US3401708A - Device for ultrasonically cleaning phonographic records - Google Patents

Device for ultrasonically cleaning phonographic records Download PDF

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Publication number
US3401708A
US3401708A US59729366A US3401708A US 3401708 A US3401708 A US 3401708A US 59729366 A US59729366 A US 59729366A US 3401708 A US3401708 A US 3401708A
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record
tank
cleaning
transducer
device
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Richard W Henes
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Richard W. Henes
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B3/00Cleaning by methods involving the use or presence of liquid or steam
    • B08B3/04Cleaning involving contact with liquid
    • B08B3/10Cleaning involving contact with liquid with additional treatment of the liquid or of the object being cleaned, e.g. by heat, by electricity, by vibration
    • B08B3/12Cleaning involving contact with liquid with additional treatment of the liquid or of the object being cleaned, e.g. by heat, by electricity, by vibration by sonic or ultrasonic vibrations
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B3/00Recording by mechanical cutting, deforming or pressing, e.g. of grooves or pits; Reproducing by mechanical sensing; Record carriers therefor
    • G11B3/58Cleaning record carriers or styli, e.g. removing shavings or dust or electrostatic charges
    • G11B3/589Cleaning record carriers or styli, e.g. removing shavings or dust or electrostatic charges before or after transducing operation

Description

R. W. HENES Sept. 17, 1968 DEVICE FOR ULTRASONICALLY CLEANING PHONOGRAPHIC RECORDS Filed Nov. 28, 1966 3,401,708 DEVICE FOR ULTRASONICALLY CLEANING PHONOGRAPHIC RECORDS Richard W. Henes, 5901 E. Calle Del Sud, Phoenix, Ariz. 85018 Filed Nov. 28, 1966, Ser. No. 597,293 7 Claims. (Cl. 134-149) This invention relates to cleaning devices and more particularly to a device for ultrasonically cleaning phonographic records.

Even though modern day records are pressed from the finest pure vinyl materials and the sound impressions recorded thereon by the latest, most highly developed sound equipment, surface noises caused by dust attracted by static electricity destroy the clarity, musical range and natural balance of the recordings. Dust and dirt filled grooves cause undue record wear resulting in a loss of the high fidelity sounds recorded thereon.

v.. .He1gt g fore cleaningmists, among other things, have been provided"forkeepingrcordslclean andiiust free, but these cleaning products require wiping the micro-groovedrecord surfaces with a soft brush or cloth. This action results in a premature wearing of the record surface. As is evident from this form of cleaning the grooves in the records are worn or damaged from the abrasive cleaning action and the dirt is forced deeper into the grooves. Even though surface noises are reduced the original tonal brilliance of the recordings are materially lessened.

In accordance with the invention disclosed a new and improved device is provided for ultrasonically cleaning records. Surface noises and the resulting groove wear caused by dust particles are substantially reduced or eliminated. The tonal brilliance of the record is retained and its life greatly increased.

It is, therefore, one object of this invention to provide a new and improved ultrasonic cleaning device for phonographic records.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved housing containing a cleaning solution for axially mounting a phonographic record.

A further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus for immersing at least a part of a phonographic record in a cleaning solution and then generating an ultrasonic field for removing contamination from the surface of the record.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a new and improved cleaning tank employing a transducer mounted on its side for automatically cleaning a phonographic record placed therein.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description when read in connection with the acompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view partly broken away of an ultrasonic phonographic record cleaning device and embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the structure shown in FIG. 1 taken along the line 22; and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross sectional view partly broken away of the structure shown in FIG. 2.

Referring more particularly to the drawing by characters of reference, FIGS. 1-3 disclose a device for ultrasonically cleaning phonographic records. Device 10 comprises a base 11 of any suitable geometrical configoration having mounted on it a tank 12 containing a suitable cleaning material such as for example a water-detergent or trichloroethylene solution 13. The tank may A Patent 0 3,401,708 Patented Sept. 17, 1968 larger than the thickness of the record to be cleaned,

be of a substantially semi-cylindrical configuration having thereby providing '-a"space for an adequate amount of cleaning solution on each sideof the record. For practical installations the tank may be up to twenty-five times the thickness of the records to be cleaned.

Record 16 shown in FIGS 1-3 is axially mounted shaft 17 within tank 12 and arranged between and parallel to its end walls 14 and 15. A pair of ears 18 and 19 fixedly secured to a flange 20 formed around the diameter of the semi-circular shaped configuration forming tank 12 provides spaced bearing mountings for shaft 17. The flange 20 in addition to strengthening the side walls of the tank also supports the tank within an opening 21 in base 11.

As shown in the drawing the record is mounted substantially on the rectangular coordinate axis lying in the plane formed by the semi-cylindrical configuration. If so desired, the tank 12 may be provided with suitable supporting leg members in lieu of base 11.

Shaft 17 is arranged to snugly fit within the spindle opening in record 16 so as to cause the record arranged 'tioned between the end walls torotate upon rotation of th'eEHeTftTsuitable-hQadl shaft and record during a cleaning operation. If desired, the record may be loosely mounted on shaft 17 and rotated by merely spinning the record by hand.

Fixedly attached to the outside of tank 12 is a transducer 23 for generating vibratory ultrasonic waves. There are several possible means of producing ultrasonic waves, the most common of which is the crystal transducer where crystal refers to a number of natural and synthetic materials which exhibit piezoelectric or similar phenomena effects. The piezoelectric effect is defined as a change in the crystal dimensions when an electric charge is applied to at least one of the crystal faces.

Quartz crystals have been used for generating ultrasonic vibrations in solids and liquids and have been widely used for sending and receiving wave energy at low power conditions. Frequencies produced by quartz type transducers cover a range of a few hundred kilocycles to about 25 megacy-cles when vibrating in a fundamental mode and can extend to a much higher frequency when operating at a harmonic frequency.

Besides quartz, Rochelle salt may be used in the generation of ultrasonic waves in liquid, especially in the low-frequency ranges. At the present time barium titanate or lead zirconate titanate and lithium sulfate have been used in crystal form for developing ultrasonic waves.

When an alternating current is applied to the crystal at a high frequency and the crystal is properly designed to oscillate at that frequency, the faces of the crystal will move with respect to each other. If one face of the crystal is pressed against the surface of a medium such as the wall of a tank, ultrasonic waves will be produced, enter the medium, and then travel through that medium providing the medium is able to support the propagation of the ultrasonic wave. It is not necessary for a crystal to vibrate or oscillate at its resonant frequency. Crystals can be driven at any frequency, however, the amplitude of crystal oscillation is so much greater at resonance that crystals are rarely used at any other frequency. The crystal will vibrate in different directions depending on the way it is cut and the change in its dimensions is proportional to the electrical force applied thereto. For more detail analysis of the proprieties of crystals for ultrasonic use reference is made to the text Ultrasonics by Benson Carlin published in 1960 by the McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.

As shown in FIG. 1 transducer 23 employing a suitable crystal is connected to a source of alternating curf '-formed..at, one end of shaft 17 for ease in grasping and rotating t e rent supply 24 having a frequency of 20,000 to one million cycles per second. The alternatingcurrent supply may comprise any conventional oscillator-poweramplifier arrangement used for ultrasonic cleaning applications.

The transducer as shown in the drawing isco'up'led to the side of tank 12. Although it is shown as being coupled to the outside of the tank it may function equally as Well if dropped inside to the bottom of the tank. .'Further, it may be mounted in an aperture in the sidewall of the tank, if so desired.

When record 16, which may be formed of vinyl or any other suitable material, is mounted on shaft 17 it is partially immersed-in a cleaning solution with its grooves filled with the cleaning material. Upon the application of a high frequency alternating current to transducer 23, it will vibrate at a high frequency. Ultrasonic waves will be generated which will be conducted through the sidewall of the tank into the cleaning solution. If the transducer is mounted in the tank or in a hole in the tank wall, the ultrasonic wave will be applied directly to the cleaning solution. Ultrasonic waves have been found to cause pressures so large that the resulting mechanical stresses may be as great as 15,000 times the hydrostatic pressure of the solution. The acceleration of the crystal driving such a bath is extremely great and may reach 20,000 km./sec. but the motion associated with such action is extremely small (a very small fraction of 1 mm.). This velocity will be generated by the crystal in a fraction of a microsecond.

This action of the transducer results in a cleaning action on the surface of the record and particularly in its grooves when the record is immersed in the solution and rotated past the transducer. The cleaning action is believed to be due to a combination of cavitation and acceleration of the cleaning fluid. Cavitation is defined as the formation and collapse of cavities in liquids, either gas or vapor filled.

Although but one embodiment of the present invention has been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention or from the scope of the appended claims.

It is claimed and desired to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A device for ultrasonically cleaning micro-grooved phonographic record surfaces comprising in combination 4 a tank for housing a cleaning solution, said tank comprising a pair of end walls having their plane surfaces substantially vertically arranged and spaced apart a distance up to twenty-five times the thickness of the record to be cleaned, means for rotatably mounting a record in i said tank between and substantially parallel to said end walls, and a transducer supported by said tank for generating vibratory waves when connected to a suitable source of power, said transducer being coupled to one of said end .walls so as to radiate vibratory waves substantially directly into the micro-grooved surfaces of the record as the record is rotated in said tank.

2. The combination as defined in claim 1 wherein said transducer generates ultrasonic vibratory waves.

3. The combination as iefined in claim 1 wherein said transducer generates ultrasonic waves having a frequency between 20,000 and one million cycles per second.

4. The combination as defined in claim 1 wherein said end walls of said tank are of a semi-circular configuration.

5. The combination as defined in claim 1 wherein said tank is of a semi-cylindrical configuration and said means for rotatably mounting the record is mounted substantially on the rectangular coordinate axis lying in the plane formed by the semi-cylindrical configuration.

6. The combination as defined in claim 5 wherein said means for mounting the record comprises a shaft for extending through the central hole in the record.

7. The combination as defined in claim 1 wherein said tank is a semi-cylindrical configuration and said means for rotatably mounting the record is located and mounted substantially on the common axis of the two semi-circular side walls of said tank.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,925,063 2/1960 Mondry 134 157 XR 2,938,732 5/1960 Mantell 134 149 XR 3,345,075 10/1967 Phillipson et al. 274-47 OTHER REFERENCES IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Method of Cleaning Magnetic Tape, by R. S. Haines, Vol. 1, No. 6, April ROBERT L. BLEUTGE, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A DEVICE FOR ULTRASONICALLY CLEANING MICRO-GROOVED PHONOGRAPHIC RECORD SURFACES COMPRISING IN COMBINATION A TANK FOR HOUSING A CLEANING SOLUTION, SAID TANK COMPRISING A PAIR OF END WALLS HAVING THEIR PLANE SURFACES SUBSTANTIALLY VERTICALLY ARRANGED AND SPACED APART A DISTANCE UP TO TWENTY-FIVE TIMES THE THICKNESS OF THE RECORD TO BE CLEANED, MEANS FOR ROTATABLY MOUNTING A RECORD IN SAID TANK BETWEEN AND SUBSTANTIALLY PARALLEL TO SAID END WALLS, AND A TRANSDUCER SUPPORTED BY SAID TANK FOR GENERATING VIBRATORY WAVES WHEN CONNECTED TO A SUITABLE SOURCE OF POWER, SAID TRANSDUCER BEING COUPLED TO ONE OF SAID END WALLS SO AS TO RADIATE VIRBATORY WAVES SUBSTANTIALLY DIRECTLY INTO THE MICRO-GROOVED SURFACES OF THE RECORD AS THE RECORD IS ROTATED IN SAID TANK.
US59729366 1966-11-28 1966-11-28 Device for ultrasonically cleaning phonographic records Expired - Lifetime US3401708A (en)

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3747942A (en) * 1972-01-07 1973-07-24 C Hammond Cleaning phonograph records
JPS5194202A (en) * 1975-02-17 1976-08-18
US3990906A (en) * 1975-04-17 1976-11-09 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Cleaning tire molds by ultrasonic wave energy
US4064885A (en) * 1976-10-26 1977-12-27 Branson Ultrasonics Corporation Apparatus for cleaning workpieces by ultrasonic energy
US4162552A (en) * 1977-07-20 1979-07-31 Heinrich Josef Winter Kunststoffverarbeitung unde Werkzeugbau GmbH Cleaning device for circular discs
US4202071A (en) * 1978-03-20 1980-05-13 Scharpf Mike A Apparatus for washing and drying phonograph records
JPS5579415U (en) * 1978-11-21 1980-05-31
US5058611A (en) * 1989-03-27 1991-10-22 Sonicor Instrument Corporation Process and apparatus for the ultrasonic cleaning of a printing cylinder
US5090432A (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-02-25 Verteq, Inc. Single wafer megasonic semiconductor wafer processing system
US5534076A (en) * 1994-10-03 1996-07-09 Verteg, Inc. Megasonic cleaning system
US6039059A (en) * 1996-09-30 2000-03-21 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning system
US20090095140A1 (en) * 2007-10-15 2009-04-16 Gerald Engen Article for receiving and supporting an inserting portion of a circular saw blade and a router bit in immersing fashion within a volume of a cleaning fluid
JP2012223760A (en) * 2011-04-21 2012-11-15 Imec Method and apparatus for cleaning semiconductor substrate
WO2014151990A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-25 Koolance, Inc. Phonograph record cleaner
US9114465B2 (en) 2007-10-15 2015-08-25 Gerald D. Engen Article and corresponding kit including an article for receiving and supporting an inserting portion of a circular saw blade and a router bit in immersing fashion within a volume of a cleaning fluid
WO2017125242A1 (en) 2016-01-20 2017-07-27 DUSSAULT, Donald Herbert Method and apparatus for cleaning a disc record

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2925063A (en) * 1956-09-28 1960-02-16 Michigan Chrome And Chemical C Dipping apparatus
US2938732A (en) * 1958-08-13 1960-05-31 Jr Cornelius Mantell Disc record cleaning device
US3345075A (en) * 1963-07-24 1967-10-03 Decca Ltd Apparatus for cleaning gramophone discs

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2925063A (en) * 1956-09-28 1960-02-16 Michigan Chrome And Chemical C Dipping apparatus
US2938732A (en) * 1958-08-13 1960-05-31 Jr Cornelius Mantell Disc record cleaning device
US3345075A (en) * 1963-07-24 1967-10-03 Decca Ltd Apparatus for cleaning gramophone discs

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3747942A (en) * 1972-01-07 1973-07-24 C Hammond Cleaning phonograph records
JPS5194202A (en) * 1975-02-17 1976-08-18
US3990906A (en) * 1975-04-17 1976-11-09 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Cleaning tire molds by ultrasonic wave energy
US4064885A (en) * 1976-10-26 1977-12-27 Branson Ultrasonics Corporation Apparatus for cleaning workpieces by ultrasonic energy
US4162552A (en) * 1977-07-20 1979-07-31 Heinrich Josef Winter Kunststoffverarbeitung unde Werkzeugbau GmbH Cleaning device for circular discs
US4202071A (en) * 1978-03-20 1980-05-13 Scharpf Mike A Apparatus for washing and drying phonograph records
JPS5579415U (en) * 1978-11-21 1980-05-31
US5058611A (en) * 1989-03-27 1991-10-22 Sonicor Instrument Corporation Process and apparatus for the ultrasonic cleaning of a printing cylinder
US5090432A (en) * 1990-10-16 1992-02-25 Verteq, Inc. Single wafer megasonic semiconductor wafer processing system
US5286657A (en) * 1990-10-16 1994-02-15 Verteq, Inc. Single wafer megasonic semiconductor wafer processing system
US5534076A (en) * 1994-10-03 1996-07-09 Verteg, Inc. Megasonic cleaning system
US8771427B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2014-07-08 Akrion Systems, Llc Method of manufacturing integrated circuit devices
US6140744A (en) * 1996-09-30 2000-10-31 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning system
US6295999B1 (en) 1996-09-30 2001-10-02 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning method
US6463938B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2002-10-15 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning method
US6681782B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2004-01-27 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning
US6039059A (en) * 1996-09-30 2000-03-21 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning system
US20040206371A1 (en) * 1996-09-30 2004-10-21 Bran Mario E. Wafer cleaning
US20060175935A1 (en) * 1996-09-30 2006-08-10 Bran Mario E Transducer assembly for megasonic processing of an article
US20060180186A1 (en) * 1996-09-30 2006-08-17 Bran Mario E Transducer assembly for megasonic processing of an article
US7117876B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2006-10-10 Akrion Technologies, Inc. Method of cleaning a side of a thin flat substrate by applying sonic energy to the opposite side of the substrate
US7211932B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2007-05-01 Akrion Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for megasonic processing of an article
US7268469B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2007-09-11 Akrion Technologies, Inc. Transducer assembly for megasonic processing of an article and apparatus utilizing the same
US7518288B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2009-04-14 Akrion Technologies, Inc. System for megasonic processing of an article
US6684891B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2004-02-03 Verteq, Inc. Wafer cleaning
US8257505B2 (en) 1996-09-30 2012-09-04 Akrion Systems, Llc Method for megasonic processing of an article
US20090095140A1 (en) * 2007-10-15 2009-04-16 Gerald Engen Article for receiving and supporting an inserting portion of a circular saw blade and a router bit in immersing fashion within a volume of a cleaning fluid
US9114465B2 (en) 2007-10-15 2015-08-25 Gerald D. Engen Article and corresponding kit including an article for receiving and supporting an inserting portion of a circular saw blade and a router bit in immersing fashion within a volume of a cleaning fluid
JP2012223760A (en) * 2011-04-21 2012-11-15 Imec Method and apparatus for cleaning semiconductor substrate
WO2014151990A1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-25 Koolance, Inc. Phonograph record cleaner
CN105027201A (en) * 2013-03-14 2015-11-04 酷兰斯公司 Phonograph record cleaner
US9830934B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2017-11-28 Koolance, Inc. Phonograph record cleaner
WO2017125242A1 (en) 2016-01-20 2017-07-27 DUSSAULT, Donald Herbert Method and apparatus for cleaning a disc record

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