US342216A - Albert mcdowell - Google Patents

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US342216A
US342216A US342216DA US342216A US 342216 A US342216 A US 342216A US 342216D A US342216D A US 342216DA US 342216 A US342216 A US 342216A
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H3/00Patterns for cutting-out; Methods of drafting or marking-out such patterns, e.g. on the cloth
    • A41H3/01Patterns for cutting-out; Methods of drafting or marking-out such patterns, e.g. on the cloth using stencils
    • A41H3/015Patterns for cutting-out; Methods of drafting or marking-out such patterns, e.g. on the cloth using stencils of adjustable type

Description

4 Sheets-Sheet l.
(No Model.)
A. MGDOWELL. ADJUSTABLE PATTERN FOR` DRAFTING GARMENTS. N0. 34z,216.
Patented Mey 1,8', 1886..
- u INVENTOR- WITNESSES:
zs altclmeys,
N PETERS. Plmwmamgnphcr, wnhmglun. D.`c.
2., t., e e h s .W e e h S 4 L L E O D 0 M An .u d 0 M 0 mw ADJUSTABLE PATTERN FOB. DRAFTING GARMENTS.`
Patented May 18, 1886.
| NVE NTO R By his .tt0rneys,
WITNESSES:
N PETERS. Pholoiinwgmplwr. washingmn. D. C.
4 sheets-sheet s.
(No Model.)
J,LMQDOWBLL. ADJUSTABLE PATTERN POR DRAFTING GARMENTS. No, 342,216.
Patented Mey 18, 1886.
A, INVENTOR:
" a $10' Mba,
By his Attorneys, ma, 054W 6M S E S S E N W W N. Patins mxu-Limegmwu, wamingwmnc (No Model.) 4 sheets-sheet 4. y
A. MGDOWELL. A ADJUSTABLE PATTERN TOR DRAPTING GARMBNTS.
No. 342,216. Patented Maly `18, 1886.
|NVENTOR' WITN ESSESZ By his .flttameys,
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
A LBERT MCDOVELL, OF NEVT YORK, N. Y.
ADJUSTABLE PATTERN FOR DRAFTING GARMENTS.
SFECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 342,216, dated May 18, 1886.
Serial No. 1T8 l17.
Application filed July 30, 1885.
To all whom. t may concern:
Be it known that I, ALBERT MoDowELL, a citizen of the United Statesand a resident of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Adjustable Patterns for Drafting Garments, of which the following is a specification.
My invent-ion relates to that class of patterns which are made of parts adj ustably con nected together, whereby the pattern may be set or adjusted to the measures taken and the parts then clamped together. vThen so set, the material or paper patterns may be outlined or marked by following the outlines of the adjustable pattern.
In order to facilitate the setting of the pattern to the measures, and to avoid, as far as possible, any reliance on thejudgment of the operator in making allowances, Ste., such patterns are usually provided with scales whereby the parts may be adjusted to the measures taken. A pattern of this general character, and especially designed for cutting out the upper parts of ladies dresses is shown in my Patent No. 310,297, of January 6, 1885. My present invention is an improvement thereon.
The objects of my present invention are, in general, to provide for a better adjustment of the parts of the pattern; to remove non-essential and extraneous parts which only add to the weight and cumbersome character of the pattern; to provide a parallel motion or adjustment for the darts, whereby whatever may be the length or width of the darts the sanne relative proportions as to length will be maintained; also,to avoid the complexity and waste of material incident to the formation of the hip-dart,which I now accomplish by making aseparate pattern for the under-arm piece, thus making a fonrpart pattern for the body or waist of the dress or other garment. I also provide a more perfect adjustment between y the curves of the side body and those of the back or back body, and have made chaugesin the side-body pattern,whereby I am enabled to place the material for the skirt just at the point needed to suit changes of fashion. I also add a pattern for the sleeve, the novel characteristics of which will be hereinafter fully set forth.
(No model In the drawings which serve to illustrate my invention, Figure l represents the pattern for the front ofthe body; and Fig.2 represents the pattern for the under-arm piece, now constructed separate from the front pattern. Fig. 3 represents the pattern for the side body,and Fig'. 4 the pattern for the back of the body. Each of these represents one half, and when applied to folded material serves to determine the contour of the two corresponding pieces of the fabric. All the views are face views and show the parts of the patterns set to corre spend with each other and to apredetermined measure. Figs. l, 2, 3, and 4 represent, respectively, pieces of fabric eut from the pattern shown in Figs. l, 2, 3, and 4, but on a reduced scale, for economy of space. Figs. 5 and 6 represent the dress-body made up from these pieces, Fig. 5 being a front view and Fig. 6 a back View. Fig. 7 represents the adjustable'pattern for the sleeve, the view being a face view, and on the same scale as Figs. l, 2, 3, and 4. Figs. 7L and 7" represent the wide and narrow parts of the sleeve out from this pattern, but on a reduced scale for economy of space. Figs. 7c and 7d illustrate moditied constructions of the sleeve-pattern, which will be hereinafter described.
My pattern is usually made from sheet metal, but other materials may be employed. rlhose plates forming the outline where seams are required are of the proper width to allow for the seam; therefore the outer margin, generally speaking, marks the cutting-line and the inner margin the seam or sewing line.
The parts are connected together in three ways-namely, by rivets or integrally, which, for convenience, I will characterize by the words rigidly connected,7 by a' hinge rivet or stud to form a joint or articulation, which I will characterize as hinged, and by slots and rivets or screws, so that the plates are at liberty to slide on each other for purposes of adjustment, which I will characterize by the single word connected77 Referring to Fig. 1, plates A and A* are rigidly connected, the latter standing at right angles to the former. Plate A2 is connected to A' below, and plate A to A above. The outer edges of plates A', A2, and A:5 form the front line of the pattern, usually about one roc and one-half inch from the edge of the fabric, as indicated by the dottcdline a in Fig. 1% This line may be curved outwardly, if desired; but this slight curvature will usually be allowedby theoperator. In mypresentinvention I omit the outer plaies for determining the distance the pattern is to be set from the edge of the material as cumbersome and unnecessary. Plate A5 is connected to A4, and forms with the latter a part ofthe neck-curve. A5 is hinged to A1 and AJ'is connected to A5, the two forming the shape of the shoulder. AT is hinged to A6 and connected to A5, the two forming part of the arnrhole. A5 is usually hinged to A9, which is connected to Adi, the branch from A. Ail: and A9 give the width of the front, and are usually provided with a scale, as shown. A10 is hinged to A and connected to A11. A10 and A11 form the pattern for the under-arm seam. These are usually provided with a scale. A1`z is adjustably hinged to A11 and connected to A15. A12 and A15- form the waistline, and A12 is usually provided with scales, as shown. In order to furnish a pattern for the upper or hip port-ion ofthe skirt, I usually add the parts A15 and A11". Plate A15 is hinged to A11,and adjustably hinged to A15atits lower end and to A1`Zat its upper end. A1 is hinged to the downward prolongation of A?. I do not consider this skirt portion an essential partof my pattern. A11 is an L-shaped plate connected at c to A and at a* to A Its longer transverse branch stands at a fixed angle with plates A and Ait, and it has an adjustment up and down parallel to A. Z are the dart` plates. In themselves they present no novelty over the dart plates shown in my former patent. Z, Z2, Z, and Z1 form the first dart. Z5, Z5, Z1, and Z8 form the second dart. These plates are connected to A11 at the top and to A1;1 at the bottom. IThe adjustment of the plate A1" up or down varies the lengths of the darts, but the difference in their lengths remains always the same. On A15, I usually place a dartsscale, as shown.
The method of using the front body portion is so similar to that described in my former patent that a detailed description further than given above will not be required.
Referring to the under-arm pattern, Fig. 2, plate B is rigidly connected to B2. is con- Y nectedto B and hinged to B". B* is connected to B5, and B5 is adjustably connected to B5. B6 is rigidly connected to B5, which latter is connected to B2. B and B5 are usually provided with scales, as shown. B7 is generally rigidly connected to B5 and B5. The plates B3, B5, and B1 when so connected may as well be integral, except for economy of construction. B is hinged to B1 and is connected to B5. B1 is hinged to B5. B5, B5, and B1) form the pattern for the skirt portion. Vhen this underarm pattern is laid on the fabric,the operator marks both the inner and outer edges of the plates B5, B5, and B1, the outer being the cutting-line and the inner the sewing-line of the under-arm seam. He marks both the inner and outer edges of plates B4, B5, and B, to indicate the cutting and sewing lines of the side seam which joins the under arm piece to the side body. The outer margins ot' B and B* form part ofthe armhole-eurve, and thelower edge of B the waistlinc. It will be understood that those edges of the pieces cut by the plates A10, A11, and A15 in Fig. l and B2, B5, and BT in Fig. 2 arejoined together in making the garment, and the hip-dart is thus formed. Vhere the skirt is abbreviated,as in a basque or sack, the under-arm piece may be cut independently ofthe front and with considerable economy. -In cutting this piece the plate B6 is laid properly with the grain or ligure of the fabric. In this pattern for the under-arm piece I have shown the plates B5?, B5, B5, and B constructed to be moved in and out along plates B', B5, and B5, and Bil as hinged toB", but it is obvious that this arrangement might be reversed. The plates B, B5, and B5 might be attached to B1, B5, and B9, and the plates B`, B5, and BT be made movable out and in.
Referring to the side-body pattern, Fig. 3, plate 0 has a branch, 0*. 0 is connected to 05. 05 and 0 arejoined to 01. 07 is hinged to 0". 05 is adjustably connected to 01 and hinged to 01, which latter is adjust-ably eonnected to 05. At its upper end 04r is connected to 05, which latter is adjustably connected to 0*. 0 is a brace connecting 05 to 015. I do not consider this as an essential feature. Other equivalent means may be substituted for it. Scales are usually employed on the plates 0', 0*, 05, 05, and 05, as shown.
Fig. Saillustrates the application of thesidebody pattern. Lines drawn at the inner edges of all the plates,except 05 a-nd 07,give the sewing-lines indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 35. The lower edge ot' 05 is the waist-line. The seam-line along the inner edges of plates C', 02, and 05,]'oins the seam-line along the inner edges of plates B, B5, and Bof Fig. 2. The adjustment of plate 05 and 0*, the hinging of the plate 0s at the waist-line, and the staying of the plates 05 and 0, as described, possess important advantages in enabling the operator to keep the top of the side body ofthe proper Width at the armhole, and to adjust the dress material below the waist to suit the bustle or place the fullness where it is required.
Referring to Fig. 4, which shows the pattern for the back or back body, D is plate provided With a branch, Dit, riveted to it or formed integral with it. Plate D2 is 'connected to D. This plate D has a curved branch, which is adjustably connected to D5. D3 is connected to D, which latter is adj ustably connected to the upper end of a curved plate, D5. D5 is hinged to D15,which is connected to the branch plate D555. DT is adjust-ably connected to the lower end of D5, and is connected to DS, and DS is adjustably hinged to Ditch, which latter is a branch h'xed rigidly to D5,or forming a part thereof. D9 is connected to D2. Dtti* is also a IIS partofD,beingusuallyformedintegrally therewith to extend the pattern below the waist-line,
which is indicated by the lower edge of DW.
D10 is hinged to Dif/1:* and is adjustably connected to Du, and this latter is hinged to Ds and adj ustably connected to Dwi. The curved branch of D,(which forms part of the pattern for the neckcurve,) plate D", the curved plate D?, (which forms part of the pattern for the arni-hole,) plate D, plate Dl, plate D", plate DW, and plate D are usually provided with scales, as shown. The plates C* on the pattern for the side body, Fig. 3, and the plate D5 on the pattern for the back body, Fig. 4, each form a part of the armhole-curve. and each is provided with a.scale,arI shown. Now, when the measure is taken and set on these scales, the portion of the armhole cut by the said plates Will be of the proper length. The scales are so proportioned to eachother, as will be well understood, that this result will be effected. The parts of this back-body pattern are adjusted and set to the measures, and the piece cut therefrom will take the form shown in Fig. 4, the dotted lines in which indicate the sewing'lines. The sewing-line at the center of the back from the waist-line up will usuallyjoin the line drawn along the inner edge of D2 at Dek, depending somewhat on the fullness required in the back. The length of the skirt below the waist-line will be determined by fashion. The plates Du and Diff* extend down below the waistline to provide for the necessary fullness for the skirt or basque. By providing an adjust-able connection where the lower end of D joins the upper end of DT the operator is enabled to place the top of the back-curve higher or lower, as fashion or the figure may require. The sewing-line; marked by plates Dl, D8, and D, in Fig. 4, joins the line marked by plates C", 0*, and Gf, iu Fig. 3. The sewing-line marked by the inner edges of plates D', D2, D, and
D* I joins the corresponding line on the other half ot' the back. The sewing-line marked by plates D3 and D" joins the line marked by the plates A5 and Ain Fig. l, forming the shoul der-seam.
These four patterns (seen in Figs. l, 2, 8, and 4) form the patterns for the entire body or waist of the dress, except the sleeves; l will now describe the sleeve-pattern, referring to Fig. 7. The plates F/and El are connected and control the size ofthe sleeve at the wrist. The plates E3 and E are connected and control the size ofthe sleeve at the elbow. E5 is rigidly connected to EL ate and is connected to FN. E5 and E control the length of the sleeve from armhole to elbow on the outside ofthe arm. ET and E8 are rigidly connected to E. El and E8 control the Width of the upper and under pieces of the sleeve at the arnihole. The upper piece, e', Fig 7, is generally wider than the under piece, e2, Fig. 7b, and the difference 65 in their width varies with the fashion. Hereinafter I will explain how this difference is effected with the patterns. E is rigidly connected to E and controls the highest point of the curve in the upper part ofthe sleeve at the arinhole. El0 is rigidly connected to E6 and is connected to E", which latter is joined to E. El and E control the size of the sleeve at the armhcle. ElAl is connected to E, which latter is rigidly joined to E3. IEu is joined to or E or both, as desired, and E15 is connected to E at one end and rigidly connected to E. E, El, E, and E15 give the shape of the inside of the sleeve and the sewing-line for same, and also control the curve of the sleeve.' The rigid connection of E to E15 gives the angle at the wrist-end of the sleeve. The plate El is adjustahly connect-ed to El and connected also to E, which latter is adjustahly connected to E and hinged to E13. E18 is connected to Em and adjustably connected to 43T. These plates El E E1S El form the outer contour from the hand to the arnihole of the larger or upper piece, e', ofthe sleeve and the ontersewing-line. Plate Emis adjustably connected to E and connected to E. This latter is adjustably connected to E4 and hinged to l-5. This latter is connected to E, which in tuln is adjustably connected to El. These plates Ei, E, EQ, and EN form the outer contour from wrist to arinhole of the smaller 9 or lower piece, e`', of the sleeve and the outer sewingline of this piece. The convex armhole curve at the end of piece e', Fig. 7, is formed by the plates El, E2, and E. E20 is a curved and slotted plate hinged to E at one end and adj ustably connected to plates E and E. Plate E21 is adjnstably connected to El' and E'lat one end, and has a slotted connection at its other end at the junction of El1 and E. The curved plate E is hinged at one end to the end of El, and has a slotted connection at the -unction of )lates E and E at the same Joint .l l
that E21 is connected therewith. Scales are usually provided on E. E2, E, E", El, E, E, and Ell. Where the measure is taken from theinside of the arm such scales may also be provided on plates E and E.
In cutting out a sleeve with one part wider than the other, asindicated in Figs. 7 and 7", it will be understood that in order to maintai'n the proper measure, that which is taken from the width of one piece must be added to the other. Therefore l usually make the scales c:i e4 e5 e6 half-size, and set the connected plates forming the exterior outlines of the pieces e e2 accordingly-that is to say, in theexample plates E and El are set at l l on opposite sides of the Zero-mark on t-he differential wristscale et, plates E and E25 at 2 2 on opposite sides ofthe zeroanarh on the differential elbow-scale e, and plates El and Ez3 at 6 and 6, respectively, on the differential scales e5 aude. at the armhole. This gives a difference of six inches at the armhole, two inches at the elbow, and one inch at the wrist. The adjust- IOO IIO
' plate E tothe armhole size along the scale Y ure, and enables the operator'to draft any of Y.
ments at e3, 6*, e5, and c may be termed the l fashion adjustments, as they are only used to govern the style of the sleeve and have nothing to do with its size or proportion. On plate E is the wrist-scale. On plate E is the elbow-scale, and on plate E is the armholescale. It will be obvious that any predetermined difference in the width of the two pieces forming the sleeve as determined by fashion may be maintained without reference to the width or length of thesleeve, the former being determined by the wrist, elbow, and armhole scalesjust mentioned, and the latter by scales on plates E5 and E, The former gives the length fromiarmhole to elbow, and the latter from elbow to wrist.
The dotted lines in Fig. 7show the position ofthe parts when the dii'f'ereI/ice between the widths of thetwo parts of the sleeveis reduced to zero at the wrist, to one inch at the elbow, and to three inches at the armhole. This difference in the widths of the two pieces carries the back seam farther under the arm, and also generally determines the gather or fullness at the elbow; but, as said before, it has nothing to do with the size of the sleeve.
My pattern enables me to retain the size of the sleeve while I vary the difference of width of its pieces, and also to maintain a certain difference in the width of the pieces, and at the same time vary the size. Thus any prevailing fashion as to width of the pieces may be followedby setting the plates of the pattern properly to the differential scales, while the size may be varied for each sleeve cut, if necessary.
To get the high point at the armhole, adjust on plate E. The other end of plate E'21 will adjust itself at its connection with E, as will also plate E2z when plate E23 is moved.
This pattern enables the operator to draft the sleeve directly on the material, and gives both the cutting and sewing lines. It Varies the width of the two pieces at the wrist, elbow, and armhole independently and without disturbing the movements for the size of the sleeve. It locates the elbow-point by measthe ordinary styles of sleeves.
As I have described my pattern, it is adapted to work from a lengtlrmeasure taken from the outside or back part of the arm, from shoulder to elbow and from elbow to Wrist; but I can also take the measure on theinside of the arm, and thus locate the elbow and get the length of the sleeve. In this case I would use the scale on plate El2 to locate the elbow, and the scale on plate E15 to complete 'the length. When the measurement is taken in this way, plates E5 and E may be omitted as non-essential, plates Emand ES being in this case united to plate El and plateEto Ew. Plate E11 should also in this case be rigidly connected to E, instead of hinged thereto.
In lieu of the construction shown in Fig. and with equally good results, I may attach E to E12 and E10 to E down nearer the elbow than as shown, these connected plates E10 and Eu passing under or over E23, as desired; and in this case I would connect Es rigidly to E6 at the same point that ET is connected to EG. This construction would enhance the symmeti-ical appearance of the rigidly-connected plates E, E?, and E". E might bein this con struction secured rigidly to E, instead of EG. This modified construction is illustrated in Fig. 7. l
In Fig. 7 I have illustrated another slight modification, wherein plates E5 and E are omitted. Vhen using this construction, the length from armhole to elbow is taken on the inside of t-he arm, as I have before stated it may be, and is set on the scale on plate E, Other slight changes of construction are also illustrated in this view, namely: Plate E is rigidly attached to plate E12 and plate E21 is hinged to plate E, and is madein two parts to slide on each other. Plate Ilby has combined with it integrally plate El", and plate E is coupled at its opposite ends to this combined plate and to plaie E, and slides on them. Fig. 7d shows the modified construction clearly. The scales on plates E1l and EL2 are the same as in the other constructions. It will be observed that the construction is somewhat simpler than that shown in Fig. 7, as several plates are omitted; but it does not form so stift a pattern as the former.
In the several iigures, x x, the., indicate clamping nuts and screws or theirequivalents, which serve to prevent any sliding ot' the plates on each other after the pattern is properl y set.
By reason of the improvements herein described, I am able to accomplish certain desirable results not, so faras I am aware, heretofore accomplished. By separating the frontbody pattern from the pattern for the underarm piece I am better enabled to follow the usual division of the waist as now made, which calls for two pieces, instead of one, in the front; also, by reason of the improved construction of the pattern for the side body I am enabled to change the width at the armhole, and keep the lines drawn by plates C and C)8 of a better shape below the waist-line. Other advantages have been already setforth.
I do not wish to limit myself to the precise construction of the'pattern herein described, as this may be varied to some extent without departing from my invention, as indicated above. Such slight changes come within the knowledge of those skilled in the art, and may be made by any one.
I am aware that it has been proposed to construct an adjustable sleeve-pattern with movable plates for outlining both pieces of the sleeve, but so far as I am aware I am the first to provide such apattern with differential scales, as shown, and to so construct it that the style may be varied without changing thesize of the sleeve or losing its measurements.
Having thus described my invention, I claiml. A pattern for drafting the body of a dress or similar garment, constructed of four separate but interdependent parts, namely: the pattern for the front body, the pattern for the under-arm piece, the pattern for the side body, and the pattern for the back body, each of said part patterns being constructed of connected plates and made adjustable as to size and form, and provided with suitable scales, substantially as set forth, whereby each may be independently set to the measure taken and the parts of the garment cut directly therefrom.
2. In an adjustable pattern for the front body, the combination, with the slotted plates A', At, A2, and A", and the plates forming the dart-patterns,all constructed and arranged substantially as described, of the slotted angular plate A, connected to plates A' and A* and to the tops of the dart-plates, said angular plate AH being mounted to play on the slotted plate A' and on a pin in plate Adi, substantially as shown, whereby its inclination is not altered by adjustment, substantially as and for the purposes set forth.
3. The pattern for the under arm piece, constructed separate from the pattern for the front body, and provided with the plates B7, B, and B, to form a pattern for the skirt below Vthe waist-line, substantially as set forth.
4. The patternfor the underarnl piece, provided with the slotted plate B', fixed rigidly to the plate B2, and the curved plate Bi", hinged to theplate B, and adj ustably connected to the plate B', to form the armhole-pattern, substantially as set forth.
5. An adjustable pattern for the underarm piece, comprising the several plates B', Bii, B2, B, B, B, and B, substantially as set forth. 1
6. An adjustable pattern for thc under-arm piece, comprising the plates B4 and B5 connected adj ustably to the plates B2 and Bis by slotted cross-plates, and a curved plate at the top to form part of the armhole-curve, substantially as set forth.
7. The combination, with the adjustable pattern for the side body provided .with a slotted connection between the plates C* and C, and with a scale on plate 0*, of the adjustable pattern for the back body provided with a slotted connection between the plates D'3 and D7, and with a scale on plate Di", the said scales on plates C* and Di being so proportioned, as described, that when set to measure and the parts cut by the patterns the portion of the armhole eut by said plates C* and D5 will be of the desired length, as set forth.
8. An adjustable pattern for the side body, comprising the plate C', provided with the slotted branch 0*, the plates GL', C", and C, the plate Ci, connected adjustably to branch 0*, the plate C,connectcd to plate C3, C5, and CS,
substantially as shown, the plate CS, connected adj ustably to plates G5 and C7, substantially as set forth.
9. The combination, with the plates D', D?, D, Dz, D, Dirt, and DR of the back-body pattern, arranged and constructed substantially as described,of the curved plate D5, slotted at both ends and hinged between said slotted ends to the plate D", and provided with scales at these slotted ends, and the plates DL and D7,connected, respectively, to the said slotted upper and lower ends of said plate D, substantially as and for the purposes set forth.
l0. An adjustable pattern for the sleeve, substantially as described, comprising adjustable plates for drafting both the upper and under parts, e' and c2, of the sleeve, and said plates provided, substantially as described,
with dierential scales e, e, c5, and e,wl1ere' by the addition to and subtraction from the width of said pieces may be made without changing the size of sleeve, as set forth.
11. An adjustable sleeve-pattern comprising the sliding plhates at the Wrist for controlling and adjusting the wrist-measure, the sliding plates at the elbow for controlling and adjusting the elbown1easure, the sliding plates Em and E, for controlling and adjusting the measure at the armhole, the sliding plates E and E, for controlling and adjusting the measure from armhole to elbow, the sliding plates for drafting the inner and outer curves of the sleeve, substantially as described, and the curved sliding plates for drafting the armholecurves, substantially as described.
l2. In an adjustable pattern for the sleeve, the combination, with the plates E, E, E), E, E?, Et, and E, arranged substantially as described, of the plates E, E, WS, and El, for marking the exterior edge of the upper piece, c', and the plates E2, E, Eand El, for1narking the exterior edge ofthe lower piece, ci, all arranged' substantially as set forth.
13. In au adjustable pattern for the sleeve, the combination, with the plates E7, El, E, and E", of the plates E, E, and E21, for forming the convex armhole-curve, all arranged and connected substantially as set forth.
14. In an adjustable pattern for the sleeve, the combination, with the plates E", E, E, EN, E, and E, of the plates El and E2, and the slotted curved plate E", hinged to E?" and having` a slotted connection with E, substanstantially as and for the purposes set forth.
l5. In an adjustable pattern for the sleeve, the combination ofthe several plates E', E, E3, E4 EI li ES 1G10 jll7 E12, llir E14, E157 E22 Ef", E, Ei", and El, all arranged and connected substantially as set forth, for use in drafting the piece c2, as described.
16. In an adjusting pattern for the sleeve, the combination of the several plates E', E, E3, :El7 14110, $11. E12 Elfi, Ell, Elfi Elfi, El?, EN, Eli), El, E", E2", and E, all arranged and connected substantially as set forth,for use in drafting the piece e', as described.
17. In an adj ust-able pattern for the sleeve,
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IZO
ISO
the combination 0f the several plates E E2 at In Witness whereof I have hereunto signed .ro the Wrist, E'E at the elbow, El0 E11 at the my name in the presence of two subscribing armhole, E12 E15 EIIL EN at the inside of the witnesses.
arm, EG E17 from Wrist to elbow outside, E5 E'i from armhole to elbow outside, Eg E20 El1 eon- ALBERT MQDOWELL. Vex curve at ar'mhole, and E, E23, and E2 concave Curve at armhole, all arranged sub- Vitnesses:
stanbially as shown, whereby the sleeve may HENRY CONNETT,
be drafted oftwo like-sized pieces, as Set fort-h. G-EO. BAINTON.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2004006705A1 (en) * 2002-07-15 2004-01-22 Grove Carol S Wearable adjustable garment pattern template
US8813378B2 (en) 2012-05-17 2014-08-26 Carol S. Grove System and method for drafting garment patterns from photographs and style drawings
US9456647B2 (en) 2012-05-17 2016-10-04 Carol S. Grove System and method for drafting garment patterns

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2004006705A1 (en) * 2002-07-15 2004-01-22 Grove Carol S Wearable adjustable garment pattern template
US6751877B2 (en) 2002-07-15 2004-06-22 Carol S. Grove Wearable adjustable garment pattern template
US8813378B2 (en) 2012-05-17 2014-08-26 Carol S. Grove System and method for drafting garment patterns from photographs and style drawings
US9456647B2 (en) 2012-05-17 2016-10-04 Carol S. Grove System and method for drafting garment patterns

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