unskilled labor.

Another object is to make a building of unit construction rather than by prefabrication.

It is also an object to construct a building in which the walls, floors, ceiling and roof can be prepacked with insulation before assembly.

Still another object is the elimination of a frame for the building by desgining the walls, floor, ceiling, and roof to be the load carrying members.

ice

Another object is to utilize snap-together construction or simply building with blocks.

And finally it is an object to provide building elements permanently pre-colored material that will require practically no maintenance.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view illustrating the construction sequence of a building incorporating the features of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view, partly broken away, showing the sill plate assembly.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the joining of two walk through a wall partition corner and sill plate and the use of the slipper guide.

FIG. 4 illustrates a typical corner installation.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the box floor sections.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the floor section joining the sill plate.

FIG. 7a is a fragmentary sectional view showing an alternate sill plate and floor assembly using optional floor joints.

FIG. 7b is a fragmentary perspective view partly in section showing the underside of the assembly illustrated in FIG. 7a.

FIG. 8 is a plan view of the wall fabrication.

FIG. 8a is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing two wall sections being initially snapped together to form a box wall section.

FIG. 8b is a view similar to FIG. 8a showing two box wall sections being snapped together.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view showing the window installation.

FIG. 10 is a plan section of the door frame assembly.

FIG. 10a is a front elevation of the front door.

FIG. 11 is a section showing the joining of the ceiling to the eave plate.

FIG. 12a particularly illustrates the gable and top plate construction showing roof and drain trough.

FIG. 12b illustrates the roof comb installation.

FIG. 13 is a cross-section showing of the gable section and top plate.

FIG. 14a illustrates slide lock for the roof members.

FIG. 14b is a perspective view showing the underside of the roof structure shown in FIG. 14a.

FIG. 15a is a view showing an alternate roof installation using a roof rafter.

FIG. 15b is a perspective view showing the eave plate and roof rafter construction of FIG. 15a.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT General assembly The assembly of the all metallic extrusion home is basically the fitting together of pre-cut extrusions 15 in the proper sequence. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the sill plate 16 is assembled and positioned in the desired floor plan; this assembly forms the outline of the buildings and is the bottom foundation for all the walls, including the kitchen, bathroom and closets. The floor extrusion 17 is then laid out on the sill plate 16. After the floor is in place the walls 18 snapped together, including the door frame 19 and window frames 20 and placed in position on the sill plate 16; at this time the vertical tie-rods 21 are screwed into the slipper guide 22 which is also a part of the sill plate 16. The top plates 23 and eave plates 24 are then fastened in place by the nut 25 on the top end of the tie-rods 21.

The ceiling 26 is assembled in place, an installation identical with the floor 17 since the same extrusion 41 is used for both. Pre-cut Wall extrusions 53 are then snapped together forming the gable section 27 which in turn is capped by the gable extrusion 28. These extrusions are held in place by an extended tie-rod 21.

The final step is the roof installation. The roof comb 29 is first placed in position across the top of the gable extrusions 28 then each roof plate 58 is snapped in position from the top down; the ends are tied to the gable extrusion 28 by a small slide lock. This assembly is aided by the fact that the ceiling will hold a mans weight and no special scaffolding is necessary.

The entire described fabrication is accomplished with the use of one wrench for tightening the nut 25 on the top end of the tie-rod and a rubber hammer to help snap extrusions in place and to drive in slide locks.

The sill plate assembly The complete sill assembly 16, FIG. 2, consists of four separate extrusions. The two top extrusions 31 are identical and therefore can be made from the same die. These two top extrusions 31 serve two purposes; the horizontal portions 32 that protrude out over the floor, FIG. 6, seals and holds the floor in place, the short vertical members 33 that run the entire length of the sill plate 31 fit into a slot 34, FIG. 3, which is sawed into the bottom end of the vertical wall members 18 and hold the wall in perfect alignment.

The center portion of the sill plate 16 houses a deep channel 35 in which is held the slipper guide 22, a solid separate extrusion which is about 18 inches long. A hole 36 is drilled and tapped into this slipper guide to receive the threaded end of the vertical wall tie rods.

FIG. 3 illustrates the joining of two walls 18 through the wall partition corner 37, FIG. 8, and the sill plate 16 and the use of the slipper guide 22. These walls 18 are rigidly connected and held firm along their entire length through this specially designed wall partition corner member 37 Each wall is prevented from rising above or falling below the other wall by the simple, solid, and secure connection of the sill plate 16. The slipper guide 22 of one wall sill 16 extends out over and into a channel or recess 38 on the side of the other wall sill 16 and is held in place by the tie-rod 21. This tie-rod 21 is placed behind the first wall member where it will not interfere with the adjoining wall top plate 23.

FIG. 4 illustrates a typical corner installation. The sill plate 16 and the slipper guides 22 are cut at a 45 degree angle at 39 and held in position by the corner member 40 and two tie-rods 21. It should be noted that the slipper guide 22 is designed with one end cut at the 45 degree angle and the other end square, the threaded hole 36 is located in such a position that the same slipper guide 22 may be used for a corner installation or reversed and used for the interior wall connection. It can also be inverted and used on both sides of the corner; this enables one universal slipper guide 22 to cover every application.

The floors 17 of the building structure are made up of box-like sections. These box sections 41 are extruded in two pieces 42 and 43 and snapped together without the use of any tools. They are open at the ends which permit pre-packing with installation, FIG. 5.

The floor sections are designed to be assembled with the tongue 44 and groove 45 principle in such a way that a load applied to any single floor member, will be equally divered and carried by the other adjoining members. For economy and strength the floor is designed and stressed to carry the greater load from the top side of the floor. The tongue and groove are offset in each way to match the sill plate 16 and prevent incorrect assembly of the first piece and each following piece.

As illustrated in FIG. 6 the floor 17 rests on the bottom flange 46 of the sill plate 16 and is held in place by the top sill members 31. The sill plate 16, being the base for all the walls 18, is layed out according to the proposed floor plan. The floor 17 is then easily assembled for each room. Each piece 41 is cut to extend from wall to Wall with each end resting on the sill plate 16. The entire length of the first and last piece also rests on the sill plate 16 which gives the floor support around its entire periphery; the top member 31 of the sill plate 16 is then mounted on the sill plate holding the floor in place. These two identical sill plate members are designed with a horizontal flange 32 which extends out over the floor 17 on each side of the wall 18; on the outside of the wall where there is no floor this horizontal flange is trimmed off at 47.

The floor is supported all the way around the room by resting on a flange 46 on the bottom edge of the sill plate 16 and is held down all the way around the room by one of the top flanges 31. The weight of the walls 18 hold the assembly together with the walls themselves being secured by the tie-rods 21. The fact that the floor extends under the walls permits the total weight of the building to be transferred and equally divided among each and every square foot of the total floor area keeping the weight per square foot to a minimum.

An alternate floor assembly for use when no firm base is available (such as a concrete slab) or extra strength is needed a specially designed sill plate 48 and floor joists 49 assembly is utilized, FIG. 7a. The sill assembly 48 is basically the same as described above. The design of the sill plate, it can be noted, is slightly different, its height has been increased to receive the floor joists which are spaced any desired distance apart and run from wall to wall. The floor then rests on top of the joists 49 and is still held down by the sill top pltae 31, a suitable slide lock 50 being used to secure the joists 49 to the sill plate 48.

The walls The walls 18 of the building structure have been designed and engineered to be the load carrying members through the stressed skin process, and carry the main structural load of the building.

The wall extrusions 53 form a wall six inches thick and are themselves six inches square. For simplicity, these ex trusions 53 are extruded in two identical halves 51 and are simply reversed and snapped together to form an enclosed wall section 53. Both ends being open, these sections, are ideally suited to be prepacked with insulation before the wall 18 itself is built. When an exterior decoration of lines or grooves 52 is desired, one section will have to be drawn from a different extrusion. The extrusions will remain identical in every way except the decoration.

Considering the two identical halves 51 used to make up the wall section 53 as one extrusion, the wall assembly 18 can be constructed using only three main extrusions; wall section extrusion 53, wall corner extrusion 54, wall partion corner 37, and when its application is necessary, wall end 56. The application of these extrusions is clearly shown in FIG. 8.

Although this figure does not represent any special construction it can be visualized the infinite number of arrangements that can be made by using these four wall members. One end 57 shows one side of a door frame 19 along with an optional trim plate 58; the other end 59 illustrates a window frame 20 and window trim plate 60 which is added for all outside trim. It should be emphasized that either side of this standard wall member 53 is the same and can be used for the outside half 61 of the wall partition corner member 37.

In construction, these wall members 53 snap easily together with a designed-in simple but strong snaplock process and without the use of any special tools. Disassembly can be accomplished almost as fast as assembly with a simple quarter turn of an isometric bar.

Window installation In the final wall assembly the window 20 becomes an integral part of the wall. The wall 18 is assembled from the corner inward; when the window is reached short vertical wall section extrusions 62 are used window sill high. The window sill 63 is easily installed on these short vertical sections, FIG. 9. When the desired window width is obtained the next full length wall extrusion 53 is installed and the side frames 64 are put in place. The next step is to lay on the top plate 65 and install the short wall sections 66 above holding the entire window frame firmly in place.

For simplicity and economy, the window frame side pieces 64 are also designed as a complete enclosure, as in FIG. 9, and made up of two extrusions 67 and 68 snapped together. This necessitates only two dies for all four extrusions used in the side pieces 64 of the window. The window sill 63 and window top plate 65 are single extrusions.

Window glass is mounted in a subframe 69 which may be installed after the wall and window frames are assembled in the building. This is a simple operation.

Door installation and fabrication The door frame 19, being an integral part of the wall, can also be considered a part of the Wall assembly 18. The door installation is somewhat typical to that of the window.

The side door frame 70 is again a complete enclosure made of two extruded pieces 71 and 72 snapped together; this section 70 is then snapped into a standard wall section 53 and becomes a part of the wall itself. The same section 70 can be reversed and used on either side of the door.

Only one top door plate 73 is needed whereas two door sill plates 74 are used, one for outside doors and one for inside doors. The door 75 can be mounted in anyone of the four positions; it can swing either in or out or to the right or left.

As shown in FIG. 10, on the front sides of this door frame are two circular tubes 76 which serve as the hinge when machined out to match the door. The slide-in channel 77 also shown serves two purposes. One way it acts as an open channel for the door lock (snap catch bolt), but when not used, as on the opposite side of the door mounting, this member is turned upside-down, thus leaving a smooth and flush surface. On the hinge side this member is left out completely, thus permitting the door to set up flush and permit the door hinge to match this half hinge completely and perfectly.

The door 75 is simply three extrusions slide locked together, the hinge section 78, center section 79, and outside section 80. It can be used as a flush door or windows 81 can easily be installed. The outside doors can be filled with insulation the same as the walls.

Ceiling installation For simplicity and economy, the ceiling 26 is made from the same extrusions 41 used in the floor 17 keeping the number of extrusion dies needed to a minimum. The ceiling 26 is installed resting on the eave plate 24, the inside top plate 82 (not shown in drawings) and the outside top plates 23 around its entire periphery as was the floor 17 giving it the same strength and support throughout its entire area, FIG. 11.

The ceiling 26 is installed the same as the fioor 17 with the reinforced side up for strength and giving it the benefit of the offset tongue and groove for fool-proof assembly. Another added benefit to this type of installation enables the builder to walk around on top of the ceiling while installing the roof which does not necessitate the building of scaffolding or any other make-up preparation.

Wall top plates and gable section As was stated in the preceding section describing the ceiling installation, the eave plate 24 and the wall top plates 23 are installed just prior to the ceiling assembly. The eave plate 24 can readily be seen in FIG. 11 and the outside top plate 23 in FIG. 1211. A standard wall top plate differs from the outside top plate 23 in that it protrudes on both sides of the wall in order to support ceilings on both sides. The outside top plate 23 extends out over the bottom wall section for weather protection.

After the top plates are in place a gable section 27 may be installed on top of the outside top plate 23 as shown in FIG. 12a. The gable section 27 is simply a number of pre-cut wall section extrusions 53 snapped together in place. To cap this gable section 27 and form a support for the roof 30, the gable extrusion 28 is used. See FIG. 12b and FIG. 13.

The roof Any suitable roof 30 may be applied to the gable extrusion 28 but preferably a roof section of strong rigid assembly is utilized with the snap-on method of construction similar to the wall section. With this type of construction the roof is maintenance free; it will never have to be refinished and is completely water tight. The installation is fast and simple and is a perfect application of stressed skin construction on every square inch of roof section.

After the comb plate 29 is in position, FIG. 12b, the first roof plate 85 on each side is snapped in place by hooking into the comb plate and pressing down. Each succeeding roof plate 85 is hooked into the next one and pressed down the same way. The last piece to be put in place is the combination roof plate and drain trough 86, FIG. 12a, or roof finial 87, FIG. 11.

Each individual roof member 85 is not only fastened into the next one it is also individually held down by its own slide lock 50 which is mounted in the channel 88 on the bottom of each roof member. This slide lock need be only about 6 inches long with the top side of one end cut away at 89, FIG. 14a, thus leaving a shoulder or lip which will extend under the flange 90 that is made on the top side of the gable plate 28 just for that purpose. As the roof is being installed, one of these slide locks 50 is placed in the channel at each end of each roof member. When the roof member is pressed into its place, this slide lock 50 is simply slid along until the trimmed end extends under the flange on the gable extrusion 28 and from the inside of the wall end. Each piece is thus locked into position before the next piece is brought up as shown in FIGS. 14a and 14b. For disassembling (if ever need be), this slide lock is simply pulled free of the gable plate 28 and roof member 85 is simply turned up on edge from the lower side, then simply lifted free.

For areas where heavy snow is anticipated or extra strength is desired a special assembly incorporating a roof rafter 91, FIGS. 15a and 15b, is available. This extra strength is achieved simply by running the roof rafter 91 from the eave plate 24 to the roof comb 29 at any interval desired and securing with a slide lock 50 as shown in FIGS. 15a and 15b.

While the apparatus herein disclosed and described constitutes a preferred form of the invention, it is also to be understood that the apparatus is capable of mechanical alteration.

I claim:

1. A building structure comprising in combination:

(A) a sill plate,

(B) a slipper guide longitudinally positionable in said sill plate,

(C) tie-rods demountably secured to and extending upwardly from said slipper guide,

(D) a series of upstanding interlocking wall extrusion supported on said sill plate embracing said vertical tie-rods at the interlocking junction of said wall extrusions,

7 8 (E) an eave plate secured by clamping means on the References Cited upper end of said tie-rod to the top of said wall UNITED STATES PATENTS extrusions v 566,190 8/1896 Kinkele et al. 52--569 3vaifiiy liiiififi fiiillif; me 5 X (G) box floor extrusion sections supported on top of 2217184 10/1940 Rugg et a1 32 270 X 2,387,229 10/1945 Auten 52270 X Sald 2,811,850 11/1957 Clary 52-284 (H) a top extruslon plate between said sill plate and 3,054,481 9/1962 Johnson et a1 52 284 X the bottom ends of said wall extrusions having a hor- 3,176,807 4/1965 Pavlecka X izontally disposed protruding flanges extending out- 10 3 37 9 9 4 19 Larger 5 wardly over the top of said box floor extrusion Sections, and FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

(I) a slide lock on the bottom of said joists arranged PRICE C. FAW, JR Assistant Examiner.

to releasably engage under the bottom of said lower 15 horizontally inwardly projecting flange to secure said joists to said sill plate. 5290, 94, 284, 293, 457, 569, 588

US3452498A 1967-09-14 1967-09-14 Building construction Expired - Lifetime US3452498A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3593468A (en) * 1968-11-05 1971-07-20 Leopold Bustin Interlocking channel sections for use in the construction of floors, ceilings, walls and the like
US3601946A (en) * 1969-05-08 1971-08-31 Samson Window Corp Interlocking mullion construction
US3603060A (en) * 1969-05-20 1971-09-07 Raymond Christy Enterprises In Structural building system
US3928951A (en) * 1971-07-06 1975-12-30 Vercon Products Roof assemblies for building structures
US3952461A (en) * 1974-12-26 1976-04-27 Kinsey Lewis R Multi-layer walls for frameless buildings formed from extruded aluminum or plastic interlocking wall elements
US4069627A (en) * 1975-03-27 1978-01-24 Owen Christopher Pegg Building structure
US4222208A (en) * 1977-10-07 1980-09-16 Ferver George W Modular homes
US4319437A (en) * 1980-01-24 1982-03-16 Murphy John A Roofing shingle assembly having solar capabilities
US4416097A (en) * 1976-02-20 1983-11-22 Weir Richard L Universal beam construction system
US4805357A (en) * 1987-01-12 1989-02-21 Aleixo Vitor C Structural mold system
US5121583A (en) * 1989-10-23 1992-06-16 Takashi Hirai Roof
US5209031A (en) * 1992-04-10 1993-05-11 John Tavano Sloped glazing structure
US5245803A (en) * 1991-11-14 1993-09-21 Haag E Keith Connector means for roof panels and a method for installation thereof
US5685114A (en) * 1995-03-20 1997-11-11 Tanaka Masakatsu Design Office Co., Ltd. Structural member, floor structure, and roof structure for wooden building and a method of building with the same
US5938566A (en) * 1995-06-30 1999-08-17 Rodriguez-Ferre; Jose M. Modular construction for children to play
US6073404A (en) * 1997-12-12 2000-06-13 Norfleet; George Model building
US20020193046A1 (en) * 2001-06-19 2002-12-19 Judd Zebersky Modular house toy
US20070068112A1 (en) * 2005-09-26 2007-03-29 Mcclintock Gene Extruded aluminum building materials
US20070193144A1 (en) * 2001-03-11 2007-08-23 Crowell James H Building system, structure and method
US20100077683A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Victoria Lyons Modular Building System
US20120214397A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2012-08-23 Peter Strycharske Method and apparatus for convective sill insulation
US8640396B1 (en) * 2013-04-25 2014-02-04 Kwikspace Guam Wind resistant modular ISO building
US9003716B1 (en) * 2014-01-06 2015-04-14 Kwikspace Guam Wind resistant modular ISO building
USD756843S1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2016-05-24 Central Japan Railway Company Passenger carrying car
US20160194864A1 (en) * 2015-01-07 2016-07-07 James Walker Frameless construction using single and double panels

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US3593468A (en) * 1968-11-05 1971-07-20 Leopold Bustin Interlocking channel sections for use in the construction of floors, ceilings, walls and the like
US3601946A (en) * 1969-05-08 1971-08-31 Samson Window Corp Interlocking mullion construction
US3603060A (en) * 1969-05-20 1971-09-07 Raymond Christy Enterprises In Structural building system
US3928951A (en) * 1971-07-06 1975-12-30 Vercon Products Roof assemblies for building structures
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US4416097A (en) * 1976-02-20 1983-11-22 Weir Richard L Universal beam construction system
US4222208A (en) * 1977-10-07 1980-09-16 Ferver George W Modular homes
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US5245803A (en) * 1991-11-14 1993-09-21 Haag E Keith Connector means for roof panels and a method for installation thereof
US5274974A (en) * 1991-11-14 1994-01-04 Haag E Keith Caps for roof-to-wall connections, eave closures and means for installation thereof
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US20120214397A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2012-08-23 Peter Strycharske Method and apparatus for convective sill insulation
USD756843S1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2016-05-24 Central Japan Railway Company Passenger carrying car
US8640396B1 (en) * 2013-04-25 2014-02-04 Kwikspace Guam Wind resistant modular ISO building
US9003716B1 (en) * 2014-01-06 2015-04-14 Kwikspace Guam Wind resistant modular ISO building
US20160194864A1 (en) * 2015-01-07 2016-07-07 James Walker Frameless construction using single and double panels

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